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Encyclopedia > Gentile

The word gentile is an anglicised version of the Latin word gentilis, meaning of or belonging to a clan or tribe. In the King James Version of the Bible it is used to refer to non-Israelite tribes or nations, as an English translation of the Hebrew words goy/גוי and nochri/נכרי. It is also used to translate New Testament Greek word ethnoi. Today, the primary meaning of gentile is non-Jew. This page is about the version of the Bible; for the Harvey Danger album, see King James Version (album). ... Goy (Hebrew: גוי, plural goyim גוים) is a transliterated Hebrew word which translates as nation or people. // A page from Elia Levitas Yiddish-Hebrew-Latin-German dictionary (16th century) contains a list of nations, including word גוי, translated to Latin as Ethnicus In the Hebrew Bible, goy and its variants appear over... The word Gentile has several meanings. ... This article is about the Christian scriptures. ... An ethnic group is a group of people who identify with one another, or are so identified by others, on the basis of a boundary that distinguishes them from other groups. ...

Contents

Latin etymology

The Latin term relates to gens (from which also derive gene, genus and genesis). The original meaning of "clan" or "family" was extended in post-Augustan Latin to acquire the wider meaning of belonging to a distinct nation or ethnicity. Later still the word came to mean "foreign," i.e. non-Roman. After the Christianization of the empire it could also be used of pagan or barbarian cultures. It also means Israelites in a Gentile state of mind; 1 cor:12:1-2 and eph:2:10-13.King James Bible 1611. GENS is an open source emulator for the Sega Genesis (Sega Megadrive). ... For a non-technical introduction to the topic, see Introduction to Genetics. ... For other uses, see Genus (disambiguation). ... Genesis (‎, Greek: Γένεσις, meaning birth, creation, cause, beginning, source or origin) is the first book of the Torah, the Tanakh, and the Old Testament. ...


In the Bible

In Saint Jerome's Latin version of the Bible, the Vulgate, gentilis was used in this wider sense, along with gentes, to translate Greek and Hebrew words with similar meanings that referred to the non-Israelite peoples. Saint-Jérôme, Quebec is a town in Quebec, near Mirabel, about 40 kilometers (25 miles) northwest of Montreal along Autoroute des Laurentides. ... The Vulgate Bible is an early 5th century version in Latin, partly revised and partly translated by Jerome on the orders of Pope Damasus I in 382. ...


The most important of such Hebrew words was "goyim" (singular, goy), a term with the broad meaning of "peoples" or "nations" which was sometimes used to refer to Israelites, but most commonly as a generic label for other peoples. Strongs Concordance defines goy as "nation, people usually of non-Hebrew people, or of descendants of Abraham of Israel, or of a swarm of locusts or other animals (fig.) Goyim = "nations". Strongs #1471[1] Goy (Hebrew: גוי, plural goyim גוים) is a transliterated Hebrew word which translates as nation or people. // A page from Elia Levitas Yiddish-Hebrew-Latin-German dictionary (16th century) contains a list of nations, including word גוי, translated to Latin as Ethnicus In the Hebrew Bible, goy and its variants appear over... Strongs Concordance is a concordance of the King James Bible (KJV) that was constructed under the direction of Dr. James Strong (1822-1894). ...


In the KJV Gentile is only one of several words used to translate goy or goyim. It is translated as "nation" 374 times, "heathen" 143 times, "Gentiles" 30 times, and "people" 11 times. Some of these verses, such as Genesis 12:2 and Genesis 25:23 refer to Israelites or descendants of Abraham. Other verses, such as Isaiah 2:4 and Deuteronomy 11:23 are generic references to any nation. Typically the KJV restricts the use of Gentile as a translation when the text is specifically referring to non-Israelites. For example, the only use of the word in Genesis is in chapter 10, verse 5, referring to the peopling of the world by descendents of Japheth, "By these were the isles of the Gentiles divided in their lands; every one after his tongue, after their families, in their nations."[2] Genesis (‎, Greek: Γένεσις, meaning birth, creation, cause, beginning, source or origin) is the first book of the Torah, the Tanakh, and the Old Testament. ... Genesis (‎, Greek: Γένεσις, meaning birth, creation, cause, beginning, source or origin) is the first book of the Torah, the Tanakh, and the Old Testament. ... Isaiah the Prophet in Hebrew Scriptures was depicted on the Sistine Chapel ceiling by Michelangelo. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Japheth (Hebrew. ...


In the New Testament, the word translates Greek terms for peoples in general, and is used specifically to indicate non-Jewish peoples, as in Jesus's command to the apostles in Matthew chapter 10, This article is about the Christian scriptures. ... For other uses, see Jew (disambiguation). ...

These twelve Jesus sent forth, and commanded them, saying, Go not into the way of the Gentiles, and into any city of the Samaritans enter ye not: But go rather to the lost sheep of the house of Israel.[3]

Here Gentiles becomes a synonym for pagan cultures of the period.


Altogether, the word is used 123 times in the King James Version of the Bible[4] and 168 times in the New Revised Standard Version[5].


Modern usage

As in the King James Bible, from the 17th century onwards gentile was most commonly used to refer to non-Jews. This was in the context of European Christian societies with a Jewish minority. For this reason Gentile commonly meant persons brought up in the Christian faith, as opposed to the adherents of Judaism, and was not typically used to refer to non-Jews in non-Western cultures. This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ...


Latter-day Saints Church usage

Main article Mormonism and Judaism.

In the terminology of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints ("LDS Church"; see also Mormon) the word Gentile takes on different meanings in different contexts, which may confuse some and alienate others. Members of the LDS church regard themselves as regathered Israelites, and so sometimes use the word "Gentile" to refer to non-members. In such usage Jews may be colloquially referred to as "Gentiles" because they are not members of the LDS Church. However, the traditional meaning is also to be found in the introduction to the Book of Mormon, in the statement that it is written to both "Jew" (literal descendants of the House of Israel) and "Gentile" (those not descended from the House of Israel or those of the tribe of Ephraim scattered among the "Gentiles" throughout the earth). This article on Mormonism and Judaism describes the views of Latter-day Saints, commonly known as Mormons, with respect to Jews and Judaism, and includes comparisons of the Mormon and Jewish faiths. ... The Salt Lake Temple of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints is the largest attraction in the citys Temple Square. ... According to Latter Day Saint belief, Mormon is the name of the compiler of the book of scripture known as the Book of Mormon. ... The Book of Mormon[1] is one of the sacred texts of the Latter Day Saint movement, regarded by Latter Day Saints as divinely revealed, and named after the prophet–historian Mormon who, according to the text, compiled most of the book. ... Tribe of Ephraim (Hebrew: אֶפְרַיִם / אֶפְרָיִם , Standard Efráyim Tiberian / ; double fruitfulness) took precedence over that of Manasseh by virtue of Jacobs blessing (Gen. ...


In order to avoid confrontation and pejorative connotations, Latter-day Saints in the 21st century avoid using the term "Gentile" in everyday matters, preferring "non-member". "Gentile" is usually reserved for discussions of scriptural passages.


Footnotes and References

  1. ^ Searched [1] for goy.
  2. ^ Genesis 10:5
  3. ^ Matthew chapter 10
  4. ^ Did a search for "Gentile" in KJV. Used BibleGateway.com. It returned 123 results of the word "Gentile". Accessed 11-Feb-2007.
  5. ^ Kohlenberger, John. The NRSV Concordance Unabridged. Grand Rapids, MI:Zondervan, 1991

See also

Goy (Hebrew: גוי, plural goyim גוים) is a transliterated Hebrew word which translates as nation or people. // A page from Elia Levitas Yiddish-Hebrew-Latin-German dictionary (16th century) contains a list of nations, including word גוי, translated to Latin as Ethnicus In the Hebrew Bible, goy and its variants appear over... “The Twelve Tribes” redirects here. ... Bnei Noah or Children of Noah is an ancient concept in Jewish Tradition. ...

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
Gentile - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (419 words)
In the most common modern use it refers to the former being derived from the Latin term gens (meaning "clan" or a "group of families") and it is often employed in the plural.
In late Latin gentilis meant "pagan", and the term gentile has equally come to be used as a synonym for "heathen" or "pagan" (Nochri/נכרי).
In English translations of the Bible the word gentiles is most commonly used as a translation of the Hebrew word goyim (plural of Goy/גוי); in the King James Version the first and only such use in the Pentateuch is in the book of Genesis 10:5.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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