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Encyclopedia > Geoffrey Hartman

Geoffrey H. Hartman (b. 1929) is a German born American literary theorist, sometimes identified with the Yale School of deconstruction, but also characterized as something of an individualist and maverick. He was born in Germany, in an Ashkenazi Jewish family. He came to the United States in 1946, and later became an American citizen. Year 1929 (MCMXXIX) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Literary theory is the theory (or the philosophy) of the interpretation of literature and literary criticism. ... The Yale school is a colloquial name for an influential group of literary critics, theorists, and philosophers of literature that were influenced by Jacques Derridas philosophy of deconstruction. ... Ashkenazi Jews, also known as Ashkenazic Jews or Ashkenazim (אַשְׁכֲּנָזִי אַשְׁכֲּנָזִים Standard Hebrew, AÅ¡kanazi,AÅ¡kanazim, Tiberian Hebrew, ʾAÅ¡kănāzî, ʾAÅ¡kănāzîm, pronounced sing. ... The word Jew ( Hebrew: יהודי) is used in a wide number of ways, but generally refers to a follower of the Jewish faith, a child of a Jewish mother, or someone of Jewish descent with a connection to Jewish culture or ethnicity and often a combination... Year 1946 (MCMXLVI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full 1946 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


He is now "Sterling Professor emeritus of English and Comparative Literature" at Yale University. One of his long term interests is the English poet, William Wordsworth A Sterling Professorship is the highest academic rank at Yale University, awarded to a tenured faculty member considered one of the best in his field. ... Yale redirects here. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... Wordsworth redirects here. ...


Hartman is also one of the leading members of the deconstructionist school of criticism. One of his works that explicitly display his position as a deconstructionist is "The Interpreter's Freud" which talks of the human cognition as being defined by many variants and has no particular scientifically proven definition. This piece was originally presented as the 1984 Freud Lecture at Yale. Deconstruction is a term in contemporary philosophy, literary criticism, and the social sciences, denoting a process by which the texts and languages of Western philosophy (in particular) appear to shift and complicate in meaning when read in light of the assumptions and absences they reveal within themselves. ... Sigmund Freud His famous couch Sigmund Freud (May 6, 1856 - September 23, 1939) was an Austrian neurologist and the founder of the psychoanalytic school of psychology, a movement that popularized the theory that unconscious motives control much behavior. ... Sigmund Freud His famous couch Sigmund Freud (May 6, 1856 - September 23, 1939) was an Austrian neurologist and the founder of the psychoanalytic school of psychology, a movement that popularized the theory that unconscious motives control much behavior. ...


Works

  • The Unmediated Vision: An Interpretation of Wordsworth, Hopkins, Rilke, and Valéry (1954)
  • André Malraux (1960)
  • Wordsworth's Poetry, 1787-1814 (1964)
  • Beyond Formalism: Literary Essays, 1958-1970 (1970)
  • The Fate of Reading and Other Essays (1975)
  • Geoffrey Hartman: Akiba's children (1978)
  • Criticism in the Wilderness: The Study of Literature Today (1980)
  • Saving the Text: Literature/Derrida/Philosophy (1981)
  • Easy Pieces (1985)
  • Bitburg in Moral and Political Perspective (1986, editor)
  • The Unremarkable Wordsworth (1987)
  • Minor Prophecies: The Literary Essay in the Culture Wars (1991)
  • The Longest Shadow: In the Aftermath of the Holocaust 1996
  • The Fateful Question of Culture 1997
  • A Critic's Journey: Literary Reflections, 1958-1998 (1999)
  • Scars of the Spirit : The Struggle Against Inauthenticity (2004)

The Best ideal is the true/ And other truth is none. ... Rainer Maria Rilke (born 4 December 1875 in Prague; died 29 December 1926 in Val-Mont (Switzerland)) was an important poet in the German language. ... Valery or Valéry can refer to: This list is incomplete; you can help by expanding it. ... Year 1954 (MCMLIV) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... André Malraux, French author, adventurer, and statesman André Malraux (November 3, 1901 – November 23, 1976) was a French author, adventurer and statesman, and a dominant figure in French politics and culture. ... Year 1960 (MCMLX) was a leap year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1787 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... Year 1814 (MDCCCXIV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar). ... Also Nintendo emulator: 1964 (emulator). ... Jan. ... Year 1970 (MCMLXX) was a common year starting on Thursday (link shows full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1970 (MCMLXX) was a common year starting on Thursday (link shows full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1975 (MCMLXXV) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Akiba Also pronounced Akiva can refer to: The Aramaic form of the name Jacob. ... Year 1978 (MCMLXXVIII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays the 1978 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 1980 (MCMLXXX) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link displays the 1980 Gregorian calendar). ... Jacques Derrida Jacques Derrida (July 15, 1930 – October 8, 2004) was an Algerian-born French literary critic and philosopher of Jewish descent, considered the first to develop deconstruction. Positioning Derridas thought Derrida had a significant effect on continental philosophy and on literary theory, particularly through his long-time... Year 1981 (MCMLXXXI) was a common year starting on Thursday (link displays the 1981 Gregorian calendar). ... This article is about the year. ... Year 1986 (MCMLXXXVI) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link displays 1986 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 1987 (MCMLXXXVII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link displays 1987 Gregorian calendar). ... The term culture war has been used to describe ideologically-driven and often strident confrontations typical of American public culture and politics since at least the 1980s. ... Year 1991 (MCMXCI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the 1991 Gregorian calendar). ... For other uses, see Holocaust (disambiguation) and Shoah (disambiguation). ... Year 1996 (MCMXCVI) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full 1996 Gregorian calendar). ... For the band, see 1997 (band). ... Jan. ... Year 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1998 Gregorian calendar). ... This article is about the year. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links

  • Hartman bibliography
  • Essay discussing the theories of Hartman and others

See also


  Results from FactBites:
 
THE PERILS OF EMBODIMENT: (4353 words)
Hartman in the chapter on Holocaust memorials, entitled The Book of the Destruction, in The Longest Shadow, concludes: "Our sefer hashoah will have to accomplish the impossible: allow the limits of representation to be healing limits, yet not allow them to conceal an event we are obligated to recall and interpret" (131).
Hartman defines a successful story as one that embodies "being a contemporary witness of one's life, fully present to it" (Longest Shadow 159, Hartman's italics), and a memorial embodiment might then be defined as being fully present to the lives past.
Hartman asks in Fateful Question (156): "The crucial question is now as always: how does one maintain compassion; what familiar or formal pedagogy can achieve a widening of sensibility when that widening soon exhausts itself?" But the answer cannot just come from the university, from literature, or from culture.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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