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Encyclopedia > GeoCities
GeoCities
URL http://geocities.yahoo.com
Commercial? Yes
Type of site Web hosting
Registration Yes
Owner Yahoo! Inc.
Created by David Bohnett and John Rezner

Yahoo! GeoCities is a free webhosting service founded by David Bohnett and John Rezner in late 1994 as Beverly Hills Internet. Uniform Resource Locator (URL) is a technical, Web-related term used in two distinct meanings: in popular usage, it is a widespread synonym for Uniform Resource Identifier (URI)—many popular and technical texts will use the term URL when referring to URI; in strict technical usage, it is a subset... Yahoo! Inc. ... Yahoo! Inc. ... Web hosting is a service that provides Internet users with online systems for storing information, images, video, or any content accessible via the web. ... 1994 (MCMXCIV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar, and was designated as the International Year of the Family and the International Year of the Sport and the Olympic Ideal by United Nations. ... Beverly Hills is a city in the western part of Los Angeles County, California. ...


In its original form, site users selected a "city" in which to place their webpages; the "cities" being named after cities or regions according to their content — for example, computer-related sites were placed in "SiliconValley" and those dealing with entertainment were assigned to "Hollywood" — hence the name of the site; now, however, this feature has since been abandoned. A webpage or web page is a page of the World Wide Web, usually in HTML/XHTML format (the file extensions are typically htm or html) and with hypertext links to enable navigation from one page or section to another. ... A BlueGene supercomputer cabinet. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Recreation. ...

Contents

History

GeoCities began as BHI which stood for "Beverly Hills Internet" (www.bhi90210.com), a small Web hosting and development company in Southern California. The company also created their own Web directory, organized thematically in six "neighborhoods" such as "SiliconValley" (for technology) and "SunsetStrip" (for nightlife and music.) Live web camera feeds were placed in several neighborhoods to strengthen the geographic context. In mid-1995, the company decided to offer users of this website (thereafter known as "Homesteaders") the ability to develop free home pages within those neighborhoods. Chat, bulletin boards, and other elements of "community" were added soon after, helping foster rapid growth, and by December of 1995, the company, which now had a total of 14 neighborhoods, was signing up thousands of Homesteaders a day and getting over six million monthly page views. The company decided to focus on building membership and community, and on December 15, 1995, BHI became known as GeoCities after having also been called Geopages. 1995 (MCMXCV) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 1995 (MCMXCV) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 15 is the 349th day of the year (350th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1995 (MCMXCV) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Over time, many companies, including Yahoo!, invested extensively in GeoCities and the site continued to grow, with the introduction of paid premium services. In May of 1997, GeoCities introduced advertisements on its pages. Despite negative reaction from users, GeoCities continued to grow. By June of 1997, GeoCities was the fifth most popular site on the Web, and by October of that year the company had signed up its one-millionth Homesteader. Yahoo! Inc. ... 1997 (MCMXCVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Wikibooks has more about this subject: Marketing Billboards and street advertising in Shinjuku, Tokyo, Japan, (2005) Advertising is paid communication through a non-personal medium in which the sponsor is identified and the message is controlled. ...


In June of 1998, in an effort to increase brand awareness, Geocities introduced a watermark to user webpages. The watermark, much like a television bug, is a transparent floating gif which used javascript to stay on the bottom right side of the browser screen. Many users felt the watermark interfered with the design of their webpage and threatened to move their webpages elsewhere. The watermark also had cross-browser issues and clashed with the markup of some pages. Geocities said in a press release that the company had received upbeat feedback regarding the watermark.[1] 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar, and was designated the International Year of the Ocean. ... This Crown & CA (for Crown Agent) watermark was standard for postage stamps of the British colonies from the 1880s to the 1920s. ... DOG on BBC News 24. ... In computing, HyperText Markup Language (HTML) is the predominant markup language for the creation of web pages. ...


In August of 1998, the company went public, listing on the NASDAQ exchange with the code GCTY. The IPO price was $17, rising rapidly after launch to a peak of over $100. However, in January 1999, it was purchased by Yahoo! for $3.57 billion with Yahoo! taking control on May 28.[2][3] 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar, and was designated the International Year of the Ocean. ... NASDAQ in Times Square, New York City. ... An initial public offering (IPO) is the first sale of a corporations common shares to public investors. ... May 28 is the 148th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (149th in leap years). ...


Yahoo!'s acquisition of GeoCities proved extremely unpopular and users soon began to leave en masse in protest at the new Terms of Service put out by Yahoo! for GeoCities. The terms stated that the company owned all rights and content, including media such as pictures. Yahoo! quickly reversed its decision. In July of 1999, Yahoo! eliminated neighborhoods and street addresses from homesteader URLs. Geocities never enforced neighborhood specific content, for example a "Hollywood" homesteader could be nothing but a college student's blog which would be more appropriate for another neighborhood. The neighborhoods were replaced by "vanity" URLs consisting of http://www.geocities.com/membername. Soon after a lawsuit was filed against Yahoo by its volunteer group of community managers, GeoCities' volunteer program (Community Leaders) was terminated. Yahoo! Inc. ... In computing and telecommunication networks (including of course the Internet) terms of service or ToS is an agreement under which a service provider agrees to provide services to the users of the service. ... Yahoo! Inc. ... Uniform Resource Locator (URL) is a technical, Web-related term used in two distinct meanings: in popular usage, it is a widespread synonym for Uniform Resource Identifier (URI)—many popular and technical texts will use the term URL when referring to URI; in strict technical usage, it is a subset... Yahoo! - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia /**/ @import /skins-1. ...


In 2001, amidst speculation by analysts that GeoCities was not yet profitable (it having declared an $8 million loss for the final quarter of 1998), Yahoo! introduced a for-fee premium hosting service at GeoCities.[4] 2001 (MMI) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Yahoo! Inc. ...


Litigation

In 1999, a complaint was instituted against GeoCities stating that the corporation violated the provisions of the Federal Trade Commision Act under 14 USC § 45, which states in relevant part, “Unfair methods of competition in or affecting commerce, and unfair or deceptive acts or practices in or affecting commerce, are hereby declared unlawful.” The FTC found that GeoCities was engaged in deceptive acts and practices in contravention to their stated privacy act. Subsequently, a consent order was entered into which prohibits GeoCities from misrepresenting the purpose for which it collects and/or uses personal identifying information from consumers. A copy of the complaint and order can be found at 127 F.T.C. 94.


The litigation came about in this way: Geocities provided free home pages and e-mail address to children and adults who provided personally identifying and demographic information when they register for the website. At the time of the complaint, GeoCities had more than 1.8 million members who were "homesteaders". GeoCities created opportunites for third party advertisers to promote products in a targeted manner to its 1.8 million users by using personally identifiable information obtained in the registration process. These acts and practices affected "commerce" as defined in Section 4 of the Federal Trade Commission.


The problem GeoCities faced was that it placed a privacy statement on its New Member Application Form and on its website promising that it would never give personally identifying information to anyone without the user's permission. GeoCities sold personal information to third parties who used the information for purposes other than those for which members gave permission.


It was ordered that GeoCities would not make any misrepresentation, in any manner about its collection or use of personal identifying information, including what information will be disclosed to third parties. GeoCities was not allowed to collect personal identifying information from any child if GeoCities had actual knowledge that the child did not have his or her parent's permission to provide the information.


GeoCities neighborhoods

According to a February 1999 archive of the site [1], the forty-one "neighborhoods" were (in alphabetical order):

Landsat pseudocolor satellite photo of Groom Lake, taken around 2000 Area 51 (currently known as Air Force Flight Test Center, Detachment 3 and also known as Dreamland, Watertown Strip, Paradise Ranch, The Box, Groom Lake, Neverland, and others) is a remote tract of land in southern Nevada, located at , at... Science fiction is a form of speculative fiction principally dealing with the impact of imagined science and technology, or both, upon society and persons as individuals. ... Fantasy is a genre of art that uses magic and other supernatural forms as a primary element of plot, theme, or setting. ... Nickname: City of Athena or Cradle of Democracy Location of the city of Athens (red dot) within the Prefecture of Athens and Periphery of Attica Coordinates: Country Greece Peripheries Attica Prefecture Athens Founded circa 2000 BC Mayor Nikitas Kaklamanis Area    - City 38. ... Old book bindings at the Merton College library. ... The Chinese poem Quatrain on Heavenly Mountain by Emperor Gaozong (Song Dynasty) // Poetry (from the Greek , poiesis, making or creating) is a form of art in which language is used for its aesthetic qualities in addition to, or in lieu of, its ostensible meaning. ... For other uses, see Philosophy (disambiguation). ... Greg Norman on the 18th tee at St Andrews. ... Four wheel drive or 4x4, is a type of four wheeled vehicle drivetrain configuration that enables all four wheels to receive power from the engine simultaneously in order to provide maximum traction. ... A fourth-generation (2006-) Ford Explorer, the best-selling mid-size SUV in the United States A sport utility vehicle, or SUV, is a passenger vehicle which combines the towing capability of a pickup truck with the passenger-carrying space of a sedan. ... Jazz is a musical art form that originated in New Orleans at around the start of the 20th century. ... Cajun cuisine originates from the French-speaking Acadian or Cajun immigrants in Louisiana, USA. It is what could be called a rustic cuisine — locally available ingredients predominate, and preparation is simple. ... The U.S. Southern states or the South, also known colloquially as Dixie, constitute a distinctive region covering a large portion of the United States, with its own unique heritage, historical perspective, customs, musical styles, and cuisine. ... Broadway theatre[1] is often considered the highest professional form of theatre in the United States. ... For other usages see Theatre (disambiguation) Theater (American English) or Theatre (British English and widespread usage among theatre professionals in the US) is that branch of the performing arts concerned with acting out stories in front of an audience using combinations of speech, gesture, music, dance, sound and spectacle &#8212... Musical theater (or theatre) is a form of theatre combining music, songs, dance, and spoken dialogue. ... Show business is a vernacular term for the business of entertainment. ... Cape Canaveral from space, August 1991 Cape Canaveral (Cabo Cañaveral in Spanish) is a strip of land in Brevard County, Florida, United States, near the center of that states Atlantic coast. ... Part of a scientific laboratory at the University of Cologne. ... Euclid, Greek mathematician, 3rd century BC, known today as the father of geometry; shown here in a detail of The School of Athens by Raphael. ... Aviation refers to flying using aircraft, machines designed by humans for atmospheric flight. ... Capitol Hill, aside from being the common nickname for the United States Congress, is the largest historic residential neighborhood in Washington, DC, stretching easterly behind the U.S. Capitol along wide avenues. ... Politics is the process by which groups make decisions. ... For a list of universities around the world, see Lists of colleges and universities Representation of a university class, 1350s. ... The Colosseum by night: exterior view of the best-preserved section. ... People participating in summer luge as a form of recreation, in the Vosges. ... For other uses, see Child (disambiguation). ... A small business may be defined as a business with a small number of employees. ... Fashion design is the applied art dedicated to the design of clothing and lifestyle accessories created within the cultural and social influences of a specific time. ... Many see natural beauty in the rose. ... The term fashion usually applies to a prevailing mode of expression, but quite often applies to a personal mode of expression that may or may not adhere to prevailing ideals. ... A family in Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso in 1997 A family consists of a domestic group of people (or a number of domestic groups), typically affiliated by birth or marriage, or by analogous or comparable relationships — including domestic partnership, cohabitation, adoption, surname and (in some cases) ownership (as occurred in the... ... This article is about motion pictures. ... Braun HF 1, Germany, 1958 OT-1471 Belweder, Poland, 1957 Television is a telecommunication system for broadcasting and receiving moving pictures and sound over a distance. ... Physical fitness is an attribute required for service in virtually all military forces. ... Madison Avenue is a north-south avenue in the borough of Manhattan in New York City which carries northbound one-way traffic. ... Wikibooks has more about this subject: Marketing Billboards and street advertising in Shinjuku, Tokyo, Japan, (2005) Advertising is paid communication through a non-personal medium in which the sponsor is identified and the message is controlled. ... For the magazine called automobile, see Automobile Magazine. ... The driver of this DAF tractor with an auto-transport semi-trailer truck prepares to offload Å koda Octavia cars in Cardiff, Wales A truck or lorry is a motor vehicle for transporting goods. ... Mika Kallios KTM125 racing motorcycle A motorcycle, also called a motorbike or just a bike, is a single-track, two-wheeled vehicle powered by an engine. ... Napa County is in north-central California Napa Valley is most famous for its wine. ... A glass of red wine This article is about the alcoholic beverage. ... A gourmet is a person with a discriminating palate and who is knowledgeable in fine food and drink. ... For other cities named Nashville, see Nashville (disambiguation). ... This article includes a list of works cited but its sources remain unclear because it lacks in-text citations. ... City flag City coat of arms Motto: Fluctuat nec mergitur (Latin: Tossed by the waves, she does not sink) Paris Eiffel tower as seen from the esplanade du Trocadéro. ... Romantic love is a form of love that is often regarded as different from mere needs driven by sexual desire, or lust. ... The Chinese poem Quatrain on Heavenly Mountain by Emperor Gaozong (Song Dynasty) // Poetry (from the Greek , poiesis, making or creating) is a form of art in which language is used for its aesthetic qualities in addition to, or in lieu of, its ostensible meaning. ... This article or section is not written in the formal tone expected of an encyclopedia article. ... The Pentagon is the headquarters of the United States Department of Defense, located at 48 N. Rotary Road, Arlington, Virginia 22211 (Map). ... 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Times Square For other uses, see Times Square (disambiguation) Times Square is the name given to a principal intersection, at the junction of Broadway and Seventh Avenue, and stretching from West 42nd to West 47th Streets in the New York City borough of Manhattan. ... A BlueGene supercomputer cabinet. ... Tug of war is an easily organized, impromptu game that requires little equipment. ... In role-playing, participants adopt characters, or parts, that have personalities, motivations, and backgrounds different from their own. ... Tokyo , literally Eastern capital)   is the seat of the Japanese government and the Imperial Palace, the home of the Japanese Imperial Family, and the de facto[1] capital of Japan. ... The main cast of the anime Cowboy Bebop (1998) (L to R: Spike Spiegel, Jet Black, Ed Tivrusky, Faye Valentine, and Ein the dog) For the oleo-resin, see Animé (oleo-resin). ... World map showing the location of Asia. ... 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References

  1. ^ Hu, Jim. "GeoCitizens fume over watermark", CNet, 1998-06-28.
  2. ^ "Yahoo! buys GeoCities", CNN.com, 1999-01-28.
  3. ^ Nuttall, Chris. "Yahoo! moves in on GeoCities", BBC News, 1999-01-29.
  4. ^ Schiffman, Betsy. "A Community That Stays Together, Pays Together", Forbes, 2001-08-28.

1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar, and was designated the International Year of the Ocean. ... June 28 is the 179th day of the year (180th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 186 days remaining. ... 1999 (MCMXCIX) was a common year starting on Friday, and was designated the International Year of Older Persons by the United Nations. ... January 28 is the 28th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1999 (MCMXCIX) was a common year starting on Friday, and was designated the International Year of Older Persons by the United Nations. ... January 29 is the 29th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2001 (MMI) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar. ... August 28 is the 240th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (241st in leap years), with 125 days remaining. ...

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
Wired News: GeoCities Black Hole No Biggie (1129 words)
On 15 June, GeoCities was added to that list -- which usually blocks outgoing email at the afflicted site -- for what Vixie and his team allege is the company's failure to prevent abuse of their systems by spammers.
GeoCities member Doug Berger said that he's not having any trouble at all with his email, since he now uses his regular ISP to send out mail -- as requested some months ago by GeoCities.
"[GeoCities] said at the time they were having problems with spamers using their mail server, and they planned to shut down the outgoing mail part of the server," Berger said.
Wired News: Feds Slam GeoCities on Privacy (1128 words)
In the consent agreement announced Thursday, GeoCities (GCTY), which offers free Web pages to consumers, agreed to a range of concessions for what the commission said were violations of its customers' privacy and misuse of personal information.
"GeoCities has misled its customers, both children and adults, by not telling the truth about how it was using their personal information," said Jodie Bernstein, director of the FTC's Bureau of Consumer Protection in a statement.
A GeoCities spokesman declined an interview with Wired News, stating that the company was in a "quiet period," in the wake of its IPO.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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