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Encyclopedia > Geoffrey Howe
Rt. Hon. Sir Geoffrey Howe
Geoffrey Howe

In office
May 5, 1979 – June 11, 1983
Preceded by Denis Healey
Succeeded by Nigel Lawson

Born 20 December 1926
Port Talbot, Wales
Political party Conservative

Richard Edward Geoffrey Howe, Baron Howe of Aberavon, CH, PC, QC (born 20 December 1926), known until 1992 as Sir Geoffrey Howe, is a senior British Conservative politician. He was Margaret Thatcher's longest-serving Cabinet minister, successively holding the posts of Chancellor of the Exchequer, Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, and finally Leader of the House of Commons and Deputy Prime Minister. The Right Honourable (abbreviated The Rt. ... Sir Geoffrey Howe presents his first budget, July 1979 This work is copyrighted. ... The Chancellor of the Exchequer is the title held by the British cabinet minister responsible for all financial matters. ... May 5 is the 125th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (126th in leap years). ... For the Smashing Pumpkins song, see 1979 (song). ... June 11 is the 162nd day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (163rd in leap years), with 203 days remaining. ... 1983 (MCMLXXXIII) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Denis Winston Healey, Baron Healey, CH, MBE, PC (born 30 August 1917), is a British Labour politician, regarded by some (especially in the Labour Party) as the best Prime Minister we never had.[1] He was born in Keighley, Yorkshire, and given his middle name in honour of Winston Churchill. ... Nigel Lawson, Baron Lawson of Blaby, PC (born March 11, 1932), was a British politician, Chancellor of the Exchequer between June 1983 and October 1989. ... December 20 is the 354th day of the year (355th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1926 (MCMXXVI) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar). ... Port Talbot (Welsh also Aberafan or Porth Talbot) is an industrial town in the traditional county of Glamorgan, south Wales, UK, with a population of approximately 50,000. ... This article is about the country. ... The Conservative Party (officially the Conservative & Unionist Party) is currently the second largest political party in the United Kingdom in terms of sitting Members of Parliament (MPs), and the largest in terms of public membership. ... The Order of the Companions of Honour is a British and Commonwealth Order. ... Her Majestys Most Honourable Privy Council is a body of advisors to the British Sovereign. ... Cherie Booth QC wearing her ceremonial robes (including full-bottomed wig) as Queens Counsel at the Bar of England and Wales. ... December 20 is the 354th day of the year (355th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1926 (MCMXXVI) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar). ... 1992 (MCMXCII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday. ... The Conservative Party (officially the Conservative & Unionist Party) is currently the second largest political party in the United Kingdom in terms of sitting Members of Parliament (MPs), and the largest in terms of public membership. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Margaret Hilda Thatcher, Baroness Thatcher, LG, OM, PC, FRS (born 13 October 1925) was Prime Minister of the United Kingdom from 1979 to 1990. ... In British politics, the Cabinet is comprised of the most senior government ministers, most of them heads of government departments with the title Secretary of State. The Cabinet is actually a committee of the Privy Council and all Cabinet members are also Privy Councillors and therefore have the prefix of... The Chancellor of the Exchequer is the title held by the British cabinet minister responsible for all financial matters. ... The Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs (commonly referred to as Foreign Secretary) is a member of the British Government responsible for relations with foreign countries, heading the Foreign and Commonwealth Office (often called simply the Foreign Office). ... The Leader of the House of Commons is a member of the Cabinet of the United Kingdom who is responsible for arranging government business in the House of Commons. ... The office of Deputy Prime Minister is one that has only existed occasionally in the history of the United Kingdom. ...


His resignation on November 1, 1990 is widely thought to have hastened Thatcher's own downfall three weeks later, in perhaps the most dramatic period of British Conservative politics in recent times.[citation needed] November 1 is the 305th day of the year (306th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 60 days remaining. ... This article is about the year. ...


Geoffrey Howe was born in 1926 at Port Talbot in Wales. After leaving Winchester College he did National Service as a Second Lieutenant in East Africa, giving political lectures in Swahili but declining an offer to remain in the army as a captain. At Trinity Hall, Cambridge, he read Law and was chairman of the Cambridge University Conservative Association, and on the committee of the Cambridge Union Society. He was called to the Bar in 1952 and was made a QC in 1965. He became chairman of the Bow Group, an internal Tory think tank of 'young modernisers' in the 1960s, and edited its magazine Crossbow. Port Talbot (Welsh also Aberafan or Porth Talbot) is an industrial town in the traditional county of Glamorgan, south Wales, UK, with a population of approximately 50,000. ... This article is about the country. ... Winchester College is a well-known boys independent school, and an example of a British public school, in the city of Winchester in Hampshire, England. ... Full name College of Scholars of the Holy Trinity of Norwich Motto - Named after The Holy Trinity Previous names - Established 1350 Sister College(s) University College All Souls College Master Prof. ... Cherie Booth QC wearing her ceremonial robes (including full-bottomed wig) as Queens Counsel at the Bar of England and Wales. ... The Bow Group is the oldest centre-right think tank in the United Kingdom. ...


Howe represented Bebington in the House of Commons from 1964 to 1966, Reigate from 1970 to 1974, and Surrey East from 1974 to 1992. In 1970 he was knighted and appointed Solicitor General in Edward Heath's government, and in 1972 became Minister of State at the Department of Trade and Industry, with a seat in the Cabinet, a post he held until Labour took power in March 1974. Bebington was a parliamentary constituency in the United Kingdom, which existed from 1950 to 1974. ... The House of Commons is the lower house of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. ... Reigate is a constituency represented in the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. ... Surrey East is a constituency represented in the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. ... Her Majestys Solicitor General for England and Wales, often known as the Solicitor General, is one of the Law Officers of the Crown, and the deputy of the Attorney General, whose duty is to advise the Crown and Cabinet on the law. ... Sir Edward Richard George Heath, KG, MBE (9 July 1916 – 17 July 2005), soldier and politician, was Prime Minister of the United Kingdom from 1970 to 1974 and leader of the Conservative Party from 1965 to 1975. ... The Department of Trade and Industry is a United Kingdom government department. ...


In Opposition between 1974 and 1979, Howe contested the second ballot of the 1975 Conservative leadership election, in which Margaret Thatcher was elected, and then was appointed by Thatcher as Shadow Chancellor of the Exchequer. He masterminded the development of new economic policies embodied in an Opposition mini-manifesto The Right Approach to the Economy. Labour Chancellor Denis Healey described being attacked by Howe (at the time his Conservative shadow Chancellor) as "like being savaged by a dead sheep". The Conservative Party Leadership Election was held during early February, 1975. ... Denis Winston Healey, Baron Healey, CH, MBE, PC (born 30 August 1917), is a British Labour politician, regarded by some (especially in the Labour Party) as the best Prime Minister we never had.[1] He was born in Keighley, Yorkshire, and given his middle name in honour of Winston Churchill. ...


With Conservative victory in the 1979 general election, Howe became Chancellor of the Exchequer himself. His tenure was characterised by radical policies to correct the public finances, reduce inflation and liberalise the economy. The shift from direct to indirect taxation, the development of a Medium-Term Financial Strategy, the abolition of exchange controls and the creation of tax-free enterprise zones were among important decisions of his Chancellorship. Some commentators regard him as the most successful Chancellor of his era. [citation needed] Margaret Thatcher James Callaghan David Steel BBC Election 1979 Titles The United Kingdom general election of 1979 was held on May 3, 1979 and is regarded as a pivotal point in 20th century British politics. ...


After the 1983 general election Thatcher appointed Howe Foreign Secretary, a post he held for six years. He became in effect the ambassador for a Britain whose international stature had been revived by the growing success of the 'Thatcher revolution'. He played an important part in reasserting the role of the five permanent members of the UN Security Council, and developed a strong working relationship with US Secretary of State George Schultz, paralleling the bond of Reagan and Thatcher. His tenure was made difficult, however, by growing behind-the-scenes tensions with the Prime Minister on a number of issues, first on South Africa and then on Britain's relations with the European Community. In June 1989, Howe, and his successor as Chancellor, Nigel Lawson, secretly threatened to both resign over Thatcher's opposition to British membership in the exchange rate mechanism of the European Monetary System. The UK general election, 1983 was held on June 9, 1983 and gave the Conservatives and Margaret Thatcher the most decisive election victory since that of Labour in 1945. ... A session of the Security Council in progress The United Nations Security Council is the most powerful organ of the United Nations. ... The United States Secretary of State is the head of the United States Department of State, concerned with foreign affairs. ... Shultz in his official D.O.L. portrait. ... Nigel Lawson, Baron Lawson of Blaby, PC (born March 11, 1932), was a British politician, Chancellor of the Exchequer between June 1983 and October 1989. ... There are three stages of monetary cooperation in the European Union. ...


In the following month of July 1989, the little-known John Major was unexpectedly appointed to replace Howe as Foreign Secretary, and the latter became Leader of the House of Commons, Lord President of the Council and Deputy Prime Minister. In the reshuffle, Howe was also offered, but turned down, the post of Home Secretary. Although attempts were made to present it positively, Howe's move back to domestic politics was generally seen as a demotion, especially after Thatcher's press secretary Bernard Ingham belittled the significance of the DPM appointment at his morning lobby briefing the following day. The sceptical attitude towards Howe in Number 10 weakened him politically — even if it may have been driven to some degree by fear of him as a possible successor — a problem compounded by the resignation from the Treasury of his principal ally Nigel Lawson later in the same year. During his time as DPM, Howe made a series of coded calls on Thatcher to re-position her administration, which was suffering rising unpopularity because of opposition to the Poll Tax, as a 'listening government'. Sir John Major KG, CH (born 29 March 1943) is a British politician who served as Prime Minister of the United Kingdom from 1990 to 1997. ... The Leader of the House of Commons is a member of the Cabinet of the United Kingdom who is responsible for arranging government business in the House of Commons. ... The Office of Lord President of the Council is a British cabinet position, the holder of which acts as presiding officer of the Privy Council. ... The office of Deputy Prime Minister is one that has only existed occasionally in the history of the United Kingdom. ... Sir Bernard Ingham (born June 21, 1932) is a journalist best known as Margaret Thatchers former press secretary. ... A poll tax, head tax, or capitation is a tax of a uniform, fixed amount per individual (as opposed to a percentage of income). ...


With pressures mounting on Thatcher, Howe resigned from the Cabinet on November 1, 1990 — in the aftermath of the Prime Minister's speech at the Rome European Council, at which she had declared for the first time that Britain would never enter a single currency — writing a letter of resignation in which he attacked Thatcher's overall handling of politics in the European Union. After attempts by Number 10 to claim that there were differences only of style, rather than substance in Howe's diagreement with the Thatcher, Howe chose to send a powerful message of dissent. In the famous resignation speech in the Commons on November 13, he offered his cricket metaphor for British negotiations in Europe: "It is rather like sending your opening batsmen to the crease, only for them to find, as the first balls are being bowled, that their bats have been broken before the game by the team captain". He called on others to "consider their own response to the tragic conflict of loyalties with which I have myself wrestled for perhaps too long". Although Howe said subsequently that his intention was only to constrain any shift in European policy by the Cabinet under the existing Prime Minister, his dramatic speech is widely seen as an important catalyst in the leadership challenge of Michael Heseltine a few days later, as well as her subsequent resignation on November 22, 1990, after failing to win an outright vote on the first ballot. November 1 is the 305th day of the year (306th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 60 days remaining. ... This article is about the year. ... 10 (ten) is the natural number following 9 and preceding 11. ... November 13 is the 317th day of the year (318th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 48 days remaining. ... For the insect, see Cricket (insect). ... The 1990 Conservative Party leadership election in the United Kingdom took place in November 1990 following the decision of former Trade and Industry Secretary Michael Heseltine to stand against the incumbent Conservative leader and Prime Minister, Margaret Thatcher. ... Michael Heseltine walks out of the cabinet meeting having resigned, January 9, 1986 Michael Ray Dibdin Heseltine, Baron Heseltine, CH, PC (born 21 March 1933) is a British Conservative politician and businessman. ... November 22 is the 326th day (327th on leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the year. ...


Howe retired from the House of Commons in 1992 and was made a life peer as Baron Howe of Aberavon, of Tandridge in the County of Surrey. He published his memoirs "Conflict of Loyalty" (Macmillan, 1994) soon after. In the Lords, Howe has continued to speak on a wide range of foreign-policy and European issues, and more recently led opposition to the Labour government's plan to convert the second chamber into an appointed body. In the United Kingdom, Life Peers are appointed members of the Peerage whose titles may not be inherited (those whose titles are inheritable are known as hereditary peers). ...


Howe has taken on a number of non-executive directorships in business and advisory posts in law and academia, including as international political adviser position to the American law firm of Jones Day. His wife Elspeth Howe, a former Chairman of the Broadcasting Standards Commission, was made a life peer in 2001 as Baroness Howe of Idlicote. Elspeth Howe, Baroness Howe of Aberavon and Baroness Howe of Idlicote (b. ... The Office of Communications, usually known as Ofcom, is the UKs communications regulator. ... This article is about the year 2001. ...


Lord Howe is a patron of the UK Metric Association. The UK Metric Association (UKMA for short) is a pressure group in the United Kingdom which argues for the full completion of the British metrication programme begun in 1965. ...


He was a close personal friend of Ian Gow, the former MP, parliamentary private secretary, and personal confidant of Margaret Thatcher, who was murdered by the IRA in July 1990. Ian Gow (February 11, 1937–July 30, 1990) was a Conservative MP for Eastbourne, who was assassinated by the IRA. Gow, a member of Margaret Thatchers government was persuaded by the speeches of his cousin Nicholas Budgen to resign in 1985 as Minister of State in HM Treasury over...

Parliament of the United Kingdom
Preceded by
Hendrie Oakshott
Member of Parliament for Bebington
19641966
Succeeded by
Edwin Brooks
Preceded by
John Vaughan-Morgan
Member of Parliament for Reigate
19701974
Succeeded by
George Gardiner
Preceded by
William Clark
Member of Parliament for Surrey East
19741992
Succeeded by
Peter Ainsworth
Legal Offices
Preceded by
Sir Arthur Irvine
Solicitor General for England and Wales
1970–1972
Succeeded by
Sir Michael Havers
Political offices
Preceded by
Denis Healey
Chancellor of the Exchequer
1979–1983
Succeeded by
Nigel Lawson
Preceded by
Francis Pym
Foreign Secretary
1983–1989
Succeeded by
John Major
Preceded by
William Whitelaw
Deputy Prime Minister of the United Kingdom
1989–1990
Succeeded by
Michael Heseltine
(1995–1997)
Preceded by
John Wakeham
Lord President of the Council
1989–1990
Succeeded by
John MacGregor
Leader of the House of Commons
1989–1990

  Results from FactBites:
 
Geoffrey Howe - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1043 words)
Geoffrey Howe was born in 1926 at Port Talbot in Wales.
Howe represented Bebington in the House of Commons from 1964 to 1966, Reigate from 1970 to 1974, and Surrey East from 1974 to 1992.
Howe retired from the Commons in 1992 and was made a life peer as Baron Howe of Aberavon, of Tandridge in the County of Surrey.
Geoffrey Howe - definition of Geoffrey Howe in Encyclopedia (607 words)
Richard Edward Geoffrey Howe, Baron Howe of Aberavon, PC (born December 20, 1926), usually known before 1992 as Sir Geoffrey Howe, is a senior British Conservative politician.
Howe's position was made difficult by significant differences between his views and those of his Prime Minister, especially on relations between the UK and the European Commmunity.
His wife Elspeth Howe, a former Chair of the Broadcasting Standards Commission, was made a life peer in 2001 as Baroness Howe of Idlicote.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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