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Encyclopedia > Gelsemium
Gelsemium
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Plantae
Division: Magnoliophyta
Class: Magnoliopsida
Order: Gentianales
Family: Gelsemiaceae
Genus: Gelsemium
Species

Gelsemium is a genus of flowering plants belonging to family Gelsemiaceae. The genus contains three species of shrubs to straggling or twining climbers. Two species are native to North America, and one to China and Southeast Asia. Scientific classification or biological classification is how biologists group and categorize extinct and living species of organisms. ... Divisions Green algae land plants (embryophytes) non-vascular embryophytes Hepatophyta - liverworts Anthocerophyta - hornworts Bryophyta - mosses vascular plants (tracheophytes) seedless vascular plants Lycopodiophyta - clubmosses Equisetophyta - horsetails Pteridophyta - true ferns Psilotophyta - whisk ferns Ophioglossophyta - adderstongue ferns seed plants (spermatophytes) †Pteridospermatophyta - seed ferns Pinophyta - conifers Cycadophyta - cycads Ginkgophyta - ginkgo Gnetophyta - gnetae Magnoliophyta - flowering... Classes Magnoliopsida - Dicots Liliopsida - Monocots The flowering plants (also angiosperms or Magnoliophyta) are one of the major groups of modern plants, comprising those that produce seeds in specialized reproductive organs called flowers, where the ovulary or carpel is enclosed. ... Orders see text Dicotyledons or dicots are flowering plants whose seed contains two embryonic leaves or cotyledons. ... Families Gentianaceae (gentian family) Apocynaceae (dogbane family) Gelsemiaceae Loganiaceae (logania family) Rubiaceae (coffee family) The Gentianales are an order of flowering plants, included within the asterid group of dicotyledons. ... Genera Gelsemium Mostuea Gelsemiaceae is a family of flowering plants, belonging to order Gentianales. ... Yellow Jessamine (also known as evening trumpetflower or Carolina Jessamine; Gelsemium sempervirens, [L.] St. ... See genus (mathematics) for the use of the term in mathematics. ... Classes Magnoliopsida - Dicots Liliopsida - Monocots The flowering plants (also angiosperms or Magnoliophyta) are one of the major groups of modern plants, comprising those that produce seeds in specialized reproductive organs called flowers, where the ovulary or carpel is enclosed. ... Genera Gelsemium Mostuea Gelsemiaceae is a family of flowering plants, belonging to order Gentianales. ... A willow shrub A shrub or bush is a horticultural rather than strictly botanical category of woody plant, distinguished from a tree by its multiple stems and lower height, usually less than 6 m tall. ... World map showing location of North America A satellite composite image of North America North America is a continent in the northern hemisphere, bounded on the north by the Arctic Ocean, on the east by the North Atlantic Ocean, on the south by the Caribbean Sea, and on the west... Location of Southeast Asia Southeast Asia is a subregion of Asia. ...


Carolus Linnaeus first classified G. sempervirens as Bignonia sempervirens in 1753; Antoine Laurent de Jussieu renamed the genus in 1789. Gelsemium is a Latinized form of the Italian word for jasmine, gelsomino. A painting of Carolus Linnaeus Carl Linnaeus, also known after his ennoblement as Carl von Linné (   listen?), and who wrote under the Latinized name Carolus Linnaeus (May 23, 1707 – January 10, 1778), was a Swedish botanist who laid the foundations for the modern scheme of taxonomy. ... 1753 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... Antoine Laurent de Jussieu (April 12, 1748 _ September 17, 1836) was a French botanist. ... 1789 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... Species About 200 species, including: Jasminum angulare Jasminum azoricum Jasminum beesianum Jasminum dichotomum - Gold Coast Jasmine Jasminum floridum Jasminum fluminense - African Jasmine Jasminum fruticans Jasminum humile - Yellow Jasmine Jasminum mesnyi - Primrose Jasmine Jasminum multiflorum - Star Jasmine Jasminum nitidum - Shining Jasmine Jasminum nudiflorum - Winter Jasmine Jasminum officinale - Common Jasmine Jasminum parkeri...


All three species of this genus are poisonous. The skull and crossbones symbol traditionally used to label a poisonous substance. ...


Species


  Results from FactBites:
 
Gelsemium Sempervirens - by Miranda Castro (772 words)
Gelsemium sempervirens, also known as yellow jasmine or wild woodbine, is a beautiful climbing plant found in moist woodlands and along seacoasts in the southern states of the U.S. It climbs high up in trees, forming festoons from tree to tree and perfuming the air in the spring when it flowers (March - May).
After recovering from the poisonous effects of Gelsemium, he was cured of the chronic fever from which he had been suffering.
Emotionally, Gelsemium is an important acute remedy for those who become literally paralyzed with anxiety (anticipatory anxiety) and fear, suffering from shaking legs, frequent urination, and diarrhea in anticipation of an important event like an exam or an interview.
Gelsemium (1295 words)
Poisonous doses of Gelsemium produce a sensation of languor, relaxation and muscular weakness, which may be followed by paralysis if the dose is sufficiently large.
The treatment of Gelsemium poisoning consists in the prompt evacuation of the stomach by an emetic, if the patient's condition permits; and secondly, and equally important, artificial respiration, aided by the early administration, subcutaneously, of ammonia, strychnine, atropine or digitalis.
In America, it was formerly extensively used as an arterial sedative and febrifuge in various fevers, more especially those of an intermittent character, but now it is considered probably of little use for this purpose, for it has no action on the skin and no marked action on the alimentary or circulatory system.
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