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Encyclopedia > Garrison Keillor
Garrison Keillor
Garrison Keillor at a 2007 performance of A Prairie Home Companion in Lanesboro, Minnesota
Garrison Keillor at a 2007 performance of A Prairie Home Companion in Lanesboro, Minnesota
Birth name Gary Edward Keillor
Born August 7, 1942 (1942-08-07) (age 65)
Anoka, Minnesota, United States
Medium Radio, Print
Nationality American
Years active 1969-present
Genres Observational comedy, Satire
Subject(s) American culture (esp. the Midwest); American politics
Spouse Mary Guntzel (1965-1976)
Ulla Skaerved (1985-1990)
Jenny Lind Nilsson (1995-present)
Notable works and roles Himself, Guy Noir, Lefty, Bob Burger, and Lake Wobegon narrator in A Prairie Home Companion

Garrison Keillor (born Gary Edward Keillor on August 7, 1942 in Anoka, Minnesota) is an American author, storyteller, humorist, columnist, musician, satirist, and radio personality. Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 290 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (1244 × 2569 pixels, file size: 675 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. ... Lanesboro is a city located in Fillmore County, Minnesota. ... Capital Saint Paul Largest city Minneapolis Largest metro area Minneapolis-St. ... is the 219th day of the year (220th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1942 (MCMXLII) was a common year starting on Thursday (the link will display the full 1942 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Anoka is a city in Anoka County, Minnesota, United States. ... Capital Saint Paul Largest city Minneapolis Largest metro area Minneapolis-St. ... In English usage, nationality is the legal relationship between a person and a country. ... Comedy may be divided into multiple genres based on the source of humour, the method of delivery, and the context in which it is delivered. ... Observational comedy is a brand of humor based on making remarks about various facets of daily life. ... 1867 edition of Punch, a ground-breaking British magazine of popular humour, including a good deal of satire of the contemporary social and political scene. ... This article is about the high culture and popular culture of the United States. ... This article is about the Midwestern region in the United States. ... Politics of the United States takes place in a framework of a presidential republic, whereby the President of the United States is head of state, head of government, and of a two-party legislative and electoral system. ... Year 1965 (MCMLXV) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the 1965 Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1976 Pick up sticks(MCMLXXVI) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the year. ... This article is about the year. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... This article is about the radio show. ... is the 219th day of the year (220th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1942 (MCMXLII) was a common year starting on Thursday (the link will display the full 1942 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Anoka is a city in Anoka County, Minnesota, United States. ... Motto: (traditional) In God We Trust (official, 1956–present) Anthem: The Star-Spangled Banner Capital Washington, D.C. Largest city New York City Official language(s) None at the federal level; English de facto Government Federal Republic  - President George W. Bush (R)  - Vice President Dick Cheney (R) Independence - Declared - Recognized... For other uses, see Author (disambiguation). ... For the Jim Henson production, see The Storyteller Storytelling is the art of portraying in words, images, and sounds what has happened in real or imagined events. ... A humorist is an author who specializes in short, humorous articles or essays. ... A columnist is a journalist who produces a specific form of writing for publication called a column. Columns appear in newspapers, magazines and the Internet. ... For the popular-music magazine, see Musician (magazine). ... List of satirists below - writers, cartoonists and others known for their involvement in satire - humourous social criticism. ... a Radio Personality is the modern incarnation of the disk jockey, or DJ. In the 1990s, successful radio stations began to focus less on the musical expertise of their hosts and more on the individual hosts personalities. ...


He is best known as host of the Minnesota Public Radio show A Prairie Home Companion (also known as Garrison Keillor's Radio Show on Britain's BBC 7, as well as on Australia's ABC and in Ireland). Minnesota Public Radio logo Minnesota Public Radio (MPR) is a regional public radio network based in the U.S. state of Minnesota that has been broadcasting since 1967. ... This article is about the radio show. ... BBC Radio 7 is a digital radio station broadcasting comedy, drama, and childrens programming 24 hours a day. ... The Australian Broadcasting Corporation or ABC is Australias national non-profit public broadcaster. ...

Contents

Biography and personal life

Keillor was born in Anoka, Minnesota, and raised in a family belonging to the Plymouth Brethren, a fundamentalist Christian denomination he has since left. He is six feet, three inches (1.9 m) tall[1] and is of part Scottish ancestry. Keillor is a member of the Democratic-Farmer-Labor Party. He is currently an Episcopalian[2], but has been a Lutheran.[3] His religious roots are often worked into his material. He graduated from the University of Minnesota with a bachelor's degree in English in 1966. While there, he began his broadcasting career on the student-operated radio station known today as Radio K. Anoka is a city in Anoka County, Minnesota, United States. ... The Brethren are a Christian Evangelical movement that began in Dublin, London, Plymouth, and the continent of Europe in the late 1820s. ... This article is about the country. ... The Minnesota Democratic-Farmer-Labor Party (DFL) is a major political party in the US state of Minnesota. ... This article is about the Episcopal Church in the United States. ... The Lutheran movement is a group of denominations of Protestant Christianity by the original definition. ... This article is about the oldest and largest campus of the University of Minnesota. ... A bachelors degree is usually an undergraduate academic degree awarded for a course or major that generally lasts for three, four, or in some cases and countries, five or six years. ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... 770 Radio K (KUOM), Real College Radio, is a college radio station operated by the University of Minnesota Twin Cities. ...


Keillor has been married three times:

  • To Mary Guntzel, from 1965 to 1976. The couple has one son, Jason, born in 1969.
  • To Ulla Skaerved (a former exchange student from Denmark at Keillor's high school whom he famously reencountered at a class reunion), from 1985 to 1990.
  • To violinist Jenny Lind Nilsson (b. 1958), who is from his hometown of Anoka, since 1995. They have one daughter, Maia, born in 1998.

The Keillors maintain homes on the Upper West Side of New York City and in Saint Paul, Minnesota. An exchange student is a student (usually from high school or university) who temporarily goes abroad and lives with a host family in a foreign country, and attends school there. ... The Upper West Side is a neighborhood of the borough of Manhattan in New York City that lies between Central Park and the Hudson River above West 59th Street. ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... For an overview of the Twin Cities metropolitan area, see Minneapolis-Saint Paul. ...


On Feb. 3, 2008, Keillor endorsed Barack Obama in the 2008 Democratic Primary. In a letter to the Obama campaign, Keillor stated "I'm happy to support your candidacy, which is so full of promise for our country."[4][5] “Barack” redirects here. ... The 2008 Democratic primaries will be the selection process by which the Democrats choose their candidates in the 2008 election for President and Vice President of the United States through a series of primaries and caucuses culminating in the 2008 Democratic National Convention, to be held from Monday, August 25...


Ancestors

Keillor has many noteworthy ancestors, including Joseph Crandall, who made progress in the studies of Native American languages and was also an associate of Roger Williams (who founded the first American Baptist church as well as Rhode Island) and Prudence Crandall (who founded the first African-American women's school in America). Roger Williams could mean: Roger Williams University Roger Williams (theologian), co-founder of Rhode Island Roger Williams (soldier) Roger Williams (pianist), American pianist Roger Williams (UK politician), British politician Roger Williams (US politician), US Texas politician Roger Williams (hepatologist), a British liver specialist Roger Williams (trombonist) Roger Williams (activist) This... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations · Other religions Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Archbishop of Canterbury · Catholic Pope Coptic Pope · Ecumenical Patriarch Christianity Portal This box:      Baptist is... This article is about the U.S. State. ... Prudence Crandall, a schoolteacher raised as a Quaker, stirred controversy with her education of black girls in Canterbury, Connecticut. ...


Career

Radio

Keillor doing a live radio broadcast in the rain.
Keillor doing a live radio broadcast in the rain.

Garrison Keillor started his radio career in November 1969 with Minnesota Educational Radio (MER), now Minnesota Public Radio (MPR), and distributing programs under the American Public Media (APM) brand. He hosted The Morning Program in the weekday drive time-slot, 6 am to 9 am, which the station called "A Prairie Home Entertainment." During this time he also began submitting fiction to The New Yorker, where his first story, "Local Family Keeps Son Happy," appeared September 19, 1970. [6] Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 467 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (931 × 1195 pixels, file size: 209 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 467 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (931 × 1195 pixels, file size: 209 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. ... Minnesota Public Radio logo Minnesota Public Radio (MPR) is a regional public radio network based in the U.S. state of Minnesota that has been broadcasting since 1967. ... American Public Media logo American Public Media is the brand under which Minnesota Public Radio distributes public radio programming outside of the state of Minnesota. ... For other uses, see New Yorker. ... is the 262nd day of the year (263rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1970 (MCMLXX) was a common year starting on Thursday (link shows full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Keillor resigned from The Morning Program in February 1971 to protest what he considered an attempt to interfere with his musical programming. The show became A Prairie Home Companion when he returned in October.[7]


Keillor has attributed the idea for the live Saturday night radio program to his 1973 assignment to write about the Grand Ole Opry, while flying an autogyro for The New Yorker, but he had already begun showcasing local musicians on the morning show, despite limited studio space for them, and in August 1973 The Minneapolis Tribune reported MER's plans for a Saturday night version of A Prairie Home Companion with live musicians. [7][8] For the song by James Blunt, see 1973 (song). ... The Grand Ole Opry is a weekly Saturday night country music radio program broadcast live on WSM radio in Nashville, Tennessee, and televised on Great American Country network. ... For other uses, see New Yorker. ... This article is about the radio show. ...


A Prairie Home Companion debuted as an old-style variety show before a live audience on July 6, 1974, featuring guest musicians and a cadre cast doing musical numbers and comic skits replete with elaborate live sound effects. The show was punctuated by spoof commercial spots from such fictitious sponsors as Jack's Auto Repair and Powdermilk Biscuits, "the biscuits that give shy persons the strength to get up and do what needs to be done." [7] Later imaginary sponsors have included Ralph's Pretty Good Grocery ("If you can't find it at Ralph's, you can probably get along without it"), Bertha's Kitty Boutique, the Catchup Advisory Board[9] (which touted "the natural mellowing agents of ketchup"), the American Duct Tape Council, and Bebop-A-Reebop Rhubarb Pie ("sweetening the sour taste of failure through the generations"). The show also contains parodic serial melodramas, such as The Adventures of Guy Noir, Private Eye and The Lives of the Cowboys. After the show's intermission, Keillor reads clever and often humorous greetings to friends and family at home submitted by members of the theater audience, in exchange for an honorarium. Also in the second half of the show, the broadcasts showcase a weekly monologue by Keillor entitled News from Lake Wobegon, based in part on Keillor's own hometown of Anoka, Minnesota. Lake Wobegon is a quintessential but fictional Midwestern small town "where all the women are strong, all the men are good-looking, and all the children are above average." A Prairie Home Companion ran until 1987, when Keillor decided to end it; he worked on other projects, including another live radio program, "The American Radio Company of the Air"--which was virtually identical in format to "A Prairie Home Companion"--for several years. In 1993 he began producing A Prairie Home Companion again, with nearly identically-formatted programs, and has done so since.[10] On A Prairie Home Companion, Keillor receives no billing or credit (except "written by Sarah Bellum", a joking reference to his own brain); his name is not mentioned unless a guest addresses him by his first name or the initials "G. K." This article is about the radio show. ... is the 187th day of the year (188th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1974 (MCMLXXIV) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar) of the 1974 Gregorian calendar. ... Guy Noir is a fictional private detective regularly featured on the public radio show A Prairie Home Companion. ... Anoka is a city in Anoka County, Minnesota, United States. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... This article is about the radio show. ... This article is about the radio show. ... The cerebellum (Latin: little brain) is a region of the brain that plays an important role in the integration of sensory perception and motor control. ... For other uses, see Brain (disambiguation). ...


Keillor is also the host of The Writer's Almanac which, like A Prairie Home Companion, is produced and distributed by American Public Media. The Writer's Almanac is also available online and via daily e-mail installments by subscription[11]. The Writers Almanac is a daily radio program of poetry and (mostly literary) history. ... American Public Media logo American Public Media is the brand under which Minnesota Public Radio distributes public radio programming outside of the state of Minnesota. ...


Writing

Keillor has written many magazine and newspaper articles, and nearly a dozen books for adults as well as children. In addition to his time as a writer for The New Yorker, he has written for The Atlantic Monthly and Salon.com. For other uses, see New Yorker. ... The Atlantic redirects here; for the ocean, see Atlantic Ocean. ... Salon. ...


He also authored an advice column on Salon.com titled "Mr. Blue". Following a heart operation, he resigned on September 4, 2001 in an article entitled "Every dog has his day"[12]: An agony aunt is an advice columnist at a magazine or newspaper. ... Salon. ... is the 247th day of the year (248th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2001 (MMI) was a common year starting on Monday (link displays the 2001 Gregorian calendar). ...

Illness offers the chance to think long thoughts about the future (praying that we yet have one, dear God), and so I have, and so this is the last column of Mr. Blue, under my authorship, for Salon. Over the years, Mr. Blue's strongest advice has come down on the side of freedom in our personal lives, freedom from crushing obligation and overwork and family expectations and the freedom to walk our own walk and be who we are. And some of the best letters have been addressed to younger readers trapped in jobs like steel suits, advising them to bust loose and go off and have an adventure. Some of the advisees have written back to inform Mr. Blue that the advice was taken and that the adventure changed their lives. This was gratifying. So now I am simply taking my own advice. Cut back on obligations: Promote a certain elegant looseness in life. Simple as that. Winter and spring, I almost capsized from work, and in the summer I had a week in St. Mary's Hospital to sit and think, and that's the result. Every dog has his day and I've had mine and given whatever advice was mine to give (and a little more). It was exhilarating to get the chance to be useful, which is always an issue for a writer (What good does fiction do?), and Mr. Blue was a way to be useful. Nothing human is beneath a writer's attention; the basic questions about how to attract a lover and what to do with one once you get one and how to deal with disappointment in marriage are the stuff that fiction is made from, so why not try to speak directly? And so I did. And now it's time to move on. Saint Marys Hospital. ...

In 2004 Keillor published a collection of political essays called Homegrown Democrat, and in June 2005 he began a syndicated newspaper column called "The Old Scout," which often addresses political issues. The column also runs at Salon.com.


Keillor wrote the screenplay for the 2006 movie version of A Prairie Home Companion, which was directed by Robert Altman. (Keillor also appears in the movie.) A Prairie Home Companion (previously known as The Last Broadcast) is a 2006 ensemble comedy film elegy directed by Robert Altman, his final film released just five months before his death. ... For other persons named Robert Altman, see Robert Altman (disambiguation). ...


Bookselling

On November 1, 2006, Keillor opened an independent bookstore in the historic Cathedral Hill area of Saint Paul, Minnesota. "Common Good Books, G. Keillor, Prop."[13] is located at the southwest corner of Selby and N. Western Avenues (in the Blair Arcade Building, Suite 14, in the basement, below Nina's Coffee Cafe). Cathedral Hill is in the Summit-University neighborhood.[14] The bookstore opening was covered by the St. Paul Pioneer Press.[15] is the 305th day of the year (306th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Independent bookstore is a term used in to identify bookstores that are primarily owned and operated by local people. ... For an overview of the Twin Cities metropolitan area, see Minneapolis-Saint Paul. ... Saint Paul, Minnesota is noted for its neighborhoods; the city has been called fifteen small towns with one mayor, owing to the neighborhood-based life of much of the city. ... The St. ...


Awards and other recognition

  • In 1994, Keillor was inducted into the Radio Hall of Fame.[16]
  • "Welcome to Minnesota" markers in interstate rest areas near the state's borders include statements such as "Like its neighbors, the thirty-second state grew as a collection of small farm communities, many settled by immigrants from Scandinavia and Germany. Two of the nation's favorite fictional small towns -- Sinclair Lewis's Gopher Prairie and Garrison Keillor's Lake Wobegon -- reflect that heritage." [17]

// The National Radio Hall of Fame and Museum, located in the Museum of Broadcast Communications in Chicago, Illinois, is a museum dedicated to recognizing those who have contributed to the development of the radio medium throughout its history in the United States. ... Sinclair Lewis Sinclair Lewis (February 7, 1885 — January 10, 1951) was an American novelist and playwright. ... Gopher Prairie, Minnesota, located in the real Stearns County, Minnesota is the fictional setting of the Sinclair Lewis novel Main Street. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...

Controversies

In 2005, Keillor's attorneys sent a cease-and-desist letter to MNSPeak.com regarding their production of a T-Shirt bearing the inscription "A Prairie Ho Companion"[18].


In 2006, after a visit to a United Methodist Church in Highland Park, TX, Keillor created a local controversy with his remarks about the event[19], including the rhetorical suggestion of a connection between event attendees and supporters of torture and a statement creating an impression of political intimidation: "I walked in, was met by two burly security men ... and within 10 minutes was told by three people that this was the Bush's church and that it would be better if I didn't talk about politics." The security detail is purportedly routine for the venue, and according to attendees Keillor did not interact with any audience members between his arrival and his lecture.[20] Prior to Keillor's remarks, participants in the event had considered the visit to have been cordial and warm.[21] This article is about the current Christian denomination based in the United States. ... Highland Park is a town located in Dallas County, Texas. ...


In 2007, Keillor wrote a column which, in part, criticized "stereotypical" gay parents, who he said were "sardonic fellows with fussy hair who live in over-decorated apartments with a striped sofa and a small weird dog and who worship campy performers."[22] In response to the strong reactions of many readers, Keillor apologized, saying

I live in a small world...in which gayness is as common as having brown eyes.... But in the larger world, gayness is controversial...and so gay people feel besieged to some degree and rightly so.... My column spoke as we would speak in my small world and it was read by people in the larger world and thus the misunderstanding.[23]

In 2008, Keillor created a controversy in St. Paul when he filed a lawsuit against his neighbors' plans to build an addition on their home, citing his need for "light and air" and a view of "open space and beyond". Keillor's home is significantly larger than others in his neighborhood and would still be significantly larger than his neighbors' planned addition.[24] Keillor came to an undisclosed settlement with his neighbors shortly after the story became public. [1]


Voiceover work

Due to his distinctive voice, Keillor is often used as a voiceover actor. Some notable appearances include: VoiceOver is a feature built into Apple Computers Mac OS X v10. ...

  • Voiceover artist for Honda UK's "the Power of Dreams" campaign. The campaign's most memorable advert is the 2003 Honda Accord commercial entitled "Cog", which features a Rube Goldberg Machine made entirely of car parts. The commercial ends with Keillor asking, "Isn't it nice when things just work?"[25] Since then, Keillor has voiced the tagline for most if not all Honda UK advertisements, and even sang the voiceover in the 2004 Honda Diesel commercial entitled "Grrr". His most recent advert was a reworking of an existing commercial with digitally added England flags to tie in with the World Cup. Keillor's tagline was "Come on England, keep the dream alive".
  • Voice of the Norse god Odin in an episode of the Disney animated series "Hercules."
  • Voice of Walt Whitman in Ken Burns's documentary series The Civil War.

The Honda Accord is an automobile manufactured by Honda since 1976, debuting as a compact hatchback and evolving into a intermediate vehicle. ... The Cog was a dramatic television commercial for the Honda Accord, made (almost completely) without any CGI or trick photography. ... A Rube Goldberg machine performs a simple task in a complex way. ... 2006 World Cup redirects here. ... For other meanings of Odin, Woden or Wotan see Odin (disambiguation), Woden (disambiguation), Wotan (disambiguation). ... Walter Whitman (May 31, 1819 – March 26, 1892) was an American poet, essayist, journalist, and humanist. ... Kenneth Lauren Burns (born July 29, 1953) is an American director and producer of documentary films known for his style of making use of original prints and photographs. ... The Civil War is an acclaimed documentary film created by Ken Burns about the American Civil War. ...

Cultural references

His style, particularly his speaking voice, is often the subject of parody. The Simpsons parodies Keillor in an episode where Homer is shown watching a Keillor-like monologist on television, and upon hitting the set, exclaiming "Stupid TV! Be more funny!", which has become one of The Simpsons' oft-quoted catchphrases.[26] One Boston radio critic likens Keillor and his "down comforter voice" to "a hypnotist intoning, 'You are getting sleepy now'", while noting that Keillor does play to listeners' intelligence.[27] Keillor rarely reads his monologue from a script. Simpsons redirects here. ... Marge on the Lam is the sixth episode of The Simpsons fifth season. ...


Fellow Minnesotan Michael J. Nelson spoofed Keillor in his novel Death Rat, set in Minnesota and basing several fictional characters on other well-known Minnesota personalities such as Prince and Jesse Ventura. Michael J. Nelson. ... Mike Nelsons Death Rat! (first published April 1, 2003) is the first full length novel by American author Michael J. Nelson. ... The Artist redirects here. ... Jesse Ventura (born July 15, 1951), also known as The Body, The Star, and The Governing Body, is an American politician, retired professional wrestler, Navy UDT veteran, actor, and former radio and television talk show host. ...


The popular online cartoon Homestar Runner once announced on their public radio station that Keillor would be "wrestling his own soothing voice in a steel cage" during their "Public Rage-O" wrestling event. Homestar Runner is a Flash animated Internet cartoon. ...


In the bonus DVD material for the album Venue Songs by band They Might Be Giants, John Hodgman delivers a fictitious newscast in which he explains that "The Artist Formerly Known as Public Radio Host Garrison Keillor" and his "legacy of Midwestern pledge-drive funk" inspired the band's first "venue song".[28] TMBG live album chronology Venue Songs is a 2004 album by the group They Might Be Giants. ... This article is about the musical group. ... John Hodgman in 2006 John Kellogg Hodgman[1] (born June 1971) is an American author and humorist who is best known for his personification of a PC in Apples Get a Mac advertising campaign and his correspondent work on Comedy Central’s The Daily Show with Jon Stewart. ...


Fellow Minnesotan, radio host, comedian, actor and political candidate Al Franken, defending his decision to leave Minnesota for a career in show business, commented during a speech in February 2004 in Manchester, New Hampshire that "we can't all be Garrison Keillor." Alan Stuart Al Franken (born May 21, 1951) is an Emmy Award–winning American comedian, actor, author, screenwriter, political commentator, radio host and, recently, politician. ... Nickname: Location in Hillsborough County, New Hampshire Coordinates: Country United States State New Hampshire County Hillsborough County Incorporated 1751 Government  - Mayor Frank Guinta (R) Area  - City  34. ...


Pennsylvanian singer-songwriter Tom Flannery wrote a song in 2003 entitled, "I Want a Job Like Garrison Keillor's." [29]


Bibliography

Keillor's work in print includes:


Lake Wobegon

  • Lake Wobegon Days (1985), ISBN 0-14-013161-2; a recorded version of this won a Grammy Award for Best Spoken Word or Non-musical Album in 1988
  • Leaving Home (1987; collection of Lake Wobegon stories), ISBN 0-670-81976-X
  • We Are Still Married (1989; collection including some Lake Wobegon stories), ISBN 0-670-82647-2
  • Wobegon Boy (1997), ISBN 0-670-87807-3
  • Lake Wobegon Summer 1956 (2001), ISBN 0-571-21014-7
  • Pontoon: A Novel of Lake Wobegon (2007), ISBN 0-670-06356-8

Lake Wobegon Days, written by Garrison Keillor is a humorous, fictional account of life in small-town Minnesota. ... See also: 1984 in literature, other events of 1985, 1986 in literature, list of years in literature. ... The Grammy Award for Best Spoken Word Album has been awarded since 1959. ... The 30th Grammy Awards were held March 2, 1988. ... See also: 1986 in literature, other events of 1987, 1988 in literature, list of years in literature. ... See also: 1988 in literature, other events of 1989, 1990 in literature, list of years in literature. ... See also: 1996 in literature, other events of 1997, 1998 in literature, list of years in literature. ... See also: 2000 in literature, other events of 2001, 2002 in literature, list of years in literature. ... The year 2007 in literature involves some significant new books. ...

Other

  • Happy to be Here (1982), ISBN 0-06-811201-7
  • WLT: A Radio Romance, (1991), ISBN 0-670-81857-7
  • A Visit to Mark Twain's House audio (1992), ISBN 0-942110-82-X
  • The Book of Guys (1993), ISBN 0-670-84943-X
  • The Sandy Bottom Orchestra (with Jenny Lind Nilsson, 1996), ISBN 0-7868-1250-8
  • Me, by Jimmy "Big Boy" Valente (1999), ISBN 0-670-88796-X
  • Good Poems (2002), ISBN 0-670-03126-7
  • Love Me (2003), ISBN 0-670-03246-8
  • Homegrown Democrat (2004), ISBN 0-670-03365-0
  • Good Poems for Hard Times (2005), ISBN 0-670-03436-3

See also: 1981 in literature, other events of 1982, 1983 in literature, list of years in literature. ... See also: 1990 in literature, other events of 1991, 1992 in literature, list of years in literature. ... See also: 1992 in literature, other events of 1993, 1994 in literature, list of years in literature. ... See also: 1998 in literature, other events of 1999, 2000 in literature, list of years in literature. ... See also: 2001 in literature, other events of 2002, 2003 in literature, list of years in literature. ... See also: 2002 in literature, other events of 2003, 2004 in literature, list of years in literature. ... The year 2004 in literature involved some significant events and new books. ... // Events February 25 - Canada Reads selects Rockbound by Frank Parker Day as the novel to be read across the nation. ...

References

  1. ^ Salon Books | Hot sex with the ex
  2. ^ prairiehome.publicradio.org
  3. ^ christianitytoday.com
  4. ^ "Shriver, Keillor endorse Obama", USA Today, USA Today, 2008. Retrieved on 2008-04-10. 
  5. ^ BarrackObama.com (2008-02-03). "Garrison Keillor Endorses Barack Obama for President". Press release. Retrieved on 2008-04-10.
  6. ^ Lee, J. Y. Garrison Keillor: A Voice of America, pages 29-30. University Press of Mississippi, 1991.
  7. ^ a b c Garrison Keillor, page 30. University Press of Mississippi, 1991.
  8. ^ "Keillor to Quit Daily Show, Others Leave KSJN, Minneapolis Tribune, 1973-08-24, 14B.
  9. ^ prairiehome.publicradio.org
  10. ^ prairiehome.publicradio.org
  11. ^ mail.publicradio.org
  12. ^ salon.com
  13. ^ Common Good Books, G. Keillor, Prop."
  14. ^ Summit-University
  15. ^ twincities.com
  16. ^ museum.tv
  17. ^ Welcome to Minnesota - Minnesota Historical Markers on Waymarking.com
  18. ^ Sean Higgins on Garrison Keillor & Internet on National Review Online
  19. ^ The United Methodist Portal
  20. ^ Dallas Morning News | News for Dallas, Texas | Columnist Jacquielynn Floyd | Dallas-Fort Worth News
  21. ^ GuideLive.com | Arts/Entertainment News and Events | Dallas-Fort Worth | The Dallas Morning News | Books
  22. ^ chicagotribune.com
  23. ^ salon.com
  24. ^ Katherine Kersten » Blog Archive » Mr. Keillor’s Unneighborly Ways
  25. ^ creativeclub.co.uk
  26. ^ snpp.com
  27. ^ boston.com
  28. ^ youtube.com
  29. ^ "I Want to a Job Like Garrison Keillor" at songaweek.com
  • Keillor, Garrison. In search of Lake Wobegon. National Geographic. Dec. 2000.
  • Lee, Judith Yaross. Garrison Keillor: A Voice of America. Jackson: University Press of Mississippi, 1991. ISBN 978-0878054572.
  • "Lights! Camera! Retake!". Telegraph (2003). Retrieved 2005-06-07.

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  Results from FactBites:
 
The mysterious appeal of Garrison Keillor. - By Sam Anderson - Slate Magazine (2204 words)
Keillor's flagship franchise is still A Prairie Home Companion, a weekly two-hour radio variety show that debuted in 1974 to a live audience of 12 people and now draws more than 4 million listeners a week across 600 stations.
Keillor the writer often stands in sharp contrast to Keillor the radio persona.
The critique was so spirited because Keillor's approach to America is the exact opposite of Henri-Lévy's: whereas the Frenchman (according to Keillor) is "short on the facts, long on conclusions" and possessed by a "childlike love of paradox," Keillor is always deliberately long on facts, short on conclusions.
Great Performances . Garrison Keillor's New Year's Eve Special | PBS (237 words)
GARRISON KEILLOR'S NEW YEAR'S EVE SPECIAL premiered on December 31, 2006 on PBS (check local listings).
The festive GREAT PERFORMANCES telecast will be all the merrier due to the Opry's role in providing Keillor with his original inspiration for an eclectic radio show that went on to become the favorite it is today.
Garrison Keillor returns to the historic venue for this special, year-end broadcast of A PRAIRE HOME COMPANION, which last aired from the Ryman in 2004.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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