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Encyclopedia > General visceral afferent fibers
General visceral afferent fibers
Scheme showing structure of a typical spinal nerve.
1. Somatic efferent.
2. Somatic afferent.
3,4,5. Sympathetic efferent.
6,7. Sympathetic afferent.
Gray's subject #190 849

The general visceral afferent fibers (GVA, or sympathetic afferent fibers), conduct sensory impulses from the viscera through the rami communicantes and posterior roots to the spinal cord. Image File history File links Gray799. ... The general somatic efferent fibers (or somatic motor fibers), efferent fibers, arise from cells in the anterior column of the spinal cord and pass out through the anterior roots to the voluntary muscles. ... The general somatic afferent fibers (or somatic sensory fibers), afferent fibers, arise from cells in the spinal ganglia and are found in all the spinal nerves, except occasionally the first cervical, and conduct impulses of pain, touch and temperature from the surface of the body through the posterior roots to... The general visceral efferent fibers (GVE or sympathetic efferent fibers), probably arise from cells in the lateral column or the base of the anterior column and emerge through the anterior roots and white rami communicantes. ... Rami communicans (plural rami communicantes) is the term used for a nerve which connects two other nervers. ... In anatomy and neurology, the dorsal root (or posterior root) is the afferent sensory root of a spinal nerve. ...


They are probably limited to the white rami connected with the spinal nerves in two groups, viz., the first thoracic to the second lumbar and the second sacral to the fourth sacral nerves. The thoracic, and the first and second lumbar nerves each contribute a branch, white ramus communicans to the adjoining sympathetic ganglion. ... The Sacral Nerves—The posterior divisions of the sacral nerves (rami posteriores) are small, and diminish in size from above downward; they emerge, except the last, through the posterior sacral foramina. ...


Examples of nerves containing GVA fibers include the glossopharyngeal nerve and the vagus nerve. [1] The glossopharyngeal nerve is the ninth of twelve cranial nerves. ... The vagus nerve (also called pneumogastric nerve or cranial nerve X) is the tenth of twelve paired cranial nerves, and is the only nerve that starts in the brainstem (within the medulla oblongata) and extends, through the jugular foramen, down below the head, to the abdomen. ...


See also

This article was originally based on an entry from a public domain edition of Gray's Anatomy. As such, some of the information contained herein may be outdated. Please edit the article if this is the case, and feel free to remove this notice when it is no longer relevant. The mechanism of the reflex arc In the nervous system, afferent neurons--otherwise known as sensory or receptor neurons--carry nerve impulses from receptors or sense organs toward the central nervous system. ... The public domain comprises the body of all creative works and other knowledge—writing, artwork, music, science, inventions, and others—in which no person or organization has any proprietary interest. ... An illustration from the 1918 edition Henry Grays Anatomy of the Human Body (or Grays Anatomy as it has more commonly become known) is an anatomy textbook widely regarded as a classic work on human anatomy. ...

A thin section of lung tissue stained with hematoxylin and eosin. ... Nervous tissue is the fourth major class of vertebrate tissue. ... This article is about cells in the nervous system. ... Grey matter (or gray matter) is a major component of the central nervous system, consisting of nerve cell bodies, glial cells (astroglia and oligodendrocytes), capillaries, and short nerve cell extensions/processes (axons and dendrites). ... The soma, or perikaryon, is the bulbous end of a neuron, containing the cell nucleus. ... An axon or nerve fiber, is a long, slender projection of a nerve cell, or neuron, that conducts electrical impulses away from the neurons cell body or soma. ... The arrow labeled axon is pointing directly at the axon hillock. ... Axoplasm is the cytoplasm of the axon of a neuron. ... The axolemma is the membrane of a neurons axon. ... Intermediate filaments are one component of the cytoskeleton - important structural components of living cells. ... Dendrites (from Greek dendron, “tree”) are the branched projections of a neuron that act to conduct the electrical stimulation received from other neural cells to the cell body, or soma, of the neuron from which the dendrites project. ... Image of a Nissl-stained histological section through the rodent hippocampus showing various classes of neurons. ... Close up of the dendrite of a striatal medium spiny neuron. ... As a part of the retina, the bipolar cell exists between photoreceptors (rod cells and cone cells) and ganglion cells. ... Pseudounipolar cells (Pseudo- false, uni- one) are sensory neurons in the peripheral nervous system. ... The multipolar neuron possesses a single (usually long) axon and many dendrites, allowing for the integration of a great deal of information from other neurons. ... A pyramidal cell (or pyramidal neuron, or projection neuron) is a multipolar neuron located in the hippocampus and cerebral cortex. ... Drawing of pigeon Purkinje cells (A) by Santiago Ramon y Cajal Purkinje cells are a class of GABAergic neuron located in the cerebellar cortex. ... In neuroscience, granule cells are tiny cells found within the granular layer of the cerebellum. ... The mechanism of the reflex arc In the nervous system, afferent neurons--otherwise known as sensory or receptor neurons--carry nerve impulses from receptors or sense organs toward the central nervous system. ... The mechanism of the reflex arc Sensory neurons (or neurones) are nerve cells within the nervous system responsible for converting external stimuli from the organisms environment into internal electrical impulses. ... The mechanism of the reflex arc Sensory neurons (neurones) are nerve cells within the nervous system responsible for converting external stimuli from the organisms environment into internal electrical motor reflex loops and several forms of involuntary behavior, including pain avoidance. ... The general somatic afferent fibers (or somatic sensory fibers), afferent fibers, arise from cells in the spinal ganglia and are found in all the spinal nerves, except occasionally the first cervical, and conduct impulses of pain, touch and temperature from the surface of the body through the posterior roots to... Special somatic afferent (SSA) refers to efferent nerves which supply muscles derived from ectoderm. ... Special visceral afferent (SVA) refers to afferent nerves supporting the gastrointestinal tract. ... An axon or nerve fiber, is a long, slender projection of a nerve cell, or neuron, that conducts electrical impulses away from the neurons cell body or soma. ... Type Ia Sensory Fiber also called Primary Afferent Type 1A Fiber or Group II sensory fibers is a component of a muscle fibers muscle spindle which keeps track of the how fast a muscle stretch changes (the velocity of the stretch). ... Organ of Golgi (neurotendinous spindle) from the human tendo calcaneus. ... Type II sensory fiber are the second of the two main groups of stretch receptors. ... A delta fibers (Aδ) are the fibers which convey fast pain information. ... C-fibers are unmyeliniated and as a result, have a slower conduction velocity, lower than 2 m/s. ... In the nervous system, efferent nerves otherwise known as motor or effector neuron carry nerve impulses away from the central nervous systemto effectors - either muscles or glands. ... Motor nerves allow the brain to stimulate muscle contraction. ... In vertebrates, the term motor neuron (or motoneuron) classically applies to neurons located in the central nervous system (CNS) which project their axons outside the CNS and directly or indirectly control muscles. ... The general somatic efferent fibers (or somatic motor fibers), efferent fibers, arise from cells in the anterior column of the spinal cord and pass out through the anterior roots to the voluntary muscles. ... The general visceral efferent fibers (GVE or sympathetic efferent fibers), probably arise from cells in the lateral column or the base of the anterior column and emerge through the anterior roots and white rami communicantes. ... Special visceral efferent (SVE) refers to efferent nerves which supply muscles which derived from the branchial arches. ... Upper motor neurons are any neurons that carry motor information down to the final common pathway, that is, any neurons that are not directly responsible for stimulating the target muscle. ... Lower motor neurons (LMNs) are the motoneurons connecting the brainstem and spinal cord to muscle fibers, bringing the nerve impulses from the upper motor neurons out to the muscles. ... Alpha motor neurons (α-MNs) are large lower motor neurons of the brainstem and spinal cord. ... A muscle spindle, with γ motor and Ia sensory fibers Gamma motoneurons (γ-motoneurons), also called gamma motor neurons, are a component of the fusimotor system, the system by which the central nervous system controls muscle spindle sensitivity. ... Illustration of the major elements in a prototypical synapse. ... Neuropil is the feltwork of unmyelinated neuronal processes (axonal and dendritic) within the gray matter of the central nervous system Traditionally, when pathologists looked at brain tissue they concentrated on neurons (the active functioning cells of the brain), glial cells and axons (especially in white matter, which is mostly composed... In a neuron, synaptic vesicles, also called neurotransmitter vesicles, store the various neurotransmitters that are released during calcium-regulated exocytosis at the presynaptic terminal into the synaptic cleft of a synapse. ... A neuromuscular junction is the junction of the axon terminal of a motoneuron with the motor end plate, the highly-excitable region of muscle fiber plasma membrane responsible for initiation of action potentials across the muscles surface. ... An electrical synapse is a mechanical and electrically conductive link between two abutting neurons that is formed at a narrow gap between the pre- and postsynaptic cells known as a gap junction. ... An interneuron (also called relay neuron,association neuron or bipolar neuron) is a term used to describe a neuron which has two different common meanings. ... Renshaw cells are located in the spinal cord horn. ... In a sensory system, a sensory receptor is a structure that recognizes a stimulus in the internal or external environment of an organism. ... NERVE ENDINGS SUCK PENIS!!! ... Meissners corpuscles (discovered by the anatomist Georg Meissner (1829-1903) are a type of mechanoreceptor and more specifically, a tactile corpuscle(corpusculum tactus). ... Merkel nerve endings are mechanoreceptors found in the skin and mucosa of vertebrates that provide touch information to the brain. ... A muscle spindle is a specialized muscle structure innervated by both sensory and motor neuron axons. ... A Pacinian corpuscle is a structure that functions as a mechanoreceptor. ... Ruffini Endings are one of the four main cutaneous mechanoreceptors. ... Bold text == Headline text == minni hi. ... This article is about cellular photoreceptors. ... Hair cells are the sensory cells of both the auditory system and the vestibular system in all vertebrates. ... Taste buds are small structures on the upper surface of the tongue, soft palate, and epiglottis that provide information about the taste of food being eaten. ... Neuroglia of the brain shown by Golgis method. ... Astrocytes (also known collectively as astroglia) are characteristic star-shaped glial cells in the brain. ... Oligodendrocytes (from Greek literally meaning few tree cells), or oligodendroglia (Greek, few tree glue),[1] are a variety of neuroglia. ... Ependyma is the thin epithelial membrane lining the ventricular system of the brain and the spinal cord canal. ... Microglia cells positive for lectins Microglia are a type of glial cell that act as the immune cells of the Central nervous system (CNS). ... Radial glial cells are a pivotal cell type in the developing CNS involved in key developmental processes, ranging from patterning and neuronal migration to their newly described role as precursors during neurogenesis. ... Myelin is an electrically insulating phospholipid layer that surrounds the axons of many neurons. ... White matter is one of the two main solid components of the central nervous system. ... Named after the German physiologist Theodor Schwann, Schwann cells are a variety of neuroglia that mainly provide myelin insulation to axons in the peripheral nervous system of jawed vertebrates. ... Oligodendrocytes (from Greek literally meaning few tree cells), or oligodendroglia (Greek, few tree glue),[1] are a variety of neuroglia. ... This article is about anatomy; for the musical group see Nodes of Ranvier (band) Nodes of Ranvier are regularly spaced gaps in the myelin sheath around an axon or nerve fiber. ... The portion of nerve fiber between two Nodes of Ranvier is called an internodal segment (or internode). ... Oblique clefts may be seen in the medullary sheath, subdividing it into irregular portions, which are termed Schmidt-Lanterman incisures (or clefts of schmidt-lanterman, segments of Lantermann, medullary segments. ... Neurolemma (spelled also neurolema, neurilemma and neurilema, and used interchangeably with epineurium) is the insulating myelin layer that surrounds an individual peripheral nerve fiber. ... Connective tissue is one of the four types of tissue in traditional classifications (the others being epithelial, muscle, and nervous tissue. ... Neurolemma (spelled also neurolema, neurilemma and neurilema, and used interchangeably with epineurium) is the insulating myelin layer that surrounds an individual peripheral nerve fiber. ... In a nerve fiber, the tubular sheath of the funiculi, perineurium, is a fine, smooth, transparent membrane, which may be easily separated, in the form of a tube, from the fibers it encloses; in structure it is made up of connective tissue, which has a distinctly lamellar arrangement. ... The nerve fibers are held together and supported within the funiculus by delicate connective tissue, called the endoneurium. ... A small bundle of fibers, enclosed in a tubular sheath, is called a funiculus; if the nerve is of small size, it may consist only of a single funiculus; but if large, the funiculi are collected together into larger bundles or nerve fascicles, which are bound together in a common... The meninges (singular meninx) are the system of membranes that envelop the central nervous system. ...

References

  1. ^ Mehta, Samir et al. Step-Up: A High-Yield, Systems-Based Review for the USMLE Step 1. Baltimore, MD: LWW, 2003.

 
 

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