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Encyclopedia > Genital organs

A sex organ, or primary sexual characteristic, narrowly defined, is any of those parts of the body (which are not always bodily organs according to the strict definition) which are involved in sexual reproduction and constitute the reproductive system in an complex organism; namely:

More generally and popularly, the term sex organ refers to any part of the body involved in erotic pleasure. The larger list would certainly include the anus for either sex, the prepuce, the breasts (especially the nipples) for females, and the nipples for males.


The Latin term genitalia is used to describe the sex organs, and in the English language this term and genital area are most often used to describe the externally visible sex organs or external genitalia: in males the penis and scrotum, in females the vulva. The other parts of the sex organs are called the internal genitalia.


A gonad is a sex organ that produces gametes, specifically the testes or ovaries in humans.


Organs of sexual anatomy originate from a common anlage and differentiate into male or female sex organs. Each sexual organ in one sex has a homologous counterpart in the other one. See a list of homologues of the human reproductive system.


Anatomical terms related to sex

The following is list of anatomical terms related to sex and sexuality:

See also: sex, human sexuality, sexual behavior, Obstetrics and gynecology, circumcision, castration, intersex, List of transgender-related topics, intimate parts, secondary sex characteristics, body modification, genital modification and mutilation, Sexual fetishism



Reproductive system

Female: Cervix - Clitoris - Fallopian tubes - Bartholin's glands - Hymen - Mammary glands - Ovaries - Skene's glands - Urethra - Uterus - Vagina
Male: Bulbourethral glands - Cowper's glands - Ejaculatory duct - Epididymis - Penis - Prostate - Scrotum - Seminal vesicles - Spermatic cord - Testes - Urethra - Vas deferens


Human organ systems

Cardiovascular system - Digestive system - Endocrine system - Immune system - Integumentary system - Lymphatic system - Muscular system - Nervous system - Skeletal system - Reproductive system - Respiratory system - Urinary system


  Results from FactBites:
 
XI. Splanchnology. 3c. The Male Genital Organs. Gray, Henry. 1918. Anatomy of the Human Body. (3421 words)
The male genitals include the testes, the ductus deferentes, the vesiculæ seminales, the ejaculatory ducts, and the penis, together with the following accessory structures, viz., the prostate and the bulbourethral glands.
The anterior border and lateral surfaces, as well as both extremities of the organ, are convex, free, smooth, and invested by the visceral layer of the tunica vaginalis.
They divide the interior of the organ into a number of incomplete spaces which are somewhat cone-shaped, being broad at their bases at the surface of the gland, and becoming narrower as they converge to the mediastinum.
XI. Splanchnology. 3d. The Female Genital Organs. Gray, Henry. 1918. Anatomy of the Human Body. (153 words)
The female genital organs consist of an internal and an external group.
The internal organs are situated within the pelvis, and consist of the ovaries, the uterine tubes, the uterus, and the vagina.
The external organs are placed below the urogenital diaphragm and below and in front of the pubic arch.
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