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Encyclopedia > Geoffrey, Archbishop of York

Geoffrey, Archbishop of York (c. 115212 December 1212) was a bastard son of Henry II, king of England. He was distinguished from his legitimate half-brothers by his consistent attachment and fidelity to his father. He was made bishop of Lincoln at the age of twenty-one (1173); but though he enjoyed the temporalities he was never consecrated and resigned the see in 1183. He then became his father's chancellor, holding a large number of lucrative benefices in plurality. Richard nominated him archbishop of York in 1189, but he was not consecrated until 1191, or enthroned until 1194. Events March 4 - Frederick I Barbarossa is elected King of the Germans Eleanor of Aquitaine has her marriage to Louis VII annulled May 18 - Eleanor of Aquitaine marries Henry of Anjou Church of Ireland acknowledges Popes authority Almohad Dynasty conquers Algeria Establishment of the archbishopric of Nidaros (Trondheim), Norway... December 12 is the 346th day (347th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events The first Great Fire of London burns most of the city to the ground Battle of Navas de Tolosa Childrens crusade Crusaders push the Muslims out of northern Spain In Japan, Kamo no Chōmei writes the Hōjōki, one of the great works of classical Japanese... ... Henry II (5 March 1133 – 6 July 1189) ruled as Count of Anjou, Duke of Normandy, and as King of England (1154–1189) and, at various times, controlled parts of Wales, Scotland, eastern Ireland, and western France. ... This is a list of British monarchs, that is, the monarchs on the thrones of some of the various kingdoms that have existed on, or incorporated, the island of Great Britain, namely: England (united with Wales from 1536) up to 1707; Scotland up to 1707; The Kingdom of Great Britain... Arms of the Bishop of Lincoln The Bishop of Lincoln is the Ordinary of the Church of England Diocese of Lincoln in the Province of Canterbury. ... Events Canonization of Saint Thomas a Becket, buried at Canterbury August 9th - Construction starts on the Leaning tower of Pisa Castle at Abergavenny was seized by the Welsh. ... Events Three-year old Emperor Go-Toba ascends to the throne of Japan after the forced abdication of his brother Antoku during the Genpei War William of Tyre excommunicated by the newly appointed Heraclius of Jerusalem, firmly ending their struggle for power Andronicus I Comnenus becomes the Byzantine emperor Births... The Lord High Chancellor of Great Britain, or Lord Chancellor and in former times Chancellor of England, is one of the most senior and important functionaries in the government of the United Kingdom. ... The Archbishop of York, Primate of England, is the metropolitan of the Province of York, and is the junior of the two archbishops of the Church of England, after the Archbishop of Canterbury. ... Events January 21 - Philip II of France and Richard I of England begin to assemble troops to wage the Third Crusade September 3- Richard I of England is crowned as king of England. ... // Events May 12 - Richard I of England marries Berengaria of Navarre. ... Events November 20 - Palermo falls to Henry VI, Emperor of the Holy Roman Empire December 25 - Henry VI is crowned king of Sicily. ...


Geoffrey, though of high character, was a man of uneven temper; his history is chiefly one of quarrels, with the see of Canterbury, with the chancellor William Longchamp, with his half-brothers Richard and John, and especially with his canons at York. This last dispute kept him in litigation before Richard and the pope for many years. He led the clergy in their refusal to be taxed by John and was forced to fly the kingdom in 1207. He died in Normandy on the 12th of December 1212. St Peters St, Canterbury, from the West Gate, 1993 Canterbury (Latin: Duroverum) is a cathedral city in the county of Kent in southeast England. ... William Longchamp (died 1197), chancellor of England and bishop of Ely, entered public life at the close of Henry IIs reign as official to the kings son Geoffrey, for the archdeaconry of Rouen. ... Richard I (September 8, 1157 – April 6, 1199) was King of England from 1189 to 1199. ... John (December 24, c. ... York is a city in northern England, at the confluence of the Rivers Ouse and Foss. ... Clergy is the generic term used to describe the formal religious leadership within a given religion. ... Mont Saint Michel is a historic pilgrimage site and a symbol of Normandy Normandy is a geographical region in northern France. ...

Preceded by:
Ralph de Warneville
Lord Chancellor
1181–1189
Succeeded by:
William Longchamp
Preceded by:
Roger de Pont L'Evêque
Archbishop of York
1181–1212
Succeeded by:
Walter de Gray

Ralph de Warneville was the twentieth Lord Chancellor of England, from 1173 to 1181. ... The Lord High Chancellor of Great Britain, or Lord Chancellor and in former times Chancellor of England, is one of the most senior and important functionaries in the government of the United Kingdom. ... William Longchamp (died 1197), chancellor of England and bishop of Ely, entered public life at the close of Henry IIs reign as official to the kings son Geoffrey, for the archdeaconry of Rouen. ... The Archbishop of York, Primate of England, is the metropolitan of the Province of York, and is the junior of the two archbishops of the Church of England, after the Archbishop of Canterbury. ... Walter de Gray (died 1 May 1255), English prelate and statesman, was a nephew of John de Gray, bishop of Norwich, and was educated at Oxford. ...

References


  Results from FactBites:
 
Britannia Biographies: Geoffrey Plantagenet, Archbishop of York (630 words)
Geoffrey Plantagenet was an illegitimate son of King Henry II.
Geoffrey, at last, consented to accept their nomination which was, shortly afterwards, confirmed by King Richard I. Geoffrey was then ordained priest; but it was not until the 18th August 1191 that he was consecrated Bishop in the Church of St. Maurice at Tours by the Archbishop of that see.
The result was the suspension of Archbishop Geoffrey by the Pope; but that suspension was reversed and a sentence given altogether in Geoffrey's favour upon his personal appeal to Rome.
Archbishop of York - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (598 words)
The Archbishop of York, Primate of England, is the metropolitan bishop of the Province of York, and is the junior of the two archbishops of the Church of England, after the Archbishop of Canterbury.
The archbishop's throne is in York Minster in central York and his official residence is Bishopthorpe Palace in the village of Bishopthorpe, outside York.
Until the Danish invasion the archbishops of Canterbury occasionally exercised authority, and it was not till the Norman Conquest that the archbishops of York asserted their complete independence.
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