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Encyclopedia > Galway
Galway
Gaillimh
Coat of arms of Galway
Laudatio Ejus Manet In Seculum Seculi
"Praise remains for ever"
Location
WGS-84 (GPS) Coordinates:
53°16′22″N 9°02′31″W / 53.2729, -9.0418
Irish Grid Reference
M300256
Statistics
Province: Connacht
County: County Galway
Dáil Éireann: Galway West
European Parliament: North-West
Dialling Code: 091
Postal District(s): G
Area: 50.57 km²
Population (2006) 72,729
City: 72,414
Suburbs: 315
Website: www.galwaycity.ie

Galway (official Irish name: Gaillimh) is the only city in the province of Connacht in the Republic of Ireland. The city is located on the west coast of Ireland. In Irish, Galway is also called Cathair na Gaillimhe, which is a translation of "City of Galway". Image File history File links Rendition of Coat of Arms of Galway, County Galway, Ireland, derived from actual image of coat of arms, image created by Bastique on 27 June 2005. ... Bullet for locations in Ireland, displays location and not area. ... Demonstration map of County Galway map with inset location on island of Ireland. ... GPS redirects here. ... The Irish national grid reference system is a system of geographic grid references commonly used in Ireland. ... When under Gaelic rule, Ireland was divided into provinces to replace the earlier system of the túatha. ... Statistics Area: 17,713. ... For much of its history, the island of Ireland was divided into 32 counties (Irish language contae or condae, pronounced IPA: ). Two historical counties, County Desmond and County Coleraine, no longer exist, while several county names have changed. ... Statistics Province: Connacht County Town: Galway Code: G (GY proposed) Area: 6,148 km² Population (2006) 231,035 (including Galway City); 159,052 (without Galway City) Website: www. ... This article is about the current Irish body. ... The Galway West parliamentary constituency spans the entire area of the western half of the Connacht county, in the heart of the Gaeltacht, taking in the towns of Galway City, Clifden and many other areas. ... Established 1952, as the Common Assembly President Hans-Gert Pöttering (EPP) Since 16 January 2007 Vice-Presidents 14 Rodi Kratsa-Tsagaropoulou (EPP) Alejo Vidal-Quadras (EPP) Gérard Onesta (Greens – EFA) Edward McMillan-Scott (ED) Mario Mauro (EPP) Miguel Angel Martínez Martínez (PES) Luigi Cocilovo (ALDE) Mechtild... North-West is a constituency of the European Parliament in Ireland. ... Subscriber trunk dialling (STD) (also known as Subscriber toll dialling) is an obsolete term for the UK telephone system allowing subscribers to dial trunk calls without operator assistance. ... Postal addresses in Ireland are similar to those in the rest of the English-speaking world, but there is no national post code system. ... This article is about the physical quantity. ... Statistics Area: 17,713. ... Anthem The Soldiers Song Republic of Ireland() – on the European continent() – in the European Union() Capital (and largest city) Dublin Official languages Irish, English Demonym Irish Government Republic and Parliamentary Democracy  -  President Mary McAleese  -  Taoiseach Bertie Ahern, TD Independence from the United Kingdom   -  Declared 24 April 1916   -  Ratified 21... A compass rose with west highlighted This article refers to the cardinal direction; for other uses see West (disambiguation). ...


The city takes its name from the Gaillimh river (River Corrib) that formed the western boundary of the earliest settlement, which was called Dún Bhun na Gaillimhe, or the fort at the bottom of the Gaillimh. The word Gaillimh means "stony" as in "stony river". (Alternative, more mythical, derivations are given in History of Galway). The city also bears the nickname City of the Tribes / Cathair na dTreabh, because fourteen [1] "Tribes" (merchant families) led the city in its Hiberno-Norman period. The term Tribes was originally a derogatory phrase from Cromwellian times. The merchants would have seen themselves as English nobility, and hence were loyal to the King. Their uncertain reaction to the siege of Galway by Cromwellian forces earned them this label, which they subsequently adopted in defiance. The River Corrib (Irish -Gaillimh / Abhainn na Gaillimhe) in the west of Ireland flows from Loch Coirib / Lough Corrib through Galway to Galway Bay. ... Galway, one of the largest cities in Ireland, situated on the west coast of Ireland, has a complex history going back around 800 years. ... EXAMPLE:Laughbox,Blondie,BamBam,Pinkie,etc. ... The Tribes of Galway were fourteen merchant families who dominated the political commercial and social life in the town of Galway between the 13th and 16th centuries. ... The term Hiberno-Norman is used of those Norman lords who settled in Ireland, admitting little if any real fealty to the Anglo-Norman settlers in England. ... The Tribes of Galway were fourteen merchant families who dominated the political commercial and social life in the town of Galway between the 13th and 16th centuries. ... For other uses, see Oliver Cromwell (disambiguation). ...


The population of Galway city, as of the 2006 census, is 72,414. Galway is Ireland's fastest growing city.[2]

Contents

History

Main article: History of Galway
This map of 1651 shows the walled city (North is to the left). The River Corrib is in the foreground, crossed by what is now "O'Briens Bridge", leading to Mainguard Street.
This map of 1651 shows the walled city (North is to the left). The River Corrib is in the foreground, crossed by what is now "O'Briens Bridge", leading to Mainguard Street.

Dún Bhun na Gaillimhe ("Fort at the Mouth (bottom) of the Gaillimh") was constructed in 1124, by the King of Connacht Tairrdelbach mac Ruaidri Ua Conchobair. A small settlement eventually grew up around this fort. During the Norman invasion of Connacht in the 1230s, Galway fort was captured by Richard Mor de Burgh, who had led this invasion. As the de Burghs eventually became gaelicised the merchants of the town pushed for greater control over the walled city. This led to them gaining complete control over the city and the granting of mayoral status by the English crown in December 1484. Galway endured difficult relations with its Irish neighbours. A notice over the west gate of the city, completed in 1562 by Mayor Thomas Oge Martyn fitz William, stated "From the Ferocious O'Flahertys may God protect us". A bye-law forbade the native Irish (as opposed to Galway's Hiberno-Norman citizens) unrestricted access into Galway, saying "neither O' nor Mac shall strutte nor swagger through the streets of Galway" without permission. During the Middle Ages, Galway was ruled by an oligarchy of fourteen[1] merchant families (12 of Norman origin and 2 of Irish origin). These were the 'tribes' of Galway. The city thrived on international trade. In the Middle Ages, it was the principal Irish port for trade with Spain and France. Christopher Columbus is known to have visited Galway, possibly stopping off on a voyage to Iceland or the Faroe Islands. He noted in the margin of one of his books that he had found evidence of land beyond the Atlantic Ocean in or near Galway in 1477.[3] During the 16th and 17th centuries Galway remained loyal to the English crown for the most part, even during the Gaelic resurgence, perhaps for reasons of survival, yet by 1642 the city allied itself with the Catholic Confederation of Kilkenny during the Wars of the Three Kingdoms. During the resulting Cromwellian conquest of Ireland Cromwellian forces captured the city after a nine month siege. At the end of the 17th century the city supported the Jacobites in the Williamite war in Ireland (it supported King James II of England against William of Orange) and was captured by the Williamites after a very short siege not long after the Battle of Aughrim in 1691. The great families of Galway were ruined, the city declined, and it did not fully recover until the great economic boom of the late twentieth century. Galway, one of the largest cities in Ireland, situated on the west coast of Ireland, has a complex history going back around 800 years. ... Download high resolution version (947x668, 421 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Download high resolution version (947x668, 421 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... The River Corrib (Irish -Gaillimh / Abhainn na Gaillimhe) in the west of Ireland flows from Loch Coirib / Lough Corrib through Galway to Galway Bay. ... The Kings of Connacht were rulers of the cóiced (variously translated as portion, fifth, province) of Connacht, which lies west of the River Shannon, Ireland. ... Tairrdelbach mac Ruaidri Ua Conchobair (1088-1156), whose name is often anglicised to Turlough O Connor, was King of Connacht and became the first High King of Ireland from west of the Shannon in centuries. ... Norman conquests in red. ... Richard Mor de Burgh, eldest son of William de Burgh; born about 1194, died 1242. ... The defensive wall of Braşov, Romania. ... OFlaherty is a major Irish clan, originally called the Muintir Murchada, of which the name Ua Flaithbertaig became the name of its ruling dynasty. ... The term Hiberno-Norman is used of those Norman lords who settled in Ireland, admitting little if any real fealty to the Anglo-Norman settlers in England. ... Norman conquests in red. ... The Middle Ages formed the middle period in a traditional schematic division of European history into three ages: the classical civilization of Antiquity, the Middle Ages, and modern times, beginning with the Renaissance. ... Christopher Columbus (1451 – May 20, 1506) was a navigator and colonialist who is one of the first Europeans to discover the Americas, after the Vikings. ... Kilkenny Castle, where the Confederate General Assembly met. ... The Wars of the Three Kingdoms were an intertwined series of conflicts that took place in Scotland, Ireland, and England between 1639 and 1651 at a time when these countries had come under the Personal Rule of the same monarch. ... Combatants English Royalists and Irish Catholic Confederate troops English Parliamentarian New Model Army troops and allied Protestants in Ireland Commanders James Butler, 1st Duke of Ormonde (1649 - Dec. ... Combatants Irish Confederate Catholics English Parliamentarians New Model Army and Protestant settlers from Ulster Commanders Thomas Preston Charles Coote Strength 2000 soldiers and civilian population, 3000 more soldiers nearby 6-7000 men, Galway a port city in western Ireland, was besieged from August 1651 to May 1652 during the Cromwellian... Charles Edward Stuart, Bonnie Prince Charlie, wearing the Jacobite blue bonnet Jacobitism was (and, to a very limited extent, remains) the political movement dedicated to the restoration of the Stuart kings to the thrones of England and Scotland. ... For the context of this war see Jacobitism and Glorious Revolution. ... James II (14 October 1633 – 16 September 1701)[1] became King of England, King of Scots,[2] and King of Ireland on 6 February 1685. ... William III of England, II of Scotland and III of Orange (The Hague, 14 November 1650 – Kensington Palace, 8 March 1702) was a Dutch aristocrat, the Prince of Orange from his birth, Stadtholder of the main provinces of the Dutch Republic from 28 June 1672, King of England and King... The Battle of Aughrim was the decisive battle of the Williamite war in Ireland. ...


Demographics

The population of Galway city and environs is 72,729 (based on the 2006 census carried out by the CSO), of which 72,414 live in the city limits and 315 live in the city's environs in County Galway. [4] The population of the city, if the current growth rate continues, will hit 100,000 by 2020. [5] Large signs like these are often posted on arterial roads at the city limits of wealthy American cities. ... Statistics Province: Connacht County Town: Galway Code: G (GY proposed) Area: 6,148 km² Population (2006) 231,035 (including Galway City); 159,052 (without Galway City) Website: www. ...


Galway City (that is, the population inside the city limits) is the third largest in the Republic of Ireland, or fifth on the island of Ireland. However, the population of the wider urban area, is fourth largest in the Republic of Ireland (sixth on the island) after Dublin, (Belfast,) Cork, Limerick (and Derry). Greater Dublin Area (GDA) is a loosely defined term which is used to describe the city of Dublin and the counties of Dun Laoghaire-Rathdown, Fingal, Kildare, Meath, South Dublin and Wicklow of the Republic of Ireland. ... Greater Belfast is an area surrounding and including Belfast in Northern Ireland. ... Metropolitan Cork refers to the city of Cork, its suburbs and the satellite towns that feed into it. ... For other uses, see Limerick (disambiguation). ... The Derry Urban Area is the urban area that includes and surrounds the city or Derry/Londonderry in County Derry/County Londonderry in Ireland. ...

Shop Street, the city's main thoroughfare.
Shop Street, the city's main thoroughfare.

The population of Galway is largely descended from a mix native Celtic tribes and of Flemish and Norman settlers. In recent years Galway has attracted a sizeable immigrant community, largely from Poland and other Central European and Baltic States states such as Latvia and Lithuania, many of whom work in the service industry. Small but growing Nigerian and Filipino communities has also attracted cultural and religious diversity to this West coast city. Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2592 × 1944 pixels, file size: 525 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) (All user names refer to en. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2592 × 1944 pixels, file size: 525 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) (All user names refer to en. ... Celts, normally pronounced // (see article on pronunciation), is widely used to refer to the members of any of the peoples in Europe using the Celtic languages or descended from those who did. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Norman conquests in red. ... Immigration is the act of moving to or settling in another country or region, temporarily or permanently. ... Central Europe The Alpine Countries and the Visegrád Group (Political map, 2004) Central Europe is the region lying between the variously and vaguely defined areas of Eastern and Western Europe. ... See: West Coast of the United States West Coast, New Zealand West Coast, Tasmania This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ...


At the time of the 2002 Census, 16.3% of the population were aged 0 to 14; 75.5% were aged 15 to 64, and 8.2% were aged 65 and above. Also, 52.9% of the population were female and 47.1% were male. The part of the city with the highest population density was the Claddagh (5,756 people per km²), and the area with the lowest density was Ballybrit (823 people per km²).[6] The Claddagh on a cold January day The Claddagh was once a fishing village located just outside the walls of Galway city where the Corrib River meets Galway Bay. ...


Climate

Climate chart for Galway, Ireland
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temperatures in °Cprecipitation totals in mm

Galway, like the whole of Ireland, experiences a year-round mild, moist, balmy and changeable climate, due to the prevailing winds of the Gulf Stream. The city experiences a lack of temperature extremes, with temperatures below 0 °C (32 °F) and above 30 °C (86 °F) being rare, though not unheard of. The city receives an average of 1,147 mm (45.2") of precipitation annually, which is evenly distributed throughout the year. Rain is the most common form of precipitation - hail, sleet and snow are rare in the city, though will sometimes be experienced during particularly cold winters. Galway is also consistently humid, with humidity normally ranging from 70% to 100% every day, and this can lead to heavy showers, and even thunderstorms breaking out when drier east winds, originating in the European continent, clash with this humidity in the late Summer in particular. Mild can refer to A type of beer popular in the UK - the opposite of bitter. ... Moist was a five-piece Canadian alternative rock band that was popular in the mid-to-late-1990s. ... For the album by Ocean Colour Scene, see North Atlantic Drift (album) The Gulf Stream is orange and yellow in this representation of water temperatures of the Atlantic. ... A year (from Old English gÄ“r) is the time between two recurrences of an event related to the orbit of the Earth around the Sun. ... This article is about precipitation. ... This article is about the precipitation. ... Sleet is a term used in a variety of ways to describe precipitation intermediate between rain and snow but distinct from hail. ... For other uses, see Snow (disambiguation). ... Humidity is the quantity of moisture in the air. ... A thunderstorm, also called an electrical storm or lightning storm, is a form of weather characterized by the presence of lightning and its attendant thunder produced from a cumulonimbus cloud. ... For other uses, see Wind (disambiguation). ... Continental Europe refers to the continent of Europe, explicitly excluding European islands and peninsulae. ...


The average January temperature in the city is 6.8 °C (40.6 °F) and the average July temperature is 16.0 °C (60.8 °F). This means that Galway is said to have a Maritime Temperate climate (Cfb) according to the Köppen climate classification system. The Köppen climate classification is one of the most widely used climate classification systems. ...


Extreme weather is rare, though the city and county can sometimes experience severe windstorms that are the result of vigorous Atlantic depressions that occasionally pass along the north west coast of Ireland. Most of these storms, however, happen between late autumn and early spring inclusive, being quite rare at other times of the year. Trends in natural disasters, Pascal Peduzzi (2004) Is climate change increasing the frequency of hazardous events? Environment Times UNEP/GRID-Arendal Extreme weather includes weather phenomena that are at the extremes of the historical distribution, especially severe or unseasonal weather. ... A case of extremely rapid cyclogenesis A European windstorm is a severe cyclonic storm that tracks across the North Atlantic towards northwestern Europe in the winter months. ... A large low-pressure system swirls off the southwestern coast of Iceland, illustrating the maxim that nature abhors a vacuum. ...


Due to the city's north-westerly location, Galway boasts long Summer days, with it daylight before 04:00 and not getting truly dark until after 23:00 during the midsummer period; however, the opposite is true in midwinter, when daylight does not truly start until 09.00, and is gone by 16:00. Midsummer may refer to the period of time centered upon the summer solstice and the diverse celebrations of it around the world, but more often refers to European celebrations that accompany the summer solstice, or to Western festivals that take place in June and are usually related to Saint John... Illumination of Earth by Sun on the day of the northern winter solstice In astronomy, the winter solstice is the moment when the earth is at a point in its orbit where one hemisphere is most inclined away from the sun. ...


Due to the mild, moist climate, Galway is able to support plantlife not usually found at such high latitudes, such as palm trees and even fig trees.[7] Plantlife is a U.K. plant conservation charity. ... Genera Many; see list of Arecaceae genera Arecaceae (also known as Palmae or Palmaceae), the palm family, is a family of flowering plants, belonging to the monocot order Arecales. ... Species About 800, including: Ficus altissima Ficus americana Ficus aurea Ficus benghalensis - Indian Banyan Ficus benjamina - Weeping Fig Ficus broadwayi Ficus carica - Common Fig Ficus citrifolia Ficus drupacea Ficus elastica Ficus godeffroyi Ficus grenadensis Ficus hartii Ficus lyrata Ficus macbrideii Ficus microcarpa - Chinese Banyan Ficus nota Ficus obtusifolia Ficus palmata...


Politics

City Council

Main article: Galway City Council
Cannon at Eyre Square, Galway The cannon were presented to the Connaught Rangers at the end of the Crimean War (1854-1856) in recognition of their military achievements.
Cannon at Eyre Square, Galway The cannon were presented to the Connaught Rangers at the end of the Crimean War (1854-1856) in recognition of their military achievements.

Services such as rubbish collection, recycling, traffic control, parks and housing are controlled by a fifteen member city council elected to five year terms by proportional representation, the next such election is due in June 2009. The make-up of the current city council following is: The introduction of this article does not provide enough context for readers unfamiliar with the subject. ... Image File history File links Galway_cannons. ... The Connaught Rangers (the Devils Own) was a regiment of the British Army, raised in 1793 from the men of Connacht by John Thomas de Burgh, 13th Earl of Clanricard. ... Combatants Allies: Second French Empire British Empire Ottoman Empire Kingdom of Sardinia Russian Empire Bulgarian volunteers Casualties 90,000 French 35,000 Turkish 17,500 British 2,194 Sardinian killed, wounded and died of disease ~134,000 killed, wounded and died of disease The Crimean War (1853–1856) was fought... A city council is the most common style of legislative government in a city or town. ... Proportional representation (sometimes referred to as full representation, or PR), is a category of electoral formula aiming at a close match between the percentage of votes that groups of candidates (grouped by a certain measure) obtain in elections and the percentage of seats they receive (usually in legislative assemblies). ...

The changes since the 2004 results include Cllr. Michael Crowe joining Fianna Fáil, Cllr. Cathriene Connolly leaving Labour and Cllr. Danny Callanan leaving Sinn Féin. The Labour Party (Irish: Páirtí an Lucht Oibre) is a social democratic political party in the Republic of Ireland. ... Fine Gael – The United Ireland Party, usually referred to as Fine Gael (IPA: , though often anglicised to ; approximate English translation: Family/Tribe of the Irish, is the second largest political party in the Republic of Ireland with a membership of over 34,000, and is the largest opposition party in... The Progressive Democrats (Irish An Páirtí Daonlathach, lit. ... Fianna Fáil – The Republican Party (Irish: ), commonly referred to as Fianna Fáil (IPA ; traditionally translated by the party into English as Soldiers of Destiny, though the actual meaning is Soldiers [Fianna] of Ireland[1]), is currently the largest political party in Ireland with 55,000 members. ... The Green Party (Irish: ; lit. ...


Mayoralty

Main article: Mayor of Galway

The City Council is chaired by a mayor who is elected to a one year term by their fellow councillors. Their role is mainly ceremonial, although they do have the casting vote. The current mayor is Cllr. Tom Costello who was elected Mayor of Galway on June 18, 2007. The Mayor of Galway have existed, with a break of ninety-seven years, since the office was inaugurated in December 1485 as the result of a patent solicited by merchants of Galway from King Richard III in London. ... A mayor (from the Latin māior, meaning larger, greater) is the modern title of the highest ranking municipal officer. ... is the 169th day of the year (170th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ...


Deputies

Galway City is part of the Galway West constituency of Dáil Éireann. Its TDs are: The Galway West parliamentary constituency spans the entire area of the western half of the Connacht county, in the heart of the Gaeltacht, taking in the towns of Galway City, Clifden and many other areas. ... This article is about the current Irish body. ... A Teachta Dála (Irish for Dáil Deputy, pronounced chock-ta dawla) is a member of Dáil Éireann, the lower chamber of the Irish Oireachtas or National Parliament. ...

Noel Grealish is an Irish Progressive Democrat politician. ... The Progressive Democrats (Irish An Páirtí Daonlathach, lit. ... Michael D. Higgins (April 18, 1941), known in Irish as Micheál D. Ó hUigínn, or informally as Michael D. , is an Irish Labour Party politician. ... Logo of the Irish Labour Party The Irish Labour Party (Irish: Páirti an Lucht Oibre) is the third largest political party in the Republic of Ireland. ... The Minister for Community, Rural and Gaeltacht Affairs is the senior minister at the Department of Community, Rural and Gaeltacht Affairs (An Roinn Gnóthaí Pobail, Tuaithe agus Gaeltachta) in the Irish Government. ... Éamon Ó Cuív (born June 23, 1950) is a senior Irish Fianna Fáil politician and is currently the Minister for Community, Rural & Gaeltacht Affairs. ... Fianna Fáil – The Republican Party (Irish: ), commonly referred to as Fianna Fáil (IPA ; traditionally translated by the party into English as Soldiers of Destiny, though the actual meaning is Soldiers [Fianna] of Ireland[1]), is currently the largest political party in Ireland with 55,000 members. ... The Minister for Community, Rural and Gaeltacht Affairs is the senior minister at the Department of Community, Rural and Gaeltacht Affairs (An Roinn Gnóthaí Pobail, Tuaithe agus Gaeltachta) in the Irish Government. ... Frank Fahey (born 1951) is an Irish Fianna Fáil politician. ... Pádraic McCormack is an Irish Fine Gael politician and is currently a TD for Galway West constituency. ... Fine Gael – The United Ireland Party, usually referred to as Fine Gael (IPA: , though often anglicised to ; approximate English translation: Family/Tribe of the Irish, is the second largest political party in the Republic of Ireland with a membership of over 34,000, and is the largest opposition party in...

Economy

Galway Chamber

Galway City, capital of Connacht, is the third largest city in the Republic of Ireland after Dublin and Cork. The City has experienced phenomenal growth in recent years. Galway City has a strong local economy with complementary business sectors, including manufacturing industry, tourism, retail and distribution, education, healthcare and services that include financial, construction, cultural, and professional. Statistics Area: 17,713. ... For other uses, see Dublin (disambiguation). ... This article is about the city in the Republic of Ireland. ...


Employment

Most (47%) of the people employed in Galway work in either the commerce or professional sector; with a large number (17%) also employed in manufacturing. Most industry and manufacturing in Galway, like the rest of Ireland, is hi-tech (e.g. ICT, medical equipment, electronics, chemicals, etc.), due to the Celtic Tiger economic boom. Tourism is also of major importance to the city, which had over 2.1 million visitors in 2000, and produced revenue of over €400 million. [8] This article does not cite any references or sources. ... This article is about people called professionals. ... High tech refers to high technology, technology that is at the cutting-edge and the most advanced currently available. ... Information technology (IT) or information and communication technology (ICT) is the technology required for information processing. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... This article is about the engineering discipline. ... A chemical substance is any material substance used in or obtained by a process in chemistry: A chemical compound is a substance consisting of two or more chemical elements that are chemically combined in fixed proportions. ... Cartoon of the Celtic Tiger. ...

Galway Harbour.
Galway Harbour.
Employment by Sector[9] 2002 %
Agriculture & Mining 200 1%
Building & Construction 1,686 6%
Manufacturing, Electrical, Gas & Water 4,679 17%
Commerce 7,615 27%
Transport 1,199 4%
Public Administration & Defence 1,452 5%
Professional 5,552 20%
Other 5,805 21%
Total 28,188 100%

Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2592 × 1944 pixel, file size: 630 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Taken by myself in February 2007. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2592 × 1944 pixel, file size: 630 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Taken by myself in February 2007. ...

Culture

Eyre Square is at the centre of Galway and a major meeting point.
Eyre Square is at the centre of Galway and a major meeting point.

Galway is often considered to be the 'Cultural Capital of Ireland', and is world renowned for its vibrant lifestyle and numerous festivals, celebrations and events. Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2592 × 1944 pixels, file size: 568 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Taken by me, August 2007. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2592 × 1944 pixels, file size: 568 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Taken by me, August 2007. ... Eyre Square (Irish: An Fhaiche Mhór) is an inner-city public park in Galway, Ireland. ...


In 2004, there were three dance organisations, ten festival companies, two film organisations, two Irish language organisations, 23 musical organisations, twelve theatre companies, two visual arts groups and four writers' groups based in the city. [10]


Furthermore, there were 51 venues for events; most of which were specialised for a certain field (e.g. concert venues or visual arts galleries), though ten were described as being 'multiple event' venues. [10]


Major squares in the city include Eyre Square, in the very centre of the city; and Spanish Parade, next to Spanish Arch. Eyre Square (Irish: An Fhaiche Mhór) is an inner-city public park in Galway, Ireland. ... The Spanish Arch, which is located on the banks of the river Corrib, was built in 1584. ...


Irish language and Culture

Main article: Culture of Ireland

Galway city has a reputation amongst Irish cities for being associated with the Irish language, music, song and dancing traditions - it is sometimes referred to as the 'Bilingual Capital of Ireland', although like all other cities in the Republic of Ireland, the vast bulk of the city's inhabitants converse mostly in English. The city is well known for its ‘Irishness’, mainly due to the fact that it has on its doorstep the Galway Gaeltacht. Irish theatre, television and radio production and Irish music form a component of Galway city life, with both An Taibhdhearc, the National Irish Language Theatre, in Galway city centre, while TG4 and RTÉ Raidió na Gaeltachta headquarters are in the Connemara Gaeltacht in County Galway. Four electoral divisions, or neighbourhoods (out of twenty-two), are designated as Gaeltachtaí. [10] A page from the Book of Kells. ... There are officially eleven cities in Ireland between the two jurisdictions in Ireland, five of these in Northern Ireland and six of them in the Republic of Ireland. ... This article is about the modern Goidelic language. ... Ireland is an island in the North Atlantic politically divided between the Republic of Ireland and Northern Ireland. ... Gaeltacht regions in Ireland Gaeltacht (pronounced ; plural Gaeltachtaí) is an Irish word for an Irish-speaking region. ... Serge Sudeikins poster for the Bat Theatre (1922). ... Taibhdhearc na Gaillimhe, also referred to as An Taibhdhearc (pron. ... TG4 (Irish: TG Ceathair or TG a Ceathair; IPA: /tiː dÊ’iː kʲahəɾʲ/) is a television channel in Ireland, aimed at Irish-language speakers and established as a wholly owned subsidiary by Radio Telefís Éireann on 31 October 1996. ... RTÉ Raidió na Gaeltachta (RnaG; Irish for Radio of the Gaeltacht) is the Irish-language radio service of Radio Telefís Éireann (RTÉ) in Ireland, and is available on 92-94FM in Ireland and via the Internet. ... Gaeltacht, plural Gaeltachtaí, is an Irish word for an Irish-speaking region. ...


Architecture

Galway Cathedral, opened in 1965
Galway Cathedral, opened in 1965

Probably the finest medieval town house in Ireland, Lynch's Castle is in Shop Street; it is now a branch of the Allied Irish Bank. Image File history File links Cathedral of Our Lady Assumed into Heaven and St Nicholas, Galway, Eire File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File links Cathedral of Our Lady Assumed into Heaven and St Nicholas, Galway, Eire File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Cathedral of Our Lady Assumed into Heaven and St Nicholas Galway Cathedral is a Catholic Cathedral located in the city of Galway, dedicated to Our Lady Assumed into Heaven and St Nicholas by Cardinal Richard Cushing in 1965. ... Allied Irish Banks plc (AIB),(ISE: ALBK) , (LSE: ALBK) , (NYSE: AIB), (Ireland not to be mistaken for Anglo Irish Bank. ...


The Church of Ireland St. Nicholas' Collegiate Church is the largest remaining medieval church still in use in Ireland. It was founded in 1320 and enlarged in the following two centuries. It is a particularly pleasant building in the heart of the old city. Its Roman Catholic counterpart, the Cathedral of Our Lady Assumed into Heaven and St Nicholas, which was consecrated in 1965, is a far larger, more imposing building constructed from limestone. It has an eclectic style, with renaissance dome, pillars and round arches, and a Romanesque portico that dominates the main facade — an unusual feature in modern Irish church building. It was suggested by a church in the city of Salamanca in Spain. Not far from the cathedral stands the original quadrangle building of National University of Ireland, Galway which was erected in 1849 (during An Gorta Mór, the Great Hunger) as one of the three colleges of the Queen's University of Ireland (along with Queen's University Belfast and University College Cork). The university holds the UNESCO archive of spoken material for the Celtic languages. The Church of Ireland (Irish: ) is an autonomous province of the Anglican Communion, operating seamlessly across the border between the Republic of Ireland and Northern Ireland. ... The Collegiate Church of St. ... The Roman Catholic Church, most often spoken of simply as the Catholic Church, is the largest Christian church, with over one billion members. ... Cathedral of Our Lady Assumed into Heaven and St Nicholas Galway Cathedral is a Catholic Cathedral located in the city of Galway, dedicated to Our Lady Assumed into Heaven and St Nicholas by Cardinal Richard Cushing in 1965. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... This article is about the European Renaissance of the 14th-17th centuries. ... South transept of Tournai Cathedral, Belgium, 12th century. ... Categories: Architectural elements | Stub ... Salamanca (population 160,000) is a city in western Spain, the capital of the province of Salamanca, which belongs to the autonomous community (region) of Castile-Leon (Castilla y León). ... Quadrangle of University of Sydney In architecture, a quadrangle, or more colloquially, quad, is a space or courtyard, usually square or rectangular in plan, the sides of which are entirely or mainly occupied by parts of a large building. ... The National University of Ireland, Galway (NUI, Galway) (Irish Ollscoil na hÉireann, Gaillimh or OÉ, Gaillimh) can trace its existence to 1845 as Queens College, Galway and was known until recently as University College, Galway (UCG) (Irish: Coláiste na hOllscoile, Gaillimh or COG). ... Starvation during the famine The Great Famine or the Great Hunger (Irish: An Gorta Mór or An Drochshaol), known more commonly outside of Ireland as the Irish Potato Famine, is the name given to a famine in Ireland between 1845 and 1849. ... The Queens University of Ireland was established formally by Royal Charter on September 3, 1850 as the degree awarding university of the Queens Colleges of Belfast, Cork, and Galway that were established in 1845 to afford a university education to members of all religious denominations in Ireland. ... Queens University Belfast is a university in Belfast, Northern Ireland and a member of the Russell Group (a lobby group of major research universities in the United Kingdom). ... University College Cork - National University of Ireland, Cork - or more commonly University College Cork (UCC) - is a constituent university of the National University of Ireland located in Cork City. ... UNESCO (United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization) is a specialized agency of the United Nations established in 1945. ... The Celtic languages are the languages descended from Proto-Celtic, or Common Celtic, a branch of the greater Indo-European language family. ...


Museum

Main article: Galway City Museum

Recently, The Galway City Museum has been opened, featuring two parts: "Fragments of a City" and "On Reflection." "Fragments of a City" is be mainly about the heritage of Galway, while "On Reflection" is a collection of the most important Irish artists from the second half of the 20th century. This museum was designed to allow tourists and local visitors to really get to understand and know the city of Galway. This museum also houses the statue of the famous poet, Pádraic Ó Conaire which was originally in Kennedy Park, prior to its renovations The Galway City Museum is a museum in Galway City, County Galway, Ireland. ... The Galway City Museum is a museum in Galway City, County Galway, Ireland. ... Pádraic Ó Conaire (February 28, 1882 – October 6, 1928) was an Irish writer and journalist whose production was primarily in the Irish language. ...


Events

Annual events include the:

Scene from the Galway Arts Festival Parade 2007
Scene from the Galway Arts Festival Parade 2007

Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 442 pixelsFull resolution (2916 × 1611 pixels, file size: 908 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) A scene from the Galway Arts Festival 2007 Credit: A Peter Clarke image I, the copyright holder of this work, hereby release it into the... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 442 pixelsFull resolution (2916 × 1611 pixels, file size: 908 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) A scene from the Galway Arts Festival 2007 Credit: A Peter Clarke image I, the copyright holder of this work, hereby release it into the... The Galway Arts Festival takes place in Galway, Ireland every July. ... Imbolc is one of the four principal festivals of the Irish calendar, celebrated either at the beginning of February or at the first local signs of Spring. ... The Galway Arts Festival takes place in Galway, Ireland every July. ... The Galway Races is a Horse-racing festival that takes place for a week starting on the last Monday in July. ... The Galway International Oyster Festival is a food festival held annually in Galway during September, the first month of the oyster season. ...

Theatre

Galway has a permanent Irish language theatre located in the city centre, Taibhdhearc na Gaillimhe, which has produced some of Ireland's most celebrated actors. The Druid Theatre Company has won international acclaim for its cutting edge production and direction. This article is about the modern Goidelic language. ... Taibhdhearc na Gailimhe, also referred to as An Taibhdhearc (pron. ... The Druid Theatre Company, founded in Galway in 1975, was the first Irish professional theatre company to be established outside Dublin. ...


In addition it also has the Town Hall Theatre, a state of the art theatre, that was opened in 1993. It is a 52 week program that covers all aspects of the performing arts including: concerts, ballets, musicals, operas, etc. It has also been the venue for many popular Irish film premieres, during the famous Galway Film Fleadh.


Education

Main article: Education in Ireland

Two higher education institutions are located in the city, the National University of Ireland, Galway and the Galway-Mayo Institute of Technology. The Institute of Technology, in addition to having 2 campuses in Galway City (its administrative headquarters on the Dublin Road and its art campus in Cluain Mhuire), also has campuses in Castlebar, Mountbellew and Letterfrack. According to the 2002 census, 40.8% of residents aged 15 and older in Galway had completed third level (higher) education, which compares favourably to the national level of 26.0%. The Republic of Irelands education system is quite similar to that of most other western countries. ... The National University of Ireland, Galway (NUI, Galway) (Irish Ollscoil na hÉireann, Gaillimh or OÉ, Gaillimh) can trace its existence to 1845 as Queens College, Galway and was known until recently as University College, Galway (UCG) (Irish: Coláiste na hOllscoile, Gaillimh or COG). ... Galway-Mayo Institute of Technology (GMIT) formerly Regional Technical College, Galway is an Institute of Technology based in Galway, Ireland with centers throughout County Galway and County Mayo. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Letterfrack (Leitir Fraic in Irish) is a small village in Connemara in Ireland founded by the Quakers in the mid-19th century. ... Refers to University studies in Ireland. ...


The offices of the Central Applications Office are also located in the city, this is the clearing house for undergraduate college and university applications in the Republic of Ireland; a related organisation, the Postgraduate Applications Centre processes some taught postgraduate courses. The Central Applications Office (CAO) is the organisation responsible for overseeing most undergraduate applications in the Republic of Ireland, the Postgraduate Applications Centre is a related organisation that oversees some taught postgraduate courses. ... A clearing house (or clearinghouse) is an organization affiliated with a securities or derivatives exchange that completes the transactions on that exchange by seeing to validation, delivery, and settlement. ... In some educational systems, undergraduate education is post-secondary education up to the level of a Bachelors degree. ... Postgraduate Applications Centre (PAC) is an organisation that processes entry into certain taught postgraduate courses in the Republic of Ireland. ... Quaternary education or postgraduate education is the fourth-stage educational level which follows the completion of an undergraduate degree at a college or university. ...


In 2002, there were 27 primary schools and 11 secondary schools in Galway.[11]. St. Mary's College, founded in 1912, was the former Catholic diocesan junior seminary and recently ended its boarding provision.

Educational Attainment (Aged 15+)[11] 2002 %
None/Not Stated 2,760 4.3%
Primary 4,938 12.1%
Lower Secondary 5,915 14.5%
Upper Secondary 11,540 28.3%
Third Level 15,549 40.8%
Total 40,702 100%

Other

The powerful River Corrib flows through the city from Lough Corrib, with many mill races and a canal to the sea. This picture (from the Claddagh) has the canal dock in the foreground, then the river (below sight line), Spanish Parade and on to the cathedral dome.
The powerful River Corrib flows through the city from Lough Corrib, with many mill races and a canal to the sea. This picture (from the Claddagh) has the canal dock in the foreground, then the river (below sight line), Spanish Parade and on to the cathedral dome.

The Claddagh Ring is associated with the Claddagh, a fishing village located just outside the old walls of the Galway city. Image copied from Wiki de:galway Taken from the Claddagh basin (at the end of the Eglinton Canal) with back to the Claddagh. ... Image copied from Wiki de:galway Taken from the Claddagh basin (at the end of the Eglinton Canal) with back to the Claddagh. ... The River Corrib (Irish -Gaillimh / Abhainn na Gaillimhe) in the west of Ireland flows from Loch Coirib / Lough Corrib through Galway to Galway Bay. ... A map of Lough Corrib taken from the Admiralty Chart made in 1846 Lough Corrib (Loch Coirib in Irish) is a lake in the west of Ireland. ... Claddagh Ring The Claddagh Ring is a traditional Irish ring, given in friendship or worn as a wedding ring. ... The Claddagh on a cold January day The Claddagh was once a fishing village located just outside the walls of Galway city where the Corrib River meets Galway Bay. ...


A "Galway Hooker" is a traditional boat native to Galway. Is also the name of a new local micro-brewed beer. Galway is mentioned in the television series Buffy the Vampire Slayer and Angel. It was the hometown of Angel and the place where he became a vampire. The Galway Hooker is a traditional sailing boat used in Galway Bay off the west coast of Ireland. ... For other uses, see Buffy the Vampire Slayer (disambiguation). ... For the South Korean TV series of the same name, see Angel (2007 TV series). ... Angel (also known as Angelus, originally Liam) (born 1727 in Galway, Ireland) is a fictional character created by Joss Whedon and David Greenwalt for the television programs Buffy the Vampire Slayer and Angel. ...


Infrastructure

According to the 2002 census, the most popular way by which Galwegians travel to work and school was by car (49.3%), followed by foot (29.6%), bus (9.2%), bike (4.1%), motorbike (0.7%) and train (0.3%). The remaining 6.8% travelled by other means or didn't state how. [12]


Airport

Galway Airport, 6 kilometres east of the city, has frequent flights throughout Ireland, Britain and Mainland Europe. Galway Airport (IATA: GWY, ICAO: EICM), or Aerphort na Gaillimhe in Irish, is located at Carnmore about 6. ... Continental Europe refers to the continent of Europe, explicitly excluding European islands and peninsulae. ...


Aerfort na Minna, 22 kilometres west of the city, operates reqular flights to each of the Oileáin Árann. Aerfort na Minna (IATA: NNR, ICAO: EICA), often known as Connemara Regional Airport in English, is the base for Aer Arann Islands, a division of Aer Arann. ... http://www. ...


Shannon Airport (90 kilometres) and Ireland West Airport Knock (86 kilometres) are also within easy reach of the city, both of which have frequent flights around Ireland and to Britain, Europe and North America. Shannon Airport (IATA: SNN, ICAO: EINN), or Aerfort na Sionna in Irish is an airport in Ireland. ... Ireland West Airport Knock (IATA: NOC, ICAO: EIKN) or Aerfort na Connacht in Irish, is located near Charlestown, County Mayo, Ireland. ... North America North America is a continent[1] in the Earths northern hemisphere and (chiefly) western hemisphere. ...


Buses

There are two companies providing bus services throughout the city - Bus Éireann and Galway City Direct. There are 16 bus routes serving the city and its suburbs altogether - Bus Éireann operates 11 routes, while Galway City Direct runs 5 routes. In February 2007, Bus Éireann announced a major expansion plan for the city, including more routes, more buses and higher frequencies. [13] This is part of the €1 billion Ceannt Station Quarter and public transport development plan. [14] Bus Éireann, or Irish Bus, provides bus services in the Republic of Ireland with the exception of those operated entirely within the Dublin Region, which are provided by Dublin Bus. ...


Waterways

The River Corrib is by far the most important waterway in Galway. In order to reduce the river from flooding, many canals where built in the city to both divert and control the water from the river, as part of two major schemes - one between 1848 and 1858 and the other during the 1950s. The canals provided a power source for Galway and were the location of the first industries in the mid-19th century. Most of the mills are still used today for various purposes; for instance, NUIG still use a mill for electricity generation for their building on Nun's Island. The River Corrib (Irish -Gaillimh / Abhainn na Gaillimhe) in the west of Ireland flows from Loch Coirib / Lough Corrib through Galway to Galway Bay. ... The National University of Ireland, Galway (NUI, Galway) (Irish Ollscoil na hÉireann, Gaillimh or OÉ, Gaillimh) can trace its existence to 1845 as Queens College, Galway and was known until recently as University College, Galway (UCG) (Irish: Coláiste na hOllscoile, Gaillimh or COG). ...


Currently, there are four bridges across the Corrib: the William O'Brien Bridge, the Salmon Weir Bridge, the Wolfe Tone Bridge and the Quincentennial Bridge. There are plans for a fifth bridge as part of the Galway City Outer Bypass project.


Railway

Galway's main railway (and bus) station is Ceannt Station, which opened on 1 August 1851[15] and which is about to get a major redevelopment, complete with a completely new urban district - Ceannt Station Quarter.[16][17] Rail services in Ireland are provided by Iarnród Éireann in the Republic of Ireland and by Northern Ireland Railways in Northern Ireland. ... Galway railway station Serves the city of Galway in County Galway Category: ... is the 213th day of the year (214th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1851 (MDCCCLI) was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Friday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... The Ceannt Station Quarter (Irish: Ceantar Stáisiún Cheannt) is a planned urban quarter for the city of Galway, County Galway, Ireland. ...

The remains of Galway to Clifden Railway line bridge at Galway City over the River Corrib
The remains of Galway to Clifden Railway line bridge at Galway City over the River Corrib

The Midland Great Western Railway (MGW) reached Galway in 1851, giving the city a direct main line to its Broadstone Station terminus in Dublin. Image File history File links Size of this preview: 580 × 600 pixels Full resolution (843 × 872 pixel, file size: 179 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) The remains of the Galway to Clifden Railway line bridge in Galway city. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 580 × 600 pixels Full resolution (843 × 872 pixel, file size: 179 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) The remains of the Galway to Clifden Railway line bridge in Galway city. ... The River Corrib (Irish -Gaillimh / Abhainn na Gaillimhe) in the west of Ireland flows from Loch Coirib / Lough Corrib through Galway to Galway Bay. ... The Midland Great Western Railway (MGWR) main line extended from Broadstone in Dublin to the Midlands (Athlone) and onwards to Galway and Clifden in what is now the Republic of Ireland. ... Broadstone railway station, (Irish: Stáisiún An Clochán Leathan), the former Dublin terminus of the Midland Great Western Railway, is currently the headquarters of Bus Eireann, housing most of their administration and also one of their main garages. ... Terminal Station was also the name of a railway station in Chattanooga, Tennessee; see Chattanooga Choo Choo. ... For other uses, see Dublin (disambiguation). ...


As the 19th century progressed the rail network in Connacht was expanded, making Galway an important railhead. The nearby town of Athenry became a railway junction, giving Galway links to Limerick and the south in 1869 and Sligo and the north in 1894. In 1895 the MGW opened a branch line between Galway and Clifden. Statistics Area: 17,713. ... A Railhead is a terminus of a railway line that interfaces with another tranport mode, for example shipping. ... WGS-84 (GPS) Coordinates: 53. ... For other uses, see Limerick (disambiguation). ... WGS-84 (GPS) Coordinates: , Irish Grid Reference G685354 Statistics Province: Connacht County: Elevation: 13 m Population (2006)  - Town:  - Rural:   17,892 [1]  24,096[1] Website: www. ... The Midland Great Western Railway (MGWR) main line extended from Broadstone in Dublin to the Midlands (Athlone) and onwards to Galway and Clifden in what is now the Republic of Ireland. ... Clifden (in Irish, An Clochán meaning bee-hive cell) is a town on the coast of County Galway, Ireland and being Connemaras largest town, it is often referred to as the Capital of Connemara. It is located on the Owenglin River where it flows into Clifden Bay. ...


The 20th century brought increasing road competition, and this led the Great Southern Railway to close the Clifden branch in 1935. Its former junction is still visible from Ceannt Station's platforms. Galway station was renamed Ceannt in 1966. In the 1970s Córas Iompair Éireann closed the Sligo-Ennis line to passenger services, and it has since closed to freight as well. Transport in Australia is a highly significant part of the infrastructure of the Australian economy, since the distances are large and the country has a relatively low population density. ... Clifden (in Irish, An Clochán meaning bee-hive cell) is a town on the coast of County Galway, Ireland and being Connemaras largest town, it is often referred to as the Capital of Connemara. It is located on the Owenglin River where it flows into Clifden Bay. ... Eamonn Ceannt (September 21, 1881 - May 8, 1916) was an Irish nationalist and rebel. ... Eamonn Ceannt (September 21, 1881 - May 8, 1916) was an Irish nationalist and rebel. ... Córas Iompair Éireann[1] (CIÉ) is a statutory authority which is owned by the Irish Government. ... WGS-84 (GPS) Coordinates: , Irish Grid Reference G685354 Statistics Province: Connacht County: Elevation: 13 m Population (2006)  - Town:  - Rural:   17,892 [1]  24,096[1] Website: www. ... For people named Ennis, see Ennis (surname). ...


Iarnród Éireann, the Republic of Ireland's national rail operator, runs six return passenger services each day between Dublin, Galway and intermediate stations. Travel time is just under 3 hours to Dublin Heuston. Current Iarnród Eireann (Irish Rail) intercity rail network An IÉ commuter train at Tara Street Station, Dublin, 2006 IÉ no. ... For other uses, see Dublin (disambiguation). ... Dublin Heuston, commonly called Heuston station, is located in Dublin, Ireland is one of the countrys main railway stations, serving the south, southwest and west of Ireland. ...


The distance by rail between Galway and Dublin is 208 km. For other uses, see Dublin (disambiguation). ...


Galway is due to get suburban rail by 2008, with regular commuter services to Athenry, and in 2009, a new stop will be included at Oranmore. The Galway Suburban Rail (Irish: Iarnród Bruachbhailteach na Gaillimhe) system is a planned one-line, three station suburban network that will operate between the city of Galway and the commuter town of Athenry, both in County Galway, Ireland. ... WGS-84 (GPS) Coordinates: 53. ... WGS-84 (GPS) Coordinates: , Irish Grid Reference M386245 Statistics Province: Connacht County: Elevation: 7 m Population (2006) 3,195  Oranmore (Irish: ) is a suburban village in County Galway on the outskirts of Galway City in Ireland. ...


Road

Main article: Roads in Ireland

Three national primary roads serve the city: the N17 from the North (Tuam, Sligo, Donegal), the N6 from the East (Athlone, Dublin), and the N18 from the South (Shannon Town, Limerick and Cork). The M4 motorway from Dublin towards Sligo and Galway was further extended in late 2005 and now reaches just west of Kinnegad; work on the next extension (the M6 motorway) towards Galway has begun. By 2015, the Galway-Dublin (by 2010), Galway-Limerick and Galway-Tuam routes will be completey motorway or high-quality dual-carriageway standard. A directional road sign in the Republic of Ireland on an other road (not a national road) at Portlaoise, County Laois, including patches for national roads and advance warning of bridge height restrictions. ... The N17 is one of the major roads that connects Galway City with major towns in north west County Galway and Mayo. ... WGS-84 (GPS) Coordinates: 53. ... WGS-84 (GPS) Coordinates: , Irish Grid Reference G685354 Statistics Province: Connacht County: Elevation: 13 m Population (2006)  - Town:  - Rural:   17,892 [1]  24,096[1] Website: www. ... WGS-84 (GPS) Coordinates: , Irish Grid Reference G924789 Statistics Province: Ulster County: Population ( ) 2,339 (2006) Website: www. ... The N6 road is a National Primary Route in the Republic of Ireland, connecting Dublin to Galway (by connecting from the M4 motorway at Kinnegad) across the midlands of Ireland. ... The N18 road is a National Primary Route in Ireland, connecting the cities of Limerick and Galway. ... Shannon Town or Shannon (Irish: An tSionna) is located in County Clare and is the only new town in the Republic of Ireland. ... For other uses, see Limerick (disambiguation). ... This article is about the city in the Republic of Ireland. ... The N4 road is a National primary route in the Republic of Ireland, running from Dublin to the northwest of Ireland and Sligo Town. ... WGS-84 (GPS) Coordinates: , Irish Grid Reference G685354 Statistics Province: Connacht County: Elevation: 13 m Population (2006)  - Town:  - Rural:   17,892 [1]  24,096[1] Website: www. ... WGS-84 (GPS) Coordinates: , Statistics Province: Leinster County: Elevation: 112m Population (2006)  - Town:  - Rural:   1149  included above Website: www. ... The N6 road is a National Primary Route in the Republic of Ireland, connecting Dublin to Galway (by connecting from the M4 motorway at Kinnegad) across the midlands of Ireland. ... For other uses, see Dublin (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Limerick (disambiguation). ... WGS-84 (GPS) Coordinates: 53. ...


In addition, there are plans for a semi-ring road of the city, the Galway City Outer Bypass, which should also be complete by 2015. [18][19] There is also an Inner City Ring (Cuar Inmheánach) route that encircles the city centre, most of which is pedestrianised. A beltway (American English), ring road or orbital motorway (British English) is a circumferential highway found around many cities. ... City Centre is a Local Government ward in the City of Manchester. ... Car-free zones (also known as auto-free zones and pedestrianised zones) are areas of a city or town in which automobile traffic is prohibited. ...


Galway is considered the gateway to Connemara and the Gaeltacht. The N59 along the western shore of Lough Corrib and the R337 along the northern shore of Galway Bay lead to this wild and romantic region. Connemara (Irish Conamara), which derives from Conmhaicne Mara (meaning: descendants of Con Mhac, of the sea), is a district in the west of Ireland (County Galway). ... Gaeltacht regions in Ireland Gaeltacht (pronounced ; plural Gaeltachtaí) is an Irish word for an Irish-speaking region. ... The N59, is a national primary road in the County Galway, Republic of Ireland which runs north from Galway city to the coastal town of Clifden (approximately 50mi). ... A map of Lough Corrib taken from the Admiralty Chart made in 1846 Lough Corrib (Loch Coirib in Irish) is a lake in the west of Ireland. ... Galway Bay (Irish: Loch Lurgain or Cuan na Gaillimhe) is a large bay on the west coast of Ireland, between County Galway in the province of Connacht to the north and the district of Burren in County Clare in the province of Munster to the south. ...


Bus travel to the city from all major towns and airports is serviced by many private operators and the national bus company Bus Éireann.


Galway Harbour

Ballyknow Quay
Ballyknow Quay

Galway is the most central port on the West Coast of Ireland in the sheltered eastern corner of Galway Bay[citation needed]. The harbour can be used by vessels up to 10,000 dwt and the inner dock can accommodate up to 9 vessels at any one time. Pending approval, Galway Harbour may see major changes, should the €1.5 billion development plan go ahead. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (3368x2244, 1384 KB) Summary Old man, Ballyknow Quay, River Corrib, Galway, Ireland. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (3368x2244, 1384 KB) Summary Old man, Ballyknow Quay, River Corrib, Galway, Ireland. ...


With Rossaveal and Doolin, it is one of the gateways to the Oileáin Árann. Rossaveal (Ros an Mhil in Irish) is a fishing village in Connemara, Ireland, and the main ferryport for the Aran Islands in Galway Bay. ... Doolin Harbour in the evening, with the Cliffs of Moher and Hags Head in the far distance The Fisher Street area of Doolin Doolin (Irish: Dúlainn) is a coastal town in County Clare, Ireland, on the Atlantic coast. ... http://www. ...


Commuter ferry services have been proposed to the commuter town of Kinvara, on the opposite side of Galway Bay. [20] WGS-84 (GPS) Coordinates: , Irish Grid Reference M369103 Statistics Province: Connacht County: Elevation: 10 m Population (2002) 945  Kinvara (Irish: , meaning head of the sea),it is also known as The Gateway to the Burren, is a sea port village located in the south of County Galway in the province... Galway Bay (Irish: Loch Lurgain or Cuan na Gaillimhe) is a large bay on the west coast of Ireland, between County Galway in the province of Connacht to the north and the district of Burren in County Clare in the province of Munster to the south. ...


Sport

Main article: Sport in Ireland

Galway has a diverse sporting heritage, with a history in sports ranging from horse racing, Gaelic games, Soccer and Rugby to Rowing, Motorsport, Greyhound racing and others. The Galway Races are known worldwide and are the highlight of the Irish horse racing calendar. Over the years it has grown into an annual festival lasting seven days. In Motorsport, the Galway International Rally was the first international rally to be run from the Republic of Ireland. Throughout its history it has attracted star drivers from all over the world. The 2007 event was won by twice World Rally Champions Marcus Grönholm and Timo Rautiainen. Logo of The Irish Sports Council Sport on the island of Ireland is popular and widespread. ... The Galway Races is a Horse-racing festival that takes place for a week starting on the last Monday in July. ... Marcus Bosse Grönholm (born February 5, 1968 in Kauniainen) is a Finland Swedish rally driver. ... Timo Rautiainen & Trio Niskalaukaus was a metal music band from Finland, formed in 1997. ...


The city has hurling and gaelic football teams at all levels, including Father Griffins and St. James GAA. Major football and hurling matches take place at Pearse Stadium in the city. The stadium is also the home of the Salthill Knocknacarra Gaelic Athletic Association club which won the All-Ireland Senior Club Football Championship in 2006. For the Cornish sport, see Cornish Hurling. ... Gaelic Football (Irish: Peil, Peil Gaelach or Caid ), commonly referred to as football, or Gaelic , is a form of football played mainly in Ireland. ... Senior Club Championships Father Griffins is a Gaelic Athletic Association club based in Galway, Ireland. ... Senior Club Championships St. ... Pearse Stadium (Irish: Páirc an Phiarsaigh) is the principal Gaelic Athletic Association stadium in Galway, Ireland. ... For other uses, see GAA (disambiguation). ... For the ladies equivalent see: Dolores Tyrrell Memorial Cup The All-Ireland Senior Club Football Championship is an annual Gaelic football tournament played between the hundreds of senior football clubs in Ireland. ...


Galway also has a soccer team, Galway United in the League of Ireland. The city also hosts the The Umbro Galway Cup, - which is held annually at the home of Salthill Devon F.C.. Soccer redirects here. ... Galway United FC was founded as Galway Rovers in 1937. ... The FAI eircom League of Ireland (Irish: Curadh na hÉireann Cumann Peile na hÉireann) is the Republic of Irelands new national football league system created following the merging of the FAI and the League of Ireland. ... Steve Staunton at launch of Cup // The Umbro Galway Cup is a National Youth Tournament which is held every year in Galway, Ireland. ... Salthill Devon is a pre-eminent soccer club in the west of Ireland. ...


There are two Senior rugby union teams in the city Galwegians RFC and Corinthians RFC, as well as provincial Connacht Rugby who play in the Magners (Celtic) League who host their matches at the Galway Sportsground. For other uses, see Rugby (disambiguation). ... Galwegians Rugby Football Club is a rugby union club in Galway, Ireland. ... The Irish Rugby Football Union Connacht Branch (the professional team of which which is run by Connacht Rugby) is one of four branches of the IRFU, and is responsible for rugby union in the Irish province of Connacht. ... The Celtic League, currently known as the Magners League for sponsorship reasons, is an annual rugby union competition involving regional sides from Ireland, Scotland and Wales. ...


Moycullen Basketball Club have been a flagship basketball club in Galway for a number of years, and compete in the National League. They are situated 13 km (8 mi) west of the city. Between Moycullen and Oranmore/Maree Club numerous Irish youth international stars have been produced over the last 10 years - who have represented Ireland at European basketball championships. A new club Titans Titans Basketball Club have recently been created in the city. They also comepete in the National League but have yet to make the breakthrough to the post-season.

The Millennium Children's Park in Galway, next to one of the city's many canals.
The Millennium Children's Park in Galway, next to one of the city's many canals.

Sailing on both sea and lake are popular, as is rowing in the River Corrib with five clubs providing the necessary facilities and organising rowing competitions. These clubs include: Tribesmen Rowing Club, Galway Rowing Club, Coláiste Iognáid ('The Jes') Rowing Club, St. Joseph's College ('The Bish') Rowing Club, andNUIG Rowing Club Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2592 × 1944 pixels, file size: 811 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Taken by me, August 2007. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2592 × 1944 pixels, file size: 811 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Taken by me, August 2007. ... For other uses, see Canal (disambiguation). ... A coxless pair which is a sweep-oar boat. ... St. ...


The Galway Motor Club provides a focus for enthusiasts.


Near the city centre on College Road the Greyhound Stadium has races every Thursday, Friday and Saturday Night. It was refurbished recently by the Irish Greyhound Board, Bord na gCon, where it shares the facility with the Connacht Rugby Team.


Nearby Salthill has three competitive swimming clubs Shark Swimming Club, Laser swimming club and Galway swimming club. There is also a handball and racketball club while there are several martial arts clubs throughout the city. Galway has also produced European and World Champion kick-boxers. Galway Bay from the Promenade, Salthill Galway Bay Salthill Diving Board by Olivier Longuet Salthill (Irish: Bóthar na Trá - literally, Beach Road) is a seaside resort situated 3 km to the west of Galway City in the province of Connacht in County Galway, Ireland. ... Gaelic handball (Irish: Liathróid Láimhe) (also known as handball, Irish handball, court handball or wall handball) is a sport similar to racquetball and squash in that it is one of the four Gaelic Games organised by the Gaelic Athletic Association. ... Racquetball racquet and ball Racquetball is a sport played with racquets and a hollow rubber ball on a special indoor court. ... Hawaiian State Grappling Championships. ...


"Power walking" and roller blading on the promenade from the Claddagh to Blackrock are popular all year round. Roller skating girl in Rome, Italy (soul grind) Roller skating is travelling on smooth terrain with roller skates. ...


Music

Galway boasts a very rich and textured musical scene, that gives the city a lot of life. As in most Irish cities there is a large traditional music scene which is kept alive in pubs and street performers. Galway is most notable for its youth music scene, with emphasis placed mainly on rock and metal bands. [citation needed]


Well known bands from Galway include Toasted Heretic, The Stunning, The Saw Doctors (from Tuam) and many other bands in a wide variety of genres. Toasted Heretic was an Irish rock group who attracted a cult following in the late 1980s and 1990s. ... The Stunning were an Irish rock band. ... The Saw Doctors are a folk-rock band from Tuam, County Galway in the west of Ireland, named after the itinerant craftsmen who once traveled from sawmill to sawmill sharpening and repairing saws. ... WGS-84 (GPS) Coordinates: 53. ...


In addition Galway also holds an annual music festival. Starting in 1996 the "Early Music Festival" has been incorporating European Music from the 12th-18th century. It encourages not only music, but dance and costumes as well for the events. The festival invites not only professional musicians but amateurs as well.


The Galway Arts Festival (Féile Ealaíon na Gaillimhe) takes place in Galway, Ireland every July. It first began in 1978 and since has grown into one of the biggest arts festivals in Ireland. It attracts international artists as well as providing a platform for local and national performers also. The Galway Arts Festival takes place in Galway, Ireland every July. ...


The festival includes parades, street performances and numerous plays, musical concerts and comedy acts. Over the years the festival has developed a reputation to rival the near-hedonistic atmosphere which envelopes the city of Galway during those weeks. Highlights of the festival tend to be Macnas and Druid performances, two large local performance groups.


Media

Main article: Media in Ireland

Galway can receive all the national radio stations and television stations, as well as cable and satellite services. The media in Ireland includes all the media and communications outlets of any other developed nation. ... Licenced Radio in Ireland is one element of the wider Media in Ireland, with 85% of the population listening to a licenced service on any given day. ... Irelands television channels are a subset of the Media in Ireland. ... For other uses, see Cable (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Satellite (disambiguation). ...


One of the main regional newspapers for the county is the The Connacht Tribune which prints three titles every week - the Connacht Sentinel on Tuesday, the Connacht Tribune on Thursday and the Galway City Tribune on Friday. As of January 2007, The Tribune has a weekly readership of over 150,000. The Connacht Tribune (An Curadh Connachtach) is an Irish newspaper circulating chiefly in County Galway, Ireland. ...


Another Galway-based newspaper is the Galway Advertiser — a free paper printed every Thursday with an average of 160 pages and a circulation of 70,000 copies. It also prints a free newspaper on Monday called Galway First aimed at the 18-35 market with a lot of emphasis on news, entertainment and sport. It is the main paper of the Advertiser Newspaper Group which distributes 200,000 newspapers per week to a variety of other Irish cities and towns.


Another free paper, the Galway Independent, prints on a Tuesday night for Wednesday circulation.


Galway Bay FM (95.8 FM) broadcasts from the city to the whole county of Galway. Another radio station is Flirt FM (101.3 FM), which is a student radio station for the National University of Ireland, Galway and Galway-Mayo Institute of Technology. Statistics Province: Connacht County Town: Galway Code: G (GY proposed) Area: 6,148 km² Population (2006) 231,035 (including Galway City); 159,052 (without Galway City) Website: www. ... Flirt FM is the student radio station for the National University of Ireland, Galway and the Galway-Mayo Institute of Technology. ... The National University of Ireland, Galway (NUI, Galway) (Irish Ollscoil na hÉireann, Gaillimh or OÉ, Gaillimh) can trace its existence to 1845 as Queens College, Galway and was known until recently as University College, Galway (UCG) (Irish: Coláiste na hOllscoile, Gaillimh or COG). ... Galway-Mayo Institute of Technology (GMIT) formerly Regional Technical College, Galway is an Institute of Technology based in Galway, Ireland with centers throughout County Galway and County Mayo. ...

The area round Spanish Arch, on The Quays.
The area round Spanish Arch, on The Quays.

The cable channel City Channel, which was originally based in Dublin, has recently launched a version of the channel for Galway. Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2592 × 1944 pixels, file size: 534 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Taken by me, August 2007. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2592 × 1944 pixels, file size: 534 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Taken by me, August 2007. ... The Spanish Arch, which is located on the banks of the river Corrib, was built in 1584. ... City Channel is a proposed cable television channel, intending to operate in Dublin, Republic of Ireland. ... For other uses, see Dublin (disambiguation). ...


Telecommunications

The area code for Galway is 091, or from outside Ireland, +35391. Communications in the Republic of Ireland, including postal services run by An Post, are regulated to a large extent by the Commission for Communications Regulation (ComReg), the Minister for Communications, Marine & Natural Resources has overall responsibility for national policy and regulation. ...


In 2004, Galway got its own Metropolitan Area Broadband Network; which is made up of 56 kilometres of fibre optic cable. This encircles the city from Knocknacarra to Ballybrit/Ballybane and also incorporates a 6 kilometre extension to the commuter town of Oranmore. The network cost €10 million to install. [21] Fiber Optic strands An optical fiber in American English or fibre in British English is a transparent thin fiber for transmitting light. ... WGS-84 (GPS) Coordinates: , Irish Grid Reference M386245 Statistics Province: Connacht County: Elevation: 7 m Population (2006) 3,195  Oranmore (Irish: ) is a suburban village in County Galway on the outskirts of Galway City in Ireland. ...


Furthermore, there are proposals to install a city-wide free Wi-Fi network; which is backed by a former city mayor. Galway-based IT company iZone are planning to also install extra features in certain 'hotspots', such as wireless telephone and text messaging services, and live music and video streams.[22] Official Wi-Fi logo Wi-Fi (pronounced wye-fye, IPA: ), also unofficially known as Wireless Fidelity, is a wireless technology brand owned by the Wi-Fi Alliance intended to improve the interoperability of wireless local area network products based on the IEEE 802. ... Hotspots are venues that offer Wi-Fi access. ...


Crime

Galway is located in the Garda Western Region, which has the lowest crime rate out of any other region in the country. It has been claimed that Galway is the safest city in Ireland. In 2005 the official figures for 'Galway West' show that the headline crime rate was 23.33 per 1,000 people. This can be compared with Cork city's 27.81 crimes per 1,000 people, and Dublin's 39.15 crimes per 1,000 people. In 2006, 2 murders occurred in Galway city.[23] It was also revealed in 2007 that the crime rate in the city has actually fallen from 2005 as well, despite some high-profile assault cases[24]. This article is about the city in the Republic of Ireland. ... For other uses, see Dublin (disambiguation). ...


Twinnings

The following places are twinned with Galway: Sign denoting twin towns of Neckarsulm, Germany Town twinning is a concept whereby towns or cities in geographically and politically distinct areas are paired with the goal of fostering human contact and cultural links. ...

[25] Image File history File links Flag_of_Denmark. ... Location of Aalborg municipality Aalborg Municipality is a municipality (Danish, kommune) in North Jutland County on the Jutland peninsula in northern Denmark. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_England. ... For other uses, see Bradford (disambiguation). ... Coat of Arms of South Yorkshire West Yorkshire is a metropolitan county within the Yorkshire and the Humber region of England, that has a population of 2. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Location in Middlesex County in Massachusetts Coordinates: , Country State County Middlesex Settled 1630 Incorporated 1636 Government  - Type Mayor-City Council  - Mayor Kenneth Reeves (D) Area  - City  7. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Nickname: Motto: Urbs in Horto (Latin: City in a Garden), I Will Location in the Chicago metro area and Illinois Coordinates: , Country State Counties Cook, DuPage Settled 1770s Incorporated March 4, 1837 Government  - Mayor Richard M. Daley (D) Area  - City 234. ... Official language(s) English[1] Capital Springfield Largest city Chicago Largest metro area Chicago Metropolitan Area Area  Ranked 25th  - Total 57,918 sq mi (140,998 km²)  - Width 210 miles (340 km)  - Length 390 miles (629 km)  - % water 4. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... This article is about The place Lorient in France. ... Morbihan (Mor-Bihan in Breton) is a department in the northwest of France named after the Morbihan (small sea in Breton), the enclosed sea that is the principal feature of the coastline. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... This article is about Milwaukee in Wisconsin. ... Official language(s) None Capital Madison Largest city Milwaukee Largest metro area Greater Milwaukee Area  Ranked 23rd  - Total 65,498 sq mi (169,790 km²)  - Width 260 miles (420 km)  - Length 310 miles (500 km)  - % water 17  - Latitude 42° 30′ N to 47° 05′ N  - Longitude 86° 46′ W to... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... For other uses, see Moncton (disambiguation). ... This article is about the Canadian province. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_Peoples_Republic_of_China. ... Tsingtao redirects here. ...   (Simplified Chinese: ; Traditional Chinese: ; pinyin: ; Wade-Giles: Shan-tung) is a coastal province of eastern Peoples Republic of China. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... City nickname Emerald City City bird Great Blue Heron City flower Dahlia City mottos The City of Flowers The City of Goodwill City song Seattle, the Peerless City Mayor Greg Nickels County King County Area   - Total   - Land   - Water   - % water 369. ... For the capital city of the United States, see Washington, D.C.. For other uses, see Washington (disambiguation). ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... The Gateway Arch, shown here behind the Old Courthouse, is the most recognizable part of the St. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_New_Zealand. ... Waitakere City is New Zealands fifth largest city, with an annual growth of about 2%. It is part of the Auckland region, and is incorporated in the Auckland metropolitan area. ... The Auckland Region is one of the sixteen regions of New Zealand, named for Auckland City, the large city at its heart. ...


Adopted ship

  • LÉ Aisling (1996)

LÉ Aisling (P23) is a ship in the Irish Naval Service. ...

See also

Look up Galway in
Wiktionary, the free dictionary.
Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
Galway

Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Wiktionary (a portmanteau of wiki and dictionary) is a multilingual, Web-based project to create a free content dictionary, available in over 150 languages. ... Image File history File links Commons-logo. ... Emily Anderson Margaret Athy, founder of St. ... Galway, one of the largest cities in Ireland, situated on the west coast of Ireland, has a complex history going back around 800 years. ... The city of Galway - built as a naval base and military fort by Tairrdelbach mac Ruaidri Ua Conchobair in 1124, refounded as a town by Richard Mor de Burgh in 1230 - has been subjected to a number of battles, sacks and sieges. ... This is a link page for cities and towns in the Republic of Ireland, including larger villages, and villages and townlands of note, as well as towns, townships or urban centres in Dublin. ... There are officially eleven cities in Ireland between the two jurisdictions in Ireland, five of these in Northern Ireland and six of them in the Republic of Ireland. ... The five cities and five boroughs of the Republic of Ireland are defined by Local Government Act, 2001 (S.I. 591 of 2001): the cities were previously referred to as county boroughs and the boroughs were previously referred to as municipal boroughs. The same Act gave the status of towns... List of Royal National Lifeboat Institution stations by county. ...

External links

  • Galway Chamber of Commerce and Industry
  • Galway City Council (local authority)

References

This memorial is a gift from the people of Genova, Italy to the people of Galway in commemoration of Coloumbus's visit. "On these shores, around the year 1477, the Genoese sailor Cristoforo Colombo found sure signs of land beyond the Atlantic. La Città di Genova alla Città di Galway. 29.VI.1992.
This memorial is a gift from the people of Genova, Italy to the people of Galway in commemoration of Coloumbus's visit. "On these shores, around the year 1477, the Genoese sailor Cristoforo Colombo found sure signs of land beyond the Atlantic. La Città di Genova alla Città di Galway. 29.VI.1992.
  1. ^ a b They were the merchant families of Athy, Blake, Bodkin, Browne, Darcy, Deane, Font, Ffrench, Joyce, Kirwin, Lynch, Martin, Morris, Skerrett.
  2. ^ BreakingNews.ie - 'Galway fastest growing city in Ireland'
  3. ^ "Off Galway Ireland, men of Cathay float in tree trunks". See also Christopher Columbus.
  4. ^ 2006 Census results (CSO)
  5. ^ RTÉ - 'Census shows drift from big five'
  6. ^ Galway City Atlas 2004 - Demographics
  7. ^ GalwayNews.ie - 'City's rarest tree gets a spruce up'
  8. ^ Galway City Development Board - Galway at the Beginning of the 21st Century
  9. ^ Galway City Atlas 2004 - Employment
  10. ^ a b c Galway City Atlas 2004 - Culture
  11. ^ a b Galway City Atlas 2004 - Education
  12. ^ Galway City Atlas 2004 - Travel Patterns
  13. ^ Bus Éireann - 'BUS EIREANN ANNOUNCES PLANS FOR MAJOR SERVICE EXPANSION IN GALWAY'
  14. ^ CIÉ - 'Ceannt Station Quarter'
  15. ^ Galway station. Railscot - Irish Railways. Retrieved on 2007-09-03.
  16. ^ CIÉ - 'Galway Station Redevelopment'
  17. ^ CIÉ - 'Ceannt Station Quarter'
  18. ^ Galway City Outer Bypass - Map
  19. ^ Galway City Council - Gaway City Outer Bypass
  20. ^ Green Party - Transport
  21. ^ Galway City Atlas 2004 - Broadband
  22. ^ 'Mayor backs plan to make Galway City a free wireless internet zone'
  23. ^ Sunday Business Post - 'Killings in 2006'
  24. ^ Unison.ie - 'City crime rate down despite spate of 'gruesome' assaults'
  25. ^ Galway City Council - Town Twinnings

  Results from FactBites:
 
Galway - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (2854 words)
Galway (official Irish name: Gaillimh) is the main city in the province of Connacht in Ireland and capital of County Galway.
Galway remained mostly loyal to the English crown during the Gaelic resurgence as a matter of survival, yet by 1642 the city allied itself with the Catholic Confederation of Kilkenny during the Wars of the Three Kingdoms.
Galway is considered the gateway to Connemara and the Gaeltacht.
Galway | Definition | Information | Explanation | Review | WikiCity.com - Wikipedia Free Encyclopedia, Free Content, ... (492 words)
Galway (Irish: Gaillimh) is the capital city of County Galway in Ireland.
Galway is known as The City of the Tribes, because fourteen so-called tribes led the city to prominence early in its history.
Galway city is the location of Galway-Mayo Institute of Technology and National University of Ireland, Galway two higher education institutions.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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