FACTOID # 6: Michigan is ranked 22nd in land area, but since 41.27% of the state is composed of water, it jumps to 11th place in total area.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Geneva Convention

The Geneva Conventions consist of treaties formulated in Geneva, Switzerland that set the standards for international law for humanitarian concerns. The conventions were the results of efforts by Henri Dunant, who was motivated by the horrors of war he witnessed at the Battle of Solferino.


Accusations of violation of the Geneva Conventions on the part of signatory nations are brought before the International Court of Justice at the Hague.


The conventions and their agreements are as follows:

In addition, there are two additional protocols to the Geneva Convention:

  • Protocol I (1977): Protocol Additional to the Geneva Conventions of 12 August 1949, and relating to the Protection of Victims of International Armed Conflicts
  • Protocol II (1977): Protocol Additional to the Geneva Conventions of 12 August 1949, and relating to the Protection of Victims of Non-International Armed Conflicts

This First Convention also mandated the foundation of the International Committee of the Red Cross. The text is given in the Resolutions of the Geneva International Conference.


The first three conventions were revised, a fourth was added, and the entire set was ratified in 1949; the whole is referred to as the "Geneva Conventions of 1949" or simply the "Geneva Conventions". Later conferences have added provisions prohibiting certain methods of warfare and addressing issues of civil wars. Nearly all 200 countries of the world are "signatory" nations, in that they have ratified these conventions.


Clara Barton was instrumental in campaigning for the ratification of the First Geneva Convention by the United States; the U.S. signed in 1882. By the Fourth Geneva Convention some 47 nations had ratified the agreements.


See also

External links

  • States party to the Geneva Conventions and their Additional Protocols (http://www.icrc.org/eng/party_gc)
  • Red Cross and Geneva Conventions (http://www.redcross.lv/en/conventions.htm)
  • Texts of the Conventions Source: ICRC 1949 Conventions and 1977 Protocols (http://www.icrc.org/ihl.nsf/WebCONVFULL!OpenView) Source: Society of Professional Journalists (http://www.globalissuesgroup.com/geneva/texts.html)
  • Reference Guide to the Geneva Conventions (http://www.genevaconventions.org/)
  • United Nation's Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights - International Human Rights Instruments (http://www.unhchr.ch/html/intlinst.htm)

Other meanings: An important gaming convention is known as Gen Con.


  Results from FactBites:
 
Geneva Conventions - MSN Encarta (736 words)
Geneva Conventions, series of international agreements that created and developed international humanitarian law to protect wounded combatants and those who assist them, prisoners of war, and civilians during times of war or other conflicts.
The first Geneva Convention was adopted in 1864 and provided for the protection of sick and wounded soldiers on the field of battle.
Whereas the Geneva Conventions primarily protect victims of war, the Hague Conventions and accompanying regulations primarily protect combatants and noncombatants by limiting the methods and means of combat.
Geneva Conventions - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (592 words)
The conventions were the results of efforts by Henri Dunant, who was motivated by the horrors of war he witnessed at the Battle of Solferino in 1859.
All four conventions were last revised and ratified in 1949, based on previous revisions and partly on some of the 1907 Hague Conventions; the whole set is referred to as the "Geneva Conventions of 1949" or simply the "Geneva Conventions".
Clara Barton was instrumental in campaigning for the ratification of the First Geneva Convention by the United States; the U.S. signed in 1882.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m