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Encyclopedia > Geocaching
A Geocache in Germany
A Geocache in Germany

Geocaching is an outdoor treasure-hunting game in which the participants use a Global Positioning System (GPS) receiver or other navigational techniques to hide and seek containers (called "geocaches" or "caches") anywhere in the world. A typical cache is a small waterproof container containing a logbook and "treasure," usually toys or trinkets of little value. Today, well over 480,000 geocaches are registered on various websites devoted to the sport. Geocaches are currently placed in 222 countries around the world and on all seven continents, including Antarctica.[citation needed] Image File history File links Geocache Pfalz Werla in Deutschland Author: selbst fotografiert von Ufudu Erstversion de. ... Image File history File links Geocache Pfalz Werla in Deutschland Author: selbst fotografiert von Ufudu Erstversion de. ... A puzzlehunt is a type of treasure hunt game Children hunt for Easter eggs like these A Geocache in Germany. ... GPS redirects here. ... Over fifty GPS satellites such as this NAVSTAR have been launched since 1978. ... For other uses, see Country (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see World (disambiguation). ... Dymaxion map by Buckminster Fuller shows land mass with minimal distortion as only one continuous continent A continent (Latin continere, to hold together) is a large continuous mass of land on the planet Earth. ...

Contents

History

Geocaching is similar to the 150-year-old letterboxing, which uses references to landmarks and clues embedded in stories. However, geocaching was not possible until the removal of Selective Availability from GPS on May 1, 2000 (May 2, 04 UTC (http://pnt.gov/public/sa/diagram.shtml shows the improvement)). The first documented placement of a GPS-located cache took place on May 3, 2000, by Dave Ulmer of Beavercreek, Oregon. The location was posted on the Usenet newsgroup sci.geo.satellite-nav [1]. By May 6, 2000, it had been found twice and logged once (by Mike Teague of Vancouver, Washington). Letterboxing is an outdoor hobby that combines elements of orienteering, art and problem-solving. ... GPS redirects here. ... is the 121st day of the year (122nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2000 (MM) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full 2000 Gregorian calendar). ... May 2 is the 122nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (123rd in leap years). ... is the 123rd day of the year (124th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2000 (MM) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full 2000 Gregorian calendar). ... Dave Ulmer invented geocaching and introduced it to the world on May 2, 2000, the day after President Clinton turned off Selective Availability (SA), the intentional degradation of the Global Positioning System (GPS) signals available to the public. ... Beaver Creek is a small unincorporated community in Clackamas County, Oregon. ... Official language(s) (none)[1] Capital Salem Largest city Portland Area  Ranked 9th  - Total 98,466 sq mi (255,026 km²)  - Width 260 miles (420 km)  - Length 360 miles (580 km)  - % water 2. ... Usenet (USEr NETwork) is a global, decentralized, distributed Internet discussion system that evolved from a general purpose UUCP architecture of the same name. ... A newsgroup is a repository usually within the Usenet system, for messages posted from many users at different locations. ... is the 126th day of the year (127th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2000 (MM) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full 2000 Gregorian calendar). ... For other uses, see Vancouver (disambiguation). ... For the capital city of the United States, see Washington, D.C.. For other uses, see Washington (disambiguation). ...


Origin of the name

The activity was originally referred to as GPS stash hunt or gpsstashing. This was changed after a discussion in the gpsstash discussion group at eGroups (now Yahoo!). On May 30, 2000, Matt Stum suggested that "stash" could have negative connotations, and suggested instead "geocaching."[2] eGroups. ... Yahoo redirects here. ... is the 150th day of the year (151st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2000 (MM) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full 2000 Gregorian calendar). ...


Geocaches

Geocache Loonse en Drunense Duinen in The Netherlands
Geocache Loonse en Drunense Duinen in The Netherlands

For the traditional geocache, a geocacher will place a waterproof container, containing a log book (with pen or pencil) and trinkets or some sort of treasures, then note the cache's coordinates. These coordinates, along with other details of the location, are posted on a website. Other geocachers obtain the coordinates from the Internet and seek out the cache using their GPS handheld receivers. The finding geocachers record their exploits in the logbook and online. Geocachers are free to take objects from the cache in exchange for leaving something of similar or higher value, so there is treasure for the next person to find. Geocache used in the Geocaching sport. ... Geocache used in the Geocaching sport. ... Motto: Je Maintiendrai (Dutch: Ik zal handhaven, English: I Shall Uphold) Anthem: Wilhelmus van Nassouwe Capital Amsterdam1 Largest city Amsterdam Official language(s) Dutch2 Government Parliamentary democracy Constitutional monarchy  - Queen Beatrix  - Prime minister Jan Peter Balkenende Independence Eighty Years War   - Declared July 26, 1581   - Recognised January 30, 1648 (by Spain... This article is about longitude and latitude; see also UTM coordinate system Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically); large version (pdf) The geographic (earth-mapping) coordinate system expresses every horizontal position on Earth by two of the three coordinates of a spherical coordinate system which... For other uses, see Treasure (disambiguation). ...

Microcache hidden and found beside the Roman Colosseum
Microcache hidden and found beside the Roman Colosseum

Typical cache treasures are not high in monetary value but may hold intrinsic value to the finder. Aside from the logbook, common cache contents are unusual coins or currency, small toys, ornamental buttons, CDs, or books. Also common are objects that are moved from cache to cache, such as Travel Bugs or Geocoins, whose travels may be logged and followed online. Occasionally, higher value items are included in geocaches, normally reserved for the "first finder", or in locations which are harder to reach. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1024x683, 183 KB) Summary I took this picture and release it into public domain - Dominic Ebacher Pictured in the image is Stephanie Furrer, who also releases her permission for unlimited usage of this image in the public domain. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1024x683, 183 KB) Summary I took this picture and release it into public domain - Dominic Ebacher Pictured in the image is Stephanie Furrer, who also releases her permission for unlimited usage of this image in the public domain. ... This article is about monetary coins. ... A travel bug from Germany A Travel Bug is a dogtag used in Geocaching. ... A 2004 USA Geocoin A Geocoin is a token used in geocaching. ...

Geocaches can range in size from "microcaches," too small to hold anything more than a tiny paper log, to those placed in five-gallon buckets or even larger containers. [3] Image File history File links Description: Ein Geocaching Travelbug Source: selbst gemacht Date: Monday, May 16, 2005 Author: Eigenes Foto von Björn Rudner (Neuromancer2K4) Permission: Björn Rudner (Neuromancer2K4) Other versions of this file: Keine anderen Versionen File links The following pages link to this file: Geocaching Travel Bug... Image File history File links Description: Ein Geocaching Travelbug Source: selbst gemacht Date: Monday, May 16, 2005 Author: Eigenes Foto von Björn Rudner (Neuromancer2K4) Permission: Björn Rudner (Neuromancer2K4) Other versions of this file: Keine anderen Versionen File links The following pages link to this file: Geocaching Travel Bug... A travel bug from Germany A Travel Bug is a dogtag used in Geocaching. ...


If a geocache has been vandalized or stolen, it is said to have been "muggled" or "plundered." The former term plays off the fact that those not familiar with geocaching are called "geo-muggles" or just muggles, a term borrowed from the Harry Potter series of books.[4] Muggle is the only word used in the Harry Potter series of books by J. K. Rowling to refer to a normal person who lacks any sort of magical ability. ... This article is about the Harry Potter series of novels. ...


If a cacher discovers that a cache has been muggled, it can be logged as needing maintenance, which sends an e-mail to the cache owner so it can be repaired, replaced, or archived (deactivated).


Variations

There are many types of caches. Some are easy enough to be called "drive-bys," "park 'n' grabs" ("PNGs"), or "cache and dash." Others are very difficult, including staged multi-caches;[5] there are even examples of caches underwater,[6][7] 50 feet (15 m) up a tree,[8] after long offroad drives,[9] on high mountain peaks,[10] on the Antarctic continent,[11] and above the Arctic Circle.[12] Different geocaching websites choose to list different variations as per their own policies (e.g., Geocaching.com does not list new Webcam, Virtual, Locationless, or Moving geocaches). For other uses, see Antarctica (disambiguation). ... For the fast food restaurant chain, see Arctic Circle Restaurants. ...

A Geocacher finding a Virtual Cache at McMurdo Station, Antarctica
A Geocacher finding a Virtual Cache at McMurdo Station, Antarctica

Variations of geocaches include: Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2272 × 1704 pixel, file size: 1. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2272 × 1704 pixel, file size: 1. ... McMurdo Station from Observation Hill. ...

  • Traditional: This is the basic cache type. It is a container with a log book (at minimum) found at its listed set of coordinates and usually trade items.
  • Night Cache: These traditional caches can only be found at night and involve following a series of reflectors with a flashlight to the final cache location.
  • Event Cache: This is a gathering organised and attended by geocachers. Physical caches placed at events are often temporarily placed for the event date only. The Geocaching events category contains some famous annual Geocaching events.
  • Cache-In Trash-Out (CITO) Events: This is a variation on event caching. Geocachers gather to clean up the trash in the area to improve the environment as a coordinated activity.
  • Letterbox Hybrid: A letterbox hybrid cache is a combination of a geocache and a letterbox in the same container. A letterbox has a rubber stamp and a logbook instead of tradable items. Letterboxers carry their own stamp with them, to stamp the letterbox's log book and inversely stamp their personal log book with the letterbox stamp. The hybrid cache contains the important materials for this and may or may not include trade items. Whether the letterbox hybrid contains trade items is up to the owner.
  • Locationless/Reverse: This variation is similar to a scavenger hunt. A description is given for something to find, such as a one-room schoolhouse, and the finder locates an example of this object. The finder records the location using their GPS handheld receiver and often takes a picture at the location showing the named object and his or her GPS receiver. Typically others are not allowed to log that same location as a find.
  • Moving/Traveling: Similar to a traditional geocache, this variation is found at a listed set of coordinates. The finder uses the log book, trades trinkets, and then hides the cache in a different location. By updating this new location on the listing, the finder essentially becomes the hider, and the next finder continues the cycle.
  • Multi-cache: This cache consists of multiple caches. These caches are one or more intermediate points containing the coordinates for the next or final cache, that contains the log book and trade items.
  • Mystery/puzzle-based: This cache requires one to discover information in order to find the cache. Generally it includes a false set of coordinates within a mile or a couple of kilometers of the cache, and a puzzle must be solved in order to determine the final cache location. In other cases the given location is correct, but the name of the location or other features found there are themselves a puzzle leading to the final cache. Alternatively, additional information is necessary to access the cache (such as a padlock combination) or there are special requirements for logging the find on-line.
  • Offset: This cache is similar to the multi-cache except that the initial coordinates are for a location containing information that encodes the final cache coordinates. An example would be to direct the finder to a plaque where the digits of a date on the plaque correspond to coordinates of the final cache.
  • Virtual: Caches of this nature are coordinates for a location that does not contain the traditional box, log book, or trade items. Instead, the location contains some other described object. Validation for finding a virtual cache generally requires you to email the cache hider with information such as a date or a name on a plaque, or to post a picture of yourself at the site with GPS receiver in hand.
  • Earthcache: Organized and maintained by the Geological Society of America, the EarthCache program is a subset of geocaching in which the "treasure" a cacher finds is not a physical container with trinkets, but an educational lesson of the Earth. The important requirement for an EarthCache to be approved and published is that the cache listing must contain educational information about the earth science of the cache area, and an interactive educational task which directly engages the cacher in that geology. EarthCaches are submitted at www.earthcache.org, and transferred to Groundspeak’s geocaching.com during the review process. The EarthCache program is funded by Groundspeak, National Geographic, Subaru, and the National Park Service.
  • Webcam: Similar to a virtual cache; there is no container, log book, or trade items for this cache type. Instead, the coordinates are for a location with a public webcam. Instead of signing a log book, the finder is often required to capture their image from the webcam for verification of the find.

A scavenger hunt is a game in which individuals or teams seek to find a number of specific items, or perform tasks, as given in a list. ... The Geological Society of America (or GSA) is a nonprofit organization dedicated to the advancement of the geosciences. ... Groundspeak, Inc. ... The National Geographic Society was founded in the USA on January 27, 1888, by 33 men interested in organizing a society for the increase and diffusion of geographical knowledge. ... For other uses, see Subaru (disambiguation). ... The National Park Service (NPS) is the United States federal agency that manages all National Parks, many National Monuments, and other conservation and historical properties with various title designations. ... A typical webcam A web camera (or webcam) is a real-time camera (usually, though not always, a video camera) whose images can be accessed using the World Wide Web, instant messaging, or a PC video calling application. ...

Paperless geocaching

Paperless geocaching is the process of using PDAs or other electronic devices to geocache without having to print out geocache pages. It also gives cachers the capability of doing some impromptu caching if they have some free time and already have cache data on hand for a particular area. Cachers can obtain geocache information (also known as waypoints) from various websites in various formats and load the data into their PDAs to take along with them. Data is generally formatted for use as filetype GPX, which uses XML and contains information describing the geocache and also information about recent visitors to the cache. Other formats exist for storage on various devices, but GPX is the most popular. A variety of programs can translate between the various formats if data is obtained in another program's format. Look up Personal digital assistant in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... A waypoint is a reference point in physical space used for purposes of navigation. ... GPX, or GPS eXchange Format is an XML schema designed for transferring GPS data between software applications. ... The Extensible Markup Language (XML) is a general-purpose markup language. ...


Obtaining data

Cachers can build their own GPX files with different client software tools, but this task could be very time consuming and prone to data entry error. Many geocachers pay a fee for Premium Membership with Geocaching.com. This allows geocachers the capability to build queries (called Pocket Queries by Geocaching.com) for caches they wish to hunt. They can obtain caches where they want to hunt based on criteria such as Zip Code or coordinates and have it emailed to them as an attachment on a schedule. Other geocachers using TerraCaching.com can download GPX files directly. By using Geocaching Software, geocachers can combine and filter cache listings from many sites. Geocaching with Navicache.com offers similar services to its members at no charge. Mr. ... Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ...


Converting and filtering data

Some cachers convert GPX files to other formats that can be read by their PDA. Others run their GPX files through Geocaching Software to change the data for special icons on their GPSr or to filter out caches based on certain criteria. If a cacher owns a Microsoft PocketPC based PDA, they can just sync the data to their handheld without converting any data. This is due to developers creating applications that read GPX files directly. If a cacher has a Palm based or other PDA, then there are quite a few programs to convert GPX files for use on a PDA. Synchronization is coordination with respect to time. ...


Ethics

Because of the hide-and-seek nature of the game, without some rules geocachers could be a danger to themselves, other cachers, or society. Geocaching.com has guidelines for hiding a cache through their listing service. Other websites, like Terracaching.com and Geocaching with Navicache.com, have their own set of guidelines for acceptable listings. Geocachers interested in enumerating a basic set of generally accepted practices have also developed the Geocacher's Creed and Geocaching Policy website. Land agencies, such as the Arizona Bureau of Land Management, have also established their own guidelines for geocaching to ensure that geocaching does not negatively impact their lands. United States Federal recreation sites have different policies dependent on the agency charged with maintaining the specific sites and the level of impact they choose to allow for geocaching. US BLM logo The Bureau of Land Management (BLM) is an agency within the United States Department of the Interior which administers Americas public lands, totaling approximately 261 million surface acres (1,056,229. ...


When geocaching in busy locations, searching for a cache can require tact and craftiness to avoid the attention of the general public (also known by geocachers as "muggles"). The person hiding a geocache frequently takes this into account so that the hider and those looking for caches will not cause undue alarm. When care is not taken in hiding or finding a geocache, cachers have been approached by police and questioned when they were seen as acting suspiciously. Other times, investigation of a cache location after suspicious activity was reported has resulted in police and bomb squad discovery of the geocache. A number of caches have been destroyed by bomb squads.[13]


Websites for geocaching

There are numerous websites that list geocaches around the world. The first and currently the largest is Geocaching.com, which began operating in 2000. This site has members worldwide and hundreds of thousands of caches available. Caches are published by regional cache reviewers, and the site stresses family-oriented caching. There is the basic, free, membership which allows users to see coordinates for most caches in its database, and the premium, paid-subscription accounts which offer additional features and a few more cache sites. Image File history File links Gnome-globe. ...


Geocaching.com no longer lists new caches without a physical object, including locationless/reverse and webcam; however, older caches of these types have been grandfathered in (except for locationless/reverse, which have been completely archived). The exception to this is earthcaches, which have been reestablished as caches eligible for new listings. Approval for new earthcaches must be obtained through the Geological Society of America. Groundspeak, Inc., the site's owner, has created a waymarking website, at Waymarking.com, to handle all other non-physical caches. A grandfather clause is an exception that allows an old rule to continue to apply to some existing situations, when a new rule will apply to all future situations. ... Groundspeak, Inc. ... Waymarking is a means by which people can catalog, mark, locate and log unique and interesting locations around the world. ...


The next to offer their own cache listing database service was Geocaching with Navicache.com. Started as a regional listing service around February of 2001, Navicache.com quickly gained popularity among those looking for a less restrictive alternatives to what was currently available. They continue to grow and while many of Navicache.com's listings can be found cross-posted to other sites, they also offer many unique listings. Unlike some of the commercial sites, Navicache.com also lists most any type of geocache (within reason) and does not charge to access any of the caches listed in their database. While all submissions still must go through an approval process, they have chosen to be more liberal in approving caches believing that the sport belongs to the players and therefore should not be controlled by any one entity.


An alternative geocaching site is TerraCaching.com, whose goal is to have members place and seek caches that are somewhat higher in quality, either from the difficulty of the hide or from the quality of the location. Cache approval is handled by other members through a sponsorship system. Members peer review the quality of other members' caches. It is another worldwide game with caches numbering in the thousands. TerraCaching.com embraces virtual caches alongside traditional/multi-stage caches and has a large selection of locationless caches integrated into the web site. The Dutch entry to TerraCaching is TerraCachers.nl.


In the United States, where most geocaching services are hosted, coordinates are not protected by copyright but cache data are. Some commercial web sites listing geocache data are generally protective of their data. People scraping data from geocaching.com have been threatened with lawsuits by Groundspeak, Inc., owners of the site. In 2001, Ed Hall was threatened with a lawsuit. According to Hall, the threat was because Groundspeak requested that he provide a copyright notice on his website, Buxley's Geocaching Waypoint, attributing Groundspeak as the owner of the cache data. However, Groundspeak claims the dispute occurred after Hall refused to remove a cache listing from his maps at the request of a cache owner. As a result, his site now acknowledges the various sources of cache data he uses, but after a disagreement with Groundspeak, Inc. about licensing, he no longer includes any data from geocaching.com.[14] Navicache.com (and others) continue to take a more 'open-caching' type approach, sharing their database with Buxley's and others.


See also

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:

Image File history File links Commons-logo. ... Ad Loc is a system for mobile-device users to collaboratively tie persistent virtual notes to physical locations without the need for any servers embedded in the environment or accessed via the Internet. ... An Ordnance Survey benchmark A C&GS benchmark disk Typical C&GS triangulation station A benchmark is a point of reference for a measurement. ... Benchmarking is a sport in which individuals or teams of participants go out and find benchmarks (also known as geodetic control points). ... BookCrossing, BC, BCing, or BXing, is defined as the practice of leaving a book in a public place to be picked up and read by others, who then do likewise. ... A dead drop or dead letter box, is a location used to secretly pass items between two people, without requiring them to meet. ... The goals of the Degree Confluence Project are to visit each of the latitude and longitude integer degree intersections on Earth, and post photographs of each location on the World Wide Web. ... A 2004 USA Geocoin A Geocoin is a token used in geocaching. ... Geodashing is an outdoor sport in which players use GPS receivers on a playing field that covers the entire planet. ... Geotagging, sometimes referred to as Geocoding, is the process of adding geographical identification metadata to various media such as websites, RSS feeds, or images. ... Over fifty GPS satellites such as this NAVSTAR have been launched since 1978. ... GPX, or GPS eXchange Format is an XML schema designed for transferring GPS data between software applications. ... Letterboxing is an outdoor hobby that combines elements of orienteering, art and problem-solving. ... A location-based game (or location-enabled game) is one in which the game play somehow evolves and progresses via a players location. ... The international orienteering symbol. ... A travel bug from Germany A Travel Bug is a dogtag used in Geocaching. ... Trigpointing is a recreational activity or sport in which participants search for trig points and log their finds. ... Waymarking is a means by which people can catalog, mark, locate and log unique and interesting locations around the world. ... A waypoint is a reference point in physical space used for purposes of navigation. ...

Further reading

  • The Essential Guide to Geocaching by Mike Dyer (ISBN 1-55591-522-1)
  • The Complete Idiot's Guide to Geocaching by Jack W. Peters (ISBN 1-59257-235-9)
  • Geocaching For Dummies by Joel McNamara (ISBN 978-0764575716)
  • Geocaching: Hike and Seek with Your GPS by Erik Sherman (ISBN 978-1590591222)
  • The Geocaching Handbook (Falcon Guide) by Layne Cameron and Dave Ulmer (ISBN 978-076273044)
  • Let's Go Geocaching by DK Publishing (ISBN 978-0756637170)
  • It's a Treasure Hunt! Geocaching & Letterboxing by Cq Products (ISBN 978-1563832680)

References

  1. ^ Dave Ulmer (2000-05-03). "GPS Stash Hunt... Stash #1 is there!". sci.geo.satellite-nav. (Web link). Retrieved on 2007-05-21.
  2. ^ Stum, Matt (2000-05-30). Cache vs Stash. Yahoo!. Retrieved on 2007-05-21.
  3. ^ Team Desert Eagle (2006-08-19). Big Boy. Groundspeak. Retrieved on 2007-05-21.
  4. ^ Matthew, Amy. Global treasure hunts catching on among geocache fans. The Pueblo Chieftain. Retrieved on 2007-05-21.
  5. ^ NFA (2005-07-06). Adirondack Murder Mystery. Groundspeak. Retrieved on 2007-05-21.
  6. ^ Freefloat (2004-06-06). Ambitious Snorkeller. Groundspeak. Retrieved on 2007-05-21.
  7. ^ Mathieson, Doug (2005-07-17). Scuba Cache:Innerkip Quarry. Groundspeak. Retrieved on 2007-05-21.
  8. ^ Team Bridgebuilder (2004-10-07). Hypostyle Hall. Groundspeak. Retrieved on 2007-05-21.
  9. ^ Headybrew (2006-04-18). Clamshell offroad and hike. TerraCaching.com. Retrieved on 2007-05-21.
  10. ^ GPearl (2004-07-25). 9 Summits - Kärnten. Groundspeak. Retrieved on 2007-05-21.
  11. ^ Arbalo (2003-02-05). Magnum's Cache. Navicache.com. Retrieved on 2007-05-21.
  12. ^ Iceshelf 2002 Research Team (2002-05-05). As North As It Gets!. Groundspeak. Retrieved on 2007-05-21.
  13. ^ Mike Vogel. Geocache player broke all the rules of Internet treasure hunt. KTVB.COM. Retrieved on 2005-09-28.
  14. ^ Hall, Ed. Why my maps were offline for a week. Buxley's Geocaching Waypoint. Retrieved on 2007-05-21.

Year 2000 (MM) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full 2000 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 123rd day of the year (124th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 141st day of the year (142nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2000 (MM) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full 2000 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 150th day of the year (151st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Yahoo redirects here. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 141st day of the year (142nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 231st day of the year (232nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Groundspeak, Inc. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 141st day of the year (142nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Pueblo Chieftain is an American daily newspaper published in Pueblo, Colorado. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 141st day of the year (142nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 187th day of the year (188th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Groundspeak, Inc. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 141st day of the year (142nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 157th day of the year (158th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Groundspeak, Inc. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 141st day of the year (142nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 198th day of the year (199th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Groundspeak, Inc. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 141st day of the year (142nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 280th day of the year (281st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Groundspeak, Inc. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 141st day of the year (142nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 108th day of the year (109th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 141st day of the year (142nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 206th day of the year (207th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Groundspeak, Inc. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 141st day of the year (142nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 36th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 141st day of the year (142nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ... is the 125th day of the year (126th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Groundspeak, Inc. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 141st day of the year (142nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 271st day of the year (272nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 141st day of the year (142nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links

Geocache listing sites

  • Buxley's Geocaching Waypoint - Compilation of multiple listing sites
  • earthcache.org - Listing of all active EarthCaches worldwide; EarthCache submission guidelines, submittal form, FAQs, contact information.
  • Geocaching.com (Groundspeak) - International listing service for geocaching
  • Geocaching.com.au - Listing service for geocaching in Australia and New Zealand; not related to Groundspeak
  • Geocaching.be - Listing service for geocaching in Belgium
  • Geocaching.dk - Listing service for geocaches in Denmark
  • Geocaching.hu - Listing service for geocaches in Hungary; not related to Grounspeak
  • Geocaching.nl - Listing service for geocaching in the Netherlands
  • Geocaching.pt - Listing service for geocaching in Portugal
  • Geocaching.ro - Listing service for geocaching in Romania
  • Geocaching.sk - Listing service for geocaches in Slovakia
  • Geocaching.se - Listing service for geocaches in Sweden
  • Geocaching.su - Listing service for geocaching in Russia and other Post-Soviet states; not related to Groundspeak
  • GPSGames.org - International listing service for geocaching as well as similar alternative activities
  • Navicache - International listing service for geocaching
  • Opencaching DE - Listing service for geocaches in Germany
  • Opencaching PL - Listing service for geocaches in Poland
  • Rejtekhely.ro - Listing service for geocaches in Transylvania
  • TerraCaching - International listing service for geocaching
  • TerraCachers.nl - Listing service for geocaching in the Netherlands based on Terracaching.com

Post-Soviet states in alphabetical order: 1. ... This article is about the region in Romania. ...

Geocaching Guides

  • A Beginner’s Guide to Geocaching
  • GeoLex - The Lexicon of Geocaching Comprehensive listing of the terms and abbreviations used in the geocaching world, and their meanings.
  • TerraCaching 101 Introduction to TerraCaching

Policy information

  • Geocaching Policy website Public land policies regarding Geocaching and related activities
  • The Geocachers' Creed A voluntary set of principles for placing and hiding geocaches
  • Cache in Trash Out Homepage

  Results from FactBites:
 
Geocaching (877 words)
Geocaching is the widely popular, high-tech game of treasure hunting, and Garmin is at the forefront with a host of products to ensure you find that big cache.
Check out our geocaching product guide to find out which unit is best for you and read below for more information about geocaching.
Geocaching can have an unintended impact on the earth's natural resources and result in trampled vegetation, damaged habitats and destruction of parks' historical and cultural resources.
Geocaching - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (2425 words)
Geocaching is an outdoor treasure-hunting game in which the participants use a Global Positioning System receiver or other navigational techniques to hide and seek containers (called "geocaches" or "caches") anywhere in the world.
Geocachers are free to take objects from the cache in exchange for leaving something of similar or higher value, so there is treasure for the next person to find.
Geocaching via GPS was made possible by the removal of selective availability of the Global Positioning System on May 1, 2000.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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