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Encyclopedia > Garden angelica
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Garden Angelica

Scientific classification
Kingdom: Plantae
Division: Magnoliophyta
Class: Magnoliopsida
Order: Apiales
Family: Apiaceae
Genus: Angelica
Species: A. archangelica
Angelica archangelica
L.

Garden Angelica (Angelica archangelica) is a biennial plant from the umbelliferous family Apiaceae. Garden Angelica, from Koehlers Medicinal-Plants 1887 Source: List of Koehler Images Copyright expired due to age of image This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. ... Scientific classification or biological classification is how biologists group and categorize extinct and living species of organisms. ... Divisions Land plants (embryophytes) Non-vascular plants (bryophytes) Marchantiophyta - liverworts Anthocerotophyta - hornworts Bryophyta - mosses Vascular plants (tracheophytes) Lycopodiophyta - clubmosses Equisetophyta - horsetails Pteridophyta - true ferns Psilotophyta - whisk ferns Ophioglossophyta - adderstongues Seed plants (spermatophytes) †Pteridospermatophyta - seed ferns Pinophyta - conifers Cycadophyta - cycads Ginkgophyta - ginkgo Gnetophyta - gnetae Magnoliophyta - flowering plants Adiantum pedatum (a fern... Classes Magnoliopsida- Dicots Liliopsida- Monocots The flowering plants (also called angiosperms) are a major group of land plants. ... Orders see text Dicotyledons or dicots are flowering plants whose seed contains two embryonic leaves or cotyledons. ... Families Apiaceae (carrot family) Araliaceae (ginseng family) Pittosporaceae Griseliniaceae Torriceliaceae The Apiales are an order of flowering plants. ... Genera See text Ref: Hortiplex 2003-11-14 The Apiaceae, the carrot or parsley family, are a family of usually aromatic plants with hollow stems, including parsley, carrot, and other relatives. ... Species See text For other uses of the word Angelica see, Angelica (disambiguation) Angelica is a genus of the Umbilliferous family Apiaceae, with about 50 species of tall perennial herbs 1-2 m tall with large bipinnate leaves and large compound umbels of white or greenish-white flowers. ... In biology, binomial nomenclature is the formal method of naming species. ... Carolus Linnaeus Baba black sheep crowned patani queen Carl Linnaeus, also known after his ennoblement as (help· info), and in English usually under the Latinized name Carolus Linnaeus (May 23, 1707 – January 10, 1778), the name with which his publications were signed, was a Swedish botanist and physician who laid... Look up Biennial in Wiktionary, the free dictionary Biennial is a term referring to a period of two years, much in the same way centennial refers to 100 years. ... Genera See text Ref: Hortiplex 2003-11-14 The Apiaceae, the carrot or parsley family, are a family of usually aromatic plants with hollow stems, including parsley, carrot, and other relatives. ...


During its first year it only grows leaves, but during its second year its fluted stem can reach a height of two metres. Its leaves are composed of numerous small leaflets, divided into three principal groups, each of which is again subdivided into three lesser groups. The edges of the leaflets are finely toothed or serrated. The flowers, which blossom in July, are small and numerous, yellowish or greenish in colour, are grouped into large, globular umbels, which bear pale yellow, oblong fruits. Angelica only grows in damp soil, preferably near rivers or deposits of water.


Angelica archangelica grows wild in Finland, Sweden, Norway and Iceland, mostly in the northern parts of the countries. It is cultivated in France, mainly in the Marais Poitevin, a marsh region close to Niort in the départment Deux-Sèvres. The Marais Poitevin is a marsh region in Western France, a remnant of the former Gulf of Poitou. ... Niort is a commune of western France, préfecture (capital) of the Deux-Sèvres département. ... Deux-Sèvres is a French département. ...


Usage/History

From the 10th century on, angelica was cultivated as a vegetable and medicinal plant, and achieved great popularity in Scandinavia in the 12th century and is still used today, especially in Samic culture. A flute-like instrument with a clarinet-like sound can be made of its hollow stem, probably as a toy for children. Linnaeus reported that Samic peoples used it in reindeer milk. Other usages include spices. As a means of recording the passage of time, the 10th century was that century which lasted from 901 to 1000. ... Vegetables in a market Vegie garden Venn diagram representing the relationship between fruits and vegetables For other uses, see Vegetable (disambiguation). ... ... For other uses, see Scandinavia (disambiguation). ... (11th century - 12th century - 13th century - other centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 12th century was that century which lasted from 1101 to 1200. ... The Sami people (also Sámi, Saami, Lapps and Laplanders) are the indigenous people of Sápmi, which encompasses parts of northern Sweden, Norway, Finland and the Kola Peninsula of Russia. ... Carolus Linnaeus Baba black sheep crowned patani queen Carl Linnaeus, also known after his ennoblement as (help· info), and in English usually under the Latinized name Carolus Linnaeus (May 23, 1707 – January 10, 1778), the name with which his publications were signed, was a Swedish botanist and physician who laid... Binomial name Rangifer tarandus (Linnaeus, 1758) For the musician, please see Caribou (musician). ...


In 1602, angelica was introduced in Niort, which had just been ravaged by the plague, and it has been popular there ever since. It is used to flavour liqueurs or aquavits (e.g. Chartreuse, Benedictine, Vermouth and Dubonnet), omelettes and trout, and as jam. The long bright green stems are also candied and used as decoration. A liqueur is a sweet alcoholic beverage, often flavoured with fruits, herbs, spices, flowers, seeds, roots, plants, barks, and sometimes cream. ... Akvavit, also known as aquavit, is a Scandinavian distilled beverage of typically about 40% alcohol by volume. ... Chartreuse is a French liqueur composed of distilled wine alcohol flavored with various herbal extracts. ... A Benedictine is a person who follows the Rule of St Benedict. ... Vermouth is a fortified wine flavored with aromatic herbs and spices (aromatized in the trade) in recipes that are closely-guarded trade secrets. ... An omelette An omelette or omelet is a preparation of beaten egg cooked with butter or oil in a frying pan, often folded around a filling. ... Rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) Biwa trout (Oncorhynchus masou subsp) Trout is the common name given to a number of species of freshwater fishes belonging to the salmon family, Salmonidae. ... Jam from berries Jam is a type of fruit preserve made by boiling fruit with sugar to make an unfiltered jelly. ...


Angelica contains a variety of chemicals which have been shown to have medicinal properties. Chewing on angelica or drinking tea brewed from it will cause local anesthesia, but it will heighten the consumer's immune system. It has been shown to be effective against various bacteria, fungal infections and even viral infections. Local anesthesia is any technique to render part of the body insensitive to pain without affecting consciousness. ... The immune system is the system of specialized cells and organs that protect an organism from outside biological influences. ... Phyla/Divisions Actinobacteria Aquificae Bacteroidetes/Chlorobi Chlamydiae/Verrucomicrobia Chloroflexi Chrysiogenetes Cyanobacteria Deferribacteres Deinococcus-Thermus Dictyoglomi Fibrobacteres/Acidobacteria Firmicutes Fusobacteria Gemmatimonadetes Nitrospirae Omnibacteria Planctomycetes Proteobacteria Spirochaetes Thermodesulfobacteria Thermomicrobia Thermotogae Bacteria (singular, bacterium) are a major group of living organisms. ... Divisions Chytridiomycota Deuteromycota Zygomycota Glomeromycota Ascomycota Basidiomycota Fungus growing on a tree in Borneo A fungus (plural fungi) is a eukaryotic organism that digests its food externally and absorbs the nutrient molecules into its cells. ... The human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) A bacteriophage virus A virus is a submicroscopic parasite that infects cells in biological organisms. ...


The essential oil of the roots of 'Angelica archangelica contains β-terebangelene, C10H16, and other terpenes; the oil of the seeds also contains β-terebangelene, together with methylethylacetic acid and hydroxymyristic acid. An essential oil is a concentrated, hydrophobic liquid containing volatile aromatic compounds extracted from plants. ... Terpenes are a class of hydrocarbons, produced by many plants, particularly conifers. ...


Etymology

Archangelica comes from the greek word "arkhangelos" (=arch-angel), due to the myth that it was the angel Gabriel who told of its use as medicine. 12th-century icon of Archangel Gabriel from Novgorod. ... Medicine is the branch of health science and the sector of public life concerned with maintaining human health or restoring it through the treatment of disease and injury. ...


In Finnish it is called väinönputki, in Sami fádnu, boska and rássi, in English garden angelica, in German arznei-engelwurz, in Dutch grote engelwortel, in Swedish kvanne, in Norwegian kvann and in Icelandic it has the name hvönn. The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ...

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Angelica archangelica

  Results from FactBites:
 
Herbs - Angelica (955 words)
Angelica is a perennial plant found in the moist mountain ravines, meadows, and coastal regions of northern Europe and Asia, and is widely cultivated.
Angelica is used externally to soothe rheumatism, arthritis, and skin disorders; internally, it is used in the treatment of anorexia, dyspepsia, and stomach ulcers.
Angelica should be used with caution by diabetics because it increase blood sugar levels.
botanical.com - A Modern Herbal | Angelica - Herb Profile and Information (3605 words)
Angelica balsam is obtained by extracting the roots with alcohol, evaporating and extracting the residue with ether.
Angelica is a good remedy for colds, coughs, pleurisy, wind, colic, rheumatism and diseases of the urinary organs, though it should not be given to patients who have a tendency towards diabetes, as it causes an increase of sugar in the urine.
Angelica may be made much use of in the garden by cutting the hollow stalks into convenient lengths and placing them amongst shrubs as traps for earwigs.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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