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Encyclopedia > Geography of North America
Global view centred on North America
Global view centred on North America

North America is the third largest continent (1990 est. pop. 365,000,000), c.9,400,000 sq mi (24,346,000 sq km) (if Eurasia is excluded), and the northern of the two continents of the Western Hemisphere. [1]. It is bounded by the Pacific Ocean on the west, the Atlantic Ocean on the east, the Caribbean Sea, Atlantic and Pacific oceans, and South America on the south, and the Arctic Ocean on the north. Canada covers most of the northern half of North America (much of which is sparsely populated). Alaska, the largest state of the U.S.A., occupies the northwestern part of the continent. Image File history File links Orhtographic_projection_centred_over_Churchill_Manitoba. ... Image File history File links Orhtographic_projection_centred_over_Churchill_Manitoba. ... World map showing North America A satellite composite image of North America. ... Map of Central America and the Caribbean A Caribbean beach in Isla Margarita, Venezuela. ... South America South America is a continent crossed by the equator, with most of its area in the Southern Hemisphere. ...


The first inhabitants of North America are believed to have come from Asia at least 20,000 years ago, some of whom are believed to have come over the Bering land bridge. Europeans, such as Christopher Columbus and many others made discoveries in North America. As human settlement in North America has evolved, now "Most people live in towns and cities with larger cities along the east and west coasts."[2] Nautical chart of Bering Strait, site of former land bridge between Asia and North America The Bering land bridge, also known as Beringia, was a land bridge roughly 1600 km (1000 miles) north to south at its greatest extent, which joined present-day Alaska and eastern Siberia at various times... Christopher Columbus (Genoa?, Italy, 1451? – Valladolid, Spain, May 20, 1506) was a navigator and maritime explorer credited as the discoverer of the Americas. ...


North America consists of all the mainland and related offshore islands lying north of the Isthmus of Panama (which joins with South America). "Anglo-America" can describe Canada and the USA together. "Middle America" is used in reference to the region of Mexico, the republics of Central America, and the Caribbean. Look up Region in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... West Indian redirects here. ...


Its natural features include the Rocky Mountains, the Appalachian Mountains (the largest mountains in the east), the Great Lakes, and the Mississippi, Missouri, Rio Grande, and St Lawrence rivers. Rockies may also refer to the National League Baseball team, the Colorado Rockies. ... A rainy day in the Great Smoky Mountains, Western North Carolina Appalachia, the central and southern Appalachian Mountains of the United States, also including the Allegheny and Cumberland Plateaus The Appalachian Mountains (French: les Appalaches) are a vast system of North American mountains, partly in Canada, but mostly in the... The Great Lakes from space The Great Lakes are a group of five large lakes in North America on or near the Canada-United States border. ... The Mississippi River, derived from the old Ojibwe word misi-ziibi meaning great river (gichi-ziibi big river at its headwaters), is the second-longest river in the United States; the longest is the Missouri River, which flows into the Mississippi. ... The Missouri River is a tributary of the Mississippi River in the United States. ... Río Bravo redirects here. ... The Saint Lawrence River (In French: fleuve Saint-Laurent) is a large west-to-east flowing river in the middle latitudes of North America, connecting the Great Lakes with the Atlantic Ocean. ...


Climate is mainly determined, to a large extent, by the latitude, ranging from arctic cold in the north to tropical heat in the south. The western half of North America tends to have wilder and wetter climate than other areas with equivalent latitude, although there are steppes (known as "prairies") and deserts in the "American Southwest" (Arizona, Colorado, California, Nevada, New Mexico, Utah, Oklahoma, Texas), along with neighboring parts of Mexico. A steppe in Western Kazakhstan in early spring In physical geography, a steppe (Russian: - , Ukrainian: - , Kazakh: - ), pronounced in English as , is a plain without trees (apart from those near rivers and lakes); it is similar to a prairie, although a prairie is generally considered as being dominated by tall grasses... A prairie is an area of land of low topographic relief that principally supports grasses and herbs, with few trees, and is generally of a mesic (moderate or temperate) climate. ... Official language(s) English Capital Phoenix Largest city Phoenix Area  Ranked 6th  - Total 113,998 sq mi (295,254 km²)  - Width 310 miles (500 km)  - Length 400 miles (645 km)  - % water 0. ... It has been suggested that this article be split into multiple articles. ... Official language(s) English Capital Sacramento Largest city Los Angeles Area  Ranked 3rd  - Total 158,302 sq mi (410,000 km²)  - Width 250 miles (400 km)  - Length 770 miles (1,240 km)  - % water 4. ... This article does not cite its references or sources. ... Capital Santa Fe Largest city Albuquerque Area  Ranked 5th  - Total 121,665 sq mi (315,194 km²)  - Width 342 miles (550 km)  - Length 370 miles (595 km)  - % water 0. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, the lead section of this article may need to be expanded. ... Official language(s) None Capital Oklahoma City Largest city Oklahoma City Area  Ranked 20th  - Total 69,960 sq mi (181,196 km²)  - Width 230 miles (370 km)  - Length 298 miles (480 km)  - % water 1. ... Official language(s) None See: Languages of Texas Capital Austin Largest city Houston Area  Ranked 2nd  - Total 268,581 sq mi (695,622 km²)  - Width 773 miles (1,244 km)  - Length 790 miles (1,270 km)  - % water 2. ...

Contents

Geographic interests

To the northwest, North America and Asia are separated by 56 miles across the Bering Strait. [2]. To the northeast, Greenland is 300 miles off the European island of Iceland. For other uses, see Bering Strait (disambiguation). ... This article is about the continent. ...


North America features the Mississippi-Missouri river system, with a drainage basin of 1,221,000 square miles. Plant life in the arctic consists mainly of grasses, mosses, and arctic willows. Coniferous trees such as spruce, pine, hemlock, and fir are indigenous to the Canadian and Western U.S. mountain ranges as far as San Francisco. The Mississippi River, derived from the old Ojibwe word misi-ziibi meaning great river (gichi-ziibi big river at its headwaters), is the second-longest river in the United States; the longest is the Missouri River, which flows into the Mississippi. ... The Missouri River is a tributary of the Mississippi River in the United States. ... A drainage basin is the area within the drainage basin divide (yellow outline), and drains the surface runoff and river discharge (blue lines) of a contiguous area. ... Species About 35; see text. ... Subgenera Subgenus Strobus Subgenus Ducampopinus Subgenus Pinus See Pinus classification for complete taxonomy to species level. ... Look up hemlock in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... FIR may stand for: finite impulse response (a property of some digital filters) far infrared, i. ... This page is a candidate for speedy deletion. ...


History

Physiographically, the continent may be divided into at least five major regions: the Canadian Shield, which is a geologically stable area of ancient rock that occupies most of the northeastern quadrant, including Greenland; the Appalachian Mountains, a geologically old and eroded system that extends from the Gaspé Peninsula to Alabama; the Atlantic-Gulf Coastal Plain, a belt of lowlands widening to the south that extends from South New England to Mexico; the Interior Lowlands, which extends down the middle of the continent from the Mackenzie Valley to the Gulf Coastal Plain including the Great Plains on the west and the agriculturally productive Interior Plains on the east; and the North American Cordillera, a complex belt of geologically young mountains and associated plateaus and basins, which extend from Alaska into Mexico and includes two orogenic belts—the Pacific Margin on the west and the Rocky Mountains on the east—separated by a system of intermontane plateaus and basins.[3]. The Coastal Plain and the main belts of the North American Cordillera continue in the south in Mexico (where the Mexican Plateau, bordered by the Sierra Madre Oriental and the Sierra Madre Occidental. It is considered a continuation of the intermontane system) to connect the Transverse Volcanic Range, a zone of high and active volcanic peaks south of Mexico City. Canadian Shield The Canadian Shield— also called the Precambrian Shield, Laurentian Shield, Bouclier Canadien (French), or Laurentian Plateau— is a large shield covered by a thin layer of soil that forms the nucleus of the North American craton. ... A rainy day in the Great Smoky Mountains, Western North Carolina Appalachia, the central and southern Appalachian Mountains of the United States, also including the Allegheny and Cumberland Plateaus The Appalachian Mountains (French: les Appalaches) are a vast system of North American mountains, partly in Canada, but mostly in the...


During the Ice Age of the late Cenozoic era, a continental ice sheet covered much of the continent, centered west of Hudson Bay (the floor of which is slowly rebounding after being depressed by the great weight of the ice). Glaciers descended the slopes of the Rocky Mountains and those of the Pacific Margin. Extensive glacial lakes, such as Glacial Lake Missoula, Bonneville (see Bonneville Salt Flats), Lahontan, Agassiz, and Algonquin, formed by glacial melt water. "Remnants of them are still visible in the Great Basin and along the edge of the Canadian Shield in the form of the Great Salt Lake, the Great Lakes, and the large lakes of west central Canada."[3] Variations in CO2, temperature and dust from the Vostok ice core over the last 400 000 years For the animated movie, see Ice Age (movie). ... Glacial Lake Missoula was a prehistoric proglacial lake in western Montana that existed periodically at the end of the last ice age between 15,000 and 13,000 years ago. ... Bonneville Salt Flats The Bonneville Salt Flats are a 121 km² (47 mi²) salt flat in northwestern Utah. ...


Coastal line

The east coast of America resembles the opposite coasts on the other side of the Atlantic. The vast majority of North America is located on the North American Plate, with parts of California and western Mexico forming the partial edge of the Pacific Plate; the two plates meet along the San Andreas fault. San Andreas may refer to: San Andreas Fault, a geologic fault that runs through California, USA San Andreas, California, USA Grand Theft Auto: San Andreas, a video game by Rockstar Games for PlayStation 2, Xbox, and PC See also: St Andrews (disambiguation) This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid...


The continent can be divided into four great regions (and sub regions): the Great Plains stretching from the Gulf of Mexico to the Canadian Arctic; the geologically young, mountainous west, including the Rocky Mountains, the Great Basin, California and Alaska; the raised but relatively flat plateau of the Canadian Shield in the northeast; and the varied eastern region, which includes the Appalachian Mountains, the coastal plain along the Atlantic seaboard, and the Florida peninsula.[2] Mexico and its long plateaus and cordilleras fall largely in the western region, although the eastern coastal plain does extend south along the Gulf. The North, the Canadian Arctic defined politically. ... In geography, a plain is a large area of land with relatively low relief. ...


The western mountains have split in the middle, into the main range of the Rockies and the Coast Ranges in California, Oregon, Washington, and British Columbia with the Great Basin (a lower area containing smaller ranges and low-lying deserts) in between. The highest peak is Denali in Alaska. Drainage map showing the Great Basin in orange Various Definitions of the Great Basin (NPS) The Great Basin is a large, arid region of the western United States. ...


The United States Geographical Survey states that the geographic center of North America is “6 miles west of Bata, Pierce County, North Dakota” at approximately 48⁰ 10′ north, 100⁰ 10′ west, approximately 15 miles (25 km) from Rugby, North Dakota. The USGS further states “No marked or monumented point has been established by any government agency as the geographic center of the 50 States, the conterminous United States, or the North American continent.”[4] Nonetheless, there is a 15 foot (4.5 m) field stone obelisk in Rugby claiming to mark the center. Three countries (Canada, the United States, and Mexico) make up most of North America's land mass; they share the continent with 34 smaller nations located mainly south of Mexico and in the Caribbean.


Surface and climate

The Rocky Mountains stretches from north to south, in contrast to South American cordilleras lean on, west, elevated plateaus, which helps to develop large-sized rivers; less high and send to the east more expanded ramifications. The mountain systems do not allow indefinite connection with the cordillera system with exceptions. They lie in chains parallel to the nearest coasts in North America.[3] These are named the Appalachians or Alleghenies. A cordillera is an extensive chain of mountains or mountain ranges, especially the principal mountain system of a continent or large island. ... This article does not cite its references or sources. ... River Gambia flowing through Niokolokoba National Park A river is a large natural waterway. ... The Appalachian Mountains are a system of North American mountains running from Newfoundland and Labrador, Canada to Alabama in the United States, although the northernmost mainland portion ends at the Gaspe Peninsula of Quebec. ... The Allegheny Mountains are a part of the Appalachian mountain range located in the eastern United States. ...

The Great Plains is the broad expanse of prairie and steppe which lies east of the Rocky Mountains in the United States and Canada. The narrow plains in the Mexican coast and the savannas of the Mississippi are analogous to, respectively, the Patagonian steppes and the pampas of the Piranha, Paraguay, and Rio de la Plata. Thus the Appalachians and the mountain chains of Brazil are regarded as creating similar interruptions to the plains community.[5]. The Great Plains is the broad expanse of prairie which lies east of the Rocky Mountains in the United States and Canada. ... Prairie refers to an area of land of low topographic relief that historically supported grasses and herbs, with few trees, and having generally a mesic (moderate or temperate) climate. ... A steppe in Western Kazakhstan in early spring In physical geography, a steppe (Russian: - , Ukrainian: - , Kazakh: - ), pronounced in English as , is a plain without trees (apart from those near rivers and lakes); it is similar to a prairie, although a prairie is generally considered as being dominated by tall grasses... Rockies may also refer to the National League Baseball team, the Colorado Rockies. ... Savanna is a grassland dotted with trees, and occurs in several types of biomes. ...


North America extends to within 10° of latitude of both the equator and the North Pole. It embraces every climatic zone, from tropical rain forest and savanna on the lowlands of Central America to areas of permanent ice cap in central Greenland.[5]. Sub arctic and tundra climates prevail in north Canada and north Alaska, and desert and semiarid conditions are found in interior regions cut off by high mountains from rain-bearing westerly winds.[2]. However, most of the continent has temperate climates very favorable to settlement and agriculture. Prairies, or vast grasslands cover a huge amount in mountain ranges.[2] Latitude, usually denoted symbolically by the Greek letter phi, , gives the location of a place on Earth north or south of the equator. ... World map showing the equator in red The Equator is an imaginary circle drawn around a planet (or other astronomical object) at a distance halfway between the poles. ... North Pole Scenery When not otherwise qualified, the term North Pole usually refers to the Geographic North Pole – the northernmost point on the surface of the Earth, where the Earths axis of rotation intersects the Earths surface. ... In physical geography, tundra is an area where the tree growth is hindered by low temperatures and short growing seasons. ...


Below is a list of North America's greatest snowfalls.

Greatest Snowfalls
Places Date Inches Centimeters
24 hours Silver Lake, Colorado April 14–15, 1921 76 195.6
1 month Tamarack, California Jan. 1911 390 991
One storm Mt. Shasta Ski Bowl, Calif. Feb. 13–19, 1959 189 480
One season Mount Baker, Wash 1998-1999 1, 140 2, 895.6

[1] Within the State of New Hampshire in the United States of America: Silver Lake is a lake in the town of Hollis on the southern border of the state. ... It has been suggested that this article be split into multiple articles. ... Tamarack may be a reference to: Tamarack Larch, a plant native to North America Lodgepole pine, also known as the Tamarack pine Tamarack (band), a Canadian folk music group Tamarack Review, a Canadian literary magazine Tamarack Camps, an American summer camp in Ortonville, Michigan, USA Tamarack Flat, an American campground... Official language(s) English Capital Sacramento Largest city Los Angeles Area  Ranked 3rd  - Total 158,302 sq mi (410,000 km²)  - Width 250 miles (400 km)  - Length 770 miles (1,240 km)  - % water 4. ...


Hydrography

River systems

North America has the most extensive lake groups in the world. The Mississippi, or preferably, the Mississippi-Missouri is the largest North American River.[6]. Its size is 1,221,000 square miles. Among the MR, is the St. Lawrence River, which is at length is 600, 000 square miles and just like the MR, opens up the "heart" of the continent, while other rivers cross the northern plains. The Saint Lawrence River (French fleuve Saint-Laurent) is a large west-to-east flowing river in the middle latitudes of North America, connecting the Great Lakes with the Atlantic Ocean. ...


The Mississippi River is called the Father of Waters since it is one of the largest rivers in the world. Including its major tributary, the Missouri River, which rises in the Rocky Mountains, the Mississippi is 3,892 miles long. Its river basin drains 2/5ths of the Continental United States, which is 1/3 size of Europe. The Mississippi rises in several small lakes in Northern Minnesota at 1,670 ft above sea level.[3] It gets larger, as it flows into the Gulf of Mexico. Then it is joined first by the Missouri River, and next by the Ohio and many smaller rivers flow into it. This article belongs in one or more categories. ... The Missouri River is a tributary of the Mississippi River in the United States. ... Depending on usage, the term continental United States can refer to either: the 48 contiguous states plus the District of Columbia; or the 48 contiguous states plus the District of Columbia and Alaska. ... Gulf of Mexico in 3D perspective. ... The Ohio River is the largest tributary by volume of the Mississippi River. ...


High bluffs borders the wide stream of the Mississippi in central U.S. It is thought that ancient glaciers melted, and streams fed by melted ice cut the deep valley in the upper MR. Gradually, their streams carved the sloping, wooded hills that goes into the bluffs. Seventeen miles north of St. Louis, the MR, joins the Mississippi side by side. A little north at Cape Girardeau, the bluff ends. Next, it flows through its alluvial valley. Along this valley, centuries of mud deposits have built up the bottom and natural levees alongside the river. In places, surface of MS lays above land, which can result in disastrous floods over the riverbank. It has always been a threat to people alongside the river. This article is about the New Zealand town of Bluff. ... A running stream. ... For the landform that extends above the surrounding terrain and that is smaller than a mountain, see the article on mountain. ... Cape Girardeau is a city located in the county of the same name in Missouri, 100 miles south of Saint Louis. ... This article is about the type of dam. ... Riverbank is a city located in Stanislaus County, California. ...


From then on, it enters the delta area, which is 12,000 square miles, and stretches out into the Gulf of Mexico in the shape of a bird's foot (although this shape consists of very low-lying land, which is in the process of getting flooded). In 1882, the U.S. government contributed to the new levee system. They built 8ft wide and 150ft at the bottom, 15-25 ft high-level banks. As forests chops away and swamps drained, floods increased in the river. (For example, the 1926 flood that lasted along the river and grew higher). The flood covered over almost 23,000 square miles of land, killing hundreds of people. Federal and state governments set up a flood control plan that included building stronger and higher levees and creating dams and spillways to divert floodwaters into other channels. Then forests replanted in order to hold moisture in the ground, and curves in the river straightened. It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Dike (construction). ... A freshwater swamp A swamp is a wetland that features permanent inundation of large areas of land by shallow bodies of water, generally with a substantial number of hummocks, or dry-land protrusions. ... For the geographical meanings of this word, see channel (geography). ...


Other main North American rivers include the Mackenzie and Copper mine, approaching the Arctic Ocean, the Churchill, Nelson River Nelson, Severn, and Albany. Then it enters the Hudson Bay, the St. Lawrence River, Rio Grande, Magdalena, Colorado. Followed by entering the Atlantic; and the Yukon, Fraser, Columbia, Sacramento, San Joaquin, and last entering the Pacific.[2][3] Mackenzie may refer to: People People or person with the surname or last name MacKenzie: Mackenzie Jones (Suzanne clan) Clan MacKenzie (Scottish clan) Alastair MacKenzie (b. ... The most commonly present source of copper ore is chalcopyrite (CuFeS2), which accounts for about 50% of copper production. ... The Churchill River is a major river in Saskatchewan and Manitoba, Canada. ... The Severn is the name of a river in the United Kingdom. ... Hudson Bay, Canada. ... The Saint Lawrence River (French fleuve Saint-Laurent) is a large west-to-east flowing river in the middle latitudes of North America, connecting the Great Lakes with the Atlantic Ocean. ... Río Bravo redirects here. ... Categories: Departments of Colombia | Stub ... The Colorado River from the bottom of Marble Canyon, in the Upper Grand Canyon Colorado River in the Grand Canyon from Desert View The Colorado River from Laughlin The Colorado River is a river in the southwestern United States and northwestern Mexico, approximately 1,450 mi (2,330 km) long... The Atlantic Ocean is Earths second-largest ocean, covering approximately one_fifth of its surface. ... Fraser River watershed The Fraser River is the longest river in British Columbia, Canada, rising near Mount Robson in the Rocky Mountains and flowing for 1400 km (870 mi), into the Pacific Ocean at the city of Vancouver. ... San Joaquin is a city located in Fresno County, California. ... For other meanings of Pacific, see Pacific (disambiguation). ...


Water

Water is a major natural resource in North America.[1] In addition, there is high runoff and snowmelt on the landscape. Rocky Mountain Rivers and lakes supply water for one-quarter of the United States. The rivers that flow from the Rocky Mountains eventually drain into three of the world's five oceans: the Atlantic, the Pacific, and the Arctic. Some of the most prolific rivers are the Colorado, the Arkansas, the Columbia, the Missouri, and the Yellowstone.


Climate and vegetation

The climate in North America is typically cool and humid. The rainy zone disproportionately extends in America, and as the continent stretches over the climatic zones, vegetation is remarkably distinctive. Great indentations of the shoreline make insular conditions to prevail in much of its interior. The area along the west coast tends to be milder and wetter than other areas with the same latitude. World map showing North America A satellite composite image of North America. ... Look up Cool in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Humidity is the quantity of moisture in the air. ...


There are various plant life distributions in North America. Plant life in the arctic includes grasses, mosses, and arctic willows. Coniferous trees, including spruces, pines, hemlocks, and firs, are indigenous to the Canadian and Western U.S. mountain ranges as far as San Francisco. Among these are giant sequoias, redwoods, great firs, and sugar pines. Sugar pines are generally confined to the northwestern area of the United States. The central region of the country has hardwoods. Southern states grow extensive yellow pines. In addition, mahogany, logwood, and lignumative - all tropical in nature - are grown. The southwest has desert plants, including yucci and cacti. The cultivated native plants of North America are tobacco, maize, potato, vanilla, melons, cacao, gourds, indigo plant, and beans. Species About 35; see text. ... Subgenera Subgenus Strobus Subgenus Ducampopinus Subgenus Pinus See Pinus classification for complete taxonomy to species level. ... Species Eastern Hemlock Carolina Hemlock Taiwan Hemlock Northern Japanese Hemlock Himalayan Hemlock Forrests Hemlock Western Hemlock Mountain Hemlock Southern Japanese Hemlock Tsuga is a genus of conifers in the family Pinaceae. ... FIR may stand for: finite impulse response (a property of some digital filters) far infrared, i. ... For other uses, see United States (disambiguation) and US (disambiguation). ... This page is a candidate for speedy deletion. ... Binomial name Sequoia sempervirens (D. Don) Endl. ... Redwood is a name used for several species of trees with red or reddish coloured wood; see each species for individual details. ... Binomial name Pinus lambertiana Douglas The Sugar Pine (Pinus lambertiana; family Pinaceae) is a species of pine that occurs in the mountains of Oregon and California in the western United States, and Baja California in northwestern Mexico; specifically the Sierra Nevada, the Cascade Range, the Coast Ranges, and the Sierra... The Pacific Northwest from space This page is about the region that includes parts of Canada and the US. For the US only region, see Northwestern United States The Pacific Northwest (abbreviated PNW, or PacNW) or Cascadia is a region in the northwest of North America. ... Beech is a typical temperate zone hardwood The term hardwood designates wood from angiosperm trees. ... The term state may refer to: a sovereign political entity, see state unitary state nation state a non-sovereign political entity, see state (non-sovereign). ... Species many, see text For the potato-like vegetable, see yuca. ... This article is about the desert plant. ... Species Nicotiana acuminata Nicotiana alata Nicotiana attenuata Nicotiana benthamiana Nicotiana clevelandii Nicotiana excelsior Nicotiana forgetiana Nicotiana glauca Nicotiana glutinosa Nicotiana langsdorffii Nicotiana longiflora Nicotiana obtusifolia Nicotiana paniculata Nicotiana plumbagifolia Nicotiana quadrivalvis Nicotiana repanda Nicotiana rustica Nicotianasuaveolens Nicotiana sylvestris Nicotiana tabacum Nicotiana tomentosa Ref: ITIS 30562 as of August 26, 2005... Corn redirects here. ... Binomial name Solanum tuberosum L. The potato (Solanum tuberosum) is a perennial plant of the Solanaceae, or nightshade, family, commonly grown for its starchy tuber. ... For other uses, see vanilla (disambiguation). ... Binomial name Cucumis melo L. The melon is the fruit and plant of a typically vine-like (climber and trailer) herb that was first cultivated more than 4000 years ago (~ 2000 BC) in Persia and Africa. ... Binomial name Theobroma cacao L. Cacao (Theobroma cacao) is a small (4–8 m tall) evergreen tree in the family Sterculiaceae (alternatively Malvaceae), native to tropical Mexico, but now cultivated throughout the tropics. ... A gourd is a hollow, dried shell of a fruit in the Cucurbitaceae family of plants. ... There is no single indigo plant. A variety of plants have been used to produce indigo dye. ... Green beans Bean is a common name for large plant seeds of several genera of Fabaceae (formerly Leguminosae) used for food or feed. ...


Human interaction

In the Western Hemisphere, remains of coral reefs lie in Florida, which are estimated to be 10,000 years old; and a skeleton dug up in the Mississippi Delta (in buried forests), near New Orleans, is supposed to have lain there 50,000 years ago. These artifacts could prove that man existed in America prehistorically. New mixed races are distinguished by a variety of names (e.g., Mestizos, Mulattoes, and Zambos), and native ancestors of European parents called Creoles.[7]. The geographical western hemisphere of Earth, highlighted in yellow. ... The shared flood plain of the Yazoo and Mississippi Rivers The Mississippi Delta is the distinct northwest section of the state of Mississippi that lies between the Mississippi and Yazoo Rivers. ... New Orleans is the largest city in the state of Louisiana, United States of America. ... Mestizo (Brazil Portuguese. ... Representation of Mulattos during the Latin American colonial period Mulatto (also Mulato) is a term of Spanish and/or Portuguese origin describing first-generation offspring of African and European ancestry. ... A representation of Zambos in Pintura de Castas during the Latin American colonial period. ... The term Creole and its relatives in other languages — such as crioulo, criollo, créole, kriolu, criol, kreyol, kriulo, kriol, krio, etc. ...


In 1960, the population of North America estimated at 405,000,000 persons. Now, North America is the fourth largest continent by population. [2]


Zoology

North America is home to many native mammal species. Several species of deer, including elk, caribou, moose, mule deer, and the abundant white-tailed deer are found throughout varous regions, along with the bison and musk ox in the central and northern plains, respectively. Three species of bear, several subspecies of wolf, and various other carnivores such as raccoons, skunks, and cats including cougars and lynxes are widely distributed. The family Mustelidae is well-represented, including badgers, otters, ferrets, and wolverines. Numerous species of squirrels and other rodents, such as beavers and muskrats, can be found in virtually every region of the continent. Central America has adapted sloths, anteaters, and armadillos. Other animals includes the condor, among the heights of the Andes, the parrots and the monkeys of Tropical forests, the humming bird, rattlesnake, alligator, and Cayman of the banks of the streams, the electric eel in the tropical waters, and swarms of mosquitoes on the wide plains. Fawn redirects here. ... Species B. antiquus B. bison B. bonasus B. priscus Bison is a taxonomic genus containing six species of large even-toed ungulates within the subfamily Bovinae. ... Binomial name Ovibos moschatus (Zimmermann, 1780) The Musk ox (Ovibos moschatus) is a bovine noted for its thick coat and for the strong odor of the male. ... Wolf Wolf Man Mount Wolf Wolf Prizes Wolf Spider Wolf 424 Wolf 359 Wolf Point Wolf-herring Frank Wolf Friedrich Wolf Friedrich August Wolf Hugo Wolf Johannes Wolf Julius Wolf Max Franz Joseph Cornelius Wolf Maximilian Wolf Rudolf Wolf Thomas Wolf As Name Wolf Breidenbach Wolf Hirshorn Other The call... Cats may refer to: Felines, members of the animal family Felidae The domesticated animal, cat The musical, yeah right, I bet that this was really dumb. ... Subfamilies Lutrinae Melinae Mellivorinae Taxidiinae Mustelinae Mustelidae is a family of carnivorous mammals. ... Families Many, see text The order Rodentia is the most numerous of all the branches on the mammal family tree. ... Families Megalonychidae Bradypodidae Sloths are medium-sized mammals that live in South America and Central America belonging to the families Megalonychidae and Bradypodidae, part of the order Pilosa. ... Families Cyclopedidae Myrmecophagidae Anteaters are the four mammal species of the suborder Vermilingua commonly known for eating ants and termites. ... For other uses, see Armadillo (disambiguation). ... Genera Vultur Gymnogyps Condor is the name for the largest species of New World vultures. ... For the runtime engine for Perl 6, see Parrot virtual machine. ... For the TV show Monkey see Monkey (TV series) Cynomolgus Monkey at Batu Caves, Malaysia A monkey is any member of two of the three groupings of simian primates. ... For the Australian jangle pop band, see The Hummingbirds. ... Species 27 species; see list of rattlesnake species and subspecies. ... Species Alligator mississippiensis Alligator sinensis An alligator is a crocodilian in the genus Alligator of the family Alligatoridae. ... Binomial name Electrophorus electricus Linnaeus, 1766 The electric eel, Electrophorus electricus, is a species of fish. ...


Mineralogy

More than any other area in the world, North America produces the most metals and minerals used by man. Thus this makes Canada, the United States, and Mexico some of the richest regions in the earth.[1][8] [9]. However, in the Rocky Mountains mineral resources are often scarce. A man is a male human. ...


Rocky Mountains

Picture of Rocky Mountains
Picture of Rocky Mountains

The Rockies known for it is the vast amount of resources has rich minerals that include bauxite, copper, lead, gold, silver, tungsten, uranium, and zinc. Coal, petroleum, and natural gas are other minerals to be found there in Wyoming.[8][9] Wakes of toxic wastes dot and mine tailings the Rocky Mountain landscape. In one major example, eighty years of zinc mining polluted the river and bank near Eagle River in north-central Colorado. A high concentration of the metal carries off by spring runoff. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2048x1536, 1047 KB) Photo of the Rocky Mountains. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2048x1536, 1047 KB) Photo of the Rocky Mountains. ...



Agriculture and forestry are two major industries. Agriculture includes arid land and irrigated farming and livestock grazing.[1] This provides you with some of the richest crops throughout the year.[9] Livestock are often moved between high-elevation summer pastures and low-elevation and winter pastures.


Deserts of North America

The desert makes up a large part of the United States. From the northern part of Mexico through the southwest and west parts of the U.S., the land is typically arid and sandy, has little vegetation, and is inhabited by relatively few animals. Nuclear tests have historically taken place in remote portions of the deserts of the southwest United States, and airplanes are commonly stored there when mothballed because the dry climate lessens the risk of deterioration Erg Chebbi, Morocco In geography, a desert is a landscape form or region that receives very little precipitation. ... For other uses, see United States (disambiguation) and US (disambiguation). ... A nuclear test explosion is an experiment involving the detonation of a nuclear weapon. ... This article refers to the tool of travel. ...


Relief maps of the United States partially show why deserts come to exist. The Sierra Nevada and Cascade mountain ranges run along the entire Pacific Coast, acting as a barrier to the humid winds that sweep in from the ocean. The rising topography forces this air upwards, causing moisture to condense and fall in the form of rain on the western slopes of the mountains, with some areas receiving more than 70 inches of rainfall per year. As a result, the air has lost much of its moisture and becomes hot and dry when it reaches the areas east of the coastal mountain ranges.[2] These hot, arid conditions are, in some instances, exacerbated in regions of extremely low altitude (some near or below sea level) by higher air pressure, resulting in drier conditions and adiabatic heating effects. What precipitation does fall generally does not last long, lost primarily to evaporation, as well as rapid runoff and efficient water uptake and storage by native vegetation. The Pacific Coast is any coast fronting the Pacific Ocean. ... For the singer, see Rain (singer). ... Lyskamm, 4 527 m, Pennine Alps A mountain is a landform that extends above the surrounding terrain in a limited area. ... Layers of Atmosphere (NOAA) Air redirects here. ...


Another cause of deserts is the pattern of motion of the Earth's atmosphere. In regions 15 to 30 degrees north and south, air sinks, making it warmer and drier.[5] This movement creates the deserts in North America as well as in Africa, Asia, and Australia. View of Jupiters active atmosphere, including the Great Red Spot. ... A world map showing the continent of Africa. ... World map showing the location of Asia. ...


Specific regions in the West

Most of the Columbian Plateau forms by volcanic action millions of years ago. Lava at once poured out of vast cracks in the earth and covered the land. In some places, lava was 7,000 feet deep. With accurate water, the lava beds remain as a good source of crop growth.


South of the Columbian Plateau is the Great Basin, which is a 200,000-square-mile region between the western wall of the Sierra Nevada and the Rocky Mountains. It includes all or parts of Oregon, Idaho, Nevada, Utah, and California. The Great Basin is a rocky desert, eroded by winds, divided into valleys by rugged mountain ranges, with little rainfall, and no other waters find their way to the sea. Formerly much of the Basin was covered in large salt lakes. The largest was Lake Bonneville, which was 1,000 ft. deep. Now only a small part of the area that was Lake Bonneville contains any water at all, that is named the Great Salt Lake. The remaining area is now long, flat and dry. These flats are used as tracks where automobile speed trials are run. The Sierra Nevada is a mountain range that is almost entirely in the eastern portion of the U.S. state of California. ... Rockies may also refer to the National League Baseball team, the Colorado Rockies. ... Official language(s) None Capital Salem Largest city Portland Area  Ranked 9th  - Total 98,466 sq mi (255,026 km²)  - Width 260 miles (420 km)  - Length 360 miles (580 km)  - % water 2. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... This article does not cite its references or sources. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, the lead section of this article may need to be expanded. ... Official language(s) English Capital Sacramento Largest city Los Angeles Area  Ranked 3rd  - Total 158,302 sq mi (410,000 km²)  - Width 250 miles (400 km)  - Length 770 miles (1,240 km)  - % water 4. ... Sea as seen from jetty in Frankston, Australia Look up maritime in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... A butte in the Great Salt Lake Desert Lake Bonneville was a prehistoric pluvial lake that covered much of North Americas Great Basin region. ... Great Salt Lake, located in the northern part of the U.S. State of Utah, is the fourth largest terminal lake in the world,[1] and the largest salt lake in the Western Hemisphere. ... For the magazine called automobile, see Automobile Magazine. ...


Another famous desert area in the Great Basin is Death Valley. It received its name when a clique of miners attempted to cross the valley as a shortcut and became lost. It was nearly 2,000,000 acres, and was made into a national monument in 1933. Its lowest point, Badwater, is 282 feet below sea level. In the summer, the temperatures of Death Valley rival the Sahara, climbing as high as 134 degrees Fahrenheit. The only water located there is in salt pools. Death Valley and Panamint Range The salt lake at Badwater, Death Valley is the lowest point in western hemisphere. ... Badwater Basin elevation sign Badwater is a site in Californias Death Valley noted as the lowest point in the Western Hemisphere, with an elevation of 282 feet (86 m) below sea level. ... For considerations of sea level change, in particular rise associated with possible global warming, see sea level rise. ...


Another desolate region is the Mojave Desert which lies south of Death Valley. It covers 15,000 square miles and has dry lakes, desert valleys, and barren mountains that rest on lava base. Like Death Valley, the Mojave contain gold and remarkable deposits of borax. Looking across from Emigrant Pass towards the Kingston Range in the eastern Mojave. ... It has been suggested that Sodium boric acid be merged into this article or section. ...


Arizona as well contains many desert areas, the best known being the Grand Canyon. The vast canyon is over 200 miles long and about a mile deep, and has been cut into layers of rock by the Colorado River. The Grand Canyon is four miles wide at its narrowest point and as wide as 18 miles in some places. Official language(s) English Capital Phoenix Largest city Phoenix Area  Ranked 6th  - Total 113,998 sq mi (295,254 km²)  - Width 310 miles (500 km)  - Length 400 miles (645 km)  - % water 0. ... The Grand Canyon is a very colorful, steep-sided gorge, carved by the Colorado River, in the U.S. state of Arizona. ... The Colorado River from the bottom of Marble Canyon, in the Upper Grand Canyon Colorado River in the Grand Canyon from Desert View The Colorado River from Laughlin The Colorado River is a river in the southwestern United States and northwestern Mexico, approximately 1,450 mi (2,330 km) long...


References

  • 1. "Deserts of America". The Golden Treasury of Knowledge 4, book 13: 1008-1091. (1961). Fratelli Fabbri. 61-10594. Retrieved on 2006-08-19.
  • 2. "Geography of North America". Universal World Reference Encyclopedia 11, book 1: 231-233. (1964). V.S. Thatcher. 64-12955. Retrieved on 2006-08-19.

1961 (MCMLXI) was a common year starting on Sunday (the link is to a full 1961 calendar). ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... August 19 is the 231st day of the year (232nd in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 1964 (MCMLXIV) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (the link is to a full 1964 calendar). ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... August 19 is the 231st day of the year (232nd in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar. ...

Notes

  1. ^ a b c d the second largest country in area in the world), U.S.A., Mexico, Greenland (Danish territory), Saint Pierre and Miquelon islands (a small French overseas department) and Bermuda (British dependency). Retrieved on 2006-10-11.
  2. ^ a b c d e f g h North America is the third largest continent, extending from the Arctic to the tropics and covering 24 million km² / 9.4 million mi². It is separated from Asia by the Bering Strait. Retrieved on 2006-10-11.
  3. ^ a b c d e Jones, Steve. North America's Geology and Geography. USA Today. Retrieved on 2006-08-19.
  4. ^ Physical Geography of North America. Retrieved on 2006-08-19.
  5. ^ a b c North America climate. Retrieved on 2006-08-19.
  6. ^ Longest River in North America. Retrieved on 2006-08-19.
  7. ^ After Columbus's "discovery" of the New World, Europeans arrived, devastating the Native Americans, drawing borders, and clashing with each other. Retrieved on 2006-10-11.
  8. ^ a b North America's extensive agricultural lands (especially in Canada and the United States) are a product of the interrelationship of positive climatic conditions, fertile soils, and technology. Retrieved on 2006-10-11.
  9. ^ a b c Economically, North America is one of the wealthiest regions of the world. Retrieved on 2006-10-11.

For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... October 11 is the 284th day of the year (285th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... October 11 is the 284th day of the year (285th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... USA Today is a national American newspaper published by the Gannett Corporation. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... August 19 is the 231st day of the year (232nd in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... August 19 is the 231st day of the year (232nd in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... August 19 is the 231st day of the year (232nd in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... August 19 is the 231st day of the year (232nd in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... October 11 is the 284th day of the year (285th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... October 11 is the 284th day of the year (285th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... October 11 is the 284th day of the year (285th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

See also

Map of Central America Central America is the central geographic region of the Americas. ... South America South America is a continent crossed by the equator, with most of its area in the Southern Hemisphere. ... Forty-nine states in the United States (all except Hawaii) lie on the North American continent; 48 of these (all except Alaska and Hawaii) are contiguous and form the continental United States. ... This is a list of geographic centers of each U.S. state: See also Extreme points of the United States Extreme points of each U.S. state List of U.S. states by elevation List of highest points of Canadian provinces and territories Extreme points of Canada Categories: | ... East Coast - The Appalachians For purposes of description, the physical geography of the United States is split into several major physiographic divisions, two of which being the Atlantic Plain and the Appalachian Highlands (see subdivisions 2-10) lie on or near the east coast. ... For purposes of description, the physical geography of the United States is split into several major physiographic divisions, three of which being the Laurentian Highlands, Interior Highlands and the Interior Plains (see subdivisions 1 and 11-15) lie in the interior of the U.S. Please refer to the Geography... The Geography of the Western United States is split into three major physiographic divisions: the Rocky Mountain System (areas 16-19 on map), the Intermontane Plateaus (20-22), and the Pacific Mountain System (23-25). ... Location: Image of Puerto Rico taken by NASA. Caribbean, archipelago between the Caribbean Sea and the North Atlantic Ocean, east of the Dominican Republic Geographic coordinates: 18 15 N, 66 30 W Map references: Central America and the Caribbean Area: Total: 9,104 km² Land: 8,959 km² Water: 145...

Other topics

Bibliography

Map and aerial photos For other uses, see Map (disambiguation). ...

  • Oldest Human Remains in North America Found
  • T. H. Clark and C. W. Stearn, The Geological Evolution of North America (1968)
  • W. P. Cumming et al., The Discovery of North America (1972)
  • R. C. West et al., Middle America: Its Lands and Peoples (3d ed. 1989)
  • T. L. McKnight, Regional Geography of the United States and Canada (1992)
  • S. Birdsall, Regional Landscapes of the United States and Canada (4th rev. ed. 1992)
  • T. Flannery, The Eternal Frontier: An Ecological History of North America and Its Peoples (2001)
  • A. Taylor, American Colonies (2001).

  Results from FactBites:
 
Category:North America - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (103 words)
North America is the third largest continent in area and the fourth ranked in population.
It is bounded on the north by the Arctic Ocean, on the east by the North Atlantic Ocean, on the south by the Caribbean Sea, and on the west by the North Pacific Ocean.
In 2001 its population was estimated at 454,225,000.
Encyclopedia: Geography of the United States (4641 words)
Forty-nine states in the United States (all except Hawaii) lie on the North American continent; 48 of these (all except Alaska) are contiguous and form the continental United States.
World map showing location of North America A satellite composite image of North America North America is a continent in the northern hemisphere, bounded on the north by the Arctic Ocean, on the east by the North Atlantic Ocean, on the south by the Caribbean Sea, and on the west...
For purposes of description, the physical geography of the United States is split into several major physiographic divisions, three of which being the Laurentian Highlands, Interior Highlands and the Interior Plains (see subdivisions 1 and 11-15) lie in the interior of the U.S. Please refer to the Geography...
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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