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Encyclopedia > Gauls
History of France Series - This is a timeline of French history. 1850s: 1850 - 1851 - 1852 - 1853 - 1854 - 1855 - 1856 - 1857 - 1858 - 1859 1860s: 1860 - 1861 - 1862 - 1863 - 1864 - 1865 - 1866 - 1867 - 1868 - 1869 1870s: 1870 - 1871 - 1872 - 1873 - 1874 - 1875 - 1876 - 1877 - 1878 - 1879 1880s: 1880 - 1881 - 1882 - 1883 - 1884... History of France
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- This is a timeline of French history. 1850s: 1850 - 1851 - 1852 - 1853 - 1854 - 1855 - 1856 - 1857 - 1858 - 1859 1860s: 1860 - 1861 - 1862 - 1863 - 1864 - 1865 - 1866 - 1867 - 1868 - 1869 1870s: 1870 - 1871 - 1872 - 1873 - 1874 - 1875 - 1876 - 1877 - 1878 - 1879 1880s: 1880 - 1881 - 1882 - 1883 - 1884 - 1885 - 1886 - 1887 - 1888... Timeline
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- Statue of Charlemagne (also called Karl der Große, Charles the Great) in Frankfurt, Germany. The Franks formed one of several west Germanic tribes who entered the late Roman Empire from Frisia as foederati and established a lasting realm in an area that covers most of modern-day France and... Franks
- History of France Chronological Gaul Franks Middle Ages Ancien Régime French Revolution First Empire Nineteenth century Third Republic Vichy France Modern France Topical Economic history Military history Social history Timeline During the latter years of the elderly Charlemagnes rule, the Vikings made advances along the northern and western... Middle Ages
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- History of France Chronological Gaul Franks Middle Ages Ancien Régime French Revolution First Empire Nineteenth century Third Republic Vichy France Modern France Topical Economic history Military history Social history Timeline The First French Empire, commonly known as the French Empire, the Napoleonic Empire or simply as The Empire, covers... First Empire
- History of France Chronological Gaul Franks Middle Ages Ancien Régime French Revolution First Empire Nineteenth century Third Republic Vichy France Modern France Topical Economic history Military history Social history Timeline This article covers the history of France from the defeat of Napoleon in 1815 to the begining of the... Nineteenth century
- History of France Chronological Gaul Franks Middle Ages Ancien Régime French Revolution First Empire Nineteenth century Third Republic Vichy France Modern France Topical Economic history Military history Social history Timeline The era of the Third Republic in France lasted from after the fall of the Second Empire in 1870... Third Republic
- Vichy France (French: now called Régime de Vichy or Vichy; called itself at the time État Français, or French State) was the French state of 1940-1944 which was a puppet government under Nazi influence, as opposed to the Free French Forces, based first in London and later... Vichy France
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- History of France Chronological Gaul Franks Middle Ages Ancien Régime French Revolution First Empire Nineteenth century Third Republic Vichy France Modern France Topical Economic history Military history Social history Timeline The military history of France includes both those military actions centered on the territory encompassing modern France, and the... Military history
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Gallia (in English Gaul) is the For other uses, see Latin (disambiguation). Latin was the language originally spoken in the region around Rome called Latium. It gained great importance as the formal language of the Roman Empire. All Romance languages are descended from Latin, and many words based on Latin are found in other modern languages... Latin name for the region of western This article is about the continente. For alternative meanings, see: Europe (disambiguation) World map showing location of Europe A satellite composite image of Europe Europe is Geology (from Greek γη- (ge-, the earth) and λογος (logos, word, reason)) is the science and study of the... Europe occupied by present-day Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License, Version 1.2 or any later version published by the Free Software Foundation; with no Invariant Sections, no Front-Cover Texts, and no Back-Cover Texts. Subject to disclaimers. Trying... France, For other uses, see Belgium (disambiguation). The word Belgian redirects to this page. For an article about the horse breed, see Belgian (horse). The Kingdom of Belgium (Dutch: Koninkrijk België, French: Royaume de Belgique, German: Königreich Belgien) is a country in Netherlands, Germany, Luxembourg, France, and the North Sea... Belgium, western Swiss redirects here; for other uses of that term, see Swiss (disambiguation) The Swiss Confederation or Switzerland is a landlocked federal state in Europe, with neighbours Germany, France, Italy, Austria and Liechtenstein. The country has a strong tradition of political and military neutrality, but also of international co-operation, as... Switzerland and the parts of the For other uses, see The Netherlands have been the name of different political and geographical entities in northwestern Europe. The Netherlands (Dutch: Nederland), the current Kingdom of the Netherlands. The Seven United Netherlands, also known as the United Provinces. A predecessor of the current country. It existed from 1581 to... Netherlands and Bundesrepublik Deutschland (In Detail) National motto: Einigkeit und Recht und Freiheit (German: Unity and Justice and Freedom) Official language German1 Capital Berlin Largest City Berlin Chancellor Gerhard Schröder President Horst Köhler Area - Total - % water Ranked 61st 349,223 km² 2.416% Population - Total (2004) - Density Ranked 13th 82... Germany on the west bank of the Rhine The Rhine canyon (Ruinaulta) in Graubünden in Switzerland Length 1.320 km Elevation of the source 1.602 m Average discharge 2.200 m³/s Area watershed 185.000 km² Origin Hinterrhein in Switzerland Mouth The North Sea Basin countries Switzerland - Liechtenstein - Austria - Germany- France - Netherlands At 1... Rhine river. (Gallia is also the This article needs cleanup. Please edit this article to conform to a higher standard of article quality. The neutrality of this article is disputed. Please see the relevant discussion on the talk page. Modern Greek is the present vernacular language of Greece (also spoken in Cyprus), and is descended from... Modern Greek name of Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License, Version 1.2 or any later version published by the Free Software Foundation; with no Invariant Sections, no Front-Cover Texts, and no Back-Cover Texts. Subject to disclaimers. Trying... France.)


In English the word Gaul commonly refers to a This article is about the European people. For the tool, see celt (tool). For other uses see Celtic (disambiguation). In ancient times, the Celts were a number of interrelated peoples in central Europe sharing a branch of Indo-European languages indicative of a common origin. Today, Celtic is often used... Celtic inhabitant of that region in ancient times, but the Gauls were widespread in Europe by Roman times, speaking Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. Start the Celtic Languages article (http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Celtic_Languages&action=edit) If you have created this page in the past few minutes and it has not yet appeared, it may not be... Celtic languages that had diverged into two groups. Besides the Gauls of modern-day France, Gauls had settled in the plains of northern For other uses, see Italy (disambiguation). The Italian Republic or Italy (Italian: Repubblica Italiana or Italia) is a southern European country, comprising a boot-shaped peninsula and two large islands in the Mediterranean Sea: Sicily and Sardinia. It shares its nothern alpine boundary with France, Switzerland, Austria and Slovenia. The... Italy, in the province Romans knew as Province of the Roman Republic, in modern-day northern Italy. It was Romes third province (after Sicily and Corsica), and was merged into Italia in 42 BC, as part of Octavians Italicisation program during the Second Triumvirate. Julius Caesar used Gallia Cisalpina for the good guys in Gaul... Gallia Cisalpina ("Gaul this side of the Alps") and Venetia et Istria. Other Gauls had migrated across the For other meanings see: Pyrenees, Victoria and Montes Pyrenaeus. Central Pyrenees The Pyrenees (French: Pyrénées; Spanish: Pirineos; Occitan: Pirenèus or Pirenèas; Catalan Pirineus; Aragonese: Perinés; Basque: Pirinioak) are a range of mountains in southwest Europe that form a natural border between France and Spain. They... Pyrenees into Hispania was the name given by the Romans to the Iberian Peninsula, and to two of the three provinces they created there: Hispania Baetica and Hispania Tarraconensis (the third being Lusitania). See also al-Andalus (Muslim Medieval Spain) Hispania Citerior Hispania Ulterior Hispania Baetica Hispania Tarraconensis Gallaecia Iberia Iberians and... Hispania, where they mixed with the indigenous The Iberian language describes a linguistic group associated with the Iberian civilization (7th Century BC - 1st Century BC), formed in the eastern and south-eastern regions of the Iberian peninsula. These languages became extinct by the 1st to 2nd Centuries AD, after being gradually replaced by Latin. Iberian seems to... Iberians as "Galloiberians" (also known as " The Celtiberians dwelt in the Iberian Peninsula and spoke a Celtic language. They lived chiefly in what is now north central Spain. Two other possibly Celtic languages, Tartessian and Lusitanian, were spoken in pre-Roman Iberia. The Lusitanii gave their name to Lusitania, the Latin name for Portugal. Extant tribal... Celtiberians").


These are the main divisions of Gaul:

  • Province of the Roman Republic, in modern-day northern Italy. It was Romes third province (after Sicily and Corsica), and was merged into Italia in 42 BC, as part of Octavians Italicisation program during the Second Triumvirate. Julius Caesar used Gallia Cisalpina for the good guys in Gaul... Gallia Cisalpina (Southern Alps)
    • Gallia Transpadana (Southern Po)
    • Gallia Cispadana (Northern Po)
  • Roman province of Gallia Narbonensis, 120 AD Gallia Narbonensis was a Roman province located in what is now Provence in southern France. Bordering directly on Italy, control of the province gave the Roman state several advantages, such as control of the land route between Italy and the Iberian peninsula; a... Gallia Transalpina (Northern Alps)
    • Roman province of Gallia Narbonensis, 120 AD Gallia Narbonensis was a Roman province located in what is now Provence in southern France. Bordering directly on Italy, control of the province gave the Roman state several advantages, such as control of the land route between Italy and the Iberian peninsula; a... Gallia Narbonensis provincia
    • Gallia Omnis (Between Rhine & Pyrenees)
      • Categories: Ancient Roman provinces | Ancient Gauls | Belgium geography stubs | Historical stubs ... Gallia Belgica
      • Categories: Ancient Roman provinces | Ancient Gauls | France geography stubs | Historical stubs ... Gallia Aquitania
      • Gallia Celtica

Gauls under Brennus is the name of two Celtic chieftains famous in ancient history: 1. In 390 BC, an army of Celts attacked Rome, led by one Brennus, capturing all of the city except for the Capitoline Hill, which was successfully held against them. This Brennus is famous for exclaiming to the... Brennus The Battle of the Allia was a battle of the first Gallic invasion of Italy. Contents // 1 Background 2 Roman Disaster 3 Recovery and Reform 4 External Links Background Prior to the battle, the Gauls invaded the Etruscan province of Siena and attacked the town of Clusium. The Clusians, overwhelmed... sacked Rome circa Centuries: 5th century BC - 4th century BC - 3rd century BC Decades: 440s BC 430s BC 420s BC 410s BC 400s BC - 390s BC - 380s BC 370s BC 360s BC 350s BC 340s BC 395 BC 394 BC 393 BC 392 BC 391 BC - 390 BC - 389 BC 388 BC 387... 390 BC. In the Greece and the Aegean Sea The Aegean sea in Greece as seen from the island of Greek: Αιγαίον Πέλαγος, Aigaion Pelagos; Turkish: Ege denizi) is an arm of the Mediterranean Sea, located between the Greek peninsula and Anatolia... Aegean world, a huge migration of Eastern Gauls appeared in Thrace is a historical and geographic area in south-east Europe spread over southern Bulgaria, north-eastern Greece, and European Turkey. Thrace borders on three seas: the Black Sea, the Aegean Sea and the Sea of Marmara. Classical Thrace and environs, from Alexander G. Findlays Classical Atlas to Illustrate... Thrace, north of For other uses, see Greece (disambiguation). Greece, formally called the Hellenic Republic (Greek: Ελληνική Δημοκρατία), is a country in the southeast of Europe on the southern tip of the Balkan peninsula. It has land... Greece, in Centuries: 4th century BC - 3rd century BC - 2nd century BC Decades: 330s BC 320s BC 310s BC 300s BC 290s BC - 280s BC - 270s BC 260s BC 250s BC 240s BC 230s BC 286 BC 285 BC 284 BC 283 BC 282 BC 281 BC 280 BC 279 BC 278... 281 BC. Another Gaulish chieftain named Brennus, at the head of a large army, was only turned back from desecrating the For other uses, see Apollo (disambiguation). Greek deities series Primordial deities Titans Aquatic deities Chthonic deities Personified concepts Other deities Olympians Zeus and Hera, Poseidon, Hades, Hestia, Demeter, Aphrodite, Athena, Apollo, Artemis, Ares, Hephaestus, Hermes, Dionysus Apollo (Greek: Απόλλων, Apóllōn) is... Temple of Apollo at For other uses, see Delphi (disambiguation). View of Delphi, looking down from the theater. Delphi (Greek Δελφοί Delphoi) is an archaeological site and a modern town in Greece. In ancient times it was the site of the Delphic Oracle, dedicated to the god Apollo. Delphi... Delphi at the last minute, alarmed, it was said, by portents of thunder and lightning. At the same time a migrating band of Celts, some 10,000 fighting men, with their women and children and slaves, were moving through Thrace. Three tribes of Gauls crossed over from Thrace to Anatolia (Greek: ανατολη anatole, rising of the sun or East; compare Orient and Levant, by popular etymology Turkish Anadolu to ana mother and dolu filled), also called by the Latin name of Asia Minor, is a region of Southwest Asia which corresponds today to... Asia Minor at express invitation of Nicomedes I, the son of Zipoete, became the king of Bithynia (c. 278 - c. 248 BC) on the death of his father. He made himself master of the whole country and put to death his brother, who had set himself up as an independent ruler. He enlarged and consolidated the... Nicomedes I of Bithynia was an ancient province in the northwest of Asia Minor, adjoining the Propontis, the Thracian Bosporus and the Black Sea (Euxine). According to Strabo it was bounded on the east by the river Sangarius (modern Sakarya river), but the more commonly received division extended it to the Parthenius, which... Bithynia, who required help in a dynastic struggle against his brother. Eventually they settled down in eastern In antiquity, Phrygia was a kingdom in the west central part of the Anatolian highlands, part of modern Turkey. It had a rich mythological heritage, as the homeland of the Great Mother Cybele, and an influential history, before it was overwhelmed by Cimmerian invaders, then briefly conquered by its neighbor... Phrygia and Cappadocia in 188 BC In ancient geography, Cappadocia was an extensive inland district of Asia Minor (modern Turkey). In the time of Herodotus the Cappadocians occupied the whole region from Mount Taurus to the Euxine (Black Sea). Cappadocia, in this sense, was bounded in the south by the chain of... Cappadocia in central Anatolia (Greek: ανατολη anatole, rising of the sun or East; compare Orient and Levant, by popular etymology Turkish Anadolu to ana mother and dolu filled), also called by the Latin name of Asia Minor, is a region of Southwest Asia which corresponds today to... Anatolia, in a region henceforth known as Ancient Galatia was an area in the highlands of central Anatolia (now Turkey). Galatia was bounded on the north by Bithynia and Paphlagonia, on the east by Pontus, on the south by Lycaonia and Cappadocia, and on the west by the remainder of Phrygia, the eastern part of which the... Galatia.


Roman rule in Gaul was established by This article is about Julius Caesar the Roman dictator. For alternative meanings: Julius Caesar (disambiguation). Bust of Julius Caesar Gaius Julius Caesar (Latin: C·IVLIVS·C·F·C·N·CAESAR¹) (July 13, 100 BC–March 15, 44 BC) was a Roman military and political leader whose conquest of Gallia... Julius Caesar, who defeated the This article is about the European people. For the tool, see celt (tool). For other uses see Celtic (disambiguation). In ancient times, the Celts were a number of interrelated peoples in central Europe sharing a branch of Indo-European languages indicative of a common origin. Today, Celtic is often used... Celtic tribes in Gaul Centuries: 2nd century BC - 1st century BC - 1st century Decades: 100s BC 90s BC 80s BC 70s BC 60s BC - 50s BC - 40s BC 30s BC 20s BC 10s BC 0s BC Years: 63 BC 62 BC 61 BC 60 BC 59 BC 58 BC 57 BC 56 BC 55... 58- Centuries: 2nd century BC - 1st century BC - 1st century Decades: 100s BC 90s BC 80s BC 70s BC 60s BC - 50s BC - 40s BC 30s BC 20s BC 10s BC 0s BC Years: 56 BC 55 BC 54 BC 53 BC 52 BC 51 BC 50 BC 49 BC 48... 51 BC and described his experiences in About the Gallic War (De Bello Gallico), sometimes The Conquest of Gaul, is an account written by Julius Caesar about his nine years of war in Gaul. In it Caesar vividly describes the battles and intrigues that took place in the nine years he spent fighting local armies that opposed... De Bello Gallico, which means About the Gallic War. The war cost the lives of more than a million Gauls, and a million further were enslaved. The area conquered by Caesar was Gallia Comata: literally, "long-haired Gaul."


The area was subsequently governed as a number of A Roman province (Latin, provincia, pl. provinciae) was the largest territorial and administrative unit of the Roman Empires foreign possessions (beyond the Italian peninsula). (The word province in modern English therefore has its origins in the term employed by the Romans.) Provinces were generally governed by politicians of senatorial... provinces, the principal ones being Roman province of Gallia Narbonensis, 120 AD Gallia Narbonensis was a Roman province located in what is now Provence in southern France. Bordering directly on Italy, control of the province gave the Roman state several advantages, such as control of the land route between Italy and the Iberian peninsula; a... Gallia Narbonensis, Roman province of Gallia Lugdunensis, 120 AD Gallia Lugdunensis was a province of the Roman Empire roughly encompassing the regions of Brittany, Normandy and the area around Lutetia Parisiorum (Paris) in what is now the modern country of France. Its capital was Lugdunum (todays Lyon). See also: Gaul Categories... Gallia Lugdunensis, Categories: Ancient Roman provinces | Ancient Gauls | France geography stubs | Historical stubs ... Gallia Aquitania and Categories: Ancient Roman provinces | Ancient Gauls | Belgium geography stubs | Historical stubs ... Gallia Belgica. The capital of the Gauls was This article is about the French city. For other usages (as Lyons), see Lyons (disambiguation). Lyon Région Rhône-Alpes Département Rhône Arrondissement Lyon Cantons chief town of 14 cantons Population (1999) 453,187 Population of the metropolitan area (aire urbaine, 1999) 1,648,216 Area 48... Lyon (Lugdunum).


On December 31 is the 365th day of the year (366th in A leap year (or intercalary year) is a year containing an extra day or month in order to keep the calendar year in sync with an astronomical or seasonal year. Seasons and astronomical events do not repeat at an... December 31, Years: 402 403 404 405 - 406 - 407 408 409 410 Decades: 370s 380s 390s - 400s - 410s 420s 430s Centuries: 4th century - 5th century - 6th century Events December 31 - Vandals, Alans and Suebians cross the Rhine, beginning an invasion of Gallia Roman legions in Britain mutiny against the Roman Emperor and... 406 the For other uses, see Vandal (disambiguation). The Vandals were an East Germanic tribe that entered the late Roman Empire, and created a state in North Africa, centered on the city of Carthage. The Vandals probably gave their name to the province of Andalusia (originally, Vandalusia), in Spain, where they temporarily... Vandals, The Alans or Alani were an Iranian nomadic group among the Sarmatian people, warlike nomadic pastoralists of mixed backgrounds, who spoke an Iranian language and shared, in a broad sense, a common culture. Contents // 1 Early Alans 2 The western Alans and Vandals 3 Alans and Slavs 4 The eastern... Alans and The Suebi or Suevi were a Germanic people whose origin was near the Baltic Sea . History 2000 years ago the Baltic Sea was known to the Romans as the Mare Suebicum. Partially because of his unfamiliarity with the various Germanic peoples interacting with Rome at the time, the historian Tacitus... Suebians crossed the Rhine The Rhine canyon (Ruinaulta) in Graubünden in Switzerland Length 1.320 km Elevation of the source 1.602 m Average discharge 2.200 m³/s Area watershed 185.000 km² Origin Hinterrhein in Switzerland Mouth The North Sea Basin countries Switzerland - Liechtenstein - Austria - Germany- France - Netherlands At 1... Rhine, beginning an invasion of Gallia.


After coming under increasing pressure from the tribes of Germany from the middle of the (2nd century - 3rd century - 4th century - other centuries) Contents // 1 Events 2 Significant persons 3 Inventions, discoveries, introductions 4 Decades and years Events The Sassanid dynasty of Persia launches a war to reconquer lost lands in the Roman east. (230 - 232 AD). Crisis of the Third Century shakes Roman Empire... 3rd century AD, Roman rule in Gaul ended with the defeat of the Roman governor Syagrius (died 487) was the son of Aegidius (the last magister militum per Gallias, who had founded a kingdom with Soissons at its centre). Syagrius governed this Gallo-Roman enclave (of varying area) for nearly twenty years until 486, when he found himself in the way of the territorial expansion... Syagrius by the Statue of Charlemagne (also called Karl der Große, Charles the Great) in Frankfurt, Germany. The Franks formed one of several west Germanic tribes who entered the late Roman Empire from Frisia as foederati and established a lasting realm in an area that covers most of modern-day France and... Franks in AD For the processor, see Intel 80486. Years: 482 483 484 485 - 486 - 487 488 489 490 Decades: 450s 460s 470s - 480s - 490s 500s 510s Centuries: 4th century - 5th century - 6th century Events Roman rule in Gaul ends with the defeat at Soissons of the Roman governor Syagrius by the Franks... 486.


See also

  • Aedui, Haedui or Hedui (Gr. Aidouoi), a Gallic people of Gallia Lugdunensis, who inhabited the country between the Arar (Saone) and Liger (Loire), in todays France. The statement in Strabo (ii. 3. 192) that they dwelt between the Arar and Dubis (Doubs) is incorrect. Their territory thus included the... Aedui
  • Ambiorix was prince of Eburones, a tribe of Belgian Gaul (Gallia Belgica). Statue of Ambiorix in Tongeren Although Caesar had freed him from paying tribute to the Aduatuci, he joined Catuvolcus (winter, 54 BC) in rising against the Roman forces under Q. Titurius Sabinus and I. Aurunculeius Cotta, and almost... Ambiorix
  • A shrewd, cunning little warrior; all perilous missions are immediately entrusted to him. Asterix gets his superhuman strength from the magic potion brewed by the druid Getafix… Asterix (French: Ast rix) is a fictional character, created in 1959 as the hero of a series of French comic books by... Asterix
  • The Gallic Empire (in Latin, imperium Galliarum) is the modern name for the independent realm that lived a brief existence during the Roman Empires Crisis of the Third Century, from 259 to 274. The Gallic or Gallo-Roman Empire consisted of the break-away Roman provinces of Gaul, Britain... Gallic Empire
  • This article covers the culture of Romanized areas of Gaul. For the political history of the brief Gallic Empire of the 3rd century, see Gallic Empire. The term Gallo-Roman describes the Romanized culture of Gaul under the rule of the Roman Empire, particularly the areas of Gallia Narbonensis that... Gallo-Roman culture
  • Gaulish is name given to the now-extinct Celtic language that was spoken in Gaul before the Romans, the Franks and the British Celts invaded. It is only known from a few quite small pieces of writing. It was a Continental P-Celtic language with a fairly complicated inflecting morphology... Gaulish language
  • List of peoples of Gaul (with their capitals): Aedui - Bibracte Allobroges - Vienne Ambiani - Amiens Andecavi - Angers Aquitani - Bordeaux Atrebates - Arras Arverni - Gergovia Baiocasses - Bayeux Boi - Bologna Bellovaci - Beauvais Bituriges - Bourges Carnutes - Chartres Catalauni - Chalons Cenomanes - Brescia Coriosilitae - Corseul Insubres - Milan Lexovii - Lisieux Mediomatrici - Metz Medulii - Medoc Menapii - Cassel Morinii - Boulogne... List of peoples of Gaul
  • Vercingetorix (72 BC - 46 BC), chieftain of the Arverni, led the great Gallic revolt against the Romans in 53-52 BC. His name in Gaulish means over-king (ver-rix) of warriors (cingetos). As described in Julius Caesars Gallic Wars, Rome had secured domination over the Celtic tribes beyond... Vercingetorix


This article describes the ancient classical period: for the classical period in music (second half of the 18th century): see Classical music era. Classical antiquity is a broad and perhaps misleading term for a long period of European history, that begins roughly with the earliest recorded Greek poetry of Homer... Classical antiquity by region
History of Greece series Aegean Civilization before 1600 BC Mycenaean Greece ca. 1600–1200 BC Greek Dark Ages ca. 1200–800 BC Ancient Greece 776–323 BC Hellenistic Greece 323 BC–146 BC Roman and Byzantine Greece 146 BC–1453 AD Ottoman Greece 1453–... Ancient Greece | History - Ancient history - Ancient Rome This is a List of Ancient Rome-related topics, that aims to include aspects of both the Ancient Roman Republic and Roman Empire. An index of important figures in Ancient Rome can be found in List of ancient Romans. The topics in this list cover... Ancient Rome | Gaul | Roman Iberia | Germanía or jerigonza is the term used in Spanish to refer to the argot used by criminals or in jails. Its purpose is to keep outsiders out of the conversation. We already have some documentation in picaresque works from the Spanish Golden Century. Some writers used it in poetry... Germania | History of Britain Chronological Prehistoric Britain Roman Britain Mediæval Britain Early Modern Britain Modern Britain Geographic History of England History of Ireland History of Scotland History of Wales Topical Economic history British Empire Military history Social history Constitutional history edit (http://en.wikipedia.org/w/wiki.phtml?title... Roman Britain | The Balkans were conquered and absorbed during classical antiquity into the territory of the Roman Empire. The regions and independent kingdoms of Thrace, Macedonia, Illyria and Dacia became Roman provinces. The province of Dacia was Romes only foothold north of the Danube river. Beginning in the 3rd century AD... Classical Balkans

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GAUL: Genetic Algorithm Utility Library (627 words)
The Genetic Algorithm Utility Library (or, GAUL for short) is a flexible programming library designed to aid in the development of applications that use genetic, or evolutionary, algorithms.
The GAUL project is a member of the AI foundry.
GAUL is still under heavy development, and therefore is unlikely to be bug free.
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