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Encyclopedia > Genetic testing

Genetic testing allows the genetic diagnosis of vulnerabilities to inherited diseases, and can also be used to determine a person's ancestry. Every person carries two copies of every gene, one inherited from their mother, one inherited from their father. The human genome is believed to contain around 25,000 - 35,000 genes. In addition to studying chromosomes to the level of individual genes, genetic testing in a broader sense includes biochemical tests for the possible presence of genetic diseases, or mutant forms of genes associated with increased risk of developing genetic disorders. Genetic testing identifies changes in chromosomes, genes, or proteins. Most of the time, testing is used to find changes that are associated with inherited disorders. The results of a genetic test can confirm or rule out a suspected genetic condition or help determine a person's chance of developing or passing on a genetic disorder. Several hundred genetic tests are currently in use, and more are being developed. This article is about the general scientific term. ... In general, diagnosis (plural diagnoses) has two distinct dictionary definitions. ... A disease is any abnormal condition of the body or mind that causes discomfort, dysfunction, or distress to the person affected or those in contact with the person. ... Kinship and descent is one of the major concepts of cultural anthropology. ... For other uses, see Gene (disambiguation). ... A graphical representation of the normal human karyotype. ... This article is about the biological chromosome. ... Biochemistry is the chemistry of life. ... This article is about the biological chromosome. ... A genetic disorder is a condition caused by abnormalities in genes or chromosomes. ...


Since genetic testing may open up ethical or psychological problems, genetic testing is often accompanied by genetic counseling. Genetic counseling is the process by which patients or relatives, at risk of an inherited disorder, are advised of the consequences and nature of the disorder, the probability of developing or transmitting it, and the options open to them in management and family planning in order to prevent, avoid or...

Contents

Types

Genetic testing is "the analysis of human DNA, RNA, chromosomes, proteins, and certain metabolites in order to detect heritable disease-related genotypes, mutations, phenotypes, or karyotypes for clinical purposes " (Holtzman & Watson 1997). It can provide information about a person's genes and chromosomes throughout life. Available types of testing include: Left: An RNA strand, with its nitrogenous bases. ... Metabolites are the intermediates and products of metabolism. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... For linguistic mutation, see Apophony. ... Individuals in the mollusk species Donax variabilis show diverse coloration and patterning in their phenotypes. ... Karyogram of human male using Giemsa staining. ... For other uses, see Person (disambiguation). ...

  • Newborn screening: Newborn screening is used just after birth to identify genetic disorders that can be treated early in life. The routine testing of infants for certain disorders is the most widespread use of genetic testing—millions of babies are tested each year in the United States. All states currently test infants for phenylketonuria (a genetic disorder that causes mental retardation if left untreated) and congenital hypothyroidism (a disorder of the thyroid gland).
  • Diagnostic testing: Diagnostic testing is used to diagnose or rule out a specific genetic or chromosomal condition. In many cases, genetic testing is used to confirm a diagnosis when a particular condition is suspected based on physical mutations and symptoms. Diagnostic testing can be performed at any time during a person's life, but is not available for all genes or all genetic conditions. The results of a diagnostic test can influence a person's choices about health care and the management of the disease.
  • Carrier testing: Carrier testing is used to identify people who carry one copy of a gene mutation that, when present in two copies, causes a genetic disorder. This type of testing is offered to individuals who have a family history of a genetic disorder and to people in ethnic groups with an increased risk of specific genetic conditions. If both parents are tested, the test can provide information about a couple's risk of having a child with a genetic condition.
  • Prenatal testing: Prenatal testing is used to detect changes in a fetus's genes or chromosomes before birth. This type of testing is offered to couples with an increased risk of having a baby with a genetic or chromosomal disorder. In some cases, prenatal testing can lessen a couple's uncertainty or help them decide whether to abort the pregnancy. It cannot identify all possible inherited disorders and birth defects, however.
  • Predictive and presymptomatic testing: Predictive and presymptomatic types of testing are used to detect gene mutations associated with disorders that appear after birth, often later in life. These tests can be helpful to people who have a family member with a genetic disorder, but who have no features of the disorder themselves at the time of testing. Predictive testing can identify mutations that increase a person's chances of developing disorders with a genetic basis, such as certain types of cancer. For example, an individual with a mutation in BRCA1 has a 65% cumulative risk of breast cancer [1]. Presymptomatic testing can determine whether a person will develop a genetic disorder, such as hemochromatosis (an iron overload disorder), before any signs or symptoms appear. The results of predictive and presymptomatic testing can provide information about a person’s risk of developing a specific disorder and help with making decisions about medical care.
  • Forensic testing: Forensic testing uses DNA sequences to identify an individual for legal purposes. Unlike the tests described above, forensic testing is not used to detect gene mutations associated with disease. This type of testing can identify crime or catastrophe victims, rule out or implicate a crime suspect, or establish biological relationships between people (for example, paternity).
  • Research testing: Research testing include finding unknown genes, learning how genes work and advancing our understanding of genetic conditions. The results of testing done as part of a research study are usually not available to patients or their healthcare providers.

Newborn screening is the process of testing newborn babies for treatable genetic, endocrinologic, metabolic and hematologic diseases. ... Phenylketonuria (PKU) is an autosomal recessive genetic disorder characterized by a deficiency in the enzyme phenylalanine hydroxylase (PAH). ... Mental retardation is a term for a pattern of persistently slow learning of basic motor and language skills (milestones) during childhood, and a significantly below-normal global intellectual capacity as an adult. ... A congenital disorder is a medical condition or defect that is present at or before birth (for example, congenital heart disease). ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Diagnostic testing is a form of Genetic testing. ... Prenatal diagnosis is the diagnosis of disease or condition in a fetus or embryo before it is born. ... For other uses, see Fetus (disambiguation). ... An abortion is the removal or expulsion of an embryo or fetus from the uterus, resulting in or caused by its death. ... A congenital disorder is a medical condition or defect that is present at or before birth (for example, congenital heart disease). ... Predictive testing is a form of Genetic testing. ... Cancer is a class of diseases or disorders characterized by uncontrolled division of cells and the ability of these to spread, either by direct growth into adjacent tissue through invasion, or by implantation into distant sites by metastasis (where cancer cells are transported through the bloodstream or lymphatic system). ... BRCA1 (breast cancer 1, early onset) is a human gene that belongs to a class of genes known as tumor suppressors, which regulate the cell cycle and prevent uncontrolled proliferation. ... Breast cancer is cancer of breast tissue. ... Haemochromatosis, also spelled hemochromatosis, is a hereditary disease characterized by improper processing by the body of dietary iron which causes iron to accumulate in a number of body tissues, eventually causing organ dysfunction. ... Forensic genetics refers to the application of genetic science to legal matters. ...

Medical procedure

Genetic testing is often done as part of a genetic consultation. Once a person decides to proceed with genetic testing, a medical geneticist, genetic counselor, primary care doctor, or specialist can order the test after obtaining informed consent. Informed consent is a legal condition whereby a person can be said to have given consent based upon an appreciation and understanding of the facts and implications of an action. ...


Genetic tests are performed on a sample of blood, hair, skin, amniotic fluid (the fluid that surrounds a fetus during pregnancy), or other tissue. For example, a medical procedure called a buccal smear uses a small brush or cotton swab to collect a sample of cells from the inside surface of the cheek. The sample is sent to a laboratory where technicians look for specific changes in chromosomes, DNA, or proteins, depending on the suspected disorder. The laboratory reports the test results in writing to a person's doctor or genetic counselor. Human blood smear: a - erythrocytes; b - neutrophil; c - eosinophil; d - lymphocyte. ... For the 1968 stage production, see Hair (musical), for the 1979 film, see Hair (film). ... Beyond overall skin structure, refer below to: See-also. ... The amniotic sac is a tough but thin transparent pair of membranes which holds a developing embryo (and later fetus) until shortly before birth. ... A medical procedure is a course of action intended to achieve a result in the care of patients, used by medical or paramedical personnel. ...


Routine newborn screening tests are done on a small blood sample, using a 'heel stick', by pricking the babies heel and blotting the blood on a special paper. Unlike other types of genetic testing, a parent will usually only receive the result if it is positive.


Interpreting results

The results of genetic tests are not always straightforward, which often makes them challenging to interpret and explain. When interpreting test results, healthcare professionals consider a person’s medical history, family history, and the type of genetic test that was done.


A positive test result means that the laboratory found a change in a particular gene, chromosome, or protein of interest. Depending on the purpose of the test, this result may confirm a diagnosis, indicate that a person is a carrier of a particular genetic mutation, identify an increased risk of developing a disease (such as cancer) in the future, or suggest a need for further testing. Because family members have some genetic material in common, a positive test result may also have implications for certain blood relatives of the person undergoing testing. It is important to note that a positive result of a predictive or presymptomatic genetic test usually cannot establish the exact risk of developing a disorder. Also, health professionals typically cannot use a positive test result to predict the course or severity of a condition. For other uses, see Gene (disambiguation). ... Figure 1: A representation of a condensed eukaryotic chromosome, as seen during cell division. ... A representation of the 3D structure of myoglobin, showing coloured alpha helices. ... Cancer is a class of diseases or disorders characterized by uncontrolled division of cells and the ability of these to spread, either by direct growth into adjacent tissue through invasion, or by implantation into distant sites by metastasis (where cancer cells are transported through the bloodstream or lymphatic system). ...


A negative test result means that the laboratory did not find a dangerous copy of the gene, chromosome, or protein under consideration. This result can indicate that a person is not affected by a particular disorder, is not a carrier of a specific genetic mutation, or does not have an increased risk of developing a certain disease. It is possible, however, that the test missed a disease-causing genetic alteration because many tests cannot detect all genetic changes that can cause a particular disorder. Further testing may be required to confirm a negative result.


In some cases, a negative result might not give any useful information. This type of result is called uninformative, indeterminate, inconclusive, or ambiguous. Uninformative test results sometimes occur because everyone has common, natural variations in their DNA, called polymorphisms, that do not affect health. If a genetic test finds a change in DNA that has not been associated with a disorder in other people, it can be difficult to tell whether it is a natural polymorphism or a disease-causing mutation. An uninformative result cannot confirm or rule out a specific diagnosis, and it cannot indicate whether a person has an increased risk of developing a disorder. In some cases, testing other affected and unaffected family members can help clarify this type of result. In biology, polymorphism can be defined as the occurrence in the same habitat of two or more forms of a trait in such frequencies that the rarer cannot be maintained by recurrent mutation alone. ...


Cost and time

The cost of genetic testing can range from under $100 to more than $2,000, depending on the nature and complexity of the test. The cost increases if more than one test is necessary or if multiple family members must be tested to obtain a meaningful result. In countries with private health insurance, in many cases, health insurance plans will cover the costs of genetic testing when it is recommended by a person's doctor.


From the date that a sample is taken, it may take a few weeks to several months to receive the test results. Results for prenatal testing are usually available more quickly because time is an important consideration in making decisions about a pregnancy.


Benefits

Genetic testing has potential benefits whether the results are positive or negative for a gene mutation. Test results can provide a sense of relief from uncertainty and help people make informed decisions about managing their health care. For example, a negative result can eliminate the need for unnecessary checkups and screening tests in some cases. A positive result can direct a person toward available prevention, monitoring, and treatment options. Some test results can also help people make decisions about having children. Newborn screening can identify genetic disorders early in life so treatment can be started as early as possible.


Screening embryos before in-vitro fertilization can potentially eliminate from society the many genetically determined disorders to lead to a lifetime of suffering.


Risks and limitations

The physical risks associated with most genetic tests are very small, particularly for those tests that require only a blood sample or buccal smear (a procedure that samples cells from the inside surface of the cheek). The procedures used for prenatal testing carry a small but real risk of losing the pregnancy (miscarriage) because they require a sample of amniotic fluid or tissue from around the fetus.


Many of the risks associated with genetic testing involve the emotional, social, or financial consequences of the test results. People may feel angry, depressed, anxious, or guilty about their results. In some cases, genetic testing creates tension within a family because the results can reveal information about other family members in addition to the person who is tested. The possibility of genetic discrimination in employment or insurance is also a concern. Genetic discrimination occurs when people are treated differently by their employer or insurance company because they have a gene mutation that causes or increases the risk of an inherited disorder. ...


Genetic testing can provide only limited information about an inherited condition. The test often can't determine if a person will show symptoms of a disorder, how severe the symptoms will be, or whether the disorder will progress over time. Another major limitation is the lack of treatment strategies for many genetic disorders once they are diagnosed.


A genetics professional can explain in detail the benefits, risks, and limitations of a particular test. It is important that any person who is considering genetic testing understand and weigh these factors before making a decision.


Many people are also concerned about the privacy implications of genetic testimony. In the United States, federal law requires that this kind of medical information to be kept confidential.


Testing

Diseases and conditions for which testing is available (among the 1300+ tests) include Cystic Fibrosis, Down's syndrome, Huntingtons Disease, Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, Phenylketonuria, Sickle-cell trait and Tay-Sachs disease. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, or HCM, is a disease of the myocardium (the muscle of the heart) in which a portion of the myocardium is hypertrophied (thickened) without any obvious cause. ... Phenylketonuria (PKU) is an autosomal recessive genetic disorder characterized by a deficiency in the enzyme phenylalanine hydroxylase (PAH). ... Sickle-cell disease is a group of genetic disorders caused by sickle hemoglobin (Hgb S or Hb S). ... Tay-Sachs disease (abbreviated TSD, also known as GM2 gangliosidosis, Hexosaminidase A deficiency or Sphingolipidosis) is a genetic disorder, fatal in its most common variant known as Infantile Tay-Sachs disease. ...


Direct-to-Consumer (DTC) Genetic Testing

Direct-to-Consumer (DTC) genetic testing is a type of genetic test that is accessible directly to the consumer without having to go through a health care professional. Usually, to attain a genetic test, health care professionals such as doctors acquire the permission of the patient and order the desired test. DTC genetic tests, however, allow consumers to bypass this process and order one themselves. There are a variety of DTC tests, ranging from testing for breast cancer alleles to mutations linked to cystic fibrosis. Benefits of DTC testing are the accessibility of tests to consumers, promotion of proactive healthcare and the privacy of genetic information. Possible additional risks of DTC testing are the lack of governmental regulation and the potential misinterpretation of genetic information.


Controversy

DTC genetic testing has been controversial due to outspoken opposition among the scientific community. Critics of DTC testing argue against the risks involved with DTC testing, the unregulated advertising and marketing claims, and the overall lack of governmental oversight.


Hazards involved with DTC testing include many of the risks already involved with any genetic test. One of the more obvious and dangerous risks of DTC genetic testing is the possibility of severe misreading of test results. Lacking professional guidance, consumers can potentially misinterpret genetic information, causing them to be deluded about their personal health.


Advertising for direct-to-consumer genetic testing may itself be deceptive. Some advertising has conveyed an exaggerated and inaccurate message about the connection between genetic information and disease risk, utilizing emotions as a selling factor. An advertisement for a BRCA-predictive genetic test for breast cancer stated: “There is no stronger antidote for fear than information.”[2]


Government Regulation

Currently, there is no strong federal regulation moderating the DTC market. Though there are several hundred tests available, only a handful are approved by the FDA, which are sold as at-home test kits. Due to the nature of the majority of DTC tests as mailed in DNA samples, it is difficult for the FDA to exercise a form of jurisdiction as the tests are completed in the laboratories of providers, and are not in fact sold as medical devices. Additionally, the FDA has not yet officially substantiated with scientific evidence the claimed accuracy of the majority of direct-to-consumer genetic tests. [3]


Fiction

Some possible future ethical problems of genetic testing were considered in the science fiction film Gattaca, and the science fiction anime series "Gundam Seed". However, these films focus on the mechanical technology instead of human experimentation. This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... Gattaca is a 1997 science fiction drama film written and directed by Andrew Niccol, starring Ethan Hawke, Uma Thurman and Jude Law with supporting roles played by Loren Dean, Gore Vidal and Alan Arkin. ... “Animé” redirects here. ... Title of the series Mobile Suit Gundam SEED (or Gundam Seed) is an anime television series from Japan. ...


Links

  • 23 and Me Personal Genome Sequencing
  • GeneTests

 
 

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