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Encyclopedia > Gene Kelly
Gene Kelly

Gene Kelly
Birth name Eugene Curran Kelly
Born August 23, 1912(1912-08-23)
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, U.S.
Died February 2, 1996 (aged 83)
Beverly Hills, California, U.S.
Years active 1942 - 1985
Spouse(s) Betsy Blair (1941-1957)
Jeanne Coyne (1960-1973)
Patricia Ward (1990-1996)

Eugene Curran Kelly (August 23, 1912February 2, 1996), better known as Gene Kelly, was an American dancer, actor, singer, director, producer, and choreographer. Jean Louisa Kelly (born March 9, 1972) is an American actress and singer. ... Image File history File links Gene_Kelly. ... is the 235th day of the year (236th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1912 (MCMXII) was a leap year starting on Monday in the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Tuesday in the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Pittsburgh redirects here. ... Capital Harrisburg Largest city Philadelphia Largest metro area Delaware Valley Area  Ranked 33rd  - Total 46,055 sq mi (119,283 km²)  - Width 280 miles (455 km)  - Length 160 miles (255 km)  - % water 2. ... Motto: (Out Of Many, One) (traditional) In God We Trust (1956 to date) Anthem: The Star-Spangled Banner Capital Washington D.C. Largest city New York City None at federal level (English de facto) Government Federal constitutional republic  - President George Walker Bush (R)  - Vice President Dick Cheney (R) Independence from... is the 33rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1996 (MCMXCVI) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full 1996 Gregorian calendar). ... Beverly Hills redirects here. ... Official language(s) English Capital Sacramento Largest city Los Angeles Largest metro area Greater Los Angeles Area  Ranked 3rd  - Total 158,302 sq mi (410,000 km²)  - Width 250 miles (400 km)  - Length 770 miles (1,240 km)  - % water 4. ... Motto: (Out Of Many, One) (traditional) In God We Trust (1956 to date) Anthem: The Star-Spangled Banner Capital Washington D.C. Largest city New York City None at federal level (English de facto) Government Federal constitutional republic  - President George Walker Bush (R)  - Vice President Dick Cheney (R) Independence from... See also: 1941 in film 1942 1943 in film 1940s in film years in film film // Events Carole Lombard is killed in a plane crash when returning from a War Bond tour. ... // Back to the Future, starring Michael J. Fox, Christopher Lloyd and Lea Thompson Rambo: First Blood Part II, starring Sylvester Stallone Rocky IV, starring Sylvester Stallone The Color Purple, starring Whoopi Goldberg, Danny Glover, Oprah Winfrey, Margaret Avery, Rae Dawn Chong, Adolph Caesar Out of Africa, starring Meryl Streep and... Academy Award The Academy Awards, popularly known as the Oscars, are the most prominent and most watched film awards ceremony in the world. ... The Academy Honorary Award is given irregularly by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences to celebrate motion picture achievements that are not covered by existing Academy Awards. ... The César Award is the national film award of France first given out in 1975. ... César: Prize (César dhonneur) ... An Emmy Award. ... Illustration by Arthur Rackham from a 1918 English Fairy Tales, by Flora Annie Steel Jack and the Beanstalk is an English fairy tale, closely associated with the tale of Jack the Giant Killer. ... The Golden Globe Awards are American awards for motion pictures and television programs, given out each year during a formal dinner. ... The Cecil B. DeMille Award for lifetime achievement in motion pictures has been given annually since 1952 by the Hollywood Foreign Press Association at the Golden Globe Award ceremonies in Hollywood, California. ... The Actor: The Screen Actors Guild Award Statue The Screen Actors Guild Awards are an annual award given by the Screen Actors Guild (SAG) to recognize outstanding performances by members. ... The Screen Actors Guilds National Honors and Tributes Committee bestows an annual Life Achievement Award for outstanding achievement in fostering the finest ideals of the acting profession. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... is the 235th day of the year (236th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1912 (MCMXII) was a leap year starting on Monday in the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Tuesday in the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... is the 33rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1996 (MCMXCVI) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full 1996 Gregorian calendar). ... A contemporary dancer rehearsing in a dance studio Dance generally refers to human movement either used as a form of expression or presented in a social, spiritual or performance setting. ... For other uses, see Actor (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Singer (disambiguation). ... The film director, on the right, gives last minute direction to the cast and crew, whilst filming a costume drama on location in London. ... A film producer creates the conditions for making movies. ... Choreography (also known as dance composition) is the art of making structures in which movement occurs, the term composition may also refer to the navigation or connection of these movement structures. ...


Kelly was a major exponent of 20th century filmed dance, known for his energetic and athletic dancing style, his good looks and the likeable characters that he played on screen. Although he is probably best known today for his performance in Singin' in the Rain, he dominated the Hollywood musical film from the mid 1940s until its demise in the late 1950s. In 1999, the American Film Institute named Kelly among the Greatest Male Stars of All Time, ranking at No. 15. Singin in the Rain is a 1952 comedy musical film starring Gene Kelly, Donald OConnor, and Debbie Reynolds and directed by Kelly and Stanley Donen, with Kelly also handling the choreography. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Part of the AFI 100 Years. ...

Contents

Early life

Gene was the third son of James Kelly, a phonograph salesman, and Harriet Curran, who were both children of Irish Roman Catholic immigrants. He was born in the Highland Park neighborhood of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, U.S. and, at the age of eight, was enrolled by his mother in dance classes, along with his older brother James. They both rebelled, and, according to Kelly:" We didn't like it much and were continually involved in fistfights with the neighbourhood boys who called us sissies...I didn't dance again until I was fifteen."[1] Kelly returned to dance on his own initiative and by then was an accomplished sportsman and well able to take care of himself. He graduated from Peabody High School in 1929. He enrolled in Pennsylvania State College to study journalism but the economic crash obliged him to seek employment to help with the family's finances. At this time, he worked up dance routines with his younger brother Fred in order to earn prize money in local talent contests.[1] The Roman Catholic Church, most often spoken of simply as the Catholic Church, is the largest Christian church, with over one billion members. ... Highland Park is a racially diverse, mostly residential neighborhood in the northeastern corner of the city of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. ... Pittsburgh redirects here. ... Capital Harrisburg Largest city Philadelphia Largest metro area Delaware Valley Area  Ranked 33rd  - Total 46,055 sq mi (119,283 km²)  - Width 280 miles (455 km)  - Length 160 miles (255 km)  - % water 2. ... Motto: (Out Of Many, One) (traditional) In God We Trust (1956 to date) Anthem: The Star-Spangled Banner Capital Washington D.C. Largest city New York City None at federal level (English de facto) Government Federal constitutional republic  - President George Walker Bush (R)  - Vice President Dick Cheney (R) Independence from... // Peabody High School is a High School in Pittsburgh, PA is located on 515 North Highland Avenue Pittsburgh, PA 15206 its principal is Sophia Facaros Special Programs/Services for Students and Community Center for Advanced Studies (CAS); Pittsburgh Scholars Program (PSP); Advanced Placement courses; Public Safety Academy-magnet (training and... The Pennsylvania State University (commonly known as Penn State) is a state-related, land-grant university. ...


In 1931 Kelly enrolled at the University of Pittsburgh (Pitt), to study economics where he joined the Phi Kappa Theta fraternity and earned a Bachelor of Arts in Economics in 1933.[2] In 1930, his family started a dance studio on Munhall Road in the Squirrel Hill neighborhood of Pittsburgh. In 1932, it was renamed The Gene Kelly Studio of the Dance. A second location was opened in Johnstown, Pennsylvania in 1933. While still an undergraduate student and later as a student at Pitt's School of Law, Gene was a teacher at the dance studio. Eventually, though, he decided to pursue his career as a dance teacher and entertainer full-time and so dropped out of law school after two months. He began to focus increasingly on performing, later claiming: "With time I became disenchanted with teaching because the ratio of girls to boys was more than ten to one, and once the girls reached sixteen the dropout rate was very high."[1] In 1937, having successfully managed and developed the family's dance school business, he moved to New York City in search of work as a choreographer.[1] The University of Pittsburgh, commonly referred to as Pitt, is a state-related, doctoral/research university in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, United States. ... Phi Kappa Theta (ΦΚΘ) is a national social fraternity with over 50 chapters and colonies at universities across the United States. ... Murray Avenue in Squirrel Hill (2005) Squirrel Hill is a large residential neighborhood in the east end of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA. As of the census of 2000, there were 26,425 people, 12,030 households, and 6,325 families residing in the 15217 ZIP code, which covers approximately the same... Nickname: Location of Pennsylvania within the USA Johnstown, Cambria County, Pennsylvania, U.S.A. Coordinates: , Country State County Cambria Government  - Mayor Tom Trigona Area  - City  6. ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ...


Stage career

After a fruitless search, Kelly returned to Pittsburgh, to his first position as a choreographer with the Charles Gaynor musical revue Hold Your Hats at the Pittsburgh Playhouse in April, 1938. Kelly appeared in six of the sketches, one of which, "La Cumparsita", became the basis of an extended Spanish number in Anchors Aweigh eight years later. Anchors Aweigh is a 1945 musical comedy film, directed by George Sidney in which two sailors go on a four-day shore leave in Hollywood, accompanied by music and song, meet an aspiring young singer and try to help her get an audition at MGM. It stars Frank Sinatra, Gene...


His first Broadway assignment, in November 1938, was as a dancer in Cole Porter's Leave It to Me! as the American ambassador's secretary who supports Mary Martin while she sings "My Heart Belongs to Daddy". He had been hired by Robert Alton who had staged a show at the Pittsburgh Playhouse and been impressed by Kelly's teaching skills. When Alton moved on to choreograph One for the Money he hired Kelly to act, sing and dance in a total of eight routines. His first career breakthrough was in the Pulitzer Prize-winning The Time of Your Life, which opened on November 11, 1939, where for the first time on Broadway he danced to his own choreography. In the same year he received his first assignment as a Broadway choreographer, for Billy Rose's Diamond Horseshoe. His future wife, Betsy Blair was a member of the cast, they began dating and were married on October 16, 1941. For other uses of Broadway, see Broadway. ... Cole Albert Porter (June 9, 1891 – October 15, 1964) was an American composer and songwriter from Peru, Indiana. ... Leave It to Me! is a musical with music and lyrics by Cole Porter. ... Mary Virginia Martin (b. ... My Heart Belongs to Daddy is a song written by Cole Porter in 1938. ... Robert Alton (January 28, 1906 – June 12, 1957) was a Tony Award-winning American dancer and choreographer, a major figure in dance choreography of Broadway and Hollywood musicals during from the 1930s through to the early 1950s. ... The Pulitzer Prize is an American award regarded as the highest national honor in print journalism, literary achievements, and musical composition. ... This page meets Wikipedias criteria for speedy deletion. ... Billy Rose (September 6, 1899 – February 10, 1966) was an American theatrical showman. ...


In 1940, he was given the leading role in Rodgers and Hart's Pal Joey, again choreographed by Robert Alton, and this role propelled him to stardom. During its run he told reporters: "I don't believe in conformity to any school of dancing. I create what the drama and the music demand. While I am a hundred percent for ballet technique, I use only what I can adapt to my own use. I never let technique get in the way of mood or continuity."[1] It was at this time also, that his phenomenal commitment to rehearsal and hard work was noticed by his colleagues. Van Johnson who also appeared in Pal Joey recalls: "I watched him rehearsing, and it seemed to me that there was no possible room for improvement. Yet he wasn't satisfied. It was midnight and we had been rehearsing since eight in the morning. I was making my way sleepily down the long flight of stairs when I heard staccato steps coming from the stage...I could see just a single lamp burning. Under it, a figure was dancing...Gene."[1] Year 1940 (MCMXL) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display the full 1940 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Rodgers and Hart was the songwriting team consisting of Richard Rodgers and Lorenz Hart. ... Pal Joey Studio cast album 1950 Pal Joey is a 1940 Broadway musical by American writer John OHara, with music and lyrics by Richard Rodgers and Lorenz Hart. ... Van Johnson (born Charles Van Johnson on August 25, 1916, in Newport, Rhode Island) is an American film and television actor and dancer. ...


Offers from Hollywood began to arrive but Kelly was in no particular hurry to quit New York. Eventually, he signed with David O. Selznick, agreeing to go to Hollywood at the end of his commitment to Pal Joey, in October 1941. Prior to leaving he also choreographed the stage production of Best Foot Forward. David O. Selznick David Oliver Selznick (May 10, 1902–June 22, 1965), was one of the icon Hollywood producers of the Golden Age. ... Best Foot Forward (1943) is a film version of the hit 1941 Broadway musical comedy. ...


Kelly did not return to stage work until his MGM contract ended in 1957,[3] and in 1958 he directed Rodgers and Hammerstein's musical play Flower Drum Song. Early in 1960 Kelly, an ardent Francophile and fluent French speaker, was invited by A. M. Julien, the general administrator of Paris Opera to select his own material and create a modern ballet for the company, the first time an American received such an assignment. The result was Pas de Dieux, based on Greek mythology combined with the music of George Gershwin's Concerto in F. It was a major success, and led to his being honored with the Chevalier of the Legion d'Honneur by the French Government. Rodgers (left) and Hammerstein (right), with Irving Berlin (middle) and Helen Tamiris, watching auditions at the St. ... Flower Drum Song was originally a novel by Chinese American author C.Y. Lee. ... Exterior of the Palais Garnier. ... The bust of Zeus found at Otricoli (Sala Rotonda, Museo Pio-Clementino, Vatican) Greek mythology is the body of stories belonging to the Ancient Greeks concerning their gods and heroes, the nature of the world and the origins and significance of their own cult and ritual practices. ... “Gershwin” redirects here. ... Concerto in F is a composition by George Gershwin for solo piano and orchestra which is closer in form to a traditional concerto than the earlier jazz-influenced Rhapsody in Blue. ... French Legion of Honor The Légion dhonneur (Legion of Honor ( AmE) or Legion of Honour ( ComE)) is an Order of Chivalry awarded by the President of France. ...


Film career

1941-1944: Becoming established in Hollywood

Gene Kelly dancing with Jerry in Anchors Aweigh (1945)

Selznick sold half of Kelly's contract to MGM and loaned him out to MGM for his first motion picture: For Me and My Gal (1942) with Judy Garland. Kelly was "appalled at the sight of myself blown up twenty times. I had an awful feeling that I was a tremendous flop"[1] but the picture did well and, in the face of much internal resistance, Arthur Freed of MGM picked up the other half of Kelly's contract. After appearing in the B-movie drama Pilot no. 5 he took the male lead in Cole Porter's Du Barry Was a Lady opposite Lucille Ball. His first opportunity to dance to his own choreography came in his next picture Thousands Cheer, where he performed a mock-love dance with a mop. Image File history File links 1kelly1. ... Image File history File links 1kelly1. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Anchors Aweigh is a 1945 musical comedy film, directed by George Sidney in which two sailors go on a four-day shore leave in Hollywood, accompanied by music and song, meet an aspiring young singer and try to help her get an audition at MGM. It stars Frank Sinatra, Gene... MGM logo Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer or MGM, is a large media company, involved primarily in the production and distribution of cinema and television programs. ... For Me and My Gal can refer to: For Me and My Gal, a 1942 Gene Kelly musical directed by Busby Berkeley For Me and My Gal, a 1917 popular standard song by George W. Meyer, Edgar Leslie, and E. Ray Goetz Category: ... See also: 1941 in film 1942 1943 in film 1940s in film years in film film // Events Carole Lombard is killed in a plane crash when returning from a War Bond tour. ... Judy Garland (born Frances Ethel Gumm; June 10, 1922 - June 22, 1969) was an Academy Award-nominated American film actress and singer, best known for her role as Dorothy Gale in The Wizard of Oz (1939). ... Arthur Freed (September 9, 1894 - April 12, 1973) was born Arthur Grossman in Down Ton Ton Village. ... Pilot #5 was a 1943 film starring Gene Kelly, Franchot Tone, Marsha Hunt, Van Johnson, and an uncredited Peter Lawford. ... DuBarry Was a Lady was a 1939 musical with songs by Cole Porter. ... Lucille Désirée Ball (August 6, 1911 – April 26, 1989) was an iconic American comedian, actress and star of the landmark sitcoms I Love Lucy, The Lucy Show, and Heres Lucy. ... Thousands Cheer was an American musical-comedy released by MGM in 1943. ...


He achieved his breakthrough as a dancer on film, when MGM loaned him out to Columbia to play opposite Rita Hayworth in Cover Girl (1944), where he created a memorable routine dancing to his own reflection. In his next film Anchors Aweigh (1945), MGM virtually gave him a free hand to devise a range of dance routines, including the celebrated and much imitated [4] animated dances with Tom and Jerry, and his duets with Frank Sinatra. This role garnered him his first and only Academy Award nomination for Best Actor. In Ziegfeld Follies (1946) - which was produced in 1944 but not released until 1946 - Kelly teamed up with Fred Astaire - for whom he had the greatest admiration - in the famous "The Babbitt and the Bromide" challenge dance routine before leaving the studio for wartime service. Throughout this period Kelly was obliged to appear in straight acting roles in a series of cheap B-movies, now largely forgotten. Rita Hayworth (October 17, 1918 – May 14, 1987), was an American actress of Spanish and Anglo-Irish descent who reached fame during the 1940s as the eras leading sex symbol. ... Cover Girl is a 1944 musical film starring Rita Hayworth and Gene Kelly. ... // July 20 - Since You Went Away is released. ... Anchors Aweigh is a 1945 musical comedy film, directed by George Sidney in which two sailors go on a four-day shore leave in Hollywood, accompanied by music and song, meet an aspiring young singer and try to help her get an audition at MGM. It stars Frank Sinatra, Gene... // Paramount Studios releases theatrical short cartoon titled The Friendly Ghost, featuring ghost named Casper With Rossellinis Roma Città aperta, Italian neorealist cinema begins. ... For other uses, see Tom and Jerry (disambiguation). ... “Sinatra” redirects here. ... Although he never won an Oscar for any of his movie performances, the comedian Bob Hope received two honorary Oscars for his contributions to cinema. ... The Academy Award for Best Actor is one of the awards given to people working in the motion picture industry by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences; nominations are made by Academy members who are actors and actresses. ... This article is about the film. ... See also: 1945 in film 1946 1947 in film 1940s in film years in film film // Events Top grossing films North America The Bells of St. ... Fred Astaire (May 10, 1899 – June 22, 1987), born Frederick Austerlitz in Omaha, Nebraska,[1] was an American film and Broadway stage dancer, choreographer, singer and actor. ...


At the end of 1944, Kelly enlisted in the United States Naval Air Service and was commissioned as lieutenant, junior grade. He was stationed in the Photographic Section, Washington D.C., where he was involved in writing and directing a range of documentaries,[5] and this stimulated his interest in the production side of film-making.[2] USN redirects here. ...


1946-1952: The glory years at MGM

On his return to Hollywood in the spring of 1946, MGM had nothing lined up and used him in yet another B-movie: Living in a Big Way. The film was considered so weak that Kelly was requested to design and insert a series of dance routines, and his ability to carry off such assignments was noticed. This led to his next picture with Judy Garland and director Vincente Minnelli, the film version of Cole Porter's The Pirate, in which Kelly plays the eponymous swashbuckler. Now regarded as a classic, the film was ahead of its time and was not well received. The Pirate gave full reign to Kelly's athleticism and is probably best remembered for the teaming of Kelly with The Nicholas Brothers - the leading African-American dancers of their day - in a virtuoso dance routine. Although MGM wanted Kelly to return to safer and more commercial vehicles, he ceaselessly fought for an opportunity to direct his own musical film. In the interim, he capitalised on his swashbuckling image as one of The Three Musketeers and appeared with Vera-Ellen in the Slaughter on Tenth Avenue ballet from Words and Music (1948). There followed Take Me Out to the Ball Game (1949), his second film with Sinatra, where Kelly paid tribute to his Irish heritage in The Hat My Father Wore on St. Patrick's Day routine. It was this musical film which persuaded Arthur Freed to allow Kelly to make On the Town, where he teamed for the third and final time with Frank Sinatra, creating a breakthrough in the musical film genre which has been described [1] as "the most inventive and effervescent musical thus far produced in Hollywood". Living in a Big Way was released on June 10, in 1947. ... Judy Garland (born Frances Ethel Gumm; June 10, 1922 - June 22, 1969) was an Academy Award-nominated American film actress and singer, best known for her role as Dorothy Gale in The Wizard of Oz (1939). ... Vincente Minnelli (February 28, 1903 – July 25, 1986) was a famous Hollywood director and accomplished stage director, often considered by critics to be the father of the modern musical. ... The Pirate is a slang term for a supposed sex move performed during oral sex. ... Categories: African Americans | Tap dancers | Art stubs ... For other uses, see The Three Musketeers (disambiguation). ... Vera-Ellen Westmeyer Rohe (February 16, 1921 - 30 August 1981) was an American actress and dancer known best by just her hyphenated first name. ... Words And Music is an album recorded by Paul Kelly and originally released in 1998. ... The year 1948 in film involved some significant events. ... Sex and the City episode, see Take Me Out to the Ballgame (SATC episode). ... See also: 1948 in film 1949 1950 in film 1940s in film 1950s in film years in film film Events Top grossing films North America Adams Rib Jolson Sings Again Pinky I Was a Male War Bride, The Snake Pit, Joan of Arc Academy Awards Best Picture: All the... This article is about the 1949 film. ...


Stanley Donen, brought to Hollywood by Kelly to be his assistant choreographer, received co-director credit for On the Town. According to Kelly: "...when you are involved in doing choreography for film you must have expert assistants. I needed one to watch my performance, and one to work with the cameraman on the timing..without such people as Stanley, Carol Haney and Jeanne Coyne I could never have done these things. When we came to do On the Town, I knew it was time for Stanley to get screen credit because we weren't boss-assistant anymore but co-creators."[1][6] Together, they opened up the musical form, taking the film musical out of the studio and into real locations, with Donen taking responsibility for the staging and Kelly handling the choreography. Kelly went much further than before in introducing modern ballet into his dance sequences, going so far in the "Day in New York" routine as to substitute four leading ballet specialists for Sinatra, Munshin, Garrett and Miller.[2] Stanley Donen (born April 13, 1924) is an American film director and choreographer hailed by David Quinlan as the King of the Hollywood musicals. His most famous work is Singin in the Rain, which he co-directed with Gene Kelly. ...


It was now Kelly's turn to ask the studio for a straight acting role and he took the lead role in the early mafia melodrama: The Black Hand (1949). There followed Summer Stock (1950) - Judy Garland's last musical film for MGM - in which Kelly performed the celebrated "You, You Wonderful You" solo routine with a newspaper and a squeaky floorboard. In his book "Easy the Hard Way", Joe Pasternak singles out Kelly for his patience and willingness to spend as much time as necessary to enable the ailing Garland to complete her part.[1] This article is about the criminal society. ... Black Hand, or Crna Ruka (Црна Рука), officially Ujedinjenje ili Smrt (Ујединјеје или Смрт) (Unification or Death) was a secret association founded in Serbia by pan-Serbian nationalists in May... See also: 1948 in film 1949 1950 in film 1940s in film 1950s in film years in film film Events Top grossing films North America Adams Rib Jolson Sings Again Pinky I Was a Male War Bride, The Snake Pit, Joan of Arc Academy Awards Best Picture: All the... Summer Stock is an MGM musical made in 1950. ... See also: 1949 in film 1950 1951 in film 1950s in film 1940s in film years in film film // Events February 15 - Walt Disney Studios animated film Cinderella debuts. ... Joseph Pasternak (September 19, 1901 – September 13, 1991) was a Hungarian-born American film director in Hollywood. ...

Gene Kelly performing in Singin' in the Rain
Gene Kelly performing in Singin' in the Rain

There followed in quick succession two musicals which have secured Kelly's reputation as a major force in the Americal musical film, An American in Paris (1951) and - probably the most popular and admired of all film musicals - Singin' in the Rain (1952). As co-director, lead star and choreographer, Kelly was the central driving force. Johnny Green, head of music at MGM at the time, described him as follows: "Gene is easygoing as long as you know exactly what you are doing when you're working with him. He's a hard taskmaster and he loves hard work. If you want to play on his team you'd better like hard work too. He isn't cruel but he is tough, and if Gene believed in something he didn't care who he was talking to, whether it was Louis B. Mayer or the gatekeeper. He wasn't awed by anybody and he had a good record of getting what he wanted".[1]. An American in Paris won six Academy Awards, including Best Picture and, in the same year, Kelly was presented with an honorary Academy Award for his contribution to film musicals and the art of choreography. The film also marked the debut of Leslie Caron, who Kelly had spotted in Paris and brought to Hollywood. Its dream ballet finale, lasting an unprecedented thirteen minutes was the most expensive production number ever filmed up to that point and was described by Bosley Crowther as being "whoop de doo ... one of the finest ever put on the screen"[2]. Singin' in the Rain featured Kelly's celebrated and much imitated[7] solo dance routine to the title song, along with the famous "Moses Supposes" routine with Donald O'Connor and the "Broadway Melody" finale with Cyd Charisse, and while it did not initially generate the same enthusiasm as An American in Paris, it subsequently overtook the latter film to occupy its current pre-eminent place among critics and filmgoers alike. Image File history File links Singin_Rain. ... Image File history File links Singin_Rain. ... Singin in the Rain is a 1952 comedy musical film starring Gene Kelly, Donald OConnor, and Debbie Reynolds and directed by Kelly and Stanley Donen, with Kelly also handling the choreography. ... An American in Paris is a 1951 musical film based on the classical composition by George Gershwin. ... Singin in the Rain is a 1952 comedy musical film starring Gene Kelly, Donald OConnor, and Debbie Reynolds and directed by Kelly and Stanley Donen, with Kelly also handling the choreography. ... For the basketball player see Johnny Green (basketball) Johnny Green (10 October 1908, New York, New York – 15 May 1989 Los Angeles) was an American songwriter, composer, musical arranger, and conductor. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... The Academy Award for Best Picture is one of the awards given to people working in the motion picture industry by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences; the awards are voted on by other people within the industry. ... Leslie Caron (IPA: ) (born July 1, 1931) is an Oscar-nominated, Golden Globe-winning, and Emmy-winning motion picture actress and dancer. ... Bosley Crowther (July 13, 1905 – March 7, 1981) was an American film critic. ... Donald David Dixon Ronald O’Connor (August 28, 1925 – September 27, 2003) was an American dancer, singer, and actor who came to fame in a series of movies in which he co-starred alternately with Gloria Jean, Peggy Ryan, and Francis the Talking Mule. ... Cyd Charisse Cyd Charisse is an American dancer and actress. ...


1953-1957: The decline of the Hollywood musical

Kelly, at the very peak of his creative powers, now made what in retrospect is seen[2] as a serious mistake. In December of 1951 he signed a contract with MGM which sent him to Europe for nineteen months so that Kelly could use MGM funds frozen in Europe to make three pictures while personally benefiting from tax exemptions. Only one of these pictures was a musical, Invitation to the Dance, a pet project of Kelly's to bring modern ballet to mainstream film audiences. It was beset with delays and technical problems, and flopped when finally released in 1956. When Kelly returned to Hollywood in 1954, the film musical was already beginning to feel the pressures from television, and MGM cut the budget for his next picture Brigadoon (1954), with Cyd Charisse, forcing the film to be made on studio backlots instead of on location in Scotland. This year also saw him appear as guest star with his brother Fred in the celebrated "I Love To Go Swimmin' with Wimmen" routine in Deep in My Heart. MGM's refusal to loan him out for Guys and Dolls and Pal Joey put further strains on his relationship with the studio. He negotiated an exit to his contract which involved making three further pictures for MGM. Invitation to the Dance is a 1956 anthology film consisting of three distinct stories, all starring and directed by Gene Kelly. ... DVD cover Brigadoon is a musical by Alan Jay Lerner and Frederick Loewe, first produced in 1947. ... Cyd Charisse Cyd Charisse is an American dancer and actress. ... This article is about the country. ... Deep in My Heart (1954) is an MGM biographical musical about the life of composer Sigmund Romberg. ... Guys and Dolls is a 1955 musical film made by the Samuel Goldwyn Company and released by MGM. It was directed by Joseph L. Mankiewicz and produced by Samuel Goldwyn. ... Pal Joey is a loosely adapted 1957 film version of the musical play of the same name; it stars Frank Sinatra, Kim Novak, and Rita Hayworth. ...


The first of these, It's Always Fair Weather (1956) co-directed with Donen, was a musical satire on television and advertising, and includes his famous roller skate dance routine to "I Like Myself", and a dance trio with Michael Kidd and Dan Dailey which allowed Kelly to experiment with the widescreen possibilities of Cinemascope. A modest success, it was followed by Kelly's last musical film for MGM, Les Girls (1957), in which he partnered a trio of leading ladies, Mitzi Gaynor, Kay Kendall and Taina Elg, fittingly ending, as he had begun, with a Cole Porter musical. The third picture he completed was a co-production between MGM and himself, the B-movie The Happy Road, set in his beloved France, his first foray in his new role as producer-director-actor. Its Always Fair Weather is a 1955 MGM film scripted by Betty Comden and Adolph Green, who also wrote the shows lyrics, scored by Andre Previn and starring Gene Kelly, Dan Dailey, Cyd Charisse, Michael Kidd, and Dolores Gray. ... Michael Kidd (born Milton Greenwald 12 August 1919) is an Jewish-American film and stage choreographer. ... Daniel James Dailey Jr. ... A Fox logo used to promote the CinemaScope process. ... Les Girls, also known as Cole Porters Les Girls, is a 1957 comedy film musical made by MGM. It was directed by George Cukor, produced by Sol C. Siegel with Saul Chaplin as associate producer from a screenplay by John Patrick based on a story by Vera Caspary with... Mitzi Gaynor (born September 4, 1931 in Chicago, Illinois, although some sources indicate 1930) is an American actress, singer, and dancer. ... Kay Kendall (May 21, 1926 – September 6, 1959) was a British actress. ... Taina Elg (b. ...


1958-1985: Years of perseverance

Although Kelly continued to make some film appearances, most of his efforts were now concentrated on film production and directing. He directed Jackie Gleason in Gigot in Paris, but the film was subsequently drastically re-cut by Seven Arts Productions[2] and flopped. Another French effort, Jacques Demy's homage to the MGM musical: Les Demoiselles de Rochefort (1967) in which Kelly appeared, also performed poorly. He appeared as himself in George Cukor's Let's Make Love (1960). Herbert John Jackie Gleason (February 26, 1916 – June 24, 1987) was an American comedian, actor, and musician. ... Gigot was an American motion picture released in 1962 by 20th Century Fox. ... Seven Arts Productions was founded in 1957 by Ray Stark and Eliot Hyman. ... Frothy musical starring Catherine Deneuve, her tragic sister Francoise Dorleac, George Chakiris, and Gene Kelly. ... George Dewey Cukor (July 7, 1899 – January 24, 1983) was an American film director. ... Lets Make Love is a 1960 comedy musical film made by 20th Century Fox. ...


His first foray into television was a documentary for NBC's Omnibus, Dancing is a Man's Game (1958) where he assembled a group of America's greatest sportsmen - including Mickey Mantle, Sugar Ray Robinson and Bob Cousy - and reinterpreted their moves choreographically, as part of his lifelong quest to remove the stigma of effeminacy[2] which surrounds the art of dance, while articulating the philosophy behind his dance style. It gained an Emmy nomination for choreography and now stands as the key document explaining Kelly's approach to modern dance. This article is about the television network. ... Omnibus was a commercially-sponsored educational TV series broadcast in the United States, primarily on Sunday afternoons, from November 9, 1952 to 1961. ... Mickey Charles Mantle (October 20, 1931 – August 13, 1995) was an American baseball player who was inducted into the National Baseball Hall of Fame in 1974. ... Sugar Ray Robinson, (born Walker Smith Jr. ... Robert Joseph Cousy (born August 9, 1928 in New York City, is an American former professional basketball player, who played point guard with the NBAs Boston Celtics from 1951 to 1963 and (briefly) with the Cincinnati Royals in the 1969-1970 season, being recognized as one of the greatest... An Emmy Award. ...


Kelly also frequently appeared on television shows during the 1960s, but his one effort at a TV series: as Father O'Malley in Going My Way (1962-1963) was dropped after one season, although it subsequently enjoyed great popularity in Catholic countries outside of the US.[2] He went on to make two major TV specials: New York, New York (1966) and produced and directed Jack and the Beanstalk (1967) which again combined cartoon animation with live dance, winning him an Emmy Award for Outstanding Children's Program. Going My Way, a 1944 Academy Award winning film directed by Leo McCarey and starring Bing Crosby. ... Illustration by Arthur Rackham from a 1918 English Fairy Tales, by Flora Annie Steel Jack and the Beanstalk is an English fairy tale, closely associated with the tale of Jack the Giant Killer. ... An Emmy Award. ...


In 1963, Kelly joined Universal Pictures for a two year stint which proved to be the most unproductive of his career to date. He joined 20th Century Fox in 1965, but had little to do - partly due to his decision to decline assignments away from Los Angeles for family reasons. His perseverance finally paid off with the major box-office hit A Guide for the Married Man (1967) where he directed Walter Matthau and a major opportunity arose when Fox - buoyed by the returns from The Sound of Music (1965) - commissioned Kelly to direct Hello, Dolly! (1969), again directing Matthau along with Barbra Streisand, but which unfortunately failed to recoup the enormous production expenses. Universal Pictures is the main motion picture production/distribution arm of Universal Studios, a subsidiary of NBC Universal. ... Twentieth (20th) Century Fox Film Corporation (known from 1935 to 1985 as Twentieth Century-Fox Film Corporation) is one of the six major American film studios. ... Flag Seal Nickname: City of Angels Location Location within Los Angeles County in the state of California Coordinates , Government State County California Los Angeles County Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa (D) Geographical characteristics Area     City 1,290. ... A Guide for the Married Man is a 1967 film starring Walter Matthau, Robert Morse, and Inger Stevens. ... Walter Matthau (October 1, 1920 – July 1, 2000) was an Academy Award-winning American comedy actor best known for his role as Oscar Madison in The Odd Couple and his frequent collaborations with fellow Odd Couple star Jack Lemmon. ... Rodgers and Hammersteins The Sound of Music is a 1965 film directed by Robert Wise and starring Julie Andrews in the lead role. ... Hello, Dolly! is a 1969 American musical film, based on the Broadway production of the same name. ... Barbra Joan Streisand (born April 24, 1942) is an American singer, theatre and film actress, composer, liberal political activist, film producer and director. ...


In 1970, he made another TV special: Gene Kelly and 50 Girls and was invited to bring the show to Las Vegas, which he duly did for an eight-week stint - on condition he be paid more than any artist had hitherto been paid there.[2] He directed veteran actors James Stewart and Henry Fonda in the comedy western The Cheyenne Social Club (1970) which performed very well at the box-office. In 1974 he appeared as a narrator in the surprise hit of the year That's Entertainment! and subsequently directed and co-starred with his friend Fred Astaire in the sequel That's Entertainment, Part II (1976). It was a measure of his powers of persuasion that he managed to coax the seventy-seven year old Astaire - who had insisted that his contract rule out any dancing, having long since retired - into performing a series of song and dance duets, evoking a powerful nostalgia for the glory days of the American musical film. He continued to make frequent TV appearances and in 1980, appeared in an acting and dancing role opposite Olivia Newton John in Xanadu (1980), a bizarre[2] and expensive flop which has since attained a cult following. In Kelly's opinion "The concept was marvellous but it just didn't come off".[1] In the same year, he was invited by Francis Ford Coppola to recruit a production staff for American Zeotrope's One from the Heart (1982). Although Coppola's ambition[2] was for Kelly to establish a production unit to rival the legendary Freed Unit at MGM, the film's failure put paid to this idea. His last major film assignment was as executive producer and co-host for That's Dancing! (1985) - a celebration of the history of dance in the American musical. His final film project was the animated movie Cats Don't Dance, released in 1997 and dedicated to him, on which Kelly acted as uncredited choreographic consultant. For further information, see Las Vegas metropolitan area and Las Vegas Strip. ... For other persons named James Stewart, see James Stewart (disambiguation). ... Henry Jaynes Fonda (May 16, 1905 – August 12, 1982) was a highly acclaimed Academy Award-winning American film and stage actor, best known for his roles as plain-speaking idealists. ... The Cheyenne Social Club is a 1970 western comedy directed by Gene Kelly and starring James Stewart and Henry Fonda. ... This article is about the 1974 MGM documentary film. ... Fred Astaire (May 10, 1899 – June 22, 1987), born Frederick Austerlitz in Omaha, Nebraska,[1] was an American film and Broadway stage dancer, choreographer, singer and actor. ... Thats Entertainment, Part II was a 1976 motion picture by MGM, and a sequel to the 1974 documentary, Thats Entertainment!. Like the previous film, Thats Entertainment, Part II was a retrospective of famous films released by MGM from the 1930s to the 1950s. ... Olivia Newton-John (born September 26, 1948) is a British-born Australian singer and actress. ... Xanadu is a 1980 musical/romance film directed by Robert Greenwald. ... Francis Ford Coppola (born April 7, 1939) is a five-time Academy Award winning American film director, producer, and screenwriter. ... One from the Heart is a 1982 musical film directed by Francis Ford Coppola. ... Arthur Freed (September 9, 1894 - April 12, 1973) was born Arthur Grossman in Down Ton Ton Village. ... 2004 DVD release Thats Entertainment! is a 1974 documentary released by Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer to celebrate its 50th anniversary. ... Cats Dont Dance is a 1997 animated family feature film, notable as the only animated feature produced by the short-lived Turner Entertainment animation unit. ...


Working methods and influence on filmed dance

When he began his collaborative film work, he was heavily influenced by Robert Alton and John Murray Anderson, striving to create moods and character insight with his dances. He choreographed his own movement, along with that of the ensemble, with the assistance of Jeanne Coyne, Stanley Donen, Carol Haney, and Alex Romero.[8] He experimented with lighting, camera techniques and special effects in order to achieve true integration of dance with film, and was one of the first to use split screens, double images, live action with animation and is credited as the person who made the ballet form commercially acceptable to film audiences.[8] Robert Alton (January 28, 1906 – June 12, 1957) was a Tony Award-winning American dancer and choreographer, a major figure in dance choreography of Broadway and Hollywood musicals during from the 1930s through to the early 1950s. ... John Murray Anderson (September 20, 1886 - January 30, 1954) was a theatre director and producer, songwriter, screenwriter, and lighting designer. ... Jeanne Coyne (February 28, 1923 in Pennsylvania - May 10, 1973) was an acclaimed Broadway dancer, choreographer and actress. ... Stanley Donen (born April 13, 1924) is an American film director and choreographer hailed by David Quinlan as the King of the Hollywood musicals. His most famous work is Singin in the Rain, which he co-directed with Gene Kelly. ... Carol Haney (December 24, 1924 _ May 10, 1964) was born in New Bedford, Massachusetts and opened a dancing school when she was fifteen years old. ... Alexander Rafael Romero (born September 9, 1983 in Maracaibo, Venezuela) is a Major League Baseball outfielder who is currently in the Arizona Diamondbacks organization. ...


There was a clear progression in his development, from an early concentration on tap and musical comedy style to greater complexity using ballet and modern dance forms.[9] Kelly himself, refused to categorize his style: "I don't have a name for my style of dancing...It's certainly hybrid...I've borrowed from the modern dance, from the classical, and certainly from the American folk dance - tap-dancing, jitterbugging...But I have tried to develop a style which is indigenous to the environment in which I was reared."[9] He especially acknowledged the influence of George M. Cohan: "I have a lot of Cohan in me. It's an Irish quality, a jaw-jutting, up-on-the-toes cockiness - which is a good quality for a male dancer to have."[1] Also, he tended to use tap and other popular dance idioms to express joy and exuberance - as in the title song from Singin' in the Rain or "I Got Rhythm" from An American in Paris, whereas pensive or romantic feelings were more often expressed via ballet or modern dance, as in "Heather on the Hill" from Brigadoon or "Our Love Is Here to Stay" from An American in Paris.[9] George Michael Cohan (July 3, 1878 – November 5, 1942) was a United States entertainer, playwright, composer, lyricist, actor, singer, dancer, director, and producer of Irish descent. ...


According to Delamater, Kelly's work "seems to represent the fulfillment of dance-film integration in the 1940s and 1950s". While Fred Astaire had revolutionized the filming of dance in the 1930s, by insisting on full-figure photography of dancers while allowing only a modest degree with camera movement, Kelly freed up the camera somewhat, making greater use of space, camera movement, camera angles and editing, creating a partnership between dance movement and camera movement, while remaining faithful to Astaire's original goal of maintaining the audience's complete attention on the dance. Kelly's reasoning behind this was that he felt the kinetic force of live dance often evaporated when brought to film, and he sought to partially overcome this by involving the camera in movement and giving the dancer a greater number of directions in which to move. Examples of this abound in Kelly's work and are well illustrated in the "Prehistoric Man" sequence from On the Town and "The Hat My Father Wore on St. Patrick's Day" from Take Me Out to the Ball Game.[9] Fred Astaire (May 10, 1899 – June 22, 1987), born Frederick Austerlitz in Omaha, Nebraska,[1] was an American film and Broadway stage dancer, choreographer, singer and actor. ...


Kelly's athleticism gave his moves a distinctive broad, muscular quality,[9] and this was very deliberate choice on his part, as he explained: "There's a strong link between sports and dancing, and my own dancing springs from my early days as an athlete...I think dancing is a man's game and if he does it well he does it better than a woman"[1]. He railed against what he saw as the widespread effeminacy in male dancing which, in his opinion, "tragically" stigmatised the genre, alienating boys from entering the field. However, he was careful to avoid accusations of homophobia: "dancing does attract effeminate young men. I don't object to that as long as they don't dance effeminately. I just say that if a man dances effeminately he dances badly - just as if a woman comes out on stage and starts to sing bass. Unfortunately people confuse gracefulness with softness. John Wayne is a graceful man and so are some of the great ball players...but, of course, they don't run the risk of being called sissies."[1] In his view: "one of our problems is that so much dancing is taught by women. You can spot many male dancers who have this tuition by their arm movements - they are soft, limp and feminine."[1] He acknowledged that, in spite of his efforts - in TV programs such as Dancing is a Man's Game (1958) for example - the situation changed little over the years.[1] A protest by The Westboro Baptist Church, a group identified by the Anti-Defamation League as virulently homophobic. ... For other persons named John Wayne, see John Wayne (disambiguation). ...


He also sought to break from the class conscious conventions of the 1930s and early 40s, when top hat and tails or tuxedos were the norm, by dancing in causal or everyday work clothes, so as to make his dancing more relevant to the cinema-going public. As his first wife, actress and dancer Betsy Blair explained: "A sailor suit or his white socks and loafers, or the T-shirts on his muscular torso, gave everyone the feeling that he was a regular guy, and perhaps they too could express love and joy by dancing in the street or stomping through puddles...he democratized the dance in movies."[10] In particular, he wanted to create a completely different image from that associated with Fred Astaire, not least because he believed his physique didn't suit such refined elegance: "I used to envy his cool aristocratic style, so intimate and contained. Fred wears top hat and tails to the manor born - I put them on and look like a truckdriver."[1]


Personal life

Kelly was married to Betsy Blair for 15 years (1941 - 1957) and they had one child, Kerry. She divorced Kelly in 1957. In 1960, Kelly married his choreographic assistant Jeanne Coyne who had divorced Stanley Donen in 1949 after a brief marriage. He remained married to Coyne from 1960 till her death in 1973 and they had two children Bridget and Tim. He was married to Patricia Ward from 1990 until his death in 1996. Betsy Blair (b. ... Jeanne Coyne (February 28, 1923 in Pennsylvania - May 10, 1973) was an acclaimed Broadway dancer, choreographer and actress. ...


Gene Kelly was a lifelong Democratic Party supporter with strong progressive convictions, which occasionally created difficulty for him as his heyday coincided with the McCarthy era in the US. In 1947, he was part of the Committee for the First Amendment, the Hollywood delegation which flew to Washington to protest at the first official hearings by the House Committee on Un-American Activities. His first wife, Betsy Blair, was suspected of being a Communist sympathiser and when MGM, who had offered Blair a part in Marty (1955), were considering withdrawing her under pressure from the American Legion, Kelly successfully threatened MGM with a pullout from It's Always Fair Weather unless his wife was restored to the part.[2][11] He used his position on the board of directors of The Writer's Guild of America on a number of occasions to mediate disputes between unions and the Hollywood studios, and although he was frequently accused by the Right of championing the unions, he was valued by the studios as an effective mediator. Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  Politics Portal      Further information: Politics of the United States#Organization of American political parties The Democratic... In the United States the term progressivism refers to two political movements: first, the original political progressive movement towards social and economic reform of the late 1800s and early 1900s; and second, the continuation of this movement/ideology in the form of modern progressivism which sees itself as a reform... A 1947 comic book published by the Catechetical Guild Educational Society warning of the dangers of a Communist takeover. ... The Committee for the First Amendment was an action group formed by actors in support of the Hollywood Ten during the hearings in front of the House Un-American Activities Committee. ... The House Committee on Un-American Activities or HUAC (1945-1975) was an investigating committee of the United States House of Representatives. ... For other uses, see Marty (disambiguation). ... This article or section is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ... Its Always Fair Weather is a 1955 MGM film scripted by Betty Comden and Adolph Green, who also wrote the shows lyrics, scored by Andre Previn and starring Gene Kelly, Dan Dailey, Cyd Charisse, Michael Kidd, and Dolores Gray. ... The Writers Guild of America (WGA) is the collective bargaining representative, or labor union, for writers in the motion picture and television industries in the United States. ...


A gregarious and highly articulate individual, he retained a lifelong passion for sports and relished competition. With his first wife, he organised weekly parties at his Beverly Hills home which were renowned for an intensely competitive and physical version of charades, known as "The Game".[11] For other uses, see: Beverly Hills (disambiguation). ... Charades or charade is a word guessing game. ...


Kelly died on February 2, 1996, in Beverly Hills, California, after suffering two strokes, at the age of 83. is the 33rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1996 (MCMXCVI) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full 1996 Gregorian calendar). ... Beverly Hills redirects here. ...


Stage work

As Actor:

As Crew Member: Leave It to Me! is a musical with music and lyrics by Cole Porter. ... Year 1938 (MCMXXXVIII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1939 (MCMXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... This page meets Wikipedias criteria for speedy deletion. ... Year 1939 (MCMXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... This page meets Wikipedias criteria for speedy deletion. ... Year 1940 (MCMXL) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display the full 1940 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Pal Joey Studio cast album 1950 Pal Joey is a 1940 Broadway musical by American writer John OHara, with music and lyrics by Richard Rodgers and Lorenz Hart. ... Year 1940 (MCMXL) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display the full 1940 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...

Best Foot Forward (1943) is a film version of the hit 1941 Broadway musical comedy. ... For other uses, see 1941 (disambiguation). ... Flower Drum Song was originally a novel by Chinese American author C.Y. Lee. ... Year 1958 (MCMLVIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Also: 1979 by Smashing Pumpkins. ...

Filmography

As Actor:

As Director: For Me and My Gal is a 1942 American Musical directed by Busby Berkeley. ... Year 1942 (MCMXLII) was a common year starting on Thursday (the link will display the full 1942 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Pilot #5 was a 1943 film starring Gene Kelly, Franchot Tone, Marsha Hunt, Van Johnson, and an uncredited Peter Lawford. ... Year 1943 (MCMXLIII) was a common year starting on Friday (the link will display full 1943 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... DuBarry Was a Lady was a 1939 musical with songs by Cole Porter. ... Year 1943 (MCMXLIII) was a common year starting on Friday (the link will display full 1943 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Thousands Cheer was an American musical-comedy released by MGM in 1943. ... Year 1943 (MCMXLIII) was a common year starting on Friday (the link will display full 1943 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1943 (MCMXLIII) was a common year starting on Friday (the link will display full 1943 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Cover Girl is a 1944 musical film starring Rita Hayworth and Gene Kelly. ... Year 1944 (MCMXLIV) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Dean Harens and Deanna Durbin in Christmas Holiday Christmas Holiday is a 1944 drama directed by Robert Siodmak. ... Year 1944 (MCMXLIV) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Anchors Aweigh is a 1945 musical comedy film, directed by George Sidney in which two sailors go on a four-day shore leave in Hollywood, accompanied by music and song, meet an aspiring young singer and try to help her get an audition at MGM. It stars Frank Sinatra, Gene... Year 1945 (MCMXLV) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar). ... Ziegfeld Follies (MGM) is a 1946 Hollywood musical comedy film starring many of MGM leading talents, including Fred Astaire, Lucille Bremer, Judy Garland, Kathryn Grayson, Lena Horne, Gene Kelly, Victor Moore, William Powell, Red Skelton , and Esther Williams. ... Year 1946 (MCMXLVI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full 1946 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Living in a Big Way was released on June 10, in 1947. ... Year 1947 (MCMXLVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display full 1947 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Pirate is a slang term for a supposed sex move performed during oral sex. ... Year 1948 (MCMXLVIII) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will display the 1948 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Three Musketeers is a Technicolor 1948 adventure film adaptation of the classic novel The Three Musketeers by Alexandre Dumas, père. ... Year 1948 (MCMXLVIII) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will display the 1948 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Words and Music was the title of a 1948 movie based on the lives of Richard Rodgers and Lorenz Hart. ... Year 1948 (MCMXLVIII) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will display the 1948 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Sex and the City episode, see Take Me Out to the Ballgame (SATC episode). ... Year 1949 (MCMXLIX) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... On the Town is a musical that opened on Broadway at the Adelphi Theatre on December 28, 1944, with music by Leonard Bernstein, book and lyrics by Betty Comden and Adolph Green, direction by George Abbott, and choreography by Jerome Robbins. ... Year 1949 (MCMXLIX) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see Black Hand (disambiguation). ... Year 1950 (MCML) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Summer Stock is an MGM musical made in 1950. ... Year 1950 (MCML) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... An American in Paris is a 1951 musical film based on the classical composition by George Gershwin. ... Year 1951 (MCMLI) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1951 (MCMLI) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Anthem Ode to Joy (orchestral)  ten founding members joined subsequently observer at the Parliamentary Assembly observer at the Committee of Ministers  official candidate Seat Strasbourg, France Membership 47 European states 5 observers (Council) 3 observers (Assembly) Leaders  -  Secretary General Terry Davis  -  President of the Parliamentary Assembly Rene van der Linden... Year 1952 (MCMLII) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1952 (MCMLII) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Singin in the Rain is a 1952 comedy musical film starring Gene Kelly, Donald OConnor, and Debbie Reynolds and directed by Kelly and Stanley Donen, with Kelly also handling the choreography. ... Year 1952 (MCMLII) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Devil Makes Three is a 1952 thriller film taking place in post-World War II West Germany starring Pier Angeli, Gene Kelly and Richard Egan. ... Year 1952 (MCMLII) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... DVD cover Brigadoon is a musical by Alan Jay Lerner and Frederick Loewe, first produced in 1947. ... Year 1954 (MCMLIV) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1954 (MCMLIV) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Deep in My Heart (1954) is an MGM biographical musical about the life of composer Sigmund Romberg. ... Year 1954 (MCMLIV) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1955 (MCMLV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays the 1955 Gregorian calendar). ... Its Always Fair Weather is a 1955 MGM film scripted by Betty Comden and Adolph Green, who also wrote the shows lyrics, scored by Andre Previn and starring Gene Kelly, Dan Dailey, Cyd Charisse, Michael Kidd, and Dolores Gray. ... Year 1955 (MCMLV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays the 1955 Gregorian calendar). ... A car from 1956 Year 1956 (MCMLVI) was a leap year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Invitation to the Dance is a 1956 anthology film consisting of three distinct stories, all starring and directed by Gene Kelly. ... A car from 1956 Year 1956 (MCMLVI) was a leap year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1957 (MCMLVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link displays the 1957 Gregorian calendar). ... Les Girls, also known as Cole Porters Les Girls, is a 1957 comedy film musical made by MGM. It was directed by George Cukor, produced by Sol C. Siegel with Saul Chaplin as associate producer from a screenplay by John Patrick based on a story by Vera Caspary with... Year 1957 (MCMLVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link displays the 1957 Gregorian calendar). ... Flower Drum Song was originally a novel by Chinese American author C.Y. Lee. ... Year 1958 (MCMLVIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Marjorie Morningstar is a movie based on the 1955 novel of the same name, made in 1958 Marjorie Morningstar at the Internet Movie Database Categories: | ... Year 1958 (MCMLVIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Inherit the Wind is a play by Jerome Lawrence and Robert Edwin Lee, which opened on Broadway in January 1955, and a 1960 Hollywood film based on the play. ... Year 1960 (MCMLX) was a leap year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Lets Make Love is a 1960 comedy musical film made by 20th Century Fox. ... Year 1960 (MCMLX) was a leap year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Summary What A Way To Go! (1964) is one of those movies that came out of the happy-fun Hollywood era of the Rat Pack years, where a popular type of movie promised escape into naive plots that exclusively focused on the themes of love and sex in fluffy, brightly... Also Nintendo emulator: 1964 (emulator). ... Broadway Playbill with June Allyson Forty Carats is a play by Jay Allen adapted from the French original by Pierre Barillet and Jean-Pierre Gredy. ... For the song by James Blunt, see 1973 (song). ... Year 1974 (MCMLXXIV) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar) of the 1974 Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the 1974 MGM documentary film. ... Year 1974 (MCMLXXIV) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar) of the 1974 Gregorian calendar. ... The Lion Roars Again is a short film that documents an event that was hosted by Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer. ... Year 1975 (MCMLXXV) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the 1974 MGM documentary film. ... Year 1976 Pick up sticks(MCMLXXVI) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Poster for Viva Knievel! Viva Knievel! is a 1977 action movie starring Evel Knievel as himself, Gene Kelly as Will Atkins, and Lauren Hutton as photojournalist Kate Morgan. ... Also: 1977 (album) by Ash. ... Xanadu is a 1980 musical/romance film directed by Robert Greenwald. ... Year 1980 (MCMLXXX) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link displays the 1980 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 1981 (MCMLXXXI) was a common year starting on Thursday (link displays the 1981 Gregorian calendar). ... This article is about the 1974 MGM documentary film. ... This article is about the year. ... Year 1993 (MCMXCIII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full 1993 Gregorian calendar). ... This article is about the 1974 MGM documentary film. ... Year 1994 (MCMXCIV) The year 1994 was designated as the International Year of the Family and the International Year of the Sport and the Olympic Ideal by the United Nations. ...

On the Town is a musical that opened on Broadway at the Adelphi Theatre on December 28, 1944, with music by Leonard Bernstein, book and lyrics by Betty Comden and Adolph Green, direction by George Abbott, and choreography by Jerome Robbins. ... Year 1949 (MCMXLIX) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Stanley Donen (born April 13, 1924) is an American film director and choreographer hailed by David Quinlan as the King of the Hollywood musicals. His most famous work is Singin in the Rain, which he co-directed with Gene Kelly. ... An American in Paris is a 1951 musical film based on the classical composition by George Gershwin. ... Year 1951 (MCMLI) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Leslie Caron (IPA: ) (born July 1, 1931) is an Oscar-nominated, Golden Globe-winning, and Emmy-winning motion picture actress and dancer. ... Singin in the Rain is a 1952 comedy musical film starring Gene Kelly, Donald OConnor, and Debbie Reynolds and directed by Kelly and Stanley Donen, with Kelly also handling the choreography. ... Year 1952 (MCMLII) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Its Always Fair Weather is a 1955 MGM film scripted by Betty Comden and Adolph Green, who also wrote the shows lyrics, scored by Andre Previn and starring Gene Kelly, Dan Dailey, Cyd Charisse, Michael Kidd, and Dolores Gray. ... Year 1955 (MCMLV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays the 1955 Gregorian calendar). ... Invitation to the Dance is a 1956 anthology film consisting of three distinct stories, all starring and directed by Gene Kelly. ... A car from 1956 Year 1956 (MCMLVI) was a leap year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1957 (MCMLVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link displays the 1957 Gregorian calendar). ... The Tunnel of Love is a 1958 romantic comedy based on the Broadway hit by Peter De Vries and Joseph Fields. ... Year 1958 (MCMLVIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Gigot was an American motion picture released in 1962 by 20th Century Fox. ... Year 1962 (MCMLXII) was a common year starting on Monday (the link is to a full 1962 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... A Guide for the Married Man is a 1967 film starring Walter Matthau, Robert Morse, and Inger Stevens. ... Year 1967 (MCMLXVII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the 1967 Gregorian calendar. ... Hello, Dolly! is a 1969 American musical film, based on the Broadway production of the same name. ... Also: 1969 (Stargate SG-1) episode. ... The Cheyenne Social Club is a 1970 western comedy directed by Gene Kelly and starring James Stewart and Henry Fonda. ... Year 1970 ([[Rf 1970 == January 1 - The Unix epoch begins at 00:00:00 UTC January 2 - The last studio performance of The Beatles oman numerals|MCMLXX]]) was a common year starting on Thursday (link shows full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Thats Entertainment, Part II was a 1976 motion picture by MGM, and a sequel to the 1974 documentary, Thats Entertainment!. Like the previous film, Thats Entertainment, Part II was a retrospective of famous films released by MGM from the 1930s to the 1950s. ... Year 1976 Pick up sticks(MCMLXXVI) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...

Television work

Year 1962 (MCMLXII) was a common year starting on Monday (the link is to a full 1962 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1963 (MCMLXIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1965 (MCMLXV) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the 1965 Gregorian calendar. ... Illustration by Arthur Rackham from a 1918 English Fairy Tales, by Flora Annie Steel Jack and the Beanstalk is an English fairy tale, closely associated with the tale of Jack the Giant Killer. ... Year 1967 (MCMLXVII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the 1967 Gregorian calendar. ... The Funny Side was an unusual sketch comedy program broadcast in the United States by NBC as part of its 1971 fall lineup. ... Year 1971 (MCMLXXI) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the 1971 Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1978 (MCMLXXVIII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays the 1978 Gregorian calendar). ... North and South, is a 1982 novel written by John Jakes. ... This article is about the year. ... Year 1986 (MCMLXXXVI) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link displays 1986 Gregorian calendar). ...

Awards and honors

Although he never won an Oscar for any of his movie performances, the comedian Bob Hope received two honorary Oscars for his contributions to cinema. ... Anchors Aweigh is a 1945 musical comedy film, directed by George Sidney in which two sailors go on a four-day shore leave in Hollywood, accompanied by music and song, meet an aspiring young singer and try to help her get an audition at MGM. It stars Frank Sinatra, Gene... Although he never won an Oscar for any of his movie performances, the comedian Bob Hope received two honorary Oscars for his contributions to cinema. ... One of the A festivals in Europe. ... Invitation to the Dance is 40 Below Summers first mainstream release, following lesser-known Rain e. ... Les Girls, also known as Cole Porters Les Girls, is a 1957 comedy film musical made by MGM. It was directed by George Cukor, produced by Sol C. Siegel with Saul Chaplin as associate producer from a screenplay by John Patrick based on a story by Vera Caspary with... Dance Magazine is a major American trade publication for dance. ... An Emmy Award. ... Medal for the officer class, decorated with a rosette Napoleon wearing the Grand Cross The President of France is the Grand Master of the Legion. ... This article is about the museum in New York City. ... Summary What A Way To Go! (1964) is one of those movies that came out of the happy-fun Hollywood era of the Rat Pack years, where a popular type of movie promised escape into naive plots that exclusively focused on the themes of love and sex in fluffy, brightly... The Locarno International Film Festival is an international film festival held annually in Locarno, Switzerland. ... Hello, Dolly! is a 1969 American musical film, based on the Broadway production of the same name. ... Cecil Blount DeMille (August 12, 1881 – January 21, 1959) was one of the most successful filmmakers during the first half of the 20th century. ... The Golden Globe Awards are American awards for motion pictures and television programs, given out each year during a formal dinner. ... This article or section is not written in the formal tone expected of an encyclopedia article. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The Screen Actors Guild (S.A.G.) is the labor union representing over 120,000 film actors in the United States. ... The University of Pittsburgh, commonly referred to as Pitt, is a state-related, doctoral/research university in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, United States. ... Pittsburgh skyline The Allegheny County Courthouse Allegheny County is a county located in the U.S. state of Pennsylvania. ... The National Medal of Arts is an award and title bestowed on selected honorees by the National Endowment for the Arts. ... William Jefferson Bill Clinton (born William Jefferson Blythe III[1] on August 19, 1946) was the 42nd President of the United States, serving from 1993 to 2001. ... The Three Tenors is how noted operatic tenors Plácido Domingo, José Carreras and Luciano Pavarotti are billed when they perform together. ... Dodger Stadium, in Los Angeles, California, has been the home of the Los Angeles Dodgers Major League Baseball team since 1962. ... Flag Seal Nickname: City of Angels Location Location within Los Angeles County in the state of California Coordinates , Government State County California Los Angeles County Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa (D) Geographical characteristics Area     City 1,290. ... The César Award is the national film award of France first given out in 1975. ...

Notes and references

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r Thomas, Tony (1991). The Films of Gene Kelly - Song and Dance Man. New York, NY: Carol Publishing Group. ISBN 0-8065-0543-5. 
  2. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l Hirschhorn, Clive (1984). Gene Kelly - a Biography. London: W.H. Allen. ISBN 0-491-03182-3. 
  3. ^ In an episode foreshadowing his later conflicts with the studio, Elia Kazan in the late 1940s offered Kelly the role of Biff in Death of a Salesman on Broadway, but MGM refused to release him. cf. Blair, p.112
  4. ^ Paula Abdul stars opposite an animated cat in her "Opposites Attract" video. In the Family Guy episode Road to Rupert, Kelly dances with Stewie Griffin.
  5. ^ According to Blair, p.111, he directed Jocelyn Brando in a semi-documentary about war-wounded veterans.
  6. ^ Blair, p.104: "Gene was the central creative force in this initial collaboration, but he was always generous about Stanley's contribution...Unfortunately, and mysteriously for me, Stanley, over the years, had been less than gracious about Gene"
  7. ^ e.g. In 1994, Kurt Browning, in an ice skating interpretation of "Singin' in the Rain" on his television special You Must Remember This. In 2005, Kelly's widow gave permission for Volkswagen to use his likeness to promote the Golf GTi car. The advertisement, shown only outside the US, used CGI to mix footage of Gene Kelly, from Singin' in the Rain, with footage of professional breakdancer David Elsewhere.
  8. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z aa Billman, Larry (1997). Film Choreographers and Dance Directors. North Carolina: McFarland and Company, pp.374-376. ISBN 0-89950-868-5. 
  9. ^ a b c d e Delamater, Jacques (2004). "Gene Kelly". International Encyclopedia of Dance 1. Oxford: Oxford University Press. pp.38-40. 
  10. ^ Blair, p.176
  11. ^ a b Blair, Betsy (2004). The Memory of All That. London: Elliott & Thompson. ISBN 1-904027-30-X. 

Elia Kazan, (Greek: Ηλίας Καζάν, IPA: ), (September 7, 1909 – September 28, 2003) was a Greek-American film and theatre director, film and theatrical producer, screenwriter, novelist and cofounder of the influential Actors Studio in New York in 1947. ... Cover to the Penguin Group edition. ... Paula Julie Abdul (born June 19, 1962) is an American multi-platinum selling Grammy Award-winning singer, dancer, television personality, jewelry designer, and Emmy Award-winning choreographer. ... Family Guy is an Emmy Award-winning American animated television series about a dysfunctional family in the fictional town of Quahog, Rhode Island. ... “Road to Rupert” is a season five episode of the FOX animated television series Family Guy. ... Stewart Gilligan Stewie Griffin is a fictional character in the animated television series Family Guy. ... Jocelyn Brando (born November 18, 1919 in San Francisco, California; died November 27, 2005 in Santa Monica, California) was an American character actress with rare film appearances. ... Year 1994 (MCMXCIV) The year 1994 was designated as the International Year of the Family and the International Year of the Sport and the Olympic Ideal by the United Nations. ... Browning skates during the 2000 Stars on Ice tour Kurt Browning (born June 18, 1966) is a prominent Canadian figure skater who was extremely popular during the late 1980s and 1990s. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Volkswagen AG (ISIN: DE0007664005), or VW, is an automobile manufacturer based in Wolfsburg, Germany. ... VW Golf Mk. ... Computer-generated imagery (commonly abbreviated as CGI) is the application of the field of computer graphics (or more specifically, 3D computer graphics) to special effects in films, television programs, commercials, simulators and simulation generally, and printed media. ... Singin in the Rain is a 1952 comedy musical film starring Gene Kelly, Donald OConnor, and Debbie Reynolds and directed by Kelly and Stanley Donen, with Kelly also handling the choreography. ... David Elsewhere Bernal (born August 2, 1979) is a popping dancer from Santa Ana, California. ...

External links

Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to:
Gene Kelly
Preceded by
Sammy Davis, Jr., Bob Hope, Shirley MacLaine, and Frank Sinatra
47th Academy Awards
Oscars host
48th Academy Awards (with Goldie Hawn, Walter Matthau, George Segal, and Robert Shaw)
Succeeded by
Warren Beatty, Ellen Burstyn, Jane Fonda, and Richard Pryor
49th Academy Awards
Persondata
NAME Kelly, Gene
ALTERNATIVE NAMES Kelly, Eugene Curran
SHORT DESCRIPTION dancer, actor, singer, director, producer, and choreographer
DATE OF BIRTH August 23, 1912(1912-08-23)
PLACE OF BIRTH Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, U.S.
DATE OF DEATH February 2, 1996
PLACE OF DEATH Beverly Hills, California, U.S.

  Results from FactBites:
 
Gene Kelly (226 words)
Gene Kelly's euphoric, puddle-splashing dance from Singin' In the Rain is one of the iconic moments of 20th-century Hollywood.
Gene Kelly - Gene Kelly dancer, actor Born: 8/23/1912 Birthplace: Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania Dancer and film and...
Singin' in the Rain (1952) - Directors: Gene Kelly and Stanley Donen Cast: Gene Kelly, Debbie Reynolds, Donald O'Connor and Cyd...
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