FACTOID # 22: South Dakota has the highest employment ratio in America, but the lowest median earnings of full-time male employees.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > General (United States)

A General is a high rank in the United States military. General can be used as a generic term for all grades of general officer, or it can specifically refer to a single rank that is just called General.


In the modern United States military, Brigadier General is a one-star rank immediately above the Colonel rank. Immediately above Brigadier General is the two-star rank of Major General. Immediately above that is the three-star rank of Lieutenant General. Immediately above that is the four-star rank of General (also known as full General). Above that is the five-star rank of General of the Army. The United States rank of General of the Army is equivalent to the foreign rank of Field Marshal. The one-star through four-star General ranks are currently in use, but General of the Army is reserved for war time, and no one currently holds that rank. No one currently holds the rank of General of the Armies of the United States either, and that rank has never been used by an active duty Army officer at the same time as all the other ranks, so it is not clear how it compares to them. General of the Armies of the United States is sometimes considered to be the equivalent of the foreign ranks of Generalissimo or Grand Marshal. Note: This article is about the military usage of the word marshal. For other usages, see the end of this article. ... Generalissimo Francisco de Miranda Generalissimo or Generalissimus is a military rank of the highest degree, superior to a Field Marshal or Grand Admiral. ... Grand Marshal is a ceremonial, military, or political office of very high rank. ...


The one-star through four-star General ranks are used in the Army, Air Force, and Marines. The Army's five-star rank of General of the Army is equivalent to the U.S. Air Force's rank of General of the Air Force. The U.S. Marines do not have an equivalent five-star rank. The U.S. Air Force and U.S. Marines do not have an equivalent to the Army's rank of General of the Armies of the United States, as there would only ever be one person from all the armed forces holding that rank. General of the Army is a military rank used in some countries of the world to denote a senior military leader, usually a General in command of a nations Army. ... This article is being considered for deletion in accordance with Wikipedias deletion policy. ...


Throughout much of the history of the United States the three+ star ranks were not used at all, or only used on a temporary basis. For much of history they were only used one at a time, with different titles used at different times for the same thing.

Contents

History

American Revolutionary War era

Henry Knox in the uniform of a Revolutionary War Major General
Henry Knox in the uniform of a Revolutionary War Major General

During the American Revolutionary War the Continental Congress appointed General Officers to lead the Continental Army. They were normally distinguished community leaders and statesmen, with several having served as provincial officers in the British Army. While there were some General Officers who were promoted to the grade from the Colonel ranks, most held their ranks by initial appointment and then with such appointment at the pleasure of the Congress, to be expired or revoked at the end of a particular campaign. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (996x1259, 517 KB) Summary Licensing File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Society of the Cincinnati Henry Knox Charles Willson Peale Metadata This file contains additional information, probably... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (996x1259, 517 KB) Summary Licensing File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Society of the Cincinnati Henry Knox Charles Willson Peale Metadata This file contains additional information, probably... Henry Knox (July 25, 1750 – October 25, 1806) was an American bookseller from Boston who became the chief artillery officer of the Continental Army and later the nations first Secretary of War. ... This article is about military actions only. ... The Continental Congress was the first national government of the United States. ... Illustration depicting uniforms and weapons used during the 1779 to 1783 period of the American Revolution by showing four soldiers standing in an informal group General George Washington, was appointed Commander-in-Chief of the Continental Army on June 15, 1775. ... The British Army is the land armed forces branch of the British Armed Forces. ... Please see Colonel for other countries which use this rank Insignia of a United States Colonel Colonel is a rank of the US military. ...


With the exception of George Washington, the General Officers at that point were Brigadier Generals or Major Generals. Their insignia was one or two stars worn on a golden epaulet. George Washington (February 22, 1732 – December 14, 1799)[1] led Americas Continental Army to victory over Britain in the American Revolutionary War (1775–1783), and in 1789 was elected the first President of the United States of America. ... Epaulette [pronunciation: ĕp-ǝ-lĕt] is a French word meaning verbatim, little shoulders (epaule, referring to shoulder), often describes the shoulder decorations such as insignia or rank, especially in military or other organizations worn on the shoulder. ...

George Washington
George Washington

During the American Revolutionary War George Washington was the highest ranking officer of the Continental Army, and he held the title of "General and Commander in Chief" of the Continental Army. He wore three stars on his epaulets. Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (972x1184, 124 KB) Česky | Deutsch | English | Ελληνικά | Español | فارسی | Français | עברית | Indonesian | Italiano | 日本語 | 한국어 | Magyar | Nederlands | Polski | Português | Românǎ | Русский | Slovenščina | Српски | Sunda | 简体中文 | 正體中文 | Türkçe | Русский | Українська +/- File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (972x1184, 124 KB) Česky | Deutsch | English | Ελληνικά | Español | فارسی | Français | עברית | Indonesian | Italiano | 日本語 | 한국어 | Magyar | Nederlands | Polski | Português | Românǎ | Русский | Slovenščina | Српски | Sunda | 简体中文 | 正體中文 | Türkçe | Русский | Українська +/- File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other...


A year prior to his death, Washington was appointed by President John Adams to the rank of Lieutenant General in the United States Army during the Quasi-War with France. Washington never exercised active authority under his new rank, however, and Adams made the appointment to frighten the French, with whom war seemed certain. For other persons named John Adams, see John Adams (disambiguation). ... The Quasi-War was an undeclared war fought entirely at sea between the United States and France from 1798 to 1801. ...


In an Act of the United States Congress on March 3, 1799, Congress provided "that a Commander of the United States shall be appointed and commissioned by the style of General of the Armies of the United States and the present office and title of Lieutenant General shall thereafter be abolished." The proposed senior general officer rank was not bestowed, however. When George Washington died, he was listed as a lieutenant general on the rolls of the United States Army. Type Bicameral Houses Senate House of Representatives President of the Senate President pro tempore Dick Cheney, (R) since January 20, 2001 Robert C. Byrd, (D) since January 4, 2007 Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi, (D) since January 4, 2007 Members 535 plus 4 Delegates and 1 Resident Commissioner Political... is the 62nd day of the year (63rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1799 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... An officer is a member of a military, naval, or if applicable, other uniformed services who holds a position of responsibility. ... The United States Army is the largest and oldest branch of the armed forces of the United States. ...


After the Revolutionary War, the tiny United States Army at first had no active duty General Officers. When it got General Officers again, the highest rank in the Army was Major General, and the senior Major General on the Army rolls was referred to as the Commanding General of the United States Army. The position was abolished at the start of the 20th century and replaced with that of Chief of Staff of the United States Army. Prior to the institution of the Chief of Staff of the United States Army in 1903, there was generally a single senior-most officer in the army. ... (19th century - 20th century - 21st century - more centuries) Decades: 1900s 1910s 1920s 1930s 1940s 1950s 1960s 1970s 1980s 1990s As a means of recording the passage of time, the 20th century was that century which lasted from 1901–2000 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar (1900–1999... The Flag of the Chief of Staff of the United States Army The Chief of Staff of the United States Army (CSA) is the professional head of the United States Army who is responsible for ensuring readiness of the Army. ...


American Civil War era

Ulysses Grant in the uniform of a Lieutenant General
Ulysses Grant in the uniform of a Lieutenant General

The rank of Lieutenant General remained inactive until Winfield Scott received a brevet promotion to the rank in 1847.[1] Image File history File links Download high resolution version (974x1570, 166 KB)Lt. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (974x1570, 166 KB)Lt. ... For other uses of Winfield Scott, see Winfield Scott (disambiguation). ...


On March 13, 1861, General Order No. 6 said that the position of Major General Commanding the Army was entitled to wear three stars.[2] In 1864 Ulysses S. Grant was appointed Lieutenant General and took command of the Union forces. He used the three star insignia formerly assigned to the position of Major General Commanding the Army. is the 72nd day of the year (73rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1861 (MDCCCLXI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Ulysses S. Grant,[2] born Hiram Ulysses Grant (April 27, 1822 – July 23, 1885), was an American general and the eighteenth President of the United States (1869–1877). ... US Lieutenant General insignia In three branches of the United States Army, United States Marine Corps and United States Air Force, a Lieutenant General is also called a three-star general, named for the three stars worn on the uniform. ... The 21st Michigan Infantry, a company of Shermans veterans. ...


Note that the Confederate States Army had already been using the rank of "Lieutenant General" for its corps commanders prior to the U.S. Army's adoption of the term. The two ranks were not synonymous. Unlike the US Army, the Confederate States Army promoted numerous officers to the ranks of Lieutenant General and General (18 and 7, respectively).[3] A group of Confederate soldiers The Confederate States Army (CSA) was organized in February 1861 to defend the newly formed Confederate States of America from military action by the United States government during the American Civil War. ...

Stonewall Jackson wearing the generic insignia of a Confederate General Officer
Stonewall Jackson wearing the generic insignia of a Confederate General Officer

During the American Civil War all generals in the Confederate military, regardless of grade, wore an insignia of three stars in a row, placed in an open wreath, with the middle one being slightly larger. One exception to this was General Robert E. Lee, who chose to wear the insignia of the lower rank of a (full) colonel (three stars) even after he became overall commander of the Confederate armies in 1865. (Napoleon Bonaparte and Gerd von Rundstedt also wore colonels' uniforms.) Download high resolution version (2500x2987, 752 KB) File links The following pages link to this file: Stonewall Jackson Categories: U.S. history images ... Download high resolution version (2500x2987, 752 KB) File links The following pages link to this file: Stonewall Jackson Categories: U.S. history images ... For other uses of Stonewall Jackson, see Stonewall Jackson (disambiguation). ... Combatants United States of America (Union) Confederate States of America (Confederacy) Commanders Abraham Lincoln, Ulysses S. Grant Jefferson Davis, Robert E. Lee Strength 2,200,000 1,064,000 Casualties 110,000 killed in action, 360,000 total dead, 275,200 wounded 93,000 killed in action, 258,000 total... Motto Deo Vindice (Latin: Under God, Our Vindicator) Anthem (none official) God Save the South (unofficial) The Bonnie Blue Flag (unofficial) Dixie (unofficial) Capital Montgomery, Alabama (until May 29, 1861) Richmond, Virginia (May 29, 1861–April 2, 1865) Danville, Virginia (from April 3, 1865) Language(s) English (de facto) Religion... // For other uses, see Robert E. Lee (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Colonel (disambiguation). ... Bonaparte as general Napoleon Bonaparte ( 15 August 1769 – 5 May 1821) was a general of the French Revolution and was the ruler of France as First Consul (Premier Consul) of the French Republic from November 11, 1799 to May 18, 1804, then as Emperor of the French (Empereur des... Karl Rudolf Gerd von Rundstedt (December 12, 1875 - February 24, 1953) was a Generalfeldmarschall of the German Army during World War II. He held some of the highest field commands in all phases of the war. ...


In the 19th century, the rank of a US general was also shown by the arrangement of buttons on the coat. This was a feature of the general dress uniform until the Army abandoned blue uniforms during World War I. Alternative meaning: Nineteenth Century (periodical) (18th century — 19th century — 20th century — more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 19th century was that century which lasted from 1801-1900 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar. ... “The Great War ” redirects here. ...

General of the Army shoulder strap insignia, 1866-1872 (Grant and Sherman).
General of the Army shoulder strap insignia, 1866-1872 (Grant and Sherman).

On July 25, 1866, the U.S. Congress established the rank of "General of the Army of the United States" for Ulysses S. Grant. When appointed General of the Army, Grant wore the rank insignia of four stars and coat buttons arranged in three groups of four. Image File history File links Us_army_general_insignia_1866. ... is the 206th day of the year (207th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1866 (MDCCCLXVI) is a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar. ...


Unlike the 1944 rank with a similar title, the 1866 rank of General of the Army was a four-star rank. Although unlike modern four-star Generals, only one officer could hold the 1866-1888 rank of General of the Army at any time.

General of the Army shoulder strap insignia, 1872-1888 (Sherman and Sheridan).
General of the Army shoulder strap insignia, 1872-1888 (Sherman and Sheridan).

After Grant retired to private life, he was succeeded as General of the Army by William T. Sherman, effective March 4, 1869. In 1872, Sherman ordered the insignia changed to two stars with the arms of the United States in between. Image File history File links Us_army_general_insignia_1872. ... Portrait of William Tecumseh Sherman by Mathew Brady William Tecumseh Sherman (February 8, 1820 – February 14, 1891) was an American soldier, businessman, and author. ... is the 63rd day of the year (64th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1869 (MDCCCLXIX) is a common year starting on Friday (link will take you to calendar) of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Sunday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar. ...


By an Act of June 1, 1888, the grade of lieutenant general was discontinued and merged in that of General of the Army, which was then conferred upon Philip H. Sheridan. (The cover of Sheridan's autobiography was decorated with four stars within a rectangle evocative of the four-star shoulder strap worn by Grant.) The rank of general of the Army ceased to exist upon the death of Sheridan on August 5, 1888 and the highest rank of the United States Army was again the two star major general rank. The Army had a few more Lieutenant Generals throughout parts of the period from 1895 to 1909. is the 152nd day of the year (153rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the toll-free telephone number see Toll-free telephone number Year 1888 (MDCCCLXXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Sunday (click on link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Friday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Philip Sheridan Philip Henry Sheridan (March 6, 1831 – August 5, 1888), a military man and one of the great generals in the American Civil War. ... is the 217th day of the year (218th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the toll-free telephone number see Toll-free telephone number Year 1888 (MDCCCLXXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Sunday (click on link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Friday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Insignia of a United States Air Force Major General German Generalmajor Insignia Major General is a military rank used in many countries. ...


World War I era

General John Pershing
General John Pershing

Three star Lieutenant Generals and four star Generals were reauthorized temporarily for World War I. Tasker H. Bliss (December 31, 1853November 9, 1930) and John J. Pershing (September 13, 1860July 15, 1948) were promoted to General in October 1917. Peyton C. March was promoted to General in May 1918. Hunter Liggett and Robert Lee Bullard were promoted to Lieutenant General on October 16, 1918. On September 3, 1919 Pub.L. 66-45 granted Pershing the rank of "General of the Armies of the United States" in recognition of his performance as the commander of the American Expeditionary Force. After the war, in 1920, the Lieutenant Generals and Generals reverted to their permanent ranks of Major General[4], except for Pershing. Pershing retired from the United States Army on September 13, 1924, and retained his rank of General of the Armies of the United States until his death in 1948.[5] Pershing wore four stars during his tenure as General of the Armies, but was later considered a five or six star general as the result of the re-creation of the General of the Army rank in 1944. Generals were reauthorized in 1929, starting with Charles Pelot Summerall. Image File history File links GEN_Pershing_as_Chief_Of_Staff. ... Image File history File links GEN_Pershing_as_Chief_Of_Staff. ... Gen. ... is the 365th day of the year (366th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1853 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... is the 313th day of the year (314th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1930 (MCMXXX) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display 1930 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... John Joseph Black Jack Pershing (September 13, 1860 – July 15, 1948) was an officer in the United States Army. ... is the 256th day of the year (257th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1860 is the leap year starting on Sunday. ... is the 196th day of the year (197th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1948 (MCMXLVIII) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will display the 1948 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Peyton Conway March (December 27, 1864 - April 13, 1955) was an American soldier and Army Chief of Staff. ... Hunter Liggett was a general of the United States Army. ... Robert Lee Bullard (b. ... is the 246th day of the year (247th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1919 (MCMXIX) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar). ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Officers of the American Expeditionary Forces and the Baker mission The American Expeditionary Forces or AEF was the United States military force sent to Europe in World War I.(In France, AEF is a news agency specialised in Education and Formation) The AEF fought alongside allied forces against imperial German... is the 256th day of the year (257th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the rap album, see 1924 (album). ... General Charles Pelot Summerall Charles Pelot Summerall (1867 - 1954) was a U.S. general who fought in World War I and served as Army Chief of Staff between 1926 and 1930. ...


World War II era

Lieutenant Generals were reauthorized on August 5, 1939.


During World War II most American Generals held temporary or “theater” appointments in the Army of the United States. Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... The Army of the United States is the official name for the conscription (U.S. term: draft) force of the United States Army that may be raised at the discretion of the United States Congress in the event of the United States entering into a major armed conflict. ...


Until the Second World War, the highest Marine Corps general rank was that of Lieutenant General with Alexander Vandegrift becoming the first four star Marine general (on active duty) in history, his rank was awarded after becoming the Commandant of the Marine Corps. Alexander Archer Vandegrift (March 13, 1887 – May 8, 1973) was a general in the United States Marine Corps. ... The Commandant of the United States Marine Corps is the highest ranking officer of the United States Marine Corps and a member of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, reporting to the Secretary of the Navy but not to the Chief of Naval Operations. ...


The second version of General of the Army, colloquially known as a "Five Star General" was created by Pub.L. 78-482 passed on 14 December 1944,[6] first as a temporary rank, then made permanent 23 March 1946 by an act of the 79th Congress.[7] It was created to give the most senior American commanders parity of rank with their British counterparts holding the rank of field marshal. The acts also created a comparable rank of Fleet Admiral for the Navy. This second General of the Army rank is not considered comparable to the American Civil War era version. This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... is the 348th day of the year (349th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1944 (MCMXLIV) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 82nd day of the year (83rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1946 (MCMXLVI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full 1946 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... ... Note: This article is about the military usage of the word marshal. For other usages, see the end of this article. ... Fleet Admiral Collar Device Fleet Admiral Shoulder Board Fleet Admiral Sleeve Insignia A Fleet Admiral in the United States Navy is an admiral considered to be the equivalent of the United States Armys General of the Army. ...


The insignia for General of the Army, as created in 1944, consisted of five stars in a pentagonal pattern, with points touching. The five officers who have held the 1944 version of General of the Army were:

      •   George C. Marshall 16 December 1944
      •   Douglas MacArthur 18 December 1944
      •   Dwight D. Eisenhower     20 December 1944
      •   Henry H. Arnold 21 December 1944
      •   Omar Bradley 20 September 1950

The timing of the first four appointments was coordinated with the appointment of the U.S. Navy's five-star Fleet Admirals (on 15, 17, and 19 December 1944) to establish both a clear order of seniority and a near-equivalence between the services. George C. Marshall George Catlett Marshall (December 31, 1880–October 16, 1959), an American military leader and statesman, was born into a middle-class family in Uniontown, Pennsylvania. ... is the 350th day of the year (351st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1944 (MCMXLIV) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the American general; for the municipality in the Philippines, see General MacArthur, Eastern Samar. ... is the 352nd day of the year (353rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1944 (MCMXLIV) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Dwight David Eisenhower (October 14, 1890 – March 28, 1969) was an American General and politician, who served as the thirty-fourth President of the United States (1953–1961). ... is the 354th day of the year (355th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1944 (MCMXLIV) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... General of the Air Force Henry Harley Hap Arnold GCB (June 25, 1886 – January 15, 1950) was an aviation pioneer and Chief of the United States Army Air Corps (from 1938), Commanding General of the U.S. Army Air Forces (from 1941 until 1945) and the first and only General... is the 355th day of the year (356th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1944 (MCMXLIV) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Omar Nelson Bradley (February 12, 1893 – April 8, 1981) was one of the main U.S. Army field commanders in North Africa and Europe during World War II and a General of the Army of the United States Army. ... is the 263rd day of the year (264th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1950 (MCML) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


A historical rumor suggests that the title 'General of the Army' was used instead of the 'Field Marshal' so that George Marshall would not be known as "Marshal Marshall". Most military sources agree that it is more likely that the rank was named after its 19th century counterpart and was so named because the rank of Field Marshal was considered by the U.S. military to be a European rank. Alternative meaning: Nineteenth Century (periodical) (18th century — 19th century — 20th century — more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 19th century was that century which lasted from 1801-1900 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Dwight Eisenhower resigned his Army commission on May 31, 1952 to run for president. After serving two terms, his successor, John F. Kennedy, signed Pub.L. 87-3 on March 23, 1961 which returned Eisenhower to Active Duty of Regular Army in grade of General of the Army dated back to December 1944. This rank is today commemorated on the signs denoting Interstate Highways as part of the Eisenhower Interstate System, which display five silver stars on a light blue background.[8][9] is the 151st day of the year (152nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1952 (MCMLII) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... John Kennedy and JFK redirect here. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... is the 82nd day of the year (83rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1961 (MCMLXI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Interstate Highways in the lower 48 states. ... The Dwight D. Eisenhower National System of Interstate and Defense Highways, commonly called the Interstate Highway System, is a network of freeways in the United States. ...


Modern use

Summary

Insignia Description
Brigadier General (BG) Typically serves as Deputy Commander to the Commanding General of a division and assists in overseeing the planning and coordination of a mission. In an infantry brigade not attached to a division, a Brigadier General serves as the unit's commander, while a Colonel serves as deputy commander.
Major General (MG) Typically commands division-sized units (10,000 to 16,000 soldiers).
Lieutenant General (LTG) An Army or Marine Corps Lieutenant General typically commands a corps-sized unit (20,000 to 45,000 soldiers), while an Air Force Lieutenant General commands a large Numbered Air Force consisting of several wings. Additionally, Lieutenant Generals of all services serve as high-level staff officers at various major command headquarters and The Pentagon, often as the heads of their departments.
General (GEN) Commands all operations that fall within his geographical area. The Chief of Staff of the Army and the Commandant of the Marine Corps are four-star Generals. Generals command major areas of responsibility and hold the highest of military positions in the Department of Defense. Air Force generals usually command Major Commands or Unified Commands. Usually they are pilots.
General of the Army This rank is only used in time of war where the commanding officer must be equal or of higher rank than those commanding armies/air forces from other nations. The last officers to hold this rank served during and immediately following World War II.
General of the Armies (Conjectured Insignia) This rank has not been used on an active duty military officer since General Pershing was promoted to the rank in 1919. George Washington was posthumously appointed General of the Armies of the Unites States in 1976.

Image File history File links USAF Brigadier General insignia, public domain image from af. ... A Brigadier General, or one-star general, is the lowest rank of general officer in the United States and some other countries, ranking just above Colonel and just below Major General. ... Symbol of the Polish 1st Legions Infantry Division in NATO code A division is a large military unit or formation usually consisting of around ten to twenty thousand soldiers. ... For other uses, see Colonel (disambiguation). ... USAF Major General insignia, public domain image from af. ... Insignia of a United States Air Force Major General German Generalmajor Insignia Major General is a military rank used in many countries. ... USAF Lieutenant General insignia, public domain image from af. ... US Lieutenant General insignia In three branches of the United States Army, United States Marine Corps and United States Air Force, a Lieutenant General is also called a three-star general, named for the three stars worn on the uniform. ... A corps (plural same as singular; a word that migrated from the French language, pronounced IPA: (cor), but originating in the Latin corpus, corporis meaning body) is either a large military unit or formation, an administrative grouping of troops within an army with a common function (such as artillery or... This is a list of Numbered Air Forces (NAF) of the United States Air Force Historically, a NAF is a level of command below a MAJCOM (Major Command), and above one or more Wings or independent Groups. ... This article is about the United States military building. ... USAF General insignia, public domain image from af. ... The Flag of the Chief of Staff of the United States Army The Chief of Staff of the United States Army (CSA) is the professional head of the United States Army who is responsible for insuring readiness of the Army. ... The Commandant of the United States Marine Corps is the highest ranking officer of the United States Marine Corps and a member of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, reporting to the Secretary of the Navy but not to the Chief of Naval Operations. ... Department of Defense redirects here. ... Image File history File links I, Wguynes, am the artist of this graphic. ... This article is about the United States Army rank General of the Army. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... General of the Armies of the United States is the highest possible rank in the United States military hierarchy, equal to a Generalissimo. ... George Washington (February 22, 1732 – December 14, 1799)[1] led Americas Continental Army to victory over Britain in the American Revolutionary War (1775–1783), and in 1789 was elected the first President of the United States of America. ...

Elaboration

After the close of the Second World War, Generals were normally promoted permanently to Brigadier General and Major General, with temporary promotions to Lieutenant and full General to fill senior positions as needed. In theory, a General would be expected to vacate their three- or four-star rank at the termination of their assignment, unless they were placed in an equal ranking billet. Douglas MacArthur, who served as four-star general and Army Chief of Staff, reverted to two stars after his CoS tour ended but chose to stay on active duty in the United States Army. This article is about the American general; for the municipality in the Philippines, see General MacArthur, Eastern Samar. ...


The practice of using Lieutenant and full General as a temporary rank continues to the current day, although the term “temporary” is in name only since most three- and four-star generals are expected to retain their rank regardless of their assignment. Such officers are also almost always granted permanent retirement rank, as well, in the last grade they held.


There have been no officers appointed to the rank of General of the Army since Omar Bradley and, in the 21st century U.S. military, further appointments are highly unlikely unless the United States were to become involved in a major war on the scale of World War II. Omar Nelson Bradley (February 12, 1893 – April 8, 1981) was one of the main U.S. Army field commanders in North Africa and Europe during World War II and a General of the Army of the United States Army. ... 20XX redirects here. ...


In the 1990s, the Defense Department gave some indication that the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff would possibly one day be a position worthy of the rank General of the Army, Fleet Admiral, or General of the Air Force as appropriate. This would be problematic in that with the appointment of United States Marine Corps Generals as Chairman, there is no current five-star USMC rank. Congressional sources indicated that there were no plans to promote any modern-day general officers to the rank of General of the Army. The Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff is by law the highest ranking military officer of the United States military, and the principal military advisor to the President of the United States. ...


The rank of General of the Army is still maintained as a rank of the U.S. military, and could again be bestowed pending approval of the United States Congress. The rank would carry a special pay grade just as the current ranks of officers do. Currently U.S. military policy is that General of the Army, General of the Air Force, and Fleet Admiral are ranks only to be used in time of war when the commanding officer must be equal to or of higher rank than those commanding armies from another nation.

A modern day U.S. Air Force General
A modern day U.S. Air Force General

In the 1990s, the Air Force adopted a sleeve stripe insignia, similar to the United States Navy, and for less than a year U.S. Air Force generals maintained the same insignia as Navy admirals. The insignia pattern was abolished and remains one of the shortest lived uniform patterns in the history of the U.S. military. Download high resolution version (1600x2000, 660 KB) Source: http://www. ... Download high resolution version (1600x2000, 660 KB) Source: http://www. ...


Statutory limits

U.S. law strictly limits the total number of general officers that may be on active duty at any time. This number is set at 302 for the Army, 279 for the Air Force, and 93 for the Marine Corps. Of these, no more than 50% may rank higher than Brigadier General. The percentage of generals ranking higher than Major General is capped at 15.7% for the Army and Air Force and 17.5% for the Marine Corps, and out of that total, no more than 25% may rank as a full General. This typically works out to about thirty full Generals on active duty at a time. There are currently 39 active duty four-star officers in the uniformed services of the United States: 12 in the Army, 9 in the Navy, 11 in the Air Force, 5 in the Marine Corps, 1 in the Coast Guard, and 1 in the Public Health Service Commissioned Corps. ...


All promotions to general require presidential nomination and Senate confirmation, as do subsequent promotions. The United States Senate is the upper house of the U.S. Congress, smaller than the United States House of Representatives. ...


Six Star Rank

There is some debate about whether or not the General of the Armies rank should be considered a Six Star rank. Further details about that can be found at General of the Armies#Six Star Rank. General of the Armies of the United States is the highest possible rank in the United States military hierarchy, equal to a Generalissimo. ... General of the Armies of the United States is the highest possible rank in the United States military hierarchy, equal to a Generalissimo. ...


George Washington

After World War II, which saw the introduction of U.S. "5-star" officers who outranked Washington, both Congress and the President revisited the issue of Washington's rank. To maintain George Washington's proper position as the first Commanding General of the United States Army, he was appointed, posthumously, to the grade of General of the Armies of the United States by congressional joint resolution Public Law 94-479 January 19, 1976, approved by President Gerald R. Ford on October 11, 1976. The Department of the Army Order 31-3, issued on March 13, 1978 had an effective appointment date of July 4, 1976.[10] The rank ensures that no United States military officer outranks George Washington. [11][12][13] The military career of George Washington spans over forty years of service to include a promotion over one hundred and seventy five years after his death. ... is the 19th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1976 Pick up sticks(MCMLXXVI) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Gerald Rudolph Ford, Jr. ... is the 284th day of the year (285th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1976 Pick up sticks(MCMLXXVI) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 72nd day of the year (73rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1978 (MCMLXXVIII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays the 1978 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 185th day of the year (186th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1976 Pick up sticks(MCMLXXVI) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Navy Equivalent Ranks

The rank of Brigadier General is equivalent to the United States Navy's rank of Rear Admiral (lower half). USN redirects here. ... The term Rear Admiral originated from the days of Naval Sailing Squadrons, and can trace its origins to the British Royal Navy. ...


The rank of Major General is equivalent to the U.S. Navy's rank of Rear Admiral (upper half). The term Rear Admiral originated from the days of Naval Sailing Squadrons, and can trace its origins to the British Royal Navy. ...


The rank of Lieutenant General is equivalent to the U.S. Navy's rank of Vice Admiral. Vice Admiral is a naval rank of three star level, equivalent to Lieutenant General in seniority. ...


The rank of General is equivalent to the U.S. Navy's rank of Admiral. For other uses, see Admiral (disambiguation). ...


The rank of General of the Army is equivalent to the U.S. Navy's rank of Fleet Admiral. A Fleet Admiral in the United States Navy is an Admiral considered the equivalent of the United States Armys General of the Army. ...


The rank of General of the Armies is equivalent to the U.S. Navy's rank of Admiral of the Navy. Admiral of the Navy has only been held by one person in history, George Dewey. As with General of the Armies, a proposal was made during World War II to bring back the rank as a six-star equivalent, under the title Flag Admiral. Chester Nimitz was briefly considered for the position, but the proposal was dropped by the United States Navy Department before the war ended, and has not been revived since. Insignia for Admiral of the Navy, worn by Admiral George Dewey Admiral of the Navy has only been held by one person in US Navy history: George Dewey. ... George Dewey (December 26, 1837 – January 16, 1917) was an admiral of the United States Navy, best known for his victory (without the loss of a single life of his own forces due to combat; one man died of a heart attack) at the Battle of Manila Bay during the... Flag Admiral was a proposed rank of the United States Navy during the last year of World War II. It is considered unofficially as a six star Admiral rank, the equivalent to the rank of General of the Armies in the United States Army. ... Chester William Nimitz (February 24, 1885 – February 20, 1966) was the Commander in Chief of Pacific Forces for the United States and Allied forces during World War II. He was the United States leading authority on submarines, as well as Chief of the Navys Bureau of Navigation in 1939. ... Seal The United States Department of the Navy was established by an Act of Congress on April 30, 1798, to provide administrative and technical support, and civilian leadership to the United States Navy. ...


References

  • Eicher, John H., and Eicher, David J., Civil War High Commands, Stanford University Press, 2001, ISBN 0-8047-3641-3.
  • Commanding Generals and Chiefs of Staff (Center for Military History)
  • How many U.S. Army five-star generals have there been and who were they? from the U.S. Army Center of Military History
  • Military service record of Douglas MacArthur, Military Personnel Records Center
  • Naval service record of Chester Nimitz, Military Personnel Records Center
  1. ^ Eicher, p. 475.
  2. ^ General Order No. 6 Regulations for the Uniform and Dress of the Army of the United States 1861
  3. ^ Eicher, pp. 787-88.
  4. ^ Only Major Generals Now; March, Liggett and Bullard Lose War Rank The New York Times, June 30, 1920
  5. ^ How many U.S. Army five-star generals have there been and who were they?
  6. ^ Public Law 482. Retrieved on 2007-10-22.
  7. ^ Public Law 333, 79th Congress. Naval Historical Center (11 April 2007). Retrieved on 2007-10-22.
  8. ^ Eisenhower Military Ranks. Eisenhower Presidential Center. Retrieved on 2007-10-22.
  9. ^ Eisenhower Resigned as General. Eisenhower Presidential Center. Retrieved on 2007-10-22.
  10. ^ Promotion order of George Washington, Military Personnel Records Center ( Image:Orders 31-3.jpg and Image:Orders 31-3 Cover Letter.jpg).
  11. ^ By George, IT IS Washington's Birthday! By C. L. Arbelbide
  12. ^ Washington's Birthday Holiday Honors "Father of our Country"
  13. ^ Congratulations to Joseph J. Frank

This article is about the American general; for the municipality in the Philippines, see General MacArthur, Eastern Samar. ... Military Personnel Records Center The Military Personnel Records Center (NPRC-MPR)[1] located at 9700 Page Avenue in Saint Louis, Missouri, USA is a branch of the National Personnel Records Center and is the repository of over 56 million military personnel records, health files, and medical records pertaining to retired... Chester William Nimitz (February 24, 1885 – February 20, 1966) was the Commander in Chief of Pacific Forces for the United States and Allied forces during World War II. He was the United States leading authority on submarines, as well as Chief of the Navys Bureau of Navigation in 1939. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 295th day of the year (296th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Naval Historical Center (NHC) is the official history program of the United States Navy. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 295th day of the year (296th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Eisenhower Presidential Center includes the Eisenhower presidential library, President Dwight David Eisenhowers boyhood home, Museum, and gravesite. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 295th day of the year (296th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 295th day of the year (296th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (2420 × 1812 pixel, file size: 188 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Author: United States Government / Department of the Army s:Order 31-3 that promoted George Washington to the rank of General of the Armies of the... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 455 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (2420 × 3188 pixel, file size: 385 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Author: United States Government / Department of the Army Cover letter for s:Order 31-3 that promoted George Washington to the rank of General of the...

External links

See also


  Results from FactBites:
 
General (United States) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (821 words)
General is the most senior rank currently used in the United States Army, United States Air Force and United States Marine Corps.
One exception to this was General Robert E. Lee who chose to wear the insignia of the lower rank of a (full) colonel (three stars) even after he became overall commander of the Confederate armies in 1865.
Brigadier General (BG): Typically serves as Deputy Commander to the Commanding General of a division and assists in overseeing the planning and coordination of a mission.
United States Attorney General - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (296 words)
The United States Attorney General is the head of the United States Department of Justice (see 28 U.S.C.) concerned with legal affairs and is the chief law enforcement officer of the United States government.
The Attorney General is appointed by the President of the United States and confirmed by the United States Senate.
The Attorney General serves as a member of the President's Cabinet, the only member who is not given the title Secretary.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m