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Encyclopedia > Gaza Strip
قطاع غزة
רְצוּעַת עֵזָה
Gaza Strip
Location of Gaza Strip
Largest city Gaza City
Official languages Palestinian Arabic (de facto)
Government Hamas-led government (de facto)
Palestinian National Authority (de jure)
 -  De facto Prime Minister Ismail Haniyeh (Hamas)
 -  De jure Prime Minister Salam Fayyad (Third Way)
 -  President of the Palestinian National Authority Mahmoud Abbas (Fatah)
Organized September 13,1993 Oslo accords 
 -  Signed PA took partial control in May 1994, and full control in September 2005 (Israel retains control of airspace and offshore maritime access) 
Area
 -  Total 360 km² (212th)
130 sq mi 
Population
 -  2007 estimate 1,482,405 (151st1)
 -  Density 3,823/km² (6th1)
10,586/sq mi
GDP (PPP)  estimate
 -  Total $770 million (160th1)
 -  Per capita 600 $ (167th1)
Currency Israeli new sheqel (de facto) (ILS)
Time zone (UTC+2)
 -  Summer (DST)  (UTC+3)
Calling code +970
1 If considered as an independent state

The Gaza Strip (Arabic: قطاع غزة transliteration: Qitˁɑ' Ġazzah/Qita' Ghazzah, Hebrew: רצועת עזהRetzu'at 'Azza) is a coastal strip of land along the Mediterranean Sea, bordering Egypt on the south-west and Israel on the north and east. It is about 41 kilometers (25 mi) long, and between 6 and 12 kilometers (4–7.5 mi) wide, with a total area of 360 square kilometers (139 sq mi). The territory takes its name from Gaza, its main city. It has about 1.4 million residents, all Palestinians.[citation needed] Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... The article is about the Middle Eastern city. ... An official language is a language that is given a special legal status in the countries, states, and other territories. ... Arabic can mean: From or related to Arabia From or related to the Arabs The Arabic language; see also Arabic grammar The Arabic alphabet, used for expressing the languages of Arabic, Persian, Malay ( Jawi), Kurdish, Panjabi, Pashto, Sindhi and Urdu, among others. ... De facto is a Latin expression that means in fact or in practice. It is commonly used as opposed to de jure (meaning by law) when referring to matters of law or governance or technique (such as standards), that are found in the common experience as created or developed without... Hamas (; acronym: , or Harakat al-Muqawama al-Islamiyya or Islamic Resistance Movement,[1]) is a Palestinian Islamic militant organization and political party. ... De facto is a Latin expression that means in fact or in practice. It is commonly used as opposed to de jure (meaning by law) when referring to matters of law or governance or technique (such as standards), that are found in the common experience as created or developed without... “Palestinian government” redirects here. ... Look up De jure in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... De facto is a Latin expression that means in fact or in practice. It is commonly used as opposed to de jure (meaning by law) when referring to matters of law or governance or technique (such as standards), that are found in the common experience as created or developed without... A prime minister is the most senior minister of cabinet in the executive branch of government in a parliamentary system. ... Ismail Haniyeh (Arabic: إسماعيل هنية; sometimes transliterated as Ismail Haniya or Ismail Haniyah); born January 1963) is a senior political leader of Hamas and former Prime Minister of the Palestinian National Authority. ... Hamas (; acronym: , or Harakat al-Muqawama al-Islamiyya or Islamic Resistance Movement,[1]) is a Palestinian Islamic militant organization and political party. ... Look up De jure in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... A prime minister is the most senior minister of cabinet in the executive branch of government in a parliamentary system. ... Dr. Salam Fayyad (Arabic: ; b. ... The Third Way is a small centrist Palestinian political party active in the Palestinian National Authority (PNA). ... The President of the Palestinian National Authority is the highest-ranking political position (equivalent to head of state) in the Palestinian National Authority (PNA). ... Mahmoud Abbas (Arabic: ) (born March 26, 1935), also known by the kunya Abu Mazen (ابو مازن), was elected President of the Palestinian National Authority (PNA) on January 9, 2005, and took office on January 15, 2005. ... Fatah (Arabic: ); a reverse acronym from the Arabic name Harakat al-Tahrir al-Watani al-Filastini (literally: Palestinian National Liberation Movement) is a major secular Palestinian political party and the largest organization in the Palestine Liberation Organization (PLO), a generally secular multi-party confederation. ... Airspace means the portion of the atmosphere controlled by a particular country on top of its territory and territorial waters or, more generally, any specific three-dimensional portion of the atmosphere. ... This article is about the physical quantity. ... To help compare sizes of different geographic regions, we list here areas between 10 km² (1000 hectares) and 100 km² (10,000 hectares). ... This is a list of the countries of the world sorted by area. ... A square mile is an English unit of area equal to that of a square with sides each 1 statute mile (≈1,609 m) in length. ... This is a list of countries ordered according to population. ... Population density per square kilometre by country, 2006 Population density map of the world in 1994. ... Population density by country, 2006 List of countries and dependencies by population density in inhabitants/km². The list includes sovereign states and self-governing dependent territories that are recognized by the United Nations. ... PPP The purchasing power parity (PPP) theory was developed by Gustav Cassel in 1920. ... There are three lists of countries of the world sorted by their gross domestic product (GDP) (the value of all final goods and services produced within a nation in a given year). ... Per capita is a Latin phrase meaning for each head. ... This article includes two lists of countries of the world[1] sorted by their gross domestic product (GDP) at purchasing power parity (PPP) per capita, the value of all final goods and services produced within a nation in a given year divided by the average population for the same year. ... ISO 4217 Code ILS User(s) Israel, The West Bank, Gaza Strip Inflation -0. ... ISO 4217 is the international standard describing three letter codes (also known as the currency code) to define the names of currencies established by the International Organization for Standardization (ISO). ... Timezone and TimeZone redirect here. ... UTC redirects here. ... Although DST is common in Europe and North America, most of the worlds people do not use it. ... UTC redirects here. ... This is a list of country calling codes defined by ITU-T recommendation E.164. ... For Palestine there is a reserved Country Code: 970. ... Arabic redirects here. ... Due to the fact that the Arabic language has a number of phonemes that have no equivalent in English or other European languages, a number of different transliteration methods have been invented to represent certain Arabic characters, due to various conflicting goals. ... Hebrew redirects here. ... Mediterranean redirects here. ... “km” redirects here. ... “Miles” redirects here. ... Square kilometre (U.S. spelling: square kilometer), symbol km², is a decimal multiple of SI unit of surface area square metre, one of the SI derived units. ... A square mile is an English unit of area equal to that of a square with sides each 1 statute mile (≈1,609 m) in length. ... Not to be confused with the Spanish name Garza or the Egyptian town of Giza. ... The Palestinian flag, adopted in 1948, is a widely recognized modern symbol of the Palestinian people. ...


The Strip itself and its population are nominally governed by the Palestinian National Authority, though following the June 2007 battle of Gaza, actual control is in the hands of the de facto government dominated by Hamas. Israel controls the strip's airspace and offshore maritime access. “Palestinian government” redirects here. ... June 2007 is the sixth month of that year. ... Combatants Hamas Fatah Casualties 22 killed 77 killed 17 non-combatants killed,[1][2] including 2 UN personnel[3] Fatah-Hamas conflict Gaza The Battle of Gaza (Arabic: ) was a military conflict between Hamas and Fatah which took place between June 7 and June 15, 2007 in the Gaza Strip. ... Since the Battle of Gaza (2007), the Gaza Strip is no longer under the control of the Palestinian National Authority, placing it under the lead of Hamas, the political rival of Fatah. ... Hamas (; acronym: , or Harakat al-Muqawama al-Islamiyya or Islamic Resistance Movement,[1]) is a Palestinian Islamic militant organization and political party. ... Airspace means the portion of the atmosphere controlled by a particular country on top of its territory and territorial waters or, more generally, any specific three-dimensional portion of the atmosphere. ...


The Gaza Strip is not currently recognized internationally as part of any sovereign country. “Sovereign” redirects here. ...

Contents

History

See also: History of Palestine and History of the Levant

This article does not cite any references or sources. ... This article deals with the general history of the Levant, which is an antiquated geographical term that refers to a large area in Southwest Asia, south of the Taurus Mountains, bounded by the Mediterranean Sea in the west, the Arabian Desert in the north, and Mesopotamia to the east. ...

Ancient history until mid 16th century (15th century BCE-1517)

The first recorded mention of the city of Gaza was a reference by Pharaoh Thutmose III (18th dynasty; 15th century BCE), though the actual habitation no doubt predates that official record. It is also mentioned in the Tell el-Amarna tablets, the diplomatic and administrative records of ancient Egypt. Not to be confused with the Spanish name Garza or the Egyptian town of Giza. ... Menkheperre Lasting is the Manifestation of Re[1] Nomen Thutmose Neferkheperu Thoth is born, beautiful of forms Horus name Kanakht Khaemwaset Mighty Bull, Arising in Thebes Nebty name Wahnesytmireempet Enduring in kingship like Re in heaven Golden Horus Sekhempahtydsejerkhaw Powerful of strength, holy of diadems Consort(s) Hatshepsut-Meryetre, Nebtu... EA 161, letter by Aziru, leader of Amurru, (stating his case to pharaoh), one of the Amarna letters in cuneiform writing on a clay tablet. ...


Because of its strategic position on the Via Maris (see map), the ancient coastal road linking Egypt with Palestine and the lands beyond, Gaza experienced little peace in antiquity. Throughout its history it was a prosperous trade centre, sitting as it does on the ancient Sea Road. Via Maris is an ancient trading route dating from the Early Bronze Age which linked Egypt with the northern empires of Syria, Anatolia and Mesopotamia - modern day Iran, Iraq, Turkey and Syria. ...


The area was under Egyptian occupation for over 300 years when the Philistines took control and settled the city and surrounding area. Gaza became an important Philistine trading centre and part of the Pentapolis (league of five cities). Map showing the location of Philistine land and cities of Gaza, Ashdod, and Ashkelon Map of the southern Levant, c. ... A Pentapolis, from the Greek words penta five and polis city(-state) is geographic and/or institutional grouping of five cities. ...

The Via Maris (purple), King's Highway (red), and other ancient Levantine trade routes, c. 1300 BCE
The Via Maris (purple), King's Highway (red), and other ancient Levantine trade routes, c. 1300 BCE

The Bible makes a reference to Gaza as the place where Samson was delivered into bondage by Delilah and where he died while toppling the temple of the god Dagon. [1][2] It fell to the Israelite King David in 1000 BCE. Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 541 pixelsFull resolution‎ (919 × 622 pixels, file size: 319 KB, MIME type: image/png) (All user names refer to en. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 541 pixelsFull resolution‎ (919 × 622 pixels, file size: 319 KB, MIME type: image/png) (All user names refer to en. ... This Gutenberg Bible is displayed by the United States Library. ... Samson and Delilah, by Anthony van Dyck (1599-1641) This article is about Biblical figure. ... For other uses, see Delilah (disambiguation). ... Dagon was a major northwest Semitic god, reportedly of grain and agriculture. ... “The Twelve Tribes” redirects here. ... This page is about the Biblical king David. ... -1...


The area fell to the Assyrians in 732 BCE, to the Egyptians, to the Babylonians in 586 BCE, Persians in 525 BCE, and the Macedonians. Macedonian ruler Alexander the Great met stiff resistance there in 332 BCE. After conquering it, he sold its inhabitants into slavery.[3] [4][5] blah ... Centuries: 9th century BC - 8th century BC - 7th century BC Decades: 780s BC 770s BC 760s BC 750s BC 740s BC - 730s BC - 720s BC 710s BC 700s BC 690s BC 680s BC Events and trends 739 BC - Hiram II becomes king of Tyre. ... Babylonia was an ancient state in Iraq), combining the territories of Sumer and Akkad. ... Centuries: 7th century BC - 6th century BC - 5th century BC Decades: 620s BC - 610s BC - 600s BC - 590s BC - 588s BC - 570s BC - 560s BC - 550s BC - 540s BC - 530s BC Events and trends 589 BC - Apries succeeds Psammetichus II as king of Egypt 588 BC - Nebuchadnezzar II of Babylon... For other uses of this term see: Persia (disambiguation) The Persian Empire is the name used to refer to a number of historic dynasties that have ruled the country of Persia (Iran). ... Centuries: 7th century BC - 6th century BC - 5th century BC Decades: 570s BC - 560s BC - 550s BC - 540s BC - 530s BC - 520s BC - 510s BC - 500s BC - 490s BC - 480s BC - 470s BC Events 529 BC - Cambyses II succeeds his father Cyrus as ruler of Persia. ... For the film of the same name, see Alexander the Great (1956 film). ... Centuries: 5th century BC - 4th century BC - 3rd century BC Decades: 380s BC 370s BC 360s BC 350s BC 340s BC - 330s BC - 320s BC 310s BC 300s BC 290s BC 280s BC 337 BC 336 BC 335 BC 334 BC 333 BC - 332 BC - 331 BC 329 BC 328...


In 145 BCE Gaza was conquered by Jonathan the Hasmonean (Brother of Judah the Maccabee). In Hellenistic and Roman times the harbour, about 3 miles (5 km) from the city proper, was called Neapolis (Greek: “New City”). Jonathan Maccabaeus was leader of the Hasmonean Dynasty of Judea from 161 to 143 BC. He is called also Apphus (Ἀπφοῦς [Syriac, (image) ] = the dissembler or the diplomat, in allusion to a trait prominent in him; 1 Maccabees ii. ... Judas Maccabeus (or Judah the Maccabee from the Hebrew יהודה המכבי transliteration: Yehudah HaMakabi) translation: Judah the Hammer was the third son of the Jewish priest Mattathias. ... The term Hellenistic (established by the German historian Johann Gustav Droysen) in the history of the ancient world is used to refer to the shift from a culture dominated by ethnic Greeks, however scattered geographically, to a culture dominated by Greek-speakers of whatever ethnicity, and from the political dominance... For other uses, see Roman Empire (disambiguation). ...


It was conquered by Arabs in the 630s after a siege during which the Jewish population of the city defended it alongside the Byzantine garrison. Believed to be the site where Muhammad's great grandfather was buried, the city became an important Islamic center. In the 12th century, Gaza was taken by Christian Crusaders; it returned to Muslim control in 1187. The area fell to the Ottomans in 1517. Languages Arabic other minority languages Religions Predominantly Sunni Islam, as well as Shia Islam, Greek Orthodoxy, Greek Catholicism, Roman Catholicism, Alawite Islam, Druzism, Ibadi Islam, and Judaism Footnotes a Mainly in Antakya. ... The Byzantine Empire is the term conventionally used to describe the Roman Empire during the Middle Ages, centered at its capital in Constantinople. ... Muhammad in a new genre of Islamic calligraphy started in the 17th century by Hafiz Osman. ... This article is about historical Crusades . ... There is also a collection of Hadith called Sahih Muslim A Muslim (Arabic: مسلم, Persian: Mosalman or Mosalmon Urdu: مسلمان, Turkish: Müslüman, Albanian: Mysliman, Bosnian: Musliman) is an adherent of the religion of Islam. ... The Ottoman Empire at the height of its power Imperial motto El Muzaffer Daima The Ever Victorious (as written in tugra) Official language Ottoman Turkish Capital İstanbul ( Constantinople/Asitane/Konstantiniyye ) Sovereigns Sultans of the Osmanli Dynasty Population ca 40 million Area 12+ million km² Establishment 1299 Dissolution October 29...


Ottoman and British control (1517-1948)

In 1517 Gaza fell to the Ottomans and was part of the Ottoman Empire until the First World War. Year 1517 was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar. ... The Ottoman Empire at the height of its power Imperial motto El Muzaffer Daima The Ever Victorious (as written in tugra) Official language Ottoman Turkish Capital İstanbul ( Constantinople/Asitane/Konstantiniyye ) Sovereigns Sultans of the Osmanli Dynasty Population ca 40 million Area 12+ million km² Establishment 1299 Dissolution October 29... Ottoman redirects here. ... “The Great War ” redirects here. ...


Starting in the early 19th century, Gaza was culturally dominated by neighboring Egypt. Though part of the Ottoman Empire, a large number of its residents were Egyptians (and their descendants) who had fled political turmoil. [6]


The region served as a battlefield during the First World War (1914-18). The Gaza Strip was taken by the British in the Third Battle of Gaza on 7 November 1917. “The Great War ” redirects here. ... Third Battle of Gaza Conflict First World War Date 31 October–7 November 1917 Place Gaza, southern Palestine Result Allied victory The Third Battle of Gaza was fought in 1917 in southern Palestine during World War I. The British forces under the command of General Edmund Allenby successfully broke...


Following World War I, Gaza became part of the British mandate for Palestine under the authority of the League of Nations. [7] “The Great War ” redirects here. ... Flag The approximate borders of the British Mandate circa 1922. ... The League of Nations was an international organization founded as a result of the Paris Peace Conference in 1919–1920. ...


British rule of Palestine ended with the Israeli War of Independence in 1948. The 1948 Arab-Israeli War, called the War of Independence by Israelis and al Nakba the catastrophe by Arabs, was the first in a series of wars in the Arab-Israeli conflict. ...


Egyptian occupation (1948-67)

According to the terms of the 1947 United Nations partition plan, the Gaza area was to become part of a new Palestinian Arab state. The Arabs rejected the United Nations plan. Map of the Gaza Strip from The World Factbook. ... Map showing the UN Partition Plan. ... It has been suggested that State of Palestine be merged into this article or section. ...


Following the dissolution of the British mandate of Palestine and 1947-1948 Civil War in Palestine, Israel declared its independence in May 1948. The Egyptian army invaded the area from the south, starting the 1948 Arab-Israeli War. [8] Flag The approximate borders of the British Mandate circa 1922. ... Combatants Palestine Jews Palestine Arabs United Kingdom The 1948 Civil War in the British Mandate of Palestine lasted from 30 November 1947 to 14 May 1948. ... David Ben Gurion (First Prime Minister of Israel) publicly pronouncing the Declaration of the State of Israel, May 14, 1948. ... Combatants  Israel Haganah Irgun Lehi Palmach Foreign Volunteers Egypt, Syria, Transjordan,  Lebanon, Iraq, Saudi Arabia, Yemen, Holy War Army, Arab Liberation Army Commanders Yaakov Dori, Yigael Yadin John Bagot Glubb, Abd al-Qadir al-Husayni, Hasan Salama, Fawzi Al-Qawuqji, Ahmed Ali al-Mwawi Strength  Israel: 29,677 initially rising...


The Gaza Strip as it is known today was the product of the subsequent 1949 Armistice Agreements between Egypt and Israel, often referred to as the Green Line. Egypt occupied the Strip from 1949 (except for four months of Israeli occupation during the 1956 Suez Crisis) until 1967. The Strip's population was greatly augmented by an influx of Palestinian Arab refugees who fled or were expelled from Israel during the fighting. The 1949 Armistice Agreements are a set of agreements signed during 1949 between Israel and its neighbors Egypt, Jordan, Lebanon, and Syria. ... Israels 1949 Green Line (dark green) and demilitarized zones (light green). ... Combatants Israel United Kingdom France Egypt Commanders Moshe Dayan Charles Keightley Pierre Barjot Gamal Abdel Nasser Abdel Hakim Amer Strength 175,000 Israeli 45,000 British 34,000 French 70,000 Casualties 197 Israeli KIA 56 British KIA 91 British WIA 10 French KIA 43 French WIA 650 KIA[1...


Towards the end of the war, the All-Palestine Government (Arabic: حكومة عموم فلسطين hukumat 'umum Filastin) was proclaimed in Gaza City on 22 September 1948 by the Arab League. It was conceived partly as an Arab League attempt to limit the influence of Transjordan over the Palestinian issue. The government was not recognized by Transjordan or any non-Arab country. It was little more than a façade under Egyptian control, had negligible influence or funding, and subsequently moved to Cairo. Palestinians living in the Gaza Strip or Egypt were issued All-Palestine passports until 1959, when Gamal Abdul Nasser, President of Egypt, annulled the All-Palestine government by decree. The All-Palestine Government (hukumat umum Filastin) was established in Gaza by the Arab League on 22 September, 1948, towards the end of the 1948 Arab-Israeli War. ... Not to be confused with the Spanish name Garza or the Egyptian town of Giza. ... Headquarters Cairo, Egypt1 Official languages Arabic Membership 22 Arab states 2 observer states Leaders  -  Secretary General Amr Moussa (since 2001)  -  Council of the Arab League Sudan  -  Speaker of the Arab Parliament Nabih Berri Establishment  -  Alexandria Protocol March 22, 1945  Area  -  Total 13,953,041 (Western Sahara Included) = 13,687,041... Map of the territory of the British Mandate of Palestine The Emirate of Transjordan was an autonomous political division of the British Mandate of Palestine, created as an administrative entity in April 1921 before the Mandate came into effect. ... For other uses, see Cairo (disambiguation). ... Gamal Abdel Nasser (Arabic: جمال عبد الناصر) Gamal Abdel Nasser (January 15, 1918 - September 28, 1970) was the second President of Egypt after Muhammad Naguib and is considered one of the most important Arab leaders in history. ...


Egypt never annexed the Gaza Strip, but instead treated it as occupied territory and administered it through a military governor. [9] The refugees were never offered Egyptian citizenship nor permitted to enter Egypt.


During the Sinai campaign of November 1956, the Gaza Strip and the Sinai Peninsula were overrun by Israeli troops. International pressure soon forced Israel to withdraw. Combatants Israel United Kingdom France Egypt Commanders Moshe Dayan Charles Keightley Pierre Barjot Gamal Abdel Nasser Abdel Hakim Amer Strength 175,000 Israeli 45,000 British 34,000 French 70,000 Casualties 197 Israeli KIA 56 British KIA 91 British WIA 10 French KIA 43 French WIA 650 KIA[1... Sinai Peninsula, Gulf of Suez (west), Gulf of Aqaba (east) from Space Shuttle STS-40 For other uses of the word Sinai, please see: Sinai (disambiguation). ...


Israel captured the Gaza Strip during the 1967 Six Day War. The 1967 Arab-Israeli War, also known as the Six-Day War or June War, was fought between Israel and its Arab neighbors Egypt, Jordan, and Syria. ...


Israeli occupation (1967-2005)

The area was again occupied by Israel in the Six-Day War in June 1967. The military occupation was to last for 38 years, until 2005. Combatants Israel Egypt Syria Jordan Iraq Commanders Yitzhak Rabin, Moshe Dayan, Uzi Narkiss, Israel Tal, Mordechai Hod, Ariel Sharon Abdel Hakim Amer, Abdul Munim Riad, Zaid ibn Shaker, Hafez al-Assad Strength 264,000 (incl. ... Year 1967 (MCMLXVII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the 1967 Gregorian calendar. ...


During the period of occupation Israeli created a settlement bloc, Gush Katif in the south west corner of the Strip near Rafah near the Egyptian border. Besides ideological reasons for being there, the settlement bloc also served Israel's security concerns. The Gaza Strip remained under Israeli military administration until 1994. During that period the military administration was also responsible for the maintenance of civil facilities and services. Homes alongside a sand dune in Neve Dekalim. ... Rafah (Arabic: رفح Hebrew: רפיח) is a town in the Gaza Strip, on the Egyptian border, and a nearby town on the Egyptian side of the border, on the Sinai Peninsula. ...


In March 1979 Israel and Egypt signed the Israel-Egypt Peace Treaty. Among other things, the treaty provided for the withdrawal by Israel of its armed forces and civilians from the Sinai Peninsula which Israel had captured during the 1967 Six-Day War. The final status of the Gaza Strip as with relations between Israel and Palestinians was not dealt with in the treaty. The treaty did settle the international border between Gaza Strip and Egypt. Egypt renounced all territorial claims to the region beyond the international border. The Israel-Egypt peace treaty (Arabic: معاهدة السلام المصرية الإسرائيلية; transliterated: Muahadat as-Salam al-Masriyah al-Israyliyah) (Hebrew: הסכם שלום ישראל-מצרים; transliterated: Heskem Shalom Yisrael-Mizraim) was signed in Washington, DC, United States, on March 26, 1979, following the Camp David Accords (1978). ... Combatants Israel Egypt Syria Jordan Iraq Commanders Yitzhak Rabin, Moshe Dayan, Uzi Narkiss, Israel Tal, Mordechai Hod, Ariel Sharon Abdel Hakim Amer, Abdul Munim Riad, Zaid ibn Shaker, Hafez al-Assad Strength 264,000 (incl. ...


In May 1994, following the Palestinian-Israeli agreements known as the Oslo Accords, a phased transfer of governmental authority to the Palestinians took place. Much of the Strip (except for the settlement blocs and military areas) came under Palestinian Authority control. The Israeli forces left Gaza City and other urban areas, leaving the new Palestinian Authority to administer and police the Strip. The Palestinian Authority, led by Yasser Arafat, chose Gaza City as its first provincial headquarters. In September 1995, Israel and the PLO signed a second peace agreement extending the Palestinian Authority to most West Bank towns. The agreement also established an elected 88-member Palestinian National Council, which held its inaugural session in Gaza in March 1996. Yitzhak Rabin, Bill Clinton, and Yasser Arafat during the Oslo Accords on September 13, 1993. ... “Palestinian government” redirects here. ... Not to be confused with the Spanish name Garza or the Egyptian town of Giza. ... Not to be confused with Yasir Arafat (cricketer). ... The Palestine Liberation Organization (PLO) (Arabic: ;   or Munazzamat al-Tahrir al-Filastiniyyah) is a multi-party confederation and is the organization regarded since 1974 as the sole legitimate representative of the Palestinian people. ... The Interim Agreement on the West Bank and the Gaza Strip or Israeli-Palestinian Interim Agreement, or simply the Interim Agreement, also known as Oslo 2 (or Oslo II), and alternately known as Taba, was a key and complex agreement about the future of the Gaza Strip and the West... The Palestinian National Council (PNC) is the parliament in exile of the Palestinian people. ...


The Second Intifada broke out in September 2000. In February 2005, the Israeli government voted to implement a unilateral disengagement plan from the Gaza Strip. The plan began to be implemented on 15 August 2005 (the day after Tisha B'av) and was completed on 12 September 2005. Under the plan, all Israeli settlements in the Gaza Strip (and four in the West Bank) and the nearby Erez bloc were dismantled with the removal of all 9,000 Israeli settlers (most of them in the Gush Katif settlement area in the Strip's southwest) and military bases. On 12 September 2005 the Israeli cabinet formally declared an end to military rule in the Gaza Strip after 38 years of control. To avoid any allegation that it was still in occupation of any part of the Gaza Strip, Israel also withdrew from the Philadelphi Route, which is a narrow strip adjacent to the Strip's border with Egypt, after Egypt's agreement to secure its side of the border. Under the Oslo Accords the Philadelphi Route was to remain under Israeli control, to prevent the smuggling of materials (such as ammunition) and people across the border with Egypt. With Egypt agreeing to patrol its side of the border, it was hoped that the objective would be achieved. For other uses, see al-Aqsa (disambiguation). ... Israels unilateral disengagement plan (Hebrew: תוכנית ההתנתקות Tokhnit HaHitnatkut or תכנית ההינתקות Tokhnit HaHinatkut in the Disengagement Plan Implementation Law), also known as the Disengagement plan, Gaza Pull-Out plan, and Hitnatkut) was a proposal by Israeli Prime Minister Ariel Sharon, adopted by the government and enacted in August 2005, to remove all... is the 227th day of the year (228th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Tisha BAv (Hebrew: תשעה באב or ט׳ באב), or the Ninth of Av, is an annual fast day in Judaism. ... is the 255th day of the year (256th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Map of Israeli settlements (magenta) in the West Bank. ... Homes alongside a sand dune in Neve Dekalim. ... The Philadelphi Route (corridor / buffer zone) was an IDF code name for the strip of land along the border between Egypt and the Gaza Strip. ... Yitzhak Rabin, Bill Clinton, and Yasser Arafat during the Oslo Accords on September 13, 1993. ... The Philadelphi Route (corridor / buffer zone) was an IDF code name for the strip of land along the border between Egypt and the Gaza Strip. ...


Palestinian Authority control (2005-2007)

In accordance with the Oslo Accords, the Palestinian Authority took over the administrative authority of the Gaza Strip (other than the settlement blocs and military areas) in 1994. After the complete Israeli withdrawal of Israeli settlers and military from the Gaza Strip on 12 September 2005, the Palestinian Authority had complete administrative authority in the Gaza Strip. Yitzhak Rabin, Bill Clinton, and Yasser Arafat during the Oslo Accords on September 13, 1993. ... “Palestinian government” redirects here. ... Israels unilateral disengagement plan (Hebrew: תוכנית ההתנתקות Tokhnit HaHitnatkut or תכנית ההינתקות Tokhnit HaHinatkut in the Disengagement Plan Implementation Law), also known as the Disengagement plan, Gaza Pull-Out plan, and Hitnatkut) was a proposal by Israeli Prime Minister Ariel Sharon, adopted by the government and enacted in August 2005, to remove all...


Palestinians maintain that the Israeli occupation is not over because Israel still controls Gazan borders, airspace and territorial waters. The Israeli human rights organization B'tselem said in November 2006 that "the broad scope of Israeli control in the Gaza Strip creates a strong case for the claim that Israel's occupation of the Gaza Strip continue." [1] University of London, School of Oriental and African Studies, law professor Iain Scobbie noted in 2006 that "Israel retains absolute authority over Gaza’s airspace and territorial sea. It is manifestly exercising governmental authority in these areas.... it is clear that Israeli withdrawal of land forces did not terminate occupation." [2] And according to some Palestinians, Israel's occupation of the Gaza Strip continued. "They control the water, the sky and the passages. How can you say occupation is over?" said Palestinian negotiator Saeb Erekat in 2005. [3] Similar viewpoints have been presented by many other Palestinian organizations and leaders.[4][5] [6] The Al Mezan Center for Human Rights also argues that the Gaza Strip remains occupied by Israel.[7] Human rights are rights which some hold to be inalienable and belonging to all humans. ... BTselem (Hebrew: , in the image of, as in Genesis 1:27) is an Israeli non-governmental organization (NGO) that describes itself as The Israeli Information Center for Human Rights in the Occupied Territories. ... Website http://www. ...


Prior to Israel's withdrawal from the Gaza Strip, the United States considered the Gaza Strip to be an Israel-occupied territory. Following the withdrawal, no official US government statement has been made on the status of the Strip. However, the CIA World Factbook (which is an official U.S. government publication), which was last updated in 2007, continues to list the Gaza Strip as an Israeli-occupied territory. World Factbook 2004 cover The World Factbook is an annual publication by the Central Intelligence Agency of the United States with basic almanac-style information about the various countries of the world. ... The Golan Heights plateau overlooking the site of the ancient city of Hippos The Israeli-occupied territories is one of a number of terms used to describe areas captured by Israel from Egypt, Jordan, and Syria during the Six-Day War of 1967. ...


Hamas won the 2006 Palestinian legislative elections. However, when a Hamas-controlled government was formed, continuing to refuse to recognise Israel, renounce violence and agree to honour agreements previously made by the PLO, Israel, the United States, Canada, and the European Union froze all funds to the Hamas-controlled government. They view Hamas as a terrorist organization. Wikinews has news related to this article: Hamas wins Palestinian election On January 25, 2006, elections were held for the Palestinian Legislative Council (PLC), the legislature of the Palestinian National Authority (PNA). ... This article is becoming very long. ...


In December 2006, news reports indicated that a number of Palestinians were leaving the Gaza Strip, due to political disorder and economic stagnation there.[8]


In January 2007, fighting continued between Hamas and Fatah, without any progress towards resolution or reconciliation. The worst clashes occurred in the northern Gaza Strip, where Gen. Muhammed Gharib, a senior commander of the Fatah-dominated Preventative Security Force, was killed when a rocket hit his home. Gharib's two daughters and two bodyguards were also killed in the attack, which was carried out by Hamas gunmen.[9] Hamas (; acronym: , or Harakat al-Muqawama al-Islamiyya or Islamic Resistance Movement,[1]) is a Palestinian Islamic militant organization and political party. ... Fatah (Arabic: ); a reverse acronym from the Arabic name Harakat al-Tahrir al-Watani al-Filastini (literally: Palestinian National Liberation Movement) is a major secular Palestinian political party and the largest organization in the Palestine Liberation Organization (PLO), a generally secular multi-party confederation. ...


At the end of January 2007, it appeared that a newly-negotiated truce between Fatah and Hamas was starting to take hold .[10] However, after a few days, new fighting broke out.[11] Fatah fighters stormed a Hamas-affiliated university in the Gaza Strip. Officers from Abbas' presidential guard battled Hamas gunmen guarding the Hamas-led Interior Ministry.[12]


In May 2007, the deal between Hamas and Fatah appeared to be weaker, as new fighting broke out between the factions. This was considered a major setback. [13] Interior Minister Hani Qawasmi, who had been considered a moderate civil servant acceptable to both factions, resigned due to what he termed harmful behavior by both factions. [14] Qawasmi was born in Gaza; the origins of his family are from Hebron in the West Bank; his father came to Gaza in 1949 and settled there. ...


Fighting spread in the Gaza Strip with both factions attacking vehicles and facilities of the other side. In response to constant attacks by rocket fire from the Gaza Strip, Israel launched an air strike which destroyed a building used by Hamas. Some Palestinians said the violence could bring the end of the Fatah-Hamas coalition government, and possibly the end of the Palestinian authority. [15] This is the list of members of the Palestine cabinet that was formed by Ismail Haniya on March 17, 2007. ...


Hamas spokeman Moussa Abu Marzouk blamed Israel and the EU for the worsening situation in the Strip. As the situation worsened and his government was on the verge of collapse, he indicated no acceptance of the idea that maybe the way to give the Palestinian people a better life is by working towards some form of mutual recognition and acceptance, instead of just continuing to call for more conflict and war. [16] Expressions of concerns were received from many Arab leaders, with many offering to try to help by doing some diplomatic work between the two factions. [17] One journalist wrote an eyewitness account stating: Hamas (; acronym: , or Harakat al-Muqawama al-Islamiyya or Islamic Resistance Movement,[1]) is a Palestinian Islamic militant organization and political party. ...

Today I have seen people shot before my eyes, I heard the screams of terrified women and children in a burning building, and I argued with gunmen who wanted to take over my home. I have seen a lot in my years as a journalist in Gaza, but this is the worst it's been. [18]

Hamas control (2007-Present)

In June 2007, the Palestinian Civil War between Hamas (Islamic Resistance Movement) and Fatah (Palestine Liberation Movement) intensified. Hamas routed Fatah, and by 14 June 2007, the Gaza Strip was completely overtaken by Hamas, resulting in a de facto government maintaining it is the legitimate government of the Palestinian Authority. Retaliation by Fatah against Hamas in the West Bank has led to the opposite result there. June 2007 is the sixth month of that year. ... Combatants Hamas Fatah Commanders Ismail Haniya Khaled Meshaal Mohammed Deif Mahmoud Abbas Mohammed Dahlan Strength Izz ad-Din al-Qassam Brigades: 15,000 Executive Force: 6,000[1][2] National Security: 30,000 Police and Preventive Security: 30,000 General Intelligence: 5,000 Presidential Guard: 4,200 Al Aqsa Martyrs... Hamas (; acronym: , or Harakat al-Muqawama al-Islamiyya or Islamic Resistance Movement,[1]) is a Palestinian Islamic militant organization and political party. ... Fatah (Arabic: ); a reverse acronym from the Arabic name Harakat al-Tahrir al-Watani al-Filastini (literally: Palestinian National Liberation Movement) is a major secular Palestinian political party and the largest organization in the Palestine Liberation Organization (PLO), a generally secular multi-party confederation. ... is the 165th day of the year (166th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... Combatants Hamas Fatah Casualties 22 killed 77 killed 17 non-combatants killed,[1][2] including 2 UN personnel[3] Fatah-Hamas conflict Gaza The Battle of Gaza (Arabic: ) was a military conflict between Hamas and Fatah which took place between June 7 and June 15, 2007 in the Gaza Strip. ... “Palestinian government” redirects here. ...


Hamas continues to consolidate its position in Gaza. It has ousted Fatah-linked officials from positions of power and authority in the Strip (such as government positions, security services, universities, newspapers etc) and is in the process of consolidating its monopoly of fire power by progressively removing guns from the hands of peripheral militias, clans, and criminal groups. It is also harassing journalists.[19]


While clamping down on lawlessness in the Strip, it has made no effort to control the continued firing of Qassam rockets from the Strip across the border into Israel, targeted at Israeli civilians. The Qassam rocket is a simple steel rocket filled with explosives, developed by the Palestinian organization Hamas. ...


Current status

The Palestinian Authority has been responsible for the civil and security administration in the Gaza Strip since 1994. There have been no Israeli settlements or military bases in the Gaza strip since the unilateral disengagement on 12 September 2005. “Palestinian government” redirects here. ... Israels unilateral disengagement plan (Hebrew: תוכנית ההתנתקות Tokhnit HaHitnatkut or תכנית ההינתקות Tokhnit HaHinatkut in the Disengagement Plan Implementation Law), also known as the Disengagement plan, Gaza Pull-Out plan, and Hitnatkut) was a proposal by Israeli Prime Minister Ariel Sharon, adopted by the government and enacted in August 2005, to remove all...


After Hamas' takeover in Gaza on 14 June 2007, Palestinian Authority Chairman Mahmoud Abbas of Fatah dismissed Hamas from the government and formed a Cabinet based in the West Bank. Abbas' government has won widespread international support. Egypt, Jordan, and Saudi Arabia said in late June 2007 that the West Bank-based Cabinet formed by Abbas was the sole legitimate Palestinian government, and Egypt moved its embassy from Gaza to the West Bank.[10]. Hamas, which has effective control of the Strip, faces international diplomatic and economic isolation. The West Bank The Palestinian National Authority (PNA or PA) is a semi-autonomous state institution nominally governing the bulk of the West Bank and the Gaza Strip (which it calls the Palestinian Territories). It was established as a part of Oslo accords between the PLO and Israel. ... Mahmoud Abbas (Arabic: ) (born March 26, 1935), also known by the kunya Abu Mazen (ابو مازن), was elected President of the Palestinian National Authority (PNA) on January 9, 2005, and took office on January 15, 2005. ... Abbas ibn Abd al-Muttalib was an uncle of Muhammad Abbas I of Egypt, egyptian pasha (1813-1854) Abbas I of Safavid aka Abbas the Great, persian Shah (1557-1629) Abbas II of Egypt aka Abbas Hilmi Pasha, egyptian khedive (1874-1944) Abbas Mirza, Prince of Persia, (1789-1833) Abu...


Nevertheless, the Gaza Strip has been under the effective control of Hamas since June 14, 2007. Hamas also effectively controls the Strip's international border with Egypt, as well as with Israel (subject to equal corresponding control by the other side). However under the Israel-Egypt Peace Treaty of 1979 the only crossing between Gaza and Egypt is to be through the Rafah Border Crossing. Since the unilateral disengagement in September 2005 this crossing has been supervised by EU Border Assistance Mission Rafah under a separate Agreement. Since the Hamas takeover of the Gaza Strip, the monitors have not been able to perform their functions under the Agreement, citing security concerns, resulting in the Rafah Crossing being closed. The only land access into the Strip to Israel is via the Erez and Karni crossings. Hamas (; acronym: , or Harakat al-Muqawama al-Islamiyya or Islamic Resistance Movement,[1]) is a Palestinian Islamic militant organization and political party. ... The Israel-Egypt peace treaty (Arabic: معاهدة السلام المصرية الإسرائيلية; transliterated: Muahadat as-Salam al-Masriyah al-Israyliyah) (Hebrew: הסכם שלום ישראל-מצרים; transliterated: Heskem Shalom Yisrael-Mizraim) was signed in Washington, DC, United States, on March 26, 1979, following the Camp David Accords (1978). ... The Rafah Border Crossing (Arabic: , Hebrew: ) is an international border that connects Rafah, Egypt and Rafah, Palestinian Authority. ... Israels unilateral disengagement plan (Hebrew: תוכנית ההתנתקות Tokhnit HaHitnatkut or תכנית ההינתקות Tokhnit HaHinatkut in the Disengagement Plan Implementation Law), also known as the Disengagement plan, Gaza Pull-Out plan, and Hitnatkut) was a proposal by Israeli Prime Minister Ariel Sharon, adopted by the government and enacted in August 2005, to remove all... The European Union Border Assistance Mission Rafah (EU BAM Rafah) is, after EUPOL COPPS, the EUs second Civilian Crisis Management Mission in the Palestinian territories. ... The Rafah Border Crossing (Arabic: , ‎) is an international border crossing between Egyptian and Palestinian-controlled Rafah. ... The Erez Crossing (Hebrew: מעבר ארז) is a pedestrian/cargo terminal on the Israeli Gaza Strip barrier. ... The Karni Crossing is a cargo terminal in the Israeli Gaza Strip barrier. ...


Geography

Flag of Palestine
Gaza Strip
Palestinian territories
v  d  e

Image File history File links Flag_of_Palestine. ... This article is about the Palestinian territories as a geopolitical phenomenon. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ...

North Gaza
Gaza City
Deir El Balah
Khan Yunis
Rafah
Principal geographical features of Israel and south-eastern Mediterranean region
Principal geographical features of Israel and south-eastern Mediterranean region

The Gaza Strip is located in the Middle East (at 31°25′N 34°20′ECoordinates: 31°25′N 34°20′E). It has a 51 kilometers (32 mi) border with Israel, and an 11 km border with Egypt, near the city of Rafah. Khan Yunis is located 7 kilometers (4 mi) northeast of Rafah, and several towns around Deir el-Balah are located along the coast between it and Gaza City. Beit Lahia and Beit Hanoun are located to the north and northeast of Gaza City, respectively. North Gaza Gaza City GAZA CITY Deir El Balah Khan Yunis Rafah The North Gaza Governorate (Arabic: ) is one of 16 Governorates of the Palestinian National Authority in the Gaza Strip which is administered by the Palestinian National Authority aside from its border with Israel, airspace and maritime territory. ... North Gaza Gaza City GAZA CITY Deir El Balah Khan Yunis Rafah The Gaza Governorate is one of 16 Governorates of the Palestinian National Authority located in the north central Gaza Strip which is administered by the Palestinian National Authority aside from its border with Israel, airspace and maritime territory. ... The article is about the Middle Eastern city. ... The Khan Yunis Governorate is one of 16 Governorates of the Palestinian National Authority, located in the southern Gaza Strip. ... North Gaza Gaza City GAZA CITY Deir El Balah Khan Yunis Rafah The Rafah Governorate (Arabic: ) is an administrative district of the Palestinian National Authority in the southernmost portion of the Gaza Strip. ... Map of the Gaza Strip from The World Factbook. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 275 × 599 pixels Full resolution (831 × 1809 pixel, file size: 525 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Annotated satellite image of Israel, the Palestinian territories and western Jordan, highlighting principal geographical features. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 275 × 599 pixels Full resolution (831 × 1809 pixel, file size: 525 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Annotated satellite image of Israel, the Palestinian territories and western Jordan, highlighting principal geographical features. ... A map showing countries commonly considered to be part of the Middle East The Middle East is a region comprising the lands around the southern and eastern parts of the Mediterranean Sea, a territory that extends from the eastern Mediterranean Sea to the Persian Gulf. ... Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ... Rafah (Arabic: رفح Hebrew: רפיח) is a town in the Gaza Strip, on the Egyptian border, and a nearby town on the Egyptian side of the border, on the Sinai Peninsula. ... Khan Yunis (Arabic: ‎; literally Jonahs Inn) is a city and adjacent refugee camp in the southern part of the Gaza Strip. ... Deir Al-Balah, Deir El-Balah, Deir ElBalah, Deir AlBalah (دير البلح) is located at the center of the Gaza Strip in Palestine and is well-known for its beaches and palm trees. ... Not to be confused with the Spanish name Garza or the Egyptian town of Giza. ... Beit Lahia (Arabic: ) is a town under Palestinian Authority of about 40,000 people in the northern Gaza Strip. ... Beit Hanoun (Arabic: ‎) is a town of 35,000 which is administered by the Palestinian Authority like the rest of the Gaza Strip. ...


The Gush Katif bloc of Israeli localities used to exist on the sand dunes adjacent to Rafah and Khan Yunis, along the southwestern edge of the 40 kilometers (25 mi) Mediterranean coastline. A few months after the disengagement in December 2005, a controversial buffer zone was created on the northern border with Israel, in the area often used to launch Qassam rockets into Israel. Part of it reaches 2.5 kilometers (1.6 mi) into the Palestinian Authority-controlled territory, on roughly the area of the former northern Israeli localities. Homes alongside a sand dune in Neve Dekalim. ... This article is about sand formations. ... Mediterranean redirects here. ... Israels unilateral disengagement plan (Hebrew: תוכנית ההתנתקות Tokhnit HaHitnatkut or תכנית ההינתקות Tokhnit HaHinatkut in the Disengagement Plan Implementation Law), also known as the Disengagement plan, Gaza Pull-Out plan, and Hitnatkut) was a proposal by Israeli Prime Minister Ariel Sharon, adopted by the government and enacted in August 2005, to remove all... December 2005 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December- → 31 December 2005 (Saturday) 25-year-old Scottish human rights worker Kate Burton and her parents are freed unharmed in the Gaza Strip by the Palestinian gunmen who kidnapped them two days earlier. ... Buffer Zone is one of the neighborhoods of North Nazimabad Town in Karachi, Sindh, Pakistan. ... The remnants of an exploded Qassam rocket that was fired from the Gaza Strip at Israel. ...


The Gaza Strip has a temperate climate, with mild winters, and dry, hot summers subject to drought. The terrain is flat or rolling, with dunes near the coast. The highest point is Abu 'Awdah (Joz Abu 'Auda), at 105 meters (344 ft) above sea level. Natural resources include arable land (about a third of the strip is irrigated), and recently discovered natural gas. Environmental issues include desertification; salination of fresh water; sewage treatment; water-borne disease; soil degradation; and depletion and contamination of underground water resources. For the usage in virology, see temperate (virology). ... For other uses, see Winter (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Summer (disambiguation). ... Fields outside Benambra, Victoria, Australia suffering from drought conditions A drought is an extended period of months or years when a region notes a deficiency in its water supply. ... For considerations of sea level change, in particular rise associated with possible global warming, see sea level rise. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... For other uses, see Natural gas (disambiguation). ... Ship stranded by the retreat of the Aral Sea Desertification is the degradation of land in arid, semi arid and dry sub-humid areas resulting from various climatic variations, but primarily from human activities. ... Biosalinity is the study and practice of using saline (salty) water for irrigating agricultural crops. ... Sewage treatment, or domestic wastewater treatment, is the process of removing contaminants from wastewater, both runoff and domestic. ... Disease that arises from infected water and is transmitted when the water is used for drinking or cooking (for example, cholera or typhoid). ... Retrogression and degradation are two regressive evolution processes associated with the loss of equilibrium of a stable soil. ...


The Strip currently holds the oldest known remains of a man-made bonfire, and some of the world's oldest dated human skeletons. It occupies territory similar to that of ancient Philistia, and is occasionally known by that name. The historic Philistines (see note Philistines below) were a people that inhabited the southern coast of Canaan around the time of the arrival of the Israelites, their territory being named Philistia in later contexts. ...


Demographics

In 2007 approximately 1.48 million Palestinians live in the Gaza Strip, of whom almost 1.0 million are UN-registered refugees [20]. The majority of the Palestinians are descendants of refugees who fled or were expelled from their homes during the 1948 Arab-Israeli War. The Strip's population has continued to increase since that time, one of the main reasons being a total fertility rate of more than 5 children per woman. In a ranking by total fertility rate, this places Gaza 19th of 222 nations.[11] The Palestinian territories, occupied — according to the United Nations terminology — since the 1967 Six-Day War, include the West Bank and the Gaza strip. ... Combatants  Israel Haganah Irgun Lehi Palmach Foreign Volunteers Egypt, Syria, Transjordan,  Lebanon, Iraq, Saudi Arabia, Yemen, Holy War Army, Arab Liberation Army Commanders Yaakov Dori, Yigael Yadin John Bagot Glubb, Abd al-Qadir al-Husayni, Hasan Salama, Fawzi Al-Qawuqji, Ahmed Ali al-Mwawi Strength  Israel: 29,677 initially rising...


The vast majority of the population are Sunni Muslims, with an estimated 2,000 Christians.[21] Sunni Islam (Arabic سنّة) is the largest denomination of Islam. ... This article is about the religous people known as Christians. ...


No Jews live in Gaza since Israel's voluntary withdrawal in 2005 and Israel's forced expulsion of all Jews from Gaza, in an effort by Israel to allow the Palestinians full control of Gaza and enable them to build a nation-state that could live side by side with Israel in peace.


Economy

See also: Palestinian economy

Economic output in the Gaza Strip declined by about one-third between 1992 and 1996. This downturn has been variously attributed to corruption and mismanagement by Yasser Arafat, and to Israeli closure policies—the imposition of generalized border closures which disrupted previously established labor and commodity market relationships between Israel and the Strip. A serious negative social effect of this downturn was the emergence of high unemployment. The Palestinian economy refers to the economy of the Palestinian territories, including the West Bank, East Jerusalem and the Gaza strip. ... Not to be confused with Yasir Arafat (cricketer). ...


Israel's use of comprehensive closures decreased during the next few years and, in 1998, Israel implemented new policies to reduce the impact of closures and other security procedures on the movement of Palestinian goods and labor into Israel. These changes fueled an almost three-year-long economic recovery in the Gaza Strip. Recovery ended with the outbreak of the al-Aqsa Intifada in the last quarter of 2000. The al-Aqsa Intifada triggered tight IDF closures of the border with Israel, as well as frequent curbs on traffic in Palestinian self-rule areas, severely disrupting trade and labor movements. In 2001, and even more severely in early 2002, internal turmoil and Israeli military measures in Palestinian Authority areas resulted in the destruction of capital plant and administrative structure, widespread business closures, and a sharp drop in GDP. Another major factor has been the decline of income earned due to reduction in the number of Gazans permitted entry to work in Israel. After the Israeli withdrawal from Gaza, the flow of a limited number of workers into Israel again resumed, although Israel has stated its intention to reduce or end such permits due to the victory of Hamas in the 2006 parliamentary elections. The term Palestinian has other usages, for which see definitions of Palestinian. ... For other uses, see al-Aqsa (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see al-Aqsa (disambiguation). ... Emblem of the IDF The Israel Defense Forces are part of the Israeli Security Forces. ... Hamas (; acronym: , or Harakat al-Muqawama al-Islamiyya or Islamic Resistance Movement,[1]) is a Palestinian Islamic militant organization and political party. ... Wikinews has news related to this article: Hamas wins Palestinian election On January 25, 2006, elections were held for the Palestinian Legislative Council (PLC), the legislature of the Palestinian National Authority (PNA). ...


The Israeli settlers of Gush Katif built greenhouses and experimented with new forms of agriculture. These greenhouses also provided employment for many hundred Gazan Palestinians. When Israel withdrew from the Gaza Strip in the Summer of 2005, the greenhouses were purchased with money raised by former World Bank president James Wolfensohn, and given to the Palestinian people to jump-start their economy. However, the effort faltered due to limited water supply, inability to export produce due to Israeli border restrictions, and corruption in the Palestinian Authority.[22] Most of the greenhouses were subsequently looted or destroyed.[23] Homes alongside a sand dune in Neve Dekalim. ... The Royal Greenhouses of Laeken. ... The World Bank logo The World Bank (the Bank) is a part of the World Bank Group (WBG), is a bank that makes loans to developing countries for development programs with the stated goal of reducing poverty. ... James D. Wolfensohn (2003) James Wolfensohn AO KBE (born December 1, 1933) was the ninth president of the World Bank Group. ...


According to the CIA World Factbook, GDP in 2001 declined 35% to a per capita income of $625 a year, and 60% of the population is now below the poverty line. Gaza Strip industries are generally small family businesses that produce textiles, soap, olive-wood carvings, and mother-of-pearl souvenirs; the Israelis have established some small-scale modern industries in an industrial center. Israel supplies the Gaza Strip with electricity. The main agricultural products are olives, citrus, vegetables, Halal beef, and dairy products. Primary exports are citrus and cut flowers, while primary imports are food, consumer goods, and construction materials. The main trade partners of the Gaza Strip are Israel, Egypt, and the West Bank. World Factbook 2004 cover The World Factbook is an annual publication by the Central Intelligence Agency of the United States with basic almanac-style information about the various countries of the world. ... The per capita income for a group of people may be defined as their total personal income, divided by the total population. ... A boy from an East Cipinang trash dump slum in Jakarta, Indonesia shows what he found. ... For other uses, see Textile (disambiguation). ... A collection of decorative soaps used for human hygiene purposes. ... Species About 20, including: Olea brachiata Olea capensis Olea caudatilimba Olea europaea Olea exasperata Olea guangxiensis Olea hainanensis Olea laxiflora Olea neriifolia Olea paniculata Olea parvilimba Olea rosea Olea salicifolia Olea tetragonoclada Olea tsoongii Olea undulata // Overview The olives (Olea) are a genus of about 20 species of small trees... A piece of nacre Nacre, also known as mother of pearl, is an organic mixture of calcium carbonate (CaCO3) in the form of platy crystals of aragonite and conchiolin (a scleroprotein). ... Electricity (from New Latin ēlectricus, amberlike) is a general term for a variety of phenomena resulting from the presence and flow of electric charge. ... Binomial name L. 19th century illustration The Olive (Olea europaea) is a species of small tree in the family Oleaceae, native to coastal areas of the eastern Mediterranean region, from Lebanon and the maritime parts of Asia Minor and northern Iran at the south end of the Caspian Sea. ... For other uses, see Citrus (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Vegetable (disambiguation). ... Halal (حلال, alāl, halaal) is an Arabic term meaning permissible. In the English language it most frequently refers to food that is permissible according to Islamic law. ... For other uses, see Beef (disambiguation). ... Dairy products are generally defined as foodstuffs produced from milk. ...


Before the second Palestinian uprising broke out in September 2000, around 25,000 workers from the Gaza Strip used to work in Israel every day.[12]


Israel, the United States, Canada, and the European Union have frozen all funds to the Palestinian government after the formation of a Hamas-controlled government after its victory in the 2006 Palestinian legislative election. They view the group as a terrorist organization, and have pressured Hamas to recognize Israel, renounce violence, and agree to past agreements. Since Israel's withdrawal, the gross domestic product of the Gaza Strip has been crippled. The enterprise and industry of the former Jewish villages has been impaired, and the previously established work relationships between Israel and the Gaza Strip have been disrupted. Job opportunities in Israel for Gaza Palestinians have been largely lost. Prior to disengagement, 120,000 Palestinians from Gaza were employed in Israel or in joint projects. Only about 20,000 have been able to keep these jobs.[citation needed] Hamas (; acronym: , or Harakat al-Muqawama al-Islamiyya or Islamic Resistance Movement,[1]) is a Palestinian Islamic militant organization and political party. ... Wikinews has news related to this article: Hamas wins Palestinian election On January 25, 2006, elections were held for the Palestinian Legislative Council (PLC), the legislature of the Palestinian National Authority (PNA). ... This article is becoming very long. ... This article is about GDP in the context of economics. ...


After the seizure by Hamas militias of the Gaza Strip on 14 June 2007, all of the outside world has cut off all contact with the Strip. The only goods permitted into the Strip through the land crossings are goods of a humanitarian nature.


Health

A study carried out by Johns Hopkins University (USA) and Al-Quds University (in Jerusalem) for CARE International in late 2002 revealed very high levels of dietary deficiency among the Palestinian population. The study found that 17.5% of children aged 6–59 months suffered from chronic malnutrition. 53% of women of reproductive age and 44% of children were found to be anemic. In the aftermath of the Israeli withdrawal of August and September 2005, the healthcare system in Gaza continues to face severe challenges.[24]After the Hamas takeover of the Gaza Strip and the subsequent Israeli declaration of Gaza Strip as a " hostile entity" , the health conditions in Gaza Strip faces new challenges exacerbated by the intensified Israeli closure. The WHO expressed its concerns about the consequences of the Palestinian internal political fragmentation; the socioeconomic decline; military actions; and the Physical, psychological and economic isolation on the health of the population in Gaza.[25] The Johns Hopkins University, founded in 1876, is a private institution of higher learning located in Baltimore, Maryland, United States. ... Al-Quds University (Arabic: جامعه القدس ) is the Arab university in Jerusalem. ... For other uses, see Jerusalem (disambiguation). ... CARE (the full form Cooperative for Assistance and Relief Everywhere is almost never used) is one of the largest private international humanitarian organizations in the world, with programmes in over 72 countries. ... Percentage of population affected by malnutrition by country, according to United Nations statistics. ... This article discusses the medical condition. ... Israels unilateral disengagement plan (Hebrew: תוכנית ההתנתקות Tokhnit HaHitnatkut or תכנית ההינתקות Tokhnit HaHinatkut in the Disengagement Plan Implementation Law), also known as the Disengagement plan, Gaza Pull-Out plan, and Hitnatkut) was a proposal by Israeli Prime Minister Ariel Sharon, adopted by the government and enacted in August 2005, to remove all... 2005 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December- → Deaths in August August 31: Michael Sheard August 26: Lord Fitt August 24: Jack Slipper August 24: Maurice Cowling August 24: Dr. Tom Pashby August 23: Brock Peters August 22: Lord Lane August 21: Robert Moog August... 2005 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December- → Deaths in September September 28 : Constance Baker Motley September 25 : M. Scott Peck September 25 : Don Adams September 20 : Simon Wiesenthal September 14 : Robert Wise September 10 : Hermann Bondi September 8 : Donald Horne September 7 : Moussa Arafat... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... A healthcare system is the organization by which health care is provided. ...


Transport and communication

The Gaza Strip has a small, poorly developed road network. It also had a single standard gauge railway line running the entire length of the Strip from north to south along its center; however, it is abandoned, in disrepair, and little trackage remains. The line once connected to the Egyptian railway system to the south, as well as the Israeli system to the north. Image File history File links Photo of Gaza Airport, now w:Yaser Arafat International Airport, taken May 2002. ... Image File history File links Photo of Gaza Airport, now w:Yaser Arafat International Airport, taken May 2002. ... Yasser Arafat International Airport (Arabic: ‎; transliterated: Matar Yasir Arafat ad-Dowaly) (IATA: GZA, ICAO: LVGZ), formerly Gaza International Airport and Dahaniya International Airport, is located in the Gaza Strip, in Rafah close to the Egyptian border. ... As railways developed and expanded one of the key issues to be decided was that of the rail gauge (the distance between the two rails of the track) which should be used. ... Egyptian National Railways (ENR) is the national railway of Egypt and managed by the parastatal Egyptian Railway Authority (ERA). ... Israel Railways Logo Israel Railways (Hebrew: רכבת ישראל Rakévet Yisraél) is Israels government-owned national railway company and is responsible for all inter-city and suburban railway passenger and freight traffic in the country. ...


The strip's one port was never completed after the outbreak of the al-Aqsa Intifada. Its airport, the Gaza International Airport, opened on 24 November 1998, as part of agreements stipulated in the Oslo II Accord and the 23 October 1998 Wye River Memorandum. The airport was closed in October 2000 by Israeli orders, and its runway was destroyed by the Israel Defense Forces in December 2001. It has since been renamed Yasser Arafat International Airport. For other uses, see al-Aqsa (disambiguation). ... Yasser Arafat International Airport (Arabic: ‎; transliterated: Matar Yasir Arafat ad-Dowaly) (IATA: GZA, ICAO: LVGZ), formerly Gaza International Airport and Dahaniya International Airport, is located in the Gaza Strip, in Rafah close to the Egyptian border. ... is the 328th day of the year (329th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1998 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 296th day of the year (297th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1998 Gregorian calendar). ... The Wye River Memorandum was a political agreement negotiated to implement the earlier Interim Agreement of 28 September, 1995 brokered by the United States between Israel and the Palestine Authority completed on October 23, 1998. ... Emblem of the IDF The Israel Defense Forces are part of the Israeli Security Forces. ... Yasser Arafat International Airport (Arabic: ‎; transliterated: Matar Yasir Arafat ad-Dowaly) (IATA: GZA, ICAO: LVGZ), formerly Gaza International Airport and Dahaniya International Airport, is located in the Gaza Strip, in Rafah close to the Egyptian border. ...


The Gaza Strip has rudimentary land line telephone service provided by an open-wire system, as well as extensive mobile telephone services provided by PalTel (Jawwal), or Israeli providers such as Cellcom. Gaza is serviced by four internet service providers that now compete for ADSL and dial-up customers. Most Gaza households have a radio and a TV (70%+), and roughly 20% have a personal computer.[citation needed] People living in Gaza have access to FTA satellite programs, broadcast TV from the Palestinian Broadcasting Corporation, the Israel Broadcasting Authority, and the Second Israeli Broadcasting Authority. Cellcom (Hebrew: סלקום) is a major Israeli telecommunications company. ... “ISP” redirects here. ... Asymmetric Digital Subscriber Line (ADSL) is a form of DSL, a data communications technology that enables faster data transmission over copper telephone lines than a conventional modem can provide. ... FTA may stand for: Freight Transport Association Failure to appear, a legal term Fault tree analysis, a systems engineering term Federación de Trabajadores Arubanos, the Aruban Workers Federation Federal Transit Administration, an agency of the United States Department of Transportation Fluorescent Treponemal Antibody Absorption, FTA-ABS, a test for... Palestinian Broadcasting Corporation has a subsidiary known by the name Voice of Palestine. ... Israel Broadcasting Authority (often referred to as the IBA) (Hebrew: רשות השידור, Reshut haShidur) is Israels state broadcasting network. ... The Second Israeli Broadcasting Authority law was passed by the Knesset in 1990. ...


See also

Image File history File links WikiNews-Logo. ... Wikinews is a free-content news source and a project of the Wikimedia Foundation. ... Israel, with the West Bank, Gaza Strip and Golan Heights The Israeli-Palestinian conflict is an ongoing dispute between the State of Israel and Arab Palestinians. ... This article is in need of attention. ... Smuggling tunnels are secret tunnels, usually hidden underground, used for smuggling of goods (including illegal weapons) and people. ... Israels unilateral disengagement plan (Hebrew: תוכנית ההתנתקות Tokhnit HaHitnatkut or תכנית ההינתקות Tokhnit HaHinatkut in the Disengagement Plan Implementation Law), also known as the Disengagement plan, Gaza Pull-Out plan, and Hitnatkut) was a proposal by Israeli Prime Minister Ariel Sharon, adopted by the government and enacted in August 2005, to remove all... Combatants  Israel Defense Forces (Israeli Security Forces) Hamas Fatah (al-Aqsa Martyrs Brigades), Popular Resistance Committees Palestinian Islamic Jihad Palestinian Army of Islam Commanders Dan Halutz (Chief of Staff) Yoav Galant (Regional) Khaled Mashal (Leader of Hamas[1])Mohammed Deif (Leader of Hamas military wing) Strength 3,000 unknown possibly... The term Palestinian Civil War can either refer to: The 1947-48 Palestinian Civil War The 2006-2007 Fatah-Hamas conflict Category: ...

References

  1. ^ Gaza Humanitarian Crisis - A Joint Statement by Israel 's leading human rights organizations.
  2. ^ Is Gaza still occupied territory?, Forced Migration Review.
  3. ^ Is Gaza still occupied?, The Jewish News Weekly of Northern California, Friday September 16, 2005.
  4. ^ PLO, PNA: Gaza Is Still Occupied.
  5. ^ The Israeli “Disengagement” Plan: Gaza Still Occupied.
  6. ^ Gaza Still Occupied: Israeli Report.
  7. ^ GAZA STILL OCCUPIED!
  8. ^ More Palestinians flee homelands, Sarah El Deeb, Associated Press, December 9, 2006.
  9. ^ Hamas, Fatah continue clashes; 8 killed, jpost.com, 1/3/07.
  10. ^ Palestinian Cease-Fire Holds on 1st Day, Ibrahim Barzak, 1/31/07, Associated Press; Cease-Fire Starts Taking Hold in Gaza Ibrahim Barzak, 1/30/07, Associated Press.
  11. ^ Hamas attacks convoy Associated Press, 2/1/07.
  12. ^ Gaza erupts in fatal clashes after truce, Associated Press, 2/2/07.
  13. ^ Hamas kills 8 in Gaza border clash, By Ibrahim Barzak, Associated Press Writer, 5/15/07.
  14. ^ Top Palestinian security official quits By Sarah El Deeb, Associated Press, 5/14/07; Resignation deepens Gaza crisis, BBC, 5/14/07.
  15. ^ Israel attacks in Gaza amid factional violence, by Nidal al-Mughrabi, Associated Press, 5/16/07.
  16. ^ Hamas Blames World, Associated Press, 5/16/07.
  17. ^ Gaza bloodshed alarms West's Arab allies by Hala Boncompagni, Associated Press, 5/16/07.
  18. ^ Eyewitness: Carnage in Gaza, By Ibrahim Barzak, Asoociated Press, (via Jpost website), 5/16/07.
  19. ^ Torn apart by factional strife. Amnesty International (24 October 2007). Retrieved on 2007-10-23.
  20. ^ UNRWA: palestine refugees
  21. ^ Middle East Christians: Gaza pastor BBC News, 21 December 2005
  22. ^ Thanassis Cambanis (2005-10-31). Greenhouses in Gaza symbolize Palestinian hopes and barriers. Boston Globe.
  23. ^ Netzer Hazani. Harvest of sorrow. New York Daily News.
  24. ^ http://news.yahoo.com/s/nm//lf_nm/mideast_gaza_health_dc
  25. ^ http://www.who.int/hac/crises/international/wbgs/sitrep_25sept2007/en/index.html

The World Factbook 2007 (government edition) cover. ... The public domain comprises the body of all creative works and other knowledge—writing, artwork, music, science, inventions, and others—in which no person or organization has any proprietary interest. ... Wikimedia Commons has media related to: Amnesty international Amnesty International (commonly known as Amnesty or AI) is an international non-governmental organization which defines its mission as to undertake research and action focused on preventing and ending grave abuses of the rights to physical and mental integrity, freedom of conscience... is the 297th day of the year (298th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 296th day of the year (297th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 304th day of the year (305th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Boston Globe is the most widely-circulated daily newspaper in Boston, Massachusetts and in the greater New England region. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ...

External links

Find more information on Gaza Strip by searching Wikipedia's sister projects
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Learning resources from Wikiversity
  • B'Tselem The Israeli Information Center for Human Rights in the Occupied Territories on the status of Gaza since the disengagement.
  • Bregman, Ahron (2002). Israel's Wars: A History Since 1947. London: Routledge. ISBN
  • Ward, Richard J. (1977). The Palestine State: A Rational Approach. London: National University Publications.
  • Directory of Palestinian related websites
  • The Electronic Intifada
  • United Nations - Question of Palestine
  • Nutritional Assessment of the West Bank and Gaza StripPDF (72.0 bytes)
  • 1991 Map of the Gaza Strip from the University of Texas at Austin
  • 1999 Map of the Gaza Strip from the University of Texas at Austin
  • Gaza women join Hamas fighters by Khaled Abu Toameh, published in the Jerusalem Post August 21, 2005.
  • Gaza Strip at Google Maps
  • Palestine Ministry of Health
  • Special: Gaza kidnapping Israeli News - Ynetnews English version of Yedioth Ahronoth
  • History of Gaza from Aldameer
  • War Enters the Classrooms - the consequences of the Mideast conflict for the children of the Gaza Strip, by Inter Press Service, February 5, 2007
  • "Gaza Still Occupied" by Mazan Human Rights organizationPDF (29.6 KiB)
  • Hamas In Control of Gaza Strip
  • New Palestinian Cabinet Sworn In

  Results from FactBites:
 
Palestinian Centre for Human Rights (384 words)
During the reporting period, IOF killed 11 Palestinians, including 2 brothers, and wounded 28 others, including 4 children, and an Israeli human rights defender in the Gaza Strip and the West Bank.
The Palestinian Centre for Human Rights (PCHR) is an independent legal body based in Gaza City dedicated to protecting human rights, promoting the rule of law and upholding democratic principles in the Occupied Palestinian Territory.
Letter from Sourani to Scottish Parliament on the humanitarian situation in the Gaza Strip
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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