FACTOID # 26: Delaware is the latchkey kid capital of America, with 71.8% of households having both parents in the labor force.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
RELATED ARTICLES
People who viewed "Genoa" also viewed:
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Genoa
Comune di Genoa

Coat of arms

Comune di Genoa
Coordinates: 44°24′N 08°55′E / 44.4, 8.917
Country Flag of Italy Italy
Region Liguria
Province Genoa (GE)
Government
 - Mayor Marta Vincenzi
Area
 - Total 243 km² (93.8 sq mi)
Elevation 20 m (66 ft)
Population (2006)
 - Total 620,316
 - Density 2,553/km² (6,612.2/sq mi)
Time zone CET (UTC+1)
Postal codes 16100
Area code(s) 010
Patron saints St. John the Baptist
Website: www.comune.genova.it

Genoa (Genova ['dʒɛːnova] in ItalianZena ['zeːna] in Genoese) is a city and a seaport in northern Italy, the capital of the Province of Genoa and of the region of Liguria. The city has a population of ca. 620,000 and the urban area has a population of ca. 890,000. Genua was a city of the ancient Ligurians. Its name is probably Ligurian, meaning "knee" (from Ancient Greek gony "knee"), i.e. "angle", from its geographical position, thus akin to the name of Geneva. Or it could derive from the Celtic root genu-, genawa (pl. genowe), meaning "mouth", i.e., estuary. Part of the old city of Genoa was inscribed on the World Heritage List (UNESCO) in 2006 (see below). Genoa is primarily used to refer to Genoa (Genova in Italian Language), a city and port in Liguria, Italy. ... Image File history File links Genova-Stemma. ... Image File history File links Italy_Regions_(including_Pelagie_Islands). ... Image File history File links Red_pog2. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Italy. ... The Regions of Italy were granted a degree of regional autonomy in the 1948 constitution, which states that the constitutions role is: to recognize, protect and promote local autonomy, to ensure that services at the State level are as decentralized as possible, and to adapt the principles and laws... Liguria is a coastal region of north-western Italy, the third smallest of the Italian regions. ... In Italy, a province (in Italian: provincia) is an administrative division of intermediate level between municipality (comune) and region (regione). ... Genoa (It. ... A mayor (from the Latin māior, meaning larger, greater) is the modern title of the highest ranking municipal officer. ... Marta Vincenzi Marta Vincenzi (born on 27 May 1947 in Genova) is a Italian politician and Member of the European Parliament for North-West with the Democratici di Sinistra, part of the Socialist Group and sits on the European Parliaments Committee on Transport and Tourism. ... This article is about the physical quantity. ... Square kilometre (US spelling: Square kilometer), symbol km², is an SI unit of surface area. ... A square mile is an English unit of area equal to that of a square with sides each 1 statute mile (≈1,609 m) in length. ... Elevation histogram of the surface of the Earth – approximately 71% of the Earths surface is covered with water. ... This article is about the unit of length. ... A foot (plural: feet or foot;[1] symbol or abbreviation: ft or, sometimes, ′ – a prime) is a unit of length, in a number of different systems, including English units, Imperial units, and United States customary units. ... Population density per square kilometre by country, 2006 Population density map of the world in 1994. ... Timezone and TimeZone redirect here. ... Time zones of Europe: Light colours indicate countries that do not observe summer time Central European Time (CET) is one of the names of the time zone that is 1 hour ahead of Coordinated Universal Time. ... Central European Time West Africa Time British Summer Time* Irish Summer Time* Western European Summer Time* Category: ... John the Baptist (also called John the Baptizer or John the Dipper) is regarded as a prophet by at least three religions: Christianity, Islam, and Mandaeanism. ... Genoese (Zeneize) is the variety of the ligurian language spoken in Genoa, the capital city of Liguria (Italy) . The Ligurian is listed by Ethnologue as a language in its own right (not to be confused with the ancient Ligurian language). ... For other uses, see City (disambiguation). ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Port. ... Genoa (It. ... Look up Region in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Liguria is a coastal region of north-western Italy, the third smallest of the Italian regions. ... The Ligures (Ligurians) were an ancient people who gave their name to Liguria, which once stretched from Northern Italy into southern Gaul. ... The Ligurian language was spoken in pre-Roman times and into the Roman era by an ancient people of north-western Italy and south-eastern France known as the Ligures. ... Note: This article contains special characters. ... Geneva (pronunciation //; French: Genève //, German:   //, Italian: Ginevra //, Romansh: Genevra) is the second most populous city in Switzerland (after Zürich), and is the most populous city of Romandy (the French-speaking part of Switzerland). ...

Contents

Flag

Flag of Genoa.
Flag of Genoa.

The flag of Genoa is the St. George's flag, a red cross on a lime white field, almost identical to the Flag of England. It is probable that the flag of Genoa was adopted by England and the City of London in 1190 so their ships entering the Mediterranean would benefit from the protection of the powerful Genoese fleet. However, historians agree that the actual origins of the flag are unclear (Encyclopedia Britannica). Image File history File links Flag_of_Genoa. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Genoa. ... For alternate uses, see Saint George (disambiguation) Saint George on horseback rides alongside a wounded dragon being led by a princess, late 19th century engraving. ... The Flag of England (5:3) The Flag of England is the St Georges Cross. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... Motto: Domine dirige nos Latin: Lord, guide us Shown within Greater London Sovereign state Constituent country Region Greater London Status City and Ceremonial County Admin HQ Guildhall Government  - Leadership see text  - Mayor John Stuttard  - MP Mark Field  - London Assembly John Biggs Area  - City  1. ... Events March 16 - Massacre and mass-suicide of the Jews of York, England prompted by Crusaders and Richard Malebys kill 150-500 Jews in Cliffords Tower June 10 - Third Crusade: Frederick I Barbarossa drowned in the Saleph River while leading an army to Jerusalem. ...


History

Ancient era and early Middle Ages

Genoa's history goes back to ancient times. The first historically known inhabitants of the area are the Ligures, an Italic tribe. The attribution of its foundation to Celts in 2500–2000 BC has been recently recognized as wrong. [citation needed] The Ligures (Ligurians) were an ancient people who gave their name to Liguria, which once stretched from Northern Italy into southern Gaul. ... Celts, normally pronounced // (see article on pronunciation), is widely used to refer to the members of any of the peoples in Europe using the Celtic languages or descended from those who did. ...


A city cemetery, dating from the 6th and 5th centuries BC, testifies to the occupation of the site by the Greeks, but the fine harbor probably was in use much earlier, perhaps by the Etruscans. It is also probable that the Phoenicians had bases in Genoa, or in the nearby area, since an inscription with an alphabet similar to that used in Tyre has been found [citation needed]. Extent of Etruscan civilization and the twelve Etruscan League cities. ... Phoenicia was an ancient civilization in the north of ancient Canaan, with its heartland along the coastal plain of what is now Lebanon and Syria. ... Tyre (Arabic , Phoenician , Hebrew Tzor, Tiberian Hebrew , Akkadian , Greek Týros) is a city in the South Governorate of Lebanon. ...


In the Roman era, Genoa was overshadowed by the powerful Marseille and Vada Sabatia, near modern Savona. Different from other Ligures and Celt settlements of the area, it was allied to Rome through a foedus aequum ("Equal pact") in the course of the Second Punic War. It was therefore destroyed by the Carthaginians in 209 BC. The town was rebuilt and, after the end of the Carthaginian Wars, received municipal rights. The original castrum thenceforth expanded towards the current areas of Santa Maria di Castello and the San Lorenzo promontory. Genoese trades included skins, wood, and honey. Goods were shipped in the mainland up to important cities like Tortona and Piacenza. Ancient Rome was a civilization that grew from a small agricultural community founded on the Italian Peninsula circa the 9th century BC to a massive empire straddling the Mediterranean Sea. ... City flag Coat of arms Motto: By her great deeds, the city of Massilia shines Location Time Zone CET (GMT +1) Coordinates Administration Country Region Provence-Alpes-Côte dAzur Department Bouches-du-Rhône (13) Subdivisions 16 arrondissements (in 8 secteurs) Intercommunality Urban Community of Marseille Provence M... Savona (Sàn-na in the local dialect of Ligurian) is a seaport and comune in the northern Italian region of Liguria, capital of the Province of Savona, in the Riviera di Ponente on the Mediterranean Sea, at sea-level. ... Combatants Roman Republic Carthage Commanders Publius Cornelius Scipio†, Tiberius Sempronius Longus Publius Cornelius Scipio Africanus, Gaius Flaminius†, Fabius Maximus, Claudius Marcellus†, Lucius Aemilius Paullus†, Gaius Terentius Varro, Marcus Livius Salinator, Gaius Claudius Nero, Gnaeus Cornelius Scipio Calvus†, Masinissa, Minucius†, Servilius Geminus† Hannibal Barca, Hasdrubal Barca†, Mago Barca†, Hasdrubal Gisco†, Syphax... This article is about the ancient city-state of Carthage in North Africa. ... Centuries: 4th century BC - 3rd century BC - 2nd century BC Decades: 250s BC 240s BC 230s BC 220s BC 210s BC - 200s BC - 190s BC 180s BC 170s BC 160s BC 150s BC Years: 214 BC 213 BC 212 BC 211 BC 210 BC - 209 BC - 208 BC 207 BC... For the medieval scholar Tortona, see Marziano da Tortona Tortona is a comune of Piedmont, in the Province of Alessandria, Italy. ... Piacenza (Placentia in Latin and old-fashioned English, Piasëinsa in the local dialect of Emiliano-Romagnolo) is a city in the Emilia-Romagna region of northern Italy. ...


After the fall of the Western Roman Empire, Genoa was occupied by the Ostrogoths. After the Gothic War, the Byzantines made it the seat of their vicar. The Lombards submitted it in 643. In 773 the Lombard Kingdom was annexed by the Frank empire; the first Carolingian count of Genoa was Ademarus, who was given the title praefectus civitatis Genuensis. Ademarus died in Corsica while fighting against the Saracens. In this period the Roman walls, destroyed by the Lombards, were rebuilt and extended. Motto Senatus Populusque Romanus The Western Roman Empire in 395. ... This article deals with the continental Ostrogoths. ... The Lombards (Latin Langobardi, whence comes the alternative name Longobards found in older English texts), were a Germanic people originally from Northern Europe that entered the late Roman Empire. ... This article is about the Frankish people and society. ...


For the following several centuries, Genoa was little more than a small, obscure fishing center, slowly building its merchant fleet which was to become the leading commercial carrier of the Mediterranean Sea. The town was sacked and burned in 934 by Arab pirates but it was quickly rebuilt.


In the 10th century the city, now part of the Marca Januensis ("Genoese Mark") was under the Obertenghi family, whose first member was Obertus I. Genoa was one of the first cities in Italy to have some citizenship rights granted by local feudataries.


Middle Ages and Renaissance

Medieval gates of Genoa is a rare survival of the city's golden age and its best known landmark.
Medieval gates of Genoa is a rare survival of the city's golden age and its best known landmark.
Christopher Columbus monument in Piazza Acquaverde.
Christopher Columbus monument in Piazza Acquaverde.
The Ancient Port of Genoa.
The Ancient Port of Genoa.
The big "bigo" in the ancient port.
The big "bigo" in the ancient port.
Main article: Republic of Genoa

Before 1100, Genoa emerged as an independent city-state, one of a number of Italian city-states during this period. Nominally, the Holy Roman Emperor was overlord and the Bishop of Genoa was president of the city; however, actual power was wielded by a number of "consuls" annually elected by popular assembly. Genoa was one of the so-called "Maritime Republics" (Repubbliche Marinare), along with Venice, Pisa, and Amalfi) and trade, shipbuilding and banking helped support one of the largest and most powerful navies in the Mediterranean. The Adorno, Campofregoso, and other smaller merchant families all fought for power in this Republic, as the power of the consuls allowed each family faction to gain wealth and power in the city. The Republic of Genoa extended over modern Liguria and Piedmont, Sardinia, Corsica and had practically complete control of the Tyrrhenian Sea. Through Genoese participation on the Crusades, colonies were established in the Middle East, in the Aegean, in Sicily and Northern Africa. Genoese Crusaders brought home a green glass goblet from the Levant, which Genoese long regarded as the Holy Grail. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (768x1024, 309 KB) Licensing File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Genoa Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner used to... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (768x1024, 309 KB) Licensing File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Genoa Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner used to... Colombus monument in Genoa I took this picture myself on September, 2003 with a Minolta XD-5 and a 35-70 f/3. ... Colombus monument in Genoa I took this picture myself on September, 2003 with a Minolta XD-5 and a 35-70 f/3. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (3072x2304, 1481 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Genoa Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner used to create... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (3072x2304, 1481 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Genoa Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner used to create... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (822x617, 258 KB) Versione alternativa File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Genoa Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner used... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (822x617, 258 KB) Versione alternativa File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Genoa Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner used... The Republic of Genoa, in full the Most Serene Republic of Genoa (known as the Ligurian Republic from 1798 to 1805) was an independent state in Liguria on the northwestern Italian coast from ca. ... August 5 - Henry I becomes King of England. ... A city-state is a region controlled exclusively by a city. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... This article is about the medieval empire. ... The Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Genova is a metropolitan see of the Roman Catholic Church in Italy. ... The Repubbliche Marinare ( ) is the collectie name of a number of important city-states which flourished in Italy and Dalmatia in the Middle Ages. ... For other uses, see Venice (disambiguation). ... Leaning Tower of Pisa. ... Amalfi is a town and commune in the province of Salerno, in the region of Campania, Italy, on the Gulf of Salerno, 24 miles southeast of Naples. ... The Mediterranean Sea is an intercontinental sea positioned between Europe to the north, Africa to the south and Asia to the east, covering an approximate area of 2. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Look up republic in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... The Republic of Genoa, in full the Most Serene Republic of Genoa (known as the Ligurian Republic from 1798 to 1805) was an independent state in Liguria on the northwestern Italian coast from ca. ... Liguria is a coastal region of north-western Italy, the third smallest of the Italian regions. ... Piedmont is a region of northwestern Italy. ... Tyrrhenian Sea. ... This article is about the medieval crusades. ... A map showing countries commonly considered to be part of the Middle East The Middle East is a region comprising the lands around the southern and eastern parts of the Mediterranean Sea, a territory that extends from the eastern Mediterranean Sea to the Persian Gulf. ... Look up Aegean Sea in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Sicily ( in Italian and Sicilian) is an autonomous region of Italy and the largest island in the Mediterranean Sea, with an area of 25,708 km² (9,926 sq. ... A world map showing the continent of Africa Africa is the worlds second-largest and second most-populous continent, after Asia. ... The Levant The Levant (IPA: ) is an imprecise geographical term historically referring to a large area in the Middle East south of the Taurus Mountains, bounded by the Mediterranean Sea on the west, and by the northern Arabian Desert and Upper Mesopotamia to the east. ... For other uses, see Holy Grail (disambiguation). ...


The collapse of the Crusader States was offset by Genoa’s alliance with the Byzantine Empire, which opened opportunities of expansion into the Black Sea and Crimea. Internal feuds between the powerful families, the Grimaldi and Fieschi, the Doria, Spinola, and others caused much disruption, but in general the republic was run much as a business affair. Genoa's political zenith came with its victory over the Duchy of Pisa at the naval Battle of Meloria (1284), and its persistent rival, Venice, in 1298. The Crusader states, c. ... Byzantine redirects here. ... For other uses, see Black Sea (disambiguation). ... Motto Процветание в единстве(Russian) Protsvetanie v edinstve(transliteration) Prosperity in unity Anthem Нивы и горы твои волшебны, Родина(Russian) Nivy i gory tvoi volshebny, Rodina(transliteration) Your fields and mounts are wonderful, Motherland Location of Crimea (red) with respect to Ukraine (light blue). ... Grimaldi usually refers to House of Grimaldi, the rulers of Monaco. ... Count Fieschi Giovanni Luigi Fieschi (or Fiesco) (c. ... Doria, originally de Auria (from de filiis Auriae), meaning the sons of Auria, and then de Oria or dOria, is the name of an old Genoese family whose history is indistiguishable from that of the Republic of Genoa from the 12th century to the 16th century. ... Leaning Tower of Pisa. ... Combatants Genoa Pisa Commanders Oberto Doria Benedetto Zaccaria Alberto Morosini Ugolino della Gherardesca Andreotto Saraceno Strength 78 galleys and 8 panfili Unknown Casualties The Battle of Meloria was fought on Sunday August 6, 1284 near the Meloria islet, in the Tyrrhenian Sea. ...


However, this prosperity did not last. The Black Death was imported into Europe in 1349 from the Genoese trading post at Caffa (Theodosia) in Crimea, on the Black Sea. Following the economic and population collapse, Genoa adopted the Venetian model of government, and was presided over by a doge (see Doge of Genoa). The wars with Venice continued, and the War of Chioggia (13781381), ended with a victory for Venice. After a period of French domination from 1394–1409, Genoa came under rule by the Visconti of Milan. Genoa lost Sardinia to Aragon, Corsica to internal revolt and its Middle Eastern colonies to the Ottoman Empire and the Arabs. This article concerns the mid fourteenth century pandemic. ... Feodosiya (Russian: Феодосия; Ukrainian: Феодосія; Crimean Tatar/Turkish: Kefe) is a port and resort city in southern Ukraine, located on the Black Sea coast of Crimea at coordinates 45. ... Theodosia (Russian: Феодосия; Ukrainian: Феодосія; Greek: Θεοδωσία; Crimean Tatar/Turkish: Kefe) is a port and resort city in southern Ukraine, located on the Black Sea coast of Crimea at coordinates 45. ... The word doge (pronounced /dôdj/ in English, /do-dje/ in Italian; plural dogi or doges) is a dialectical Italian word (in standard Italian it became duce) that comes from Latin dux, meaning leader, especially military, and giving rise to the noble or princely title duke in English. ... Flag of Genoa. ... The War of Chioggia was a conflict between Genoa and Venice which lasted from 1378 to 1381, from which Venice emerged triumphant. ... Events March - John Wyclif tried to gain public favour by laying his theses before parliament, and then made them public in a tract. ... Year 1381 was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar. ... Visconti was a noble family that ruled Milan during the Middle Ages and Early Renaissance period. ... Type Anti-tank Nationality Joint France/Germany Era Cold War, modern Launch platform Individual, Vehicle Target Vehicle, Fortification History Builder MBDA, Bharat Dynamics (under license) Date of design 70s Production period since 1972 Service duration since 1972 Operators 41 countries Variants MILAN 1, MILAN 2, MILAN 2T, MILAN 3, MILAN... Capital Zaragoza Official language(s) Spanish Area  â€“ Total  â€“ % of Spain Ranked 4th  47,719 km²  9. ... Ottoman redirects here. ...


Christopher Columbus, a native of Genoa, donated one-tenth of his income from the discovery of the Americas for Spain to the Bank of San Giorgio in Genoa for the relief of taxation on foods. The Spanish connection was reinforced by Andrea Doria, who established a new constitution in 1528, making Genoa a satellite of the Spanish Empire. Under the ensuing economic recovery, many Genoese families amassed tremendous fortunes. At the time of Genoa’s peak in the 16th century, the city attracted many artists, including Rubens, Caravaggio and Van Dyck. The famed architect Galeazzo Alessi (1512–1572) designed many of the city’s splendid palazzi. A number of Genoese Baroque and Rococo artists settled elsewhere and a number of local artists became prominent. Christopher Columbus (1451 – May 20, 1506) was a navigator and colonialist who is one of the first Europeans to discover the Americas, after the Vikings. ... World map showing the Americas CIA political map of the Americas The Americas are the lands of the Western hemisphere or New World, consisting of the continents of North America[1] and South America with their associated islands and regions. ... The Palace of Saint George in Genoa. ... For other uses, see Andrea Doria (disambiguation). ... Peter Paul Rubens (June 28, 1577 – May 30, 1640) was a prolific seventeenth-century Flemish and European painter, and a proponent of an exuberant Baroque style that emphasized movement, color, and sensuality. ... For other uses, see Caravaggio (disambiguation). ... Self Portrait With a Sunflower Sir Anthony (Antoon) van Dyck (*March 22, 1599 - December 9, 1641) was a Flemish painter — mainly of portraits — who became the leading court painter in England. ... Galeazzo Alessi (1512- December 30, 1572), Italian architect, was born at Perugia, and was probably a pupil of Caporali. ... The quintessential medieval European palace: Palais de la Cité, in Paris, the royal palace of France. ... Artists from Genoa were influential during the 17th century. ...


Genoa suffered from French bombardment in 1684, and was occupied by Austria in 1746 during the War of the Austrian Succession. In 1768, Genoa was forced to also cede Corsica to France. Combatants Prussia France Spain Bavaria Naples and Sicily Sweden (1741 — 1743) Austria Great Britain Hanover Dutch Republic Saxony Kingdom of Sardinia Russia Commanders Frederick II Leopold I Leopold II Maurice de Saxe François-Marie de Broglie Charles VII Charles Emil Lewenhaupt Ludwig Khevenhüller Charles Alexander George II Charles...


Modern history

With the shift in world economy and trade routes to the New World and away from the Mediterranean, Genoa's political and economic power went into steady decline. [citation needed]


In 1797, under pressure from Napoleon, Genoa became a French protectorate called the Ligurian Republic, which was annexed by France in 1805. This affair is commemorated in the famous first sentence of Tolstoy's War and Peace: 1797 (MDCCXCVII) was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 11-day-slower Julian calendar). ... For other uses, see Napoleon (disambiguation). ... Ligurian Republic and Northen Italy, 1801 The Ligurian Republic was a short-lived French satellite republic formed by Napoleon Bonaparte in 1796. ... 1805 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... Coat of arms of the Tolstoy family Tolstoy, or Tolstoi (Russian: ) is a prominent family of Russian nobility, descending from one Andrey Kharitonovich Tolstoy (i. ... For other uses, see War and Peace (disambiguation). ...

"Well, Prince, so Genoa and Lucca are now just family estates of the Buonapartes.(...) And what do you think of this latest comedy, the coronation at Milan, the comedy of the people of Genoa and Lucca laying their petitions [to be annexed to France] before Monsieur Buonaparte, and Monsieur Buonaparte sitting on a throne and granting the petitions of the nations?" (spoken by a throughly anti-Boanapartist Russian aristocrat, soon after the news reached St. Petersburg). Saint Petersburg (Russian: Санкт-Петербу́рг, English transliteration: Sankt-Peterburg), colloquially known as Питер (transliterated Piter), formerly known as Leningrad (Ленингра́д, 1924–1991) and...

Although the Genoese revolted against France in 1814 and liberated the city on their own, delegates at the Congress of Vienna sanctioned its incorporation into Piedmont (Kingdom of Sardinia), thus ending the three century old struggle by the House of Savoy to acquire the city. The king of Piedmont even sent the Bersaglieri to sack the city, defining the Genoese as "scum". The city soon gained a reputation as a hotbed of anti-Savoy republican agitation, although the union with Savoy was economically very beneficial. With the growth of the Risorgimento movement, the Genoese turned their struggles from Giuseppe Mazzini's vision of a local republic into a struggle for a unified Italy under a liberalized Savoy monarchy. In 1860, Giuseppe Garibaldi set out from Genoa with over a thousand volunteers to begin the campaign. This is called the departure of the thousands and a monument is set on the rock where the group departed from. Year 1814 (MDCCCXIV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar). ... The Congress of Vienna was a conference between ambassadors from the major powers in Europe that was chaired by the Austrian statesman Klemens Wenzel von Metternich and held in Vienna, Austria, from late September, 1814, to June 9, 1815. ... Piedmont is a region of northwestern Italy. ... Kingdom of Sardinia, in 1839: Mainland Piedmont with Savoy, Nice, and Sardinia in the inset. ... The House of Savoy or in Italian, La Casa di Savoia, or simply Casa Savoia, (or Savoie, French) is a dynasty of nobles who traditionally had their domain in Savoy, a region that includes present-day Piemonte, other parts of Northern Italy, and a smaller region in France. ... Italian unification, also known as Risorgimento (resurrection), was a historical process by which the Kingdom of Sardinia (ruled by the Savoy dynasty with Turin as its capital) gradually conquered the Italian peninsula, including the Kingdom of the Two Sicilies, the Duchy of Modena, the Grand Duchy of Tuscany, the Duchy... Giuseppe Mazzini. ... 1860 is the leap year starting on Sunday. ... Garibaldi in 1866. ...


During World War II the British fleet bombarded Genoa and one bomb fell into the cathedral of San Lorenzo without exploding. It is now available to public viewing on the cathedral premises. Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000...


The 27th G8 summit in the city, in July 2001, was overshadowed by violent protests, with one protester, Carlo Giuliani, killed amid accusations of police brutality. Trials of accused officials are ongoing as of 2007. Official group portrait. ... Year 2001 (MMI) was a common year starting on Monday (link displays the 2001 Gregorian calendar). ... Carlo Giuliani (March 14, 1978 -- July 20, 2001) was an Italian demonstrator who was shot dead by police during the demonstrations against the Group of Eight summit that was held in Genoa from July 19 to July 21, 2001. ... 2007 is a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


In 2004, the European Union designated Genoa as the European Capital of Culture, along with the French city of Lille. Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The European Capital of Culture is a city designated by the European Union for a period of one year during which it is given a chance to showcase its cultural life and cultural development. ... For other uses, see Lille (disambiguation). ...


Main sights

For a more extensive list, see Buildings and structures in Genoa.
Genoa: Le Strade Nuove and the system of the Palazzi dei Rolli*
UNESCO World Heritage Site

State Party Flag of Italy Italy
Type Cultural
Criteria ii, iv
Reference 1211
Region Europe and North America
Inscription History
Inscription 2006  (30th Session)
* Name as inscribed on World Heritage List.
Region as classified by UNESCO.

The main features of central Genoa include Piazza de Ferrari, around which are sited the Opera and the Palace of the Doges. There is also a house where Christopher Columbus is said to have been born. A UNESCO World Heritage Site is a specific site (such as a forest, mountain, lake, desert, monument, building, complex, or city) that has been nominated and confirmed for inclusion on the list maintained by the international World Heritage Programme administered by the UNESCO World Heritage Committee, composed of 21 State... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1600 × 1200 pixel, file size: 611 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Genoa Metadata This file contains additional... As of 2006, there are a total of 830 World Heritage Sites located in 138 State Parties. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Italy. ... A UNESCO World Heritage Site is a specific site (such as a forest, mountain, lake, desert, monument, building, complex, or city) that has been nominated and confirmed for inclusion on the list maintained by the international World Heritage Programme administered by the UNESCO World Heritage Committee, composed of 21 State... This is a list of the UNESCO World Heritage Sites in Europe. ... A UNESCO World Heritage Site is a specific site (such as a forest, mountain, lake, desert, monument, building, complex, or city) that has been nominated and confirmed for inclusion on the list maintained by the international World Heritage Programme administered by the UNESCO World Heritage Committee, composed of 21 State... Christopher Columbus (1451 – May 20, 1506) was a navigator and colonialist who is one of the first Europeans to discover the Americas, after the Vikings. ...


Strada Nuova (now Via Garibaldi), in the old city, was inscribed on the World Heritage List in 2006. This district was designed in the mid-16th century to accommodate Mannerist palaces of the city's most eminent families, including Palazzo Rosso (now a museum), Palazzo Bianco, Palazzo Grimaldi and Palazzo Reale. The famous art college, Musei di Strada Nuova and the Palazzo del Principe are also located on this street. Elabana Falls is in Lamington National Park, part of the Central Eastern Rainforest Reserves World Heritage site in Queensland, Australia. ... The Palazzo Bianco with the neighboring garden of the Palazzo Doria Tursi. ...


Other landmarks of the city include St. Lawrence Cathedral (Cattedrale di San Lorenzo), the Old Harbor (Porto Antico), transformed into a mall by architect Renzo Piano, and the famous cemetery of Staglieno, renowned for its monuments and statues. The Museo d'Arte Orientale has one of the largest collections of Oriental art in Europe. Façade of St. ... The Padre Pio Pilgrimage Church in San Giovanni Rotondo. ...


Other than the old city sights, Genoa also has a large aquarium located in the above-mentioned old harbor. The Aquarium of Genoa is one of the largest in Europe. “Aquaria” redirects here. ... The Aquarium of Genoa The Aquarium of Genoa is the biggest aquarium in Italy and the second in Europe. ... For other uses, see Europe (disambiguation). ...


The port of Genoa also contains an ancient lighthouse, called La Lanterna (i.e., "the lantern"). It is the oldest working lighthouse in the world, one of the five tallest ones, and the tallest brick one and it is Genoa's landmark. Eddystone Lighthouse, one of the first wavewashed lighthouses For other uses, see Lighthouse (disambiguation). ...


One of the most beautiful and pictoresque Genoese neighbourhood is Boccadasse in the east of the city. Boccadasse (Boccadaze in genoese) is an old mariners neighbourhood of the Italian city of Genoa; it lies at the eastern side of the Corso Italia stroll, the main sea front stroll of the city of Genoa, at the feet of Via Aurora a typical ligurian narrow street (creuza). The origin...


Demographics

The population is homogeneously Italian. Southern and northern Italians alike flocked to the city during the late 1900s. An estimated 95.3% of the population is of Italian origin. But there has been a sharp increase of immigrants mostly from South America, Eastern Europe, and a very meagre number from Asia. [1] Immigration is the movement of people into one place from another. ... For other uses, see Asia (disambiguation). ...


Immigrants by country (2004):

Sports

Football
Genoa Cricket & Football Club gives to the City of Genoa the very first football club founded in Italy. The club was founded in 1893 by James Spensley, an English doctor, and has won 9 championships and a Italy Cup.
Another football club in the city is U.C. Sampdoria, founded in 1946 from the merger of two existing clubs, Andrea Doria (founded in 1895) and Sampierdarenese (founded in 1911). Sampdoria has won one Italian championship, 4 Italy Cups and 1 UEFA Cup Winners' Cup in 1989/90. It has been suggested that Genoa cricket and football club be merged into this article or section. ... A football team is the collective name given to a number of players who play together in a football game, be it association football (soccer), rugby, Australian football, American football, Gaelic football, or other version of football. ... Year 1893 (MDCCCXCIII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... A football team is the collective name given to a number of players who play together in a football game, be it association football (soccer), rugby, Australian football, American football, Gaelic football, or other version of football. ... Unione Calcio Sampdoria (commonly nicknamed Blucerchiati, blue-ringed) is a football club based in Genoa, Italy. ... Year 1946 (MCMXLVI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full 1946 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Famous people

Famous Genoese include Sinibaldo and Ottobuono Fieschi (Popes Innocent IV and Adrian V) and Pope Benedict XV, navigators Christopher Columbus and Andrea Doria, composers Niccolò Paganini and Michele Novaro, Italian patriots Giuseppe Mazzini and Nino Bixio, writer and translator Fernanda Pivano, poet Edoardo Sanguineti, Communist politician Palmiro Togliatti, architect Renzo Piano, Physics 2002 Nobel Prize winner Riccardo Giacconi, Literature 1975 Nobel Prize winner Eugenio Montale, the artist Vanessa Beecroft, comedians Gilberto Govi, Paolo Villaggio, Beppe Grillo, Luca Bizzarri and Maurizio Crozza; singer-songwriters Fabrizio de André and Ivano Fossati, actor Vittorio Gassman, and actress Moana Pozzi, Giorgio Parodi who conceived the motorcycle company Moto Guzzi with Carlo Guzzi and Giovanni Ravelli. Some reports say Giovanni Caboto (John Cabot) is also from Genoa, others say he was from Savona. Innocent IV, né Sinibaldo de Fieschi ( 1180/90 - December 7, 1254), pope from 1243 to 1254, belonged to one of the first families of Genoa, and, educated at Parma and Bologna, passed for one of the best canonists of his time. ... Adrian V (also known as Hadrian V), born Ottobuono de Fieschi ( 1205 - August 18, 1276), pope in 1276, was a Genoese who was created cardinal deacon of San Adriano by his uncle Innocent IV. He was sent to England in 1265 by Clement IV to mediate between King Henry III... Pope Benedict XV Benedict XV, né Giacomo della Chiesa (November 21, 1854-January 22, 1922), was Pope of the Roman Catholic Church from 1914 to 1922; he succeeded Pope Saint Pius X. He was born in Genoa, Italy, of a noble family. ... Christopher Columbus (1451 – May 20, 1506) was a navigator and colonialist who is one of the first Europeans to discover the Americas, after the Vikings. ... For other uses, see Andrea Doria (disambiguation). ... Niccolò (or Nicolò) Paganini (October 27, 1782 – May 27, 1840) was an Italian violinist, violist, guitarist and composer. ... Michele Novaro (1822 - 1885) was a Italian songwriter. ... Giuseppe Mazzini. ... Nino Bixio (2 October 1821-1873) was an Italian soldier born on the 2nd of October 1821. ... Fernanda Pivano (born July 18, 1917) is an Italian writer, journalist, translator and critic. ... Edoardo Sanguineti (born December 9, 1930) is an Italian writer, born in Genoa. ... Palmiro Togliatti (March 26, 1893 - August 21, 1964) was an Italian communist leader. ... The Padre Pio Pilgrimage Church in San Giovanni Rotondo. ... Riccardo Giacconi (born October 6, 1931) is an Italian-born American Nobel Prize-winning astrophysicist. ... Eugenio Montale Eugenio Montale (October 12, 1896, Genoa – September 12, 1981, Milan) was an Italian poet, prose writer, editor and traslator, winner of the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1975. ... Vanessa Beecroft (Genoa, Italy, 1969) is an Italian contemporary artist living in New York. ... Gilberto Govi (born Amerigo Armando Gilberto Govi, Genoa 22 October 1885; 28 April 1966) was an Italian actor, founder of the Genoese Dialectal Theatre. ... Paolo Villaggio as Ugo Fantozzi. ... Giuseppe Piero Grillo, better known as Beppe Grillo (born July 21, 1948), is an Italian comedian and actor, who also works in theatres and television. ... The term singer-songwriter refers to performers who both write and sing their own material. ... Fabrizio De André (February 18, 1940 - January 11, 1999) was an Italian singer-songwriter. ... Ivano Alberto Fossati (born September 21, 1951) is an Italian singer-songwriter and musician. ... Vittorio Gassman Vittorio Gassman (Il Mattatore) (September 1, 1922 – June 29, 2000) was an Italian theatre and film actor and director. ... Moana Pozzi, often called simply Moana, complete name was Anna Moana Rosa Pozzi (April 27, 1961 - September 15, 1994) was an Italian pornstar. ... Moto Guzzi is an Italian motorcycle manufacturer that was established in 1920. ... Giovanni Caboto (c. ... Savona (Sàn-na in the local dialect of Ligurian) is a seaport and comune in the northern Italian region of Liguria, capital of the Province of Savona, in the Riviera di Ponente on the Mediterranean Sea, at sea-level. ...


Miscellaneous

  • The University of Genoa, with 40,000 students (one of the largest universities in Italy) was founded in 1471.
  • The word jeans comes from Genoa, as a way to pronounce genoese.
  • The Genoese have emigrated too, mostly to South America; Uruguay, Chile, Argentina have strong Genoese communities. The special strong connection with Argentina is witnessed by the famous song Ma se ghe penso, and by the episode From the Apennines to the Andes in the book Cuore (Heart) by Edmondo De Amicis]; the supporters of the Boca Juniors football team, rooted in the neighborhood of La Boca, in Buenos Aires, are known as los xeneizes. Most inhabitants of those countries will recognize Farinata (Faina as they call it, a chickpea flatbread) and Torta Pasqualina (a salty artichokes, eggs, and cheese pie) as local dishes, but they are from Genoa. A significant portion of Gibraltar's population is of Genoese origin.
  • The Yiddish word Yanova with which Ashkenazi Jews are most commonly calling the Diamante Citron, is a jargon from the city of Genoa which was the transport station for the citron or as they are calling it Etrog.

The University of Genoa (Università degli Studi di Genova in Italian or UniGe) is one of the larger universities in Italy. ... Jeans are trousers traditionally made from denim, but may also be made from a variety of fabrics not including corduroy. ... Ma se ghe penso is a song in the dialect of Genoa. ... Heart (Italian: Cuore) is a childrens novel written by Italian author Edmondo De Amicis. ... Edmondo De Amicis (Oneglia (Imperia), October 21, 1846 - Bordighera, 1908), is a notable Italian childrens writer. ... “Boca Juniors” redirects here. ... Yiddish (ייִדיש, Jiddisch) is a Germanic language spoken by about four million Jews throughout the world. ... Language(s) Yiddish, Hebrew, Russian, English Religion(s) Judaism Related ethnic groups Sephardi Jews, Mizrahi Jews, and other Jewish ethnic divisions Ashkenazi Jews, also known as Ashkenazic Jews or Ashkenazim (Standard Hebrew: sing. ... Trinomial name Citrus medica cv. ... Binomial name L. For other uses, see Citron (disambiguation). ... Trinomial name Citrus medica var. ...

Sister cities

Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Baltimore redirects here. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Boston redirects here. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Greece. ... Chios (Greek: , alternative transliterations Khios and Hios), is the fifth largest of the Greek islands, situated in the Aegean Sea seven kilometres (five miles) off the Turkish coast. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Nickname: Location in the state of Ohio, USA Coordinates: , Country State Counties Franklin, Delaware, and Fairfield Government  - Mayor Michael B. Coleman (D) Area  - City  212. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Ecuador. ... This article is about the city of Guayaquil. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Spain. ... Huelva is a city in southwestern Spain, the capital of the province of Huelva in the autonomous region of Andalusia. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... City flag Coat of arms Motto: By her great deeds, the city of Massilia shines Location Time Zone CET (GMT +1) Coordinates Administration Country Region Provence-Alpes-Côte dAzur Department Bouches-du-Rhône (13) Subdivisions 16 arrondissements (in 8 secteurs) Intercommunality Urban Community of Marseille Provence M... Image File history File links Flag_of_Ukraine. ... The ODESSA, which stands for the German phrase Organisation der ehemaligen SS-Angehörigen, which phrase in turn translates as “Organization of Former Members of the SS,” is the name commonly given to an international Nazi network alleged to have been set up towards the end of World War II... Image File history File links Flag_of_Croatia. ... Rijeka (in local Croatian dialects Rika and Reka; Fiume in Italian and Hungarian. ...

See also

The Republic of Genoa, in full the Most Serene Republic of Genoa (known as the Ligurian Republic from 1798 to 1805) was an independent state in Liguria on the northwestern Italian coast from ca. ... Genoese (Zeneize) is the variety of the ligurian language spoken in Genoa, the capital city of Liguria (Italy) . The Ligurian is listed by Ethnologue as a language in its own right (not to be confused with the ancient Ligurian language). ... Ligurian is a Romance language, consisting of a group of Gallo-Italic dialects currently spoken in Liguria, northern Italy, and parts of the Mediterranean coastal zone of France, and Monaco. ... The route of the Metro The Metropolitana di Genova is a light metro consisting of a single line that connects the center of Genoa with the suburb of Rivarolo, to the north-west of the city centre. ... In 1991 the M/T Haven (formerly Amoco Milford Haven), an oil tanker owned by Troodos Shipping (a company ran by Lucas Haji-Ioannou and his son Stelios Haji-Ioannou) and loaded with 144,000 tonnes (1 million barrels) of crude oil, exploded, caught fire and sank off the coast...

Image gallery

Bibliography

  • Gino Benvenuti. Le repubbliche marinare. Amalfi, Pisa, Genova e Venezia. Netwon Compton, Rome, 1989.
  • Steven A. Epstein; Genoa & the Genoese, 958-1528 University of North Carolina Press, 1996; online edition
  • Steven A. Epstein; "Labour and Port Life in Medieval Genoa." Mediterranean Historical Review 3 (1988): 114-40.
  • Steven A. Epstein; "Business Cycles and the Sense of Time in Medieval Genoa." Business History Review 62 ( 1988): 238-60.
  • Face Richard. "Secular History in Twelfth-Century Italy: Caffaro of Genoa." Journal of Medieval History 6 (1980): 169-84.
  • Hughes Diane Owen. "Kinsmen and Neighbors in Medieval Genoa." In The Medieval City, edited by Harry A. Miskimin, David Herlihy, and Adam L. Udovitch, pp. 3-28. 1977.
  • Hughes Diane Owen. "Urban Growth and Family Structure in Medieval Genoa." Past and Present 66 (1975): 3-28.
  • Lopez Robert S. "Genoa." In Dictionary of the Middle Ages, pp. 383-87. 1982.
  • Vitale Vito. Breviario della storia di Genova. Vols. 1-2. Genoa, 1955.

The Journal of Medieval History is a major international academic journal devoted to all aspects of the history of Europe in the Middle Ages. ...

External links

Staglieno: A monumental cemetery

Coordinates: 44°24′N, 8°55′E
Image File history File links Flag_of_Italy. ... Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ...



  Results from FactBites:
 
Genoa - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1592 words)
Genoa (Italian: Genova, Genoese: Zena) is a city and a seaport in northern Italy, the capital of the Province of Genoa and of the region of Liguria.
Genoa lost Sardinia to Aragon, Corsica to internal revolt and its Middle Eastern colonies to the Ottoman Empire and the Arabs.
Genoa suffered from French bombardment in 1684, and was occupied by Austria in 1746 during the War of the Austrian Succession.
Genoa. The Columbia Encyclopedia, Sixth Edition. 2001-05 (602 words)
Among Genoa’s notable buildings are the Cathedral of San Lorenzo (rebuilt in 1100 and frequently restored), the palace of the doges, the richly decorated churches of the Annunciation and of St. Ambrose (both 16th cent.), the medieval Church of San Donato, many Renaissance palaces, and the Carlo Felice opera house (19th cent.).
Genoa’s expansion and its military defense were largely financed by a group of merchants who in 1408 organized a powerful bank, the Banco San Giorgio.
The power of Genoa was revived by the seaman and statesman Andrea Doria, who wrote a new constitution in 1528; the conspiracy (1547) of the Fieschi family against his dictatorship failed.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m