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Encyclopedia > Gandalf
Character from Tolkien's Legendarium
Name Gandalf
Other names
See Names and titles below
Titles
See Names and titles below
Race Ainur
Culture Maiar of Manwë and Varda
Book(s) The Hobbit
The Fellowship of the Ring
The Two Towers
The Return of the King
The Silmarillion

In J. R. R. Tolkien's legendarium, Gandalf is a central character in The Hobbit and The Lord of the Rings, where he appears as a fairly archetypal wizard, taking a key role in the latter book's War of the Ring. He is a member of the order known as the Istari — and later, head of that order after deposing Saruman — and leader of the Fellowship of the Ring and the army of the West. In Norse mythology, Gandalf is a dwarfish name referenced in the Catalogue of Dwarfs section of the poem Völuspá contained within the Elder Edda. ... Tolkien redirects here. ... Tolkiens Legendarium (ISBN 0-313-30530-7) is a collection of scholarly essays edited by Verlyn Flieger and Carl F. Hostetter on the History of Middle-earth series of books relating to the fiction of J. R. R. Tolkien, compiled and edited by his son, Christopher Tolkien. ... For other uses, see Gandalf (disambiguation). ... (In the context of property law, title refers to ownership or documents of ownership; see title (property). ... For other uses, see Gandalf (disambiguation). ... Here is a complete bestiary of the People, Creatures and Mystical Beings of Middle-earth as written about in the mythology of J. R. R. Tolkien. ... The Ainur (from Valarin Ayanûz; singular Ainu) are a fictional race from J. R. R. Tolkiens universe, Eä. Spoiler warning: The Ainur are the spirits emanated by Ilúvatar to help him to create the Universe, Eä, through the Music of the Ainur. ... For other uses, see Culture (disambiguation). ... The Maiar are a race from J. R. R. Tolkiens fantasy legendarium. ... Manwë Súlimo is a fictional character in J. R. R. Tolkiens legendarium. ... A character from J. R. R. Tolkiens fantasy universe, Middle-earth, Varda Elentári is a Vala, wife of Manwë. Varda, also known as Queen of the stars is said to be too beautiful for words; within her face radiates the light of Ilúvatar. ... This article is about the book. ... The Fellowship of the Ring is the first of three volumes of the epic novel The Lord of the Rings by the English author J. R. R. Tolkien. ... The Two Towers is the second volume of J. R. R. Tolkiens The Lord of the Rings. ... The Return of the King is the third and final volume of J. R. R. Tolkiens The Lord of the Rings, following The Fellowship of the Ring and The Two Towers. ... The Silmarillion is a collection of J. R. R. Tolkiens mythopoeic works, edited and published posthumously by his son Christopher Tolkien in 1977, with assistance from Guy Gavriel Kay, who would later become a noted fantasy fiction writer. ... Tolkien redirects here. ... A legendarium is a book or series of books consisting of a collection of legends. ... This article is about the book. ... This article is about the novel. ... For other uses, see Archetype (disambiguation). ... In the fiction of J. R. R. Tolkien, the Wizards of Middle-earth are a small group of beings outwardly resembling Men but possessing much greater physical and mental power. ... Combatants Free peoples: Gondor, Rohan, Dale, Esgaroth, Erebor, The Shire, Lothlórien, the Woodland Realm and the Fangorn forest Evil forces: Under Sauron: Mordor, Rhûn, Morgul, Harad, Umbar, Khand Under Saruman: Isengard, Dunland Commanders Gandalf (died but later resurrected) Aragorn Théoden† Éomer Denethor† Dáin II† Brand† Galadriel... In the fiction of J. R. R. Tolkien, the Wizards of Middle-earth are a small group of beings outwardly resembling Men but possessing much greater physical and mental power. ... Saruman is a fictional character in J. R. R. Tolkiens Middle-earth legendarium. ... Spoiler warning: The Fellowship of the Ring, as described in the first volume of The Lord of the Rings, which bears the same name, is a union of 9 representatives from each of the free peoples in Middle-earth, the number chosen to match the 9 Ringwraiths. ...

Contents

Concept and creation

Mythical roots

The Old Norse name "Gandalfr" appears in the list of dwarves in the Völuspá of the Elder Edda; the name is made up of the words gandr meaning both "wand" and (especially in compounds) "magic" and alfr meaning "elf" or in a wider sense (mythological) "being". Hence "magic-elf/-being" or wizard (non human).Association of gandr with taller magic men is found in the pre indoeuropean basques folklore related to jentillak ,a sort of wanderer race of wise men from the darkest times of prehistoric Europe. Tolkien took the name along with the dwarves' names when he wrote The Hobbit in the 1930s. He came to regret the creation of this "rabble of eddaic-named dwarves, [...] invented in an idle hour" (The Return of the Shadow:452), since it forced him to come up with an explanation of why Old Norse names should be used in Third Age Middle-earth. He solved the dilemma in 1942 by the explanation that Old Norse was a translation of the language of Dale. The figure of Gandalf has other influences from Germanic mythology, particularly Odin in his incarnation as "the Wanderer", an old man with one eye, a long white beard, a wide brimmed hat, and a staff (see ): Tolkien states that he thinks of Gandalf as an "Odinic wanderer" in a letter of 1946 (Letters no. 107). Gandalf is also in many ways similar to Väinämöinen, a powerful sage in the Finnish national epic Kalevala. Old Norse is the Germanic language spoken by the inhabitants of Scandinavia and their overseas settlements during the Viking Age, until about 1300. ... In Norse mythology, the dwarves (Old Norse: dvergar, sing. ... Völuspá (The Prophecy of the Seeress) is the first poem in the Poetic Edda. ... Look up Poetic Edda in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... The jentil (or jentilak with the basque plural), were a race of giants in the Basque mythology. ... The History of The Lord of the Rings is a 4-volume work by Christopher Tolkien that documents the process of J. R. R. Tolkiens writing of his masterwork The Lord of the Rings (LotR). ... Dale is a town in J. R. R. Tolkiens fictional universe of Middle-earth. ... For other meanings of Odin,Woden or Wotan see Odin (disambiguation), Woden (disambiguation), Wotan (disambiguation). ... Illustration from the Kalevala, by Akseli Gallen-Kallela 1896. ... The Kalevala is an epic poem which the Finn Elias Lönnrot compiled from Finnish and Karelian folklore in the 19th century. ...


Der Berggeist

Tolkien had a postcard labelled Der Berggeist (German: "the mountain spirit" or "the mountain ghost"), and on the paper cover in which he kept it, he wrote "the origin of Gandalf" at some point. The postcard reproduces a painting of a bearded figure, sitting on a rock under a pine tree in a mountainous setting. He wears a wide-brimmed round hat and a long cloak, and a white fawn is nuzzling his upturned hands.


Humphrey Carpenter in his 1977 biography said that Tolkien had bought the postcard during his 1911 holiday in Switzerland. However, Manfred Zimmerman (1983) discovered that the painting was by German artist Josef Madlener and dates to the late 1920s. Carpenter concluded that Tolkien was probably mistaken about the origin of the postcard himself. Tolkien must have acquired the card at some time in the early 1930s, at a time when The Hobbit had already begun to take shape.[citation needed] Humphrey William Bouverie Carpenter (April 29, 1946 – January 4, 2005) was an English biographer, author and radio broadcaster. ... Der Berggeist Josef Madlener (1881–1967) was a Swabian artist and illustrator. ...

"Der Berggeist" by Josef Madlener.
"Der Berggeist" by Josef Madlener.

The original painting was auctioned at Sotheby's in London on 12 July 2005 for 84,000 GBP.[1] The previous owner had been given the painting by Madlener in the 1940s and recalled that he had stated the mountains in the background of the painting were the Dolomites. Image File history File links Der Berggeist by Josef Madlener (mid to late 1920s) This work is copyrighted. ... Image File history File links Der Berggeist by Josef Madlener (mid to late 1920s) This work is copyrighted. ... Der Berggeist Josef Madlener (1881–1967) was a Swabian artist and illustrator. ... Sothebys (NYSE: BID) is the worlds second oldest international auction house in continuous operation. ... is the 193rd day of the year (194th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... GBP may be: short for Game Boy Player the ISO currency code for the British Pound Sterling. ... // The Dolomites (Italian: Dolomiti; German: Dolomiten; Friulian: Dolomitis) are a section of the Alps. ...


Characteristics

The first description of Gandalf is in the first pages of The Hobbit, dating to the early 1930s. Gandalf's fame is alluded to even before his physical description ("Tales and adventures sprouted up all over the place wherever he went, in the most extraordinary fashion."), directed by the author to the reader, while the protagonist's ("unsuspecting Bilbo's") impression is that of A protagonist is the main figure of a piece of literature or drama and has the main part or role. ...

an old man with a staff. He had a tall pointed blue hat, a long grey cloak, a silver scarf over which a white beard hung down below his waist, and immense black boots. (Chapter 1, "An Unexpected Party".)

Also in The Hobbit, Tolkien adds that Gandalf has a sharp nose and The tigrakhauda (Orthocorybantians) relief of eastern stairs of the Apadana of Persepolis. ...

bushy eyebrows that stuck out beyond the brim of his hat. (Chapter 1, "An Unexpected Party".)

Gandalf is the archetypical wizard, combining kind wisdom with the ability to perform magical feats, particularly those involving fire. otheruses|Magician}} The Enchanted Garden of Messer Ansaldo by Marie Spartali Stillman: a magician makes his garden bear fruit and flowers in winter. ... For other uses, see Fire (disambiguation). ...


Appearances

Literature

Arrival in Middle-earth

As revealed in The Silmarillion and Unfinished Tales, Gandalf the Grey was one of the Maiar of Valinor, a servant of the Valar, and of Ilúvatar (the creator of the universe). In Valinor, he was known as Olórin and was said to be the wisest of the Maiar. He lived in the gardens of Irmo under the tutelage of Nienna, the patron of mercy. When the Valar decided to send the order of the Wizards to Middle-earth in order to counsel and assist all those who opposed Sauron, Olórin was proposed by Manwë. Olórin initially begged leave to be excused as he feared he lacked the strength to face Sauron. The Silmarillion is a collection of J. R. R. Tolkiens mythopoeic works, edited and published posthumously by his son Christopher Tolkien in 1977, with assistance from Guy Gavriel Kay, who would later become a noted fantasy fiction writer. ... Unfinished Tales (full title Unfinished Tales of Númenor and Middle-earth) is a collection of stories by J. R. R. Tolkien that were never completed during his lifetime, but were edited by his son Christopher Tolkien and published in 1980. ... The Maiar are a race from J. R. R. Tolkiens fantasy legendarium. ... Valinor (meaning Land of the Valar) is a fictional location from J. R. R. Tolkiens legendarium, the realm of the Valar in Aman. ... The Valar (singular Vala) are characters in J.R.R. Tolkiens legendarium. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Irmo is a fictional character from J. R. R. Tolkiens legendarium. ... Nienna is a Vala from J. R. R. Tolkiens universe, Middle-earth. ... In the fiction of J. R. R. Tolkien, the Wizards of Middle-earth are a small group of beings outwardly resembling Men but possessing much greater physical and mental power. ... A map of the Northwestern part of Middle-earth at the end of the Third Age, courtesy of the Encyclopedia of Arda. ... This article is about a fictional character from J. R. R. Tolkiens Middle-earth fantasy writings. ... Manwë Súlimo is a fictional character in J. R. R. Tolkiens legendarium. ...


In the Order, he had a strained relationship with Saruman, its leader. The order was commanded only to counsel Men, Elves, and Dwarves, and was forbidden to use force to dominate them as Sauron did - a decree Saruman broke. Saruman is a fictional character in J. R. R. Tolkiens Middle-earth legendarium. ... The race of Men in J. R. R. Tolkiens Middle-earth books, such as The Hobbit and The Lord of the Rings, refers to humanity and does not denote gender. ... In J. R. R. Tolkiens legendarium, an Elf is an individual member of one of the races that inhabit the lands of Arda. ... In J. R. R. Tolkiens fictional universe of Middle-earth, Dwarves (also known as the Naugrim) are beings of short stature who all possess beards and are often friendly with Hobbits, although long suspicious of Elves. ...


Gandalf was the last Istar to arrive in Middle-earth, landing in Mithlond. He seemed the oldest and least wise of them, but Círdan the Shipwright felt that he had the highest inner greatness on their first meeting in the Havens, and gave him Narya, the Ring of Fire. Saruman learned of the gift and resented it. Gandalf hid it well, and it was not known (except apparently to the Elves Elrond and Galadriel) until he left with the other ring-bearers at the end of the Third Age that he and not Círdan was the holder of the third of the Elven-rings. In the fiction of J. R. R. Tolkien, the Wizards of Middle-earth are a small group of beings outwardly resembling Men but possessing much greater physical and mental power. ... The Grey Havens in the Lord of the Rings movie trilogy Location of the Grey Havens in Middle-earth marked in red The elven ports of Mithlond or the Grey Havens was an Elvish port on the Gulf of Lune in the northwest of J. R. R. Tolkiens fictional... In the fiction of J.R.R. Tolkien, Círdan (ship-maker in Sindarin) the Shipwright is a Teleri Elf (of which he was one of the wisest princes), a great mariner and shipwright, lord of the Falas during much of the First Age, the wisest and perhaps the second... narya written in Quenya In Middle-earth, the fantasy universe of J. R. R. Tolkien, Narya (the Ring of Fire or Red Ring) is one of the Rings of Power, specifically one of the Three Rings for the Elven Kings under the sky. Created by Celebrimbor after Annatar had left... Elrond Half-elven is a fictional character in J. R. R. Tolkiens Middle-earth legendarium. ... Galadriel is a fictional character created by J. R. R. Tolkien, appearing in The Lord of the Rings. ... In The Lord of the Rings, by J. R. R. Tolkien, Frodo Baggins is appointed to be the Ring-bearer by the Council of Elrond in Rivendell. ...


Early adventures

As explained in the appendices of The Return of the King, Gandalf entered Dol Guldur in the Third Age, thinking that it might be the hiding place of Sauron's spirit. He was right, and Sauron, then known as the Necromancer, fled Dol Guldur, but without Gandalf finding out whether or not his suspicions were right. Four hundred years later, the White Council was founded. Galadriel proposed that Gandalf be made the head of it, but the position of leadership was instead given to Saruman. The Return of the King is the third and final volume of J. R. R. Tolkiens The Lord of the Rings, following The Fellowship of the Ring and The Two Towers. ... In the fictional world of J. R. R. Tolkiens Middle-earth, Dol Guldur, or Hill of Sorcery, was a stronghold of Sauron located in the south of Mirkwood. ... For other uses, see The Third Age. ... In J. R. R. Tolkiens legendarium, the White Council is a group of Elves and Wizards of Middle-earth, formed in 2463 T.A. to contest the growing power of Dol Guldur, at the request of Galadriel. ...


Some twenty years later, Gandalf re-entered Dol Guldur. He found that the Necromancer was indeed Sauron himself, and also discovered the dying dwarf Thráin II, who gave to him the map and the key of Erebor. When Gandalf brought this information to the Council, he urged them to attack and drive out Sauron, but Saruman disagreed and overruled him, saying that Sauron had no power yet. Thráin II is a Dwarf from J. R. R. Tolkiens fictional universe of Middle-earth. ... In J. R. R. Tolkiens Middle-earth legendarium, the Lonely Mountain (Sindarin Erebor) is a mountain in the northeast of Rhovanion. ...


Quest of Erebor

In The Hobbit, Gandalf arranged and partially accompanied a band of thirteen dwarves and the Hobbit Bilbo Baggins for the quest of reclaiming the lost Dwarven treasure of Erebor from the dragon Smaug. It is on this quest that Gandalf found his sword, Glamdring, in a troll's treasure hoard, and that Bilbo found the One Ring (though at the time it was mistaken for a lesser ring). This article is about the book. ... In J. R. R. Tolkiens fictional universe of Middle-earth, Dwarves (also known as the Naugrim) are beings of short stature who all possess beards and are often friendly with Hobbits, although long suspicious of Elves. ... Bilbo Baggins (2890 Third Age - ? Fourth Age) is an important character in J. R. R. Tolkiens legendarium. ... In J. R. R. Tolkiens Middle-earth legendarium, the Lonely Mountain (Sindarin Erebor) is a mountain in the northeast of Rhovanion. ... Smaug in his lair: an illustration for the fantasy The Hobbit Smaug is a fictional character in The Hobbit by J. R. R. Tolkien. ... An artists impression of Glamdring, the sword of Gandalf Glamdring is a sword in J. R. R. Tolkiens fantasy universe of Middle-earth. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


The story behind The Hobbit is elaborated upon in Unfinished Tales, which tells of a chance meeting between Gandalf and Thorin Oakenshield, Thráin's son, in the inn of the Prancing Pony in Bree. Gandalf had for some time foreseen the coming war with Sauron, and knew that the North was especially vulnerable. If Rivendell were to be attacked, the dragon Smaug could cause great devastation. Thorin was also keen to regain his lost territory, and the quest was born. Unknown to the dwarves or Bilbo, Gandalf had joined the quest in order to investigate what he suspected to be the resurgence of Sauron (or the "Necromancer", as he is referred to in The Hobbit) in Mirkwood. During the dwarves' quest, Gandalf twice vanished — once to scout their path, the second time to "attend to other pressing business", the nature of which he refused to discuss. Unfinished Tales (full title Unfinished Tales of Númenor and Middle-earth) is a collection of stories by J. R. R. Tolkien that were never completed during his lifetime, but were edited by his son Christopher Tolkien and published in 1980. ... In J. R. R. Tolkiens Middle-earth legendarium, Thorin Oakenshield was a Dwarf, the son of Thráin II and the grandson of King Thrór. ... Bree is a fictional village in J. R. R. Tolkiens Middle-earth, east of the Shire and south of Fornost Erain. ... Location of Rivendell in Middle-earth marked in red Rivendell (Sindarin: Imladris) is an Elven outpost in Middle-earth, a fictional realm created by J. R. R. Tolkien. ... For the game Mirkwood, see Mirkwood (mud). ...


When Bilbo found the One Ring, Gandalf was immediately suspicious of the Hobbit's story of how he acquired it, due to Bilbo's uncharacteristic lie about the matter. He privately confronted Bilbo and forced the truth out of him, and was deeply troubled by his story of the Ring's powers, as they seemed eerily familiar.


After escaping from the Misty Mountains pursued by Orcs and Wargs, Gandalf called out to the Great Eagles, who took the dwarves, Bilbo, and himself to safety. It was also through a clever plan that Gandalf was able to convince the great Beorn — who did not like uninvited guests or dwarves — to house the small company. The Misty Mountains as seen in the prologue to The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring (2001). ... Varg redirects here, for the Norwegian black metal musician see Varg Vikernes. ... In J. R. R. Tolkiens fictional universe of Middle-earth, Beorn was a shape-shifter, a man who could assume the appearance of a great black bear. ...


Before the company entered Mirkwood, Gandalf departed, saying that he had pressing business to attend to. This pressing business was a meeting of the White Council, which finally decided to act on Gandalf's information of Sauron in Dol Guldur and drive him out of Mirkwood, which they did soon after.


Gandalf got back to Esgaroth and the Lonely Mountain before the dwarves and Bilbo. He disguised himself in Esgaroth and only revealed himself when it seemed the Men of Esgaroth and the Elves of Mirkwood would go to war with Thorin over Smaug's treasure. When an army of Orcs and Wargs arrived and attacked all three parties involved, the Battle of the Five Armies began. After the battle, Gandalf accompanied Bilbo back to the Shire and revealed what his pressing business had been: the White Council had attacked Dol Guldur and driven the Necromancer from it. Esgaroth upon the Long Lake, also known as Lake-town, is a fictional community of Men in The Hobbit by J. R. R. Tolkien. ... In J. R. R. Tolkiens Middle-earth legendarium, the Lonely Mountain (Sindarin Erebor) is a mountain in the northeast of Rhovanion. ... The Battle of Five Armies is a battle depicted in The Hobbit by J. R. R. Tolkien. ...


The War of the Ring begins

As explained in The Fellowship of the Ring, Gandalf spent the years between The Hobbit and The Lord of the Rings travelling Middle-earth in search of information on Sauron's resurgence and Bilbo's mysterious ring, while befriending Aragorn. He spent as much time as he could in the Shire, however, strengthening his friendship with Bilbo and befriending Bilbo's heir, Frodo. It was also at about this time that he first began to be suspicious of Saruman, especially after Saruman occupied Isengard. The Fellowship of the Ring is the first of three volumes of the epic novel The Lord of the Rings by the English author J. R. R. Tolkien. ... Aragorn II is a fictional character from J. R. R Tolkiens Middle-earth legendarium. ... “Frodo” redirects here. ... Location of Isengard in Middle-earth marked in red In J. R. R. Tolkiens fictional universe of Middle-earth, Isengard, a translation of the Sindarin Angrenost, was a large fortress. ...


He returned to the Shire to attend Bilbo's "eleventy-first" (111th) birthday party, bringing many fireworks and a giant flying firework "dragon". At the end of the party Bilbo put on the Ring and disappeared at the end of his speech, as a prank on his neighbours. Troubled by this, Gandalf confronted his old friend and tried to persuade him to leave the Ring to Frodo. Bilbo became hostile and accused Gandalf of trying to steal the Ring — which he called "my precious," much as Gollum, the creature from whom Bilbo took the ring in The Hobbit, had previously done. Horrified, Gandalf stood to his full height and almost ordered Bilbo to leave the Ring behind. Bilbo returned to his senses, and admitted that the Ring had been troubling him lately. Bilbo then departed for Rivendell and never possessed the Ring again, leaving it in Frodo's keeping. Though it troubled both Gandalf and Frodo that Bilbo appeared to miss it on occasion, Gandalf stated that he was nevertheless the first bearer of the Ring to give it up willingly. This article is about the fictional character. ...


Over the next seventeen years, Gandalf travelled extensively, searching for answers. Having long sought for Gollum near Mordor, Gandalf met in Mirkwood with Aragorn, who had captured the creature. Gandalf interrogated Gollum, threatening him with fire when Gollum proved initially unwilling to speak. Finally, he learned that Sauron had forced Gollum under torture in Barad-dûr to tell what he knew about the ring, adding to Gandalf's suspicions that Bilbo carried the One Ring. Barad-dûr and Mount Doom in Peter Jacksons film The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King. ...


Upon returning to the Shire, in 3018, Gandalf confirmed his suspicions by throwing the Ring into Frodo's hearth fire and reading the writing that appeared on the Ring's surface. He then told Frodo the full history of the Ring, urging him to leave with it and make for Rivendell, the home of the Elves, knowing he would be in grave danger if he stayed at home. He also told Frodo that he would attempt to return for Frodo's fiftieth birthday party so as to accompany him on the road thereafter, and that Frodo had to leave quietly as the servants of Sauron would be searching for him. Location of Rivendell in Middle-earth marked in red Rivendell (Sindarin: Imladris) is an Elven outpost in Middle-earth, a fictional realm created by J. R. R. Tolkien. ...


Riding near the Shire, Gandalf encountered Radagast the Brown, another of the Istari, who told him that he had been sent for by Saruman. Radagast had to see Gandalf immediately because the Nazgûl had come forth and crossed the River Anduin. Gandalf left a note for Frodo with Barliman Butterbur, an inn-keeper in Bree, and headed towards Isengard. Once there, he was disturbed by the way Saruman spoke to him, including insulting Radagast and mocking the way Gandalf addressed him. Soon enough, Saruman revealed his true colours and betrayed Gandalf, quickly imprisoning him at the top of the tower of Orthanc. Saruman had previously come under the influence of Sauron by using the palantír of Orthanc. Eventually Gandalf was rescued by Gwaihir the Eagle after witnessing Saruman begin building his army. Radagast the Brown is one of the five Wizards in J. R. R. Tolkiens fantasy epic The Lord of the Rings and is mentioned in The Hobbit. ... In J. R. R. Tolkiens Middle-earth legendarium, the Nazgûl (from Black Speech Nazg (ring) and Gûl (wraith, spirit); Ringwraiths, sometimes written Ring-wraiths), also known as the Nine Riders or Black or Dark Riders (or simply the Nine), are evil servants of Sauron. ... In J. R. R. Tolkiens fictional Middle-earth, Anduin is the Sindarin name for the Great River of Wilderland, the longest river in the Third Age (the original Sindarin name means Long River). ... Barliman Butterbur is a fictional character from J. R. R. Tolkiens epic fantasy The Lord of the Rings. ... Location of Orthanc and Isengard in Middle-earth marked in red In J. R. R. Tolkiens fictional universe of Middle-earth, Orthanc is the black tower of Isengard. ... A palantír is a magical artifact from J. R. R. Tolkiens fictional universe of Middle-earth. ... In J. R. R. Tolkiens fictional universe of Middle-earth, the eagles were immense flying birds that were sentient, and could speak. ...


Gwaihir set Gandalf down in the kingdom of Rohan, where Gandalf appealed to its king, Théoden, for a horse. Théoden, under the influence of Saruman through his servant Gríma Wormtongue, told Gandalf to take any horse he pleased as long as he left. It was then that Gandalf met the great horse Shadowfax, one of the mearas, and pursued the horse for several days before Shadowfax permitted Gandalf to ride him. Gandalf rode for the Shire, but did not reach it until after Frodo had set out. Knowing that Frodo and his companions would be heading for Rivendell, Gandalf began to make his own way there. He faced the Nazgûl (Sauron's chief servants) at Weathertop but was driven off after all-night battle and pursued by four of them afterward; Frodo, Aragorn and company would face the remaining five wraiths in the same place a few nights later. Gandalf reached Rivendell just ahead of Frodo's arrival. For other uses, see Rohan (disambiguation). ... In J. R. R. Tolkiens The Lord of the Rings, Théoden was the seventeenth King of Rohan, and last of the Second Line. ... In J. R. R. Tolkiens novel The Lord of the Rings, Gríma (Wormtongue) is the chief advisor to King Théoden of Rohan. ... This is a complete list of horses from J. R. R. Tolkiens Middle-earth legendarium. ... The Mearas were a breed of wild horses in the north of Middle-earth in the J.R.R. Tolkien legendarium. ... In J. R. R. Tolkiens Middle-earth legendarium, the Nazgûl (from Black Speech Nazg (ring) and Gûl (wraith, spirit); Ringwraiths, sometimes written Ring-wraiths), also known as the Nine Riders or Black or Dark Riders (or simply the Nine), are evil servants of Sauron. ... In the fiction of J. R. R. Tolkien, Weathertop (Sindarin Amon Sûl, Hill of Wind) is a significant hill in the Eriador region of Middle-earth, the southernmost and highest summit of the Weather Hills. ...


In Rivendell, Gandalf helped Elrond drive off the Nazgûl pursuing Frodo and played a great part in the following council as the only person who knew the full history of the Ring. It was then he also revealed that Saruman had betrayed them all by seeking the Ring himself. When it was decided that the Ring had to be destroyed, Gandalf volunteered to join and help Frodo – now the Ringbearer – in his quest. He also was the one who persuaded Elrond to let Frodo's cousins Merry and Pippin join the Fellowship. In The Lord of the Rings by J. R. R. Tolkien, the Council of Elrond is a fictional secret council called by Elrond in Rivendell in order to decide what should be done with the One Ring. ... Meriadoc Brandybuck, usually referred to as Merry, is a fictional character from J.R.R. Tolkiens Middle-earth, featured throughout his most famous work, The Lord of the Rings. ... Peregrin Took (T.A. 2990–F.A. 70), better known to his friends as Pippin, is a fictional character from J. R. R. Tolkiens universe of Middle-earth, a Hobbit, and one of Frodo Bagginss youngest but dearest friends. ...


Death and resurrection

Taking charge of the Fellowship (nine representatives of the free peoples of Middle-earth "set against the Nine Riders"), Gandalf and Aragorn led the Hobbits and their companions on an unsuccessful effort to cross Mount Caradhras in winter. After this failure to cross the mountains, they decided to go through the Mines of Moria. When the Company entered, they discovered that the Dwarf colony that was once there had been overrun by Orcs, and Balin had died. During an ensuing fight with the Orcs of Moria, Gandalf led the company across the Bridge of Khazad-dûm, until a Balrog came to face the company. The ancient demon – known as Durin's Bane – faced the Grey Wizard on the bridge of Khazad-dûm. In the fictional universe of J. R. R. Tolkiens Middle-earth, Caradhras, also called the Redhorn (the literal English translation of the Sindarin name), is one of the mightiest peaks in the Misty Mountains. ... In the fiction of J. R. R. Tolkien, Moria was an ominous name given by the Eldar to what had once been an enormous underground complex in north-western Middle-earth, comprising a vast network of tunnels, chambers, mines and huge halls or mansions, that ran under and ultimately through... In J. R. R. Tolkiens fantasy world of Middle-earth, Balin was a Dwarf leader, the son of Fundin and elder brother of Dwalin. ... The Bridge of Khazad-dûm is a narrow stone bridge crossing a chasm within the eastern gates of the Dwarf-city of Khazad-dûm. ... A Balrog fighting Gandalf, as depicted by Ted Nasmith. ... Durins Bane from Peter Jacksons The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring. ...


After a short exchange of blows, Gandalf broke the bridge in front of him with his staff, which also broke in the process. As the Balrog fell, however, it wrapped its whip around Gandalf's knees, dragging him into the abyss. As the Company looked on in horror, Gandalf fell into shadow, crying "Fly, you fools!"


As revealed in The Two Towers, neither Gandalf nor the Balrog were killed by the fall into the deep underground lake under Moria. Gandalf pursued the creature for eight days until they climbed to the peak of Zirakzigil. Here they fought for two days and nights. In the end, the Balrog was cast down and broke the mountainside with its fall. Gandalf himself died as well during this ordeal and his body lay on the peak while his spirit travelled outside of time. The Two Towers is the second volume of J. R. R. Tolkiens The Lord of the Rings. ... Celebdil (Sindarin), also known as Zirakzigil (Khuzdul) or Silvertine is a fictional mountain from J. R. R. Tolkiens Middle-earth legendarium. ... Combatants Gandalf Balrog Commanders None None Strength 1 1 Casualties 1 1 Battle between Gandalf and the Balrog on the Silvertine. ...


Gandalf was "sent back", resurrected by Eru and returned as the more imposing figure, Gandalf the White. After being found by Gwaihir, he was healed of his injuries and re-clothed in white robes by Galadriel in Lórien, although he retained his grey cloak for a while. He then travelled to Fangorn forest, where he encountered Aragorn, Gimli, and Legolas, who were tracking the Fellowship members Merry and Pippin. Look up Resurrection in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... In J. R. R. Tolkiens fictional universe of Middle-earth, the eagles were immense flying birds that were sentient, and could speak. ... location of Lórien in Middle-earth marked in red This article is about the Lórien of J. R. R. Tolkiens works. ... In J. R. R. Tolkiens Middle-earth, Fangorn forest is the habitat of the Ents. ... Gimli is a fictional character from J. R. R. Tolkiens Middle-earth legendarium, featured in The Lord of the Rings. ... Legolas is a character in J. R. R. Tolkiens legendarium, featured in The Lord of the Rings. ...


Arriving in Rohan, Gandalf found that Théoden had been further weakened by Gríma Wormtongue's vile influence. He broke Wormtongue's hold over Théoden, and convinced the king to join them in the fight against Sauron. Gandalf then set off in search of Erkenbrand of the Westfold and his warriors to assist Théoden in the coming battle. Gandalf and Erkenbrand with his warriors arrived in time to break the Uruk-hai's attack on Helm's Deep. After the ensuing battle, Gandalf and the king went to Isengard, which, it turned out, had been attacked and conquered by a force of Ents led by Treebeard, along with Merry and Pippin. Gandalf broke Saruman's staff and expelled him from the Order of Wizards and the White Council, and assumed Saruman's place as head of both. He then took Pippin with him to Gondor to aid in the defence of Minas Tirith after Pippin looked into the palantír of Orthanc and came face to face with Sauron. For other uses, see Rohan (disambiguation). ... Erkenbrand is a character from J. R. R. Tolkiens novel The Lord of the Rings. ... In J. R. R. Tolkiens fictional realm of Middle-earth, the Uruk-hai (Black Speech: Orc folk) were a new breed of Orcs that appeared during the Third Age. ... In J. R. R. Tolkiens Middle-earth fantasy writings, Helms Deep was a large valley in the north-western Ered Nimrais (White Mountains). ... Combatants Isengard Rohan Commanders Saruman Théoden, Aragorn, Gandalf, Éomer Strength 10,000 Uruk-hai and common Orcs of Isengard, 2,000-5,000 Dunlendings, an unknown number of orc-human hybrids about 2,000 Rohirrim; reinforced by 1,000 more Rohirrim in the morning, and thousands of Huorns Casualties... For other uses, see ENT. Ents are a fictional race from J. R. R. Tolkiens fantasy world of Middle-earth. ... Treebeard or (Sindarin) Fangorn is a fictional character from J. R. R. Tolkiens Middle-earth. ... Gondor is a fictional kingdom in J. R. R. Tolkiens Middle-earth. ... Minas Tirith (IPA: ), originally named Minas Anor, is a heavily fortified city in J. R. R. Tolkiens Middle-earth writings, which was the capital of Gondor in the second half of the Third Age. ... A palantír is a magical artifact from J. R. R. Tolkiens fictional universe of Middle-earth. ... Location of Orthanc and Isengard in Middle-earth marked in red In J. R. R. Tolkiens fictional universe of Middle-earth, Orthanc is the black tower of Isengard. ...


Winning the war

In The Return of the King, Gandalf relieved Gondor's Steward, Denethor, of command of the city; Denethor had lost his mind in despair after seeing his son Faramir gravely wounded in battle, as well as a vision of the Corsairs of Umbar coming to invade. Together with Prince Imrahil of Dol Amroth, Gandalf led the defenders during the siege of the city. When the forces of Mordor finally broke through the gates of the city, Gandalf alone, with Shadowfax, confronted the Witch-king of Angmar, Lord of the Nazgûl. Their duel was never fought, however, since the Rohirrim arrived at that moment, compelling the Nazgûl to leave and engage them. Gandalf would have ridden to their aid, but he too was suddenly required elsewhere — to save Faramir from the now-insane Denethor, who sought to burn himself and his son on a funeral pyre. He organised the city's defences while the main battle raged outside between the forces of Rohan and the Gondorians against Mordor's great army on the Pelennor Fields. The Return of the King is the third and final volume of J. R. R. Tolkiens The Lord of the Rings, following The Fellowship of the Ring and The Two Towers. ... This article is about the Steward of Gondor in the time of the War of the Ring. ... Faramir is also the name of Ondohers son. ... The Corsairs of Umbar were a fleet of Men of Umbar in J. R. R. Tolkiens Middle-earth legendarium, allied to Sauron in his war against Gondor. ... In J. R. R. Tolkiens fictional universe of Middle-earth, Imrahil was the twenty-second Prince of Dol Amroth. ... In J. R. R. Tolkiens legendarium, Dol Amroth is a fictional place being a princedom which forms part of the kingdom of Gondor. ... Mount Doom and Barad-dûr in Mordor, as depicted in the Peter Jackson film. ... The Witch-king of Angmar, also known as the Lord of the Nazgûl and the Black Captain among other names, is a fictional character from the novel The Lord of the Rings by J. R. R. Tolkien, set in the fantasy world of Middle-earth. ... The Battle of the Pelennor Fields was a battle for the city of Minas Tirith in J. R. R. Tolkiens The Lord of the Rings. ... In the fiction of J. R. R. Tolkiens Middle-earth, the Pelennor Fields were the townlands and fields of Minas Tirith, capital of Gondor. ...


Aragorn and Gandalf then led the final battle against Sauron's forces at the Black Gate, waging an outnumbered battle to distract the Dark Lord's attention away from Frodo and Samwise Gamgee, who were at the very same moment scaling Mount Doom to destroy the Ring. Before the battle Gandalf and the other leaders of the West went to try to negotiate with the Mouth of Sauron, with Gandalf as chief herald and negotiator. The Mouth revealed Frodo's mithril (Dwarven metal) shirt and other items which were part of the Hobbits' gear. Outraged, Gandalf sent the Mouth of Sauron away with a rejection of Mordor's terms of surrender. The forces of the West then held out against Sauron's armies, until Gollum fell with the Ring into the fire, destroying it with him. Gandalf then saved the two Hobbits, riding upon Gwaihir and leading two other Eagles to their rescue on the side of Mt. Doom. The Black Gate or Morannon is a location in J. R. R. Tolkiens fantasy universe of Middle-earth. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... In J. R. R. Tolkiens legendarium, Samwise Gamgee, later known as Samwise Gardner[2] or Samwise the Brave and commonly known as Sam, is a fictional character who is Frodo Bagginss servant and companion on the journey to Mordor. ... In J. R. R. Tolkiens fictional universe of Middle-earth, Mount Doom, or Orodruin, is a volcano in Mordor where the One Ring was forged in the Crack of Doom, a fiery chasm within the mountain. ... In J. R. R. Tolkiens fictional universe of Middle-earth, the Mouth of Sauron was the name given to the Dark Lord Saurons servant and emissary. ... Mithril is a fictional metal from J. R. R. Tolkiens Middle-earth fantasy writings. ...


After the war, he crowned Aragorn King of Gondor as King Elessar, and helped him find a sapling of the White Tree of Gondor. He accompanied the Hobbits back to the borders of the Shire, before leaving to go and rest in the house of Tom Bombadil. In J. R. R. Tolkiens fantasy universe of Middle-earth, the White Tree of Gondor stood as a symbol of Gondor in the Court of the Fountain in Minas Tirith. ... Tom Bombadil is a supporting character in J. R. R. Tolkiens legendarium. ...


Three years later, Gandalf — who by now had spent over 2,000 years in Middle-earth — departed with Frodo, Galadriel, Bilbo, and Elrond across the sea to the Undying Lands. In the fictional writings of J. R. R. Tolkien, the Undying Lands are a realm inhabited by immortal beings. ...


Adaptations

Gandalf in the 2003 Cincinnati stage production of The Return of the King.

In the BBC radio dramatisations, Norman Shelley played Gandalf in The Lord of the Rings (1955 and 1956), Heron Carvic played him in The Hobbit (1968) and Sir Michael Hordern played him in The Lord of the Rings (1981). Image File history File links Download high resolution version (592x843, 193 KB)Ian McKellen as Gandalf in The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (592x843, 193 KB)Ian McKellen as Gandalf in The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring. ... Sir Ian Murray McKellen, CBE (born May 25, 1939) is an English stage and screen actor, the recipient of a Tony Award and two Oscar nominations. ... For other persons named Peter Jackson, see Peter Jackson (disambiguation). ... The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring is a film, released on Wednesday, December 19, 2001, directed by Peter Jackson with a runtime of 178 minutes (2 hours, 58 minutes). ... The Fellowship of the Ring is the first of three volumes of the epic novel The Lord of the Rings by the English author J. R. R. Tolkien. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (853x480, 61 KB) Gandalf, as portrayed in The Lord of the Rings (1978). ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (853x480, 61 KB) Gandalf, as portrayed in The Lord of the Rings (1978). ... Ralph Bakshi (October 29, 1938) is an American director of animated and occasionally live-action films. ... J.R.R. Tolkiens The Lord of the Rings is a 1978 animated fantasy film directed by Ralph Bakshi. ... This article is about the novel. ... Image File history File links Rotk-1-2351-gandalf-citade. ... Image File history File links Rotk-1-2351-gandalf-citade. ... Rankin/Bass Productions, Inc. ... DVD cover The Return of the King is an animated adaptation of the novel by J. R. R. Tolkien which was released by Rankin/Bass as a TV special in 1980. ... The Return of the King is the third and final volume of J. R. R. Tolkiens The Lord of the Rings, following The Fellowship of the Ring and The Two Towers. ... Image File history File links Mckellenthewhite. ... Image File history File links Mckellenthewhite. ... Sir Ian Murray McKellen, CBE (born May 25, 1939) is an English stage and screen actor, the recipient of a Tony Award and two Oscar nominations. ... Churchwarden is a term used to describe tobacco pipes with long, curved stems. ... For other persons named Peter Jackson, see Peter Jackson (disambiguation). ... This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... The Return of the King is the third and final volume of J. R. R. Tolkiens The Lord of the Rings, following The Fellowship of the Ring and The Two Towers. ... Image File history File links STAGE_GANDALF.jpg‎ Summary Author=self. ... Image File history File links STAGE_GANDALF.jpg‎ Summary Author=self. ... The Return of the King is the third and final volume of J. R. R. Tolkiens The Lord of the Rings, following The Fellowship of the Ring and The Two Towers. ... BBC Radio is a service of the British Broadcasting Corporation which has operated in the United Kingdom under the terms of a Royal Charter since 1927. ... Norman Shelley (February 16, 1903 - August 22, 1980) was an English actor, best known for his work in radio, in particular for the BBCs Childrens Hour. ... During 1955 and 1956, a condensed radio dramatisation of The Lord of the Rings was broadcast in twelve episodes on BBC Radios the Third Programme. ... Heron Carvic is a British actor who performed as voice actor in the BBC Radio version of The Hobbit. ... Sir Michael Hordern (October 3, 1911-May 2, 1995) was a British actor, knighted in 1983 for his services to the theatre. ... In 1981 BBC Radio 4 broadcast a dramatisation of J. R. R. Tolkiens The Lord of the Rings in 26 half-hour stereo instalments. ...


John Huston provided the voice of Gandalf in two animated television features by Rankin/Bass (The Hobbit and The Return of the King). John Marcellus Huston (August 5, 1906 – August 28, 1987) was an American film director and actor. ... The bouncing ball animation (below) consists of these 6 frames. ... Rankin/Bass Productions, Inc. ... J. R. R. Tolkiens The Hobbit was adapted into an animated television movie by the team at Rankin-Bass Productions in 1977. ... DVD cover The Return of the King is an animated adaptation of the novel by J. R. R. Tolkien which was released by Rankin/Bass as a TV special in 1980. ...


In the 1978 animated version of The Lord of the Rings by Ralph Bakshi, Gandalf was voiced by William Squire. J.R.R. Tolkiens The Lord of the Rings is a 1978 animated fantasy film directed by Ralph Bakshi. ... Ralph Bakshi (October 29, 1938) is an American director of animated and occasionally live-action films. ... William Squire (29 April 1916 - 3 May 1989) was a British actor of film and television. ...


Sir Ian McKellen played Gandalf in the Lord of the Rings movie trilogy directed by Peter Jackson. Visually Gandalf was based on illustrations by John Howe, who also served as a concept artist along with Alan Lee. McKellen was nominated for an Academy Award for Best Supporting Actor in The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring, making him the only individual cast member to be nominated for his performance. In interviews, McKellen has said that, if The Hobbit is ever filmed, he would be delighted to return as Gandalf. Sir Ian Murray McKellen, CBE (born May 25, 1939) is an English stage and screen actor, the recipient of a Tony Award and two Oscar nominations. ... This article is about the Peter Jackson films. ... For other persons named Peter Jackson, see Peter Jackson (disambiguation). ... John Howe 2003 John Howe (born August 21, 1957 in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada) is a book illustrator, living in Neuchatel, Switzerland. ... Alan Lee 2003 in (New Zealand) Alan Lee (born August 20, 1947) is an English book illustrator and movie conceptual designer. ... Although he never won an Oscar for any of his movie performances, the comedian Bob Hope received two honorary Oscars for his contributions to cinema. ... Best Supporting Actor or Best Supporting Actress is an accolade given by a group of film or theatre professionals in recognition of the work of supporting and character actors. ...


Sean Connery was originally considered for the role of Gandalf, but turned it down. Connery also admits that he "didn't understand" the subject matter and had not read Tolkien's books.[2] Sir Thomas Sean Connery (born 25 August 1930) is a retired Scottish actor and producer who is perhaps best known as the first actor to portray James Bond in cinema, starring in seven Bond films. ...


Gandalf was portrayed by Brent Carver in the three-hour production of The Lord of the Rings, which opened in 2006 in Toronto. Brent Carver (born 1952 in Cranbrook, British Columbia) is a Canadian actor. ... This article is about the musicals. ...


In the United States, Gandalf was portrayed by Tom Stiver in productions of The Two Towers (2002), and The Return of the King (2003) for Clear Stage Cincinnati. At Chicago's Lifeline Theatre, Gandalf was played by Charles Picard in The Two Towers (1999). Clear Stage Cincinnati Founded in 2003, Clear Stage Cincinnati is a professional theatre company in Cincinnati, Ohio dedicated to developing and showcasing fresh new theatrical artists by providing them with a Clear Stage for the advancement of their craft. ... Nickname: Motto: Urbs in Horto (Latin: City in a Garden), I Will Location in the Chicago metro area and Illinois Coordinates: , Country State Counties Cook, DuPage Settled 1770s Incorporated March 4, 1837 Government  - Mayor Richard M. Daley (D) Area  - City  234. ... Lifeline Theatre was founded in Chicago, Illinois, United States, in 1983 by four Northwestern University graduates. ... Charles Picard (1883-1965) was a prominent Classical archaeologist and historian of ancient Greek art. ...


In the anime Zero no Tsukaima, Gandalfr was the name of the legendary familiar whose master is the bearer of Void Magic. The main male protagonist Saito, is the reincarnation of Gandalfr in the story. The rune symbol inscribed on Saito's hand also reads Gandalfr. Zero no Tsukaima lit. ...


Names and titles

  • Olórin, his name in Valinor and in very ancient times. "Olórin was my name in my youth in the West that is forgotten". The word originates in Tolkien's invented language of Quenya, and its meaning is associated with dreams.
  • Mithrandir, his name in Tolkien's invented language of Sindarin, used in Gondor and by the Elves, meaning Grey Pilgrim. See Randir.
  • Gandalf Greyhame, Gandalf was his name in the North, meaning Elf with the Staff and Greyhame meaning Greycloak.[3]
  • Gandalf the Grey, and later Gandalf the White after he was reborn as the successor to Saruman.
  • The White Rider (when riding the great horse Shadowfax), contrast to the Black Riders (Nazgûl).
  • Stormcrow (a reference to his arrival being associated with times of trouble), often used by his detractors to mean he was a troublesome meddler in the affairs of others.
  • Incánus (in the south), of unclear language and meaning. Tolkien changed his mind about it several times, varying between the Latin word incanus meaning grey.
  • Tharkûn (to the Dwarves), probably meaning Staff-man.
  • Greybeard to the peoples of Sauron.
  • Graham Alexander Looks like him.

Within the Tolkien legendarium, "Gandalf" translates an unknown name of the meaning "Wand-Elf (alternatively cane/staff)". Valinor (meaning Land of the Valar) is a fictional location from J. R. R. Tolkiens legendarium, the realm of the Valar in Aman. ... Quenya is one of the fictional languages spoken by the Elves (the Quendi) the ones who speak. The first-found children of Ilúvatar, in the fantasy works of J. R. R. Tolkien. ... For other uses, see Dream (disambiguation). ... Sindarin is an artificial language (or conlang) developed by J. R. R. Tolkien. ... Gondor is a fictional kingdom in J. R. R. Tolkiens Middle-earth. ... For other uses, see Latin (disambiguation). ... In J. R. R. Tolkiens fictional universe of Middle-earth, Dwarves (also known as the Naugrim) are beings of short stature who all possess beards and are often friendly with Hobbits, although long suspicious of Elves. ... A legendarium is a book or series of books consisting of a collection of legends. ...


References

  1. ^ Manfred Zimmerman, The Origin of Gandalf and Josef Madlener, Mythlore 34 (1983)
  2. ^ IGN
  3. ^ www.glyphweb.com, Encyclopedia of Arda: Greyhame

External links

image This article is about the novel. ... Tolkien redirects here. ... The Fellowship of the Ring is the first of three volumes of the epic novel The Lord of the Rings by the English author J. R. R. Tolkien. ... The Two Towers is the second volume of J. R. R. Tolkiens The Lord of the Rings. ... The Return of the King is the third and final volume of J. R. R. Tolkiens The Lord of the Rings, following The Fellowship of the Ring and The Two Towers. ... This article is about the Peter Jackson films. ... J.R.R. Tolkiens The Lord of the Rings is a 1978 animated fantasy film directed by Ralph Bakshi. ... DVD cover The Return of the King is an animated adaptation of the novel by J. R. R. Tolkien which was released by Rankin/Bass as a TV special in 1980. ... During 1955 and 1956, a condensed radio dramatisation of The Lord of the Rings was broadcast in twelve episodes on BBC Radios the Third Programme. ... In 1979 the US National Public Radio broadcast a radio dramatisation of J. R. R. Tolkiens The Lord of the Rings. ... In 1981 BBC Radio 4 broadcast a dramatisation of J. R. R. Tolkiens The Lord of the Rings in 26 half-hour stereo instalments. ... This article is about the musicals. ... This article is about the musicals. ... This article is about the musicals. ... This article is about the musicals. ... “Frodo” redirects here. ... In J. R. R. Tolkiens legendarium, Samwise Gamgee, later known as Samwise Gardner[2] or Samwise the Brave and commonly known as Sam, is a fictional character who is Frodo Bagginss servant and companion on the journey to Mordor. ... Meriadoc Brandybuck, usually referred to as Merry, is a fictional character from J.R.R. Tolkiens Middle-earth, featured throughout his most famous work, The Lord of the Rings. ... Peregrin Took (T.A. 2990–F.A. 70), better known to his friends as Pippin, is a fictional character from J. R. R. Tolkiens universe of Middle-earth, a Hobbit, and one of Frodo Bagginss youngest but dearest friends. ... Bilbo Baggins (2890 Third Age - ? Fourth Age) is an important character in J. R. R. Tolkiens legendarium. ... Aragorn II is a fictional character from J. R. R Tolkiens Middle-earth legendarium. ... Legolas is a character in J. R. R. Tolkiens legendarium, featured in The Lord of the Rings. ... Gimli is a fictional character from J. R. R. Tolkiens Middle-earth legendarium, featured in The Lord of the Rings. ... Boromir is a supporting character in J. R. R. Tolkiens legendarium. ... This article is about a fictional character from J. R. R. Tolkiens Middle-earth fantasy writings. ... Saruman is a fictional character in J. R. R. Tolkiens Middle-earth legendarium. ... This article is about the fictional character. ... Elrond Half-elven is a fictional character in J. R. R. Tolkiens Middle-earth legendarium. ... In the fiction of J. R. R. Tolkien, Glorfindel is an Elf, a Noldor who appears in the tales of Middle-earth. ... Galadriel is a fictional character created by J. R. R. Tolkien, appearing in The Lord of the Rings. ... In J. R. R. Tolkiens The Lord of the Rings, Théoden was the seventeenth King of Rohan, and last of the Second Line. ... Éomer is a supporting character in J. R. R. Tolkiens legendarium. ... Éowyn (T.A. 2995–F.A. ?), a shieldmaiden of Rohan, is a character in J. R. R. Tolkiens fantasy universe of Middle-earth who appears in his most famous work, The Lord of the Rings. ... Gríma, called (the) Wormtongue, is a fictional character in J.R.R. Tolkiens The Lord of the Rings. ... Faramir is also the name of Ondohers son. ... This article is about the Steward of Gondor in the time of the War of the Ring. ... For the Lord of the Rings character with this name, see Beregond (Captain). ... This article is about the fictional character. ... The Witch-king of Angmar, also known as the Lord of the Nazgûl and the Black Captain among other names, is a fictional character from the novel The Lord of the Rings by J. R. R. Tolkien, set in the fantasy world of Middle-earth. ... Treebeard or (Sindarin) Fangorn is a fictional character from J. R. R. Tolkiens Middle-earth. ... Tom Bombadil is a supporting character in J. R. R. Tolkiens legendarium. ... The Lord of the Rings, an epic high fantasy novel by the British author J. R. R. Tolkien, set in his world of Middle-earth (a fictional past version of our Earth), has been adapted for various media multiple times. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... The works of J. R. R. Tolkien have served as the inspiration to painters, musicians, film-makers and writers, to such an extent that Tolkien is sometimes seen as the father of the entire genre of high fantasy. ... While an immense number of computer and video games owe a great deal to J. R. R. Tolkiens works and the many other works making up the high fantasy settings based upon them, relatively few games have been directly adapted from his world of Middle-earth. ... The music for the The Lord of the Rings film trilogy was composed, orchestrated and conducted by Howard Shore. ... This article is about the book. ... The Adventures of Tom Bombadil is a collection of poetry by J. R. R. Tolkien, published in 1962. ... The Silmarillion is a collection of J. R. R. Tolkiens mythopoeic works, edited and published posthumously by his son Christopher Tolkien in 1977, with assistance from Guy Gavriel Kay, who would later become a noted fantasy fiction writer. ... Unfinished Tales (full title Unfinished Tales of Númenor and Middle-earth) is a collection of stories by J. R. R. Tolkien that were never completed during his lifetime, but were edited by his son Christopher Tolkien and published in 1980. ... The History of Middle-earth is a 12-volume series of books published from 1983-1996, that collect and analyse material relating to the fiction of J. R. R. Tolkien, compiled and edited by his son, Christopher Tolkien. ... The History of The Lord of the Rings is a 4-volume work by Christopher Tolkien that documents the process of J. R. R. Tolkiens writing of his masterwork The Lord of the Rings (LotR). ... Bilbos Last Song is a poem by J. R. R. Tolkien. ... The Children of Húrin (2007) is a completion of a tale by J. R. R. Tolkien begun in 1918. ... The History of The Hobbit, a new study of J. R. R. Tolkien’s The Hobbit, is to be published by Houghtin Mifflin in May and June 2007. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (500x733, 96 KB) Georg von Rosen - Oden som vandringsman, 1886 (Odin, the Wanderer) Artwork from 1886 by Georg von Rosen (1843-1923). ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
TheOneRing.net™ | Movies | Characters | Gandalf (488 words)
Gandalf was the bearer of Narya, the Ring of Fire, given to him by Cirdan when he arrived in Middle Earth.
When Bilbo found the Ring, Gandalf immediately suspected that it was the One Ring, but allowed Bilbo to keep it, for he knew Bilbo to be strong, and innocent: plus he knew no safer place for it, and he dare not be tempted with it himself.
Gandalf was one of the most important people at the Council of Elrond, because he alone knew the full history of Sauron and the Ring.
Gandalf - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (3792 words)
Gandalf was already known to the Hobbits of the Shire as an old conjurer who entertained children with fireworks during festivals and parties.
Gandalf then led the final battle against Sauron's forces at the Black Gate, waging an outnumbered battle to distract the Dark Lord's attention away from Frodo and Sam, who were at the very same moment scaling Mount Doom to destroy the Ring.
Gandalf · Aragorn · Legolas · Gimli · Boromir
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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