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Encyclopedia > Galveston, Texas
"Galveston" redirects here. For the town in the U.S. state of Indiana, see Galveston, Indiana.
City of Galveston

Seal
Nickname: The Oleander City
Location in the state of Texas
Location in the state of Texas
County Galveston
Government
 - Mayor Lyda Ann Thomas
Area
 - City 539.6 km²  (208.3 sq mi)
 - Land 119.5 km² (46.1 sq mi)
 - Water 420.1 km² (162.2 sq mi)
Population (2005)
 - City 57,466
Time zone CST (UTC-6)
Website: www.cityofgalveston.org

Galveston is the county seat of Galveston County located along the Gulf Coast region in the U.S. state of Texas within the Houston–Sugar Land–Baytown metropolitan area. As of the 2005 U.S. Census estimate, the city had a total population of 57,466. Galveston is accessible by a causeway linking Galveston Island to the mainland on the north end of the city, a toll bridge on the western end of the island, and by ferry boat service on the east end of the city. Galveston is a town located in Cass County, Indiana. ... Image File history File links City_of_Galveston_Texas_Seal. ... This article or section seems to contain too many examples (or of a poor quality) for an encyclopedia entry. ... Adapted from Wikipedias TX county maps by Seth Ilys. ... Official language(s) No official language See languages of Texas Capital Austin Largest city Houston Largest metro area Dallas–Fort Worth Metroplex Area  Ranked 2nd  - Total 261,797 sq mi (678,051 km²)  - Width 773 miles (1,244 km)  - Length 790 miles (1,270 km)  - % water 2. ... United States of America, showing states, divided into counties. ... Galveston County Courts Building Galveston County is a county located in the U.S. state of Texas within the Houston–Sugar Land–Baytown metropolitan area. ... A mayor (from the Latin māior, meaning larger, greater) is the modern title of the highest ranking municipal officer. ... Area is a physical quantity expressing the size of a part of a surface. ... Square kilometre (U.S. spelling: square kilometer), symbol km², is a decimal multiple of SI unit of surface area square metre, one of the SI derived units. ... A square mile is an English unit of area equal to that of a square with sides each 1 statute mile (≈1,609 m) in length. ... Timezone and TimeZone redirect here. ...  CST or UTC-6 The Central Time Zone observes standard time by subtracting six hours from UTC during standard time (UTC-6) and five hours during daylight saving time (UTC-5). ... −12 | −11 | −10 | −9:30 | −9 | −8 | −7 | −6 | −5 | −4 | −3:30 | −3 | −2:30 | −2 | −1 | −0:25 | UTC (0) | +0:20 | +0:30 | +1 | +2 | +3 | +3:30 | +4 | +4:30 | +4:51 | +5 | +5:30 | +5:40 | +5:45 | +6 | +6:30 | +7 | +7:20 | +7... Galveston County Courts Building Galveston County is a county located in the U.S. state of Texas within the Houston–Sugar Land–Baytown metropolitan area. ... States that border the Gulf of Mexico are shown in red The Gulf Coast region of the United States comprises the coasts of states which border the Gulf of Mexico. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  Politics Portal      A U.S. state is any one of the fifty subnational entities of the... Official language(s) No official language See languages of Texas Capital Austin Largest city Houston Largest metro area Dallas–Fort Worth Metroplex Area  Ranked 2nd  - Total 261,797 sq mi (678,051 km²)  - Width 773 miles (1,244 km)  - Length 790 miles (1,270 km)  - % water 2. ... The Houston–Sugar Land–Baytown metropolitan area, a title designated by the U.S. Census as of 2003, is the seventh-largest metropolitan area and one of the most diverse[2] in the United States consisting of 10 counties within the state of Texas. ... The U.S. Census is mandated by the United States Constitution. ... The Hindenburgdamm rail causeway across the Wadden Sea to the island of Sylt in Schleswig-Holstein, Germany In modern usage, a causeway is a road or railway elevated by a bank, usually across a broad body of water or wetland. ... A map of Galveston Island, a barrier island on the Texas Gulf coast in the United States Galveston Island is a barrier island on the Texas Gulf coast in the United States, about 50 miles (80 kilometers) south of Houston. ...


Galveston is known for its historic neighborhoods and a ten-mile (16 km) long seawall designed to protect the city from floods. Galveston Seawall during construction The Galveston Seawall, USA, constructed in 1902, is a seawall that was built after the Galveston Hurricane of 1900 for protection from future hurricanes. ...


The city houses many tourist attractions. The attractions include the Galveston Schlitterbahn waterpark, Moody Gardens, the Lone Star Flight Museum, a downtown neighborhood of historic buildings known as "The Strand," many historical museums and mansions, and miles of beach front. The Strand plays host to a yearly Mardi Gras festival, Galveston Island Jazz & Blues Festival, Texas Beach Fest, Lone Star Bike Rally, and a Victorian-themed Christmas festival called "Dickens on the Strand" (honoring the works of novelist Charles Dickens, especially A Christmas Carol) in early December. Galveston is also home to the Balinese Room, a historic nightclub, formerly a notorious illegal gambling hall, located on a 600 foot (180 m) pier extending into the Gulf of Mexico. [1] Schlitterbahn is the name used for either of three water parks located in Texas. ... Moody Gardens is a tourist complex in Galveston, Texas. ... The Lone Star Flight Museum, located in Galveston, Texas, displays more than 40 historically significant aircraft and many hundreds of artifacts related to the history of flight. ... The Strand District, in downtown Galveston, Texas (USA), is a National Historic Landmark District of mainly Victorian era buildings that now house restaurants, antique stores, and curio shops. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Christmas is an annual holiday that celebrates the birth of Jesus. ... Dickens on the Strand is an annual Christmas festival in Galveston, Texas occurring the first weekend in December. ... “Dickens” redirects here. ... The Balinese Room was a well-known nightclub in Galveston, Texas built on a pier stretching 600 feet from the Galveston Seawall over the waters of Galveston Bay. ...


Galveston is the second-largest city in Galveston County in population after League City; League City surpassed Galveston between 2000 and 2005. [2] League City is located in Galveston County in the U.S. state of Texas within the Houston-Sugar Land-Baytown metropolitan area. ...

Contents

History

Exploration and settlement

The city in 1871.
The city in 1871.

Galveston island was originally inhabited by members of the Karankawa and Akokisa tribes. The Spanish explorer Cabeza de Vaca was shipwrecked on the island in 1528 and there began his famous trek to Mexico. In the late 1600s, the French explorer Robert Cavelier de La Salle claimed the area for Louis XIV and named it Saint-Louis. Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 531 pixelsFull resolution (9226 × 6128 pixel, file size: 12. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 531 pixelsFull resolution (9226 × 6128 pixel, file size: 12. ... Karankawa A group of Indian tribes, now extinct, known collectively as the Karankawa (also Karankawan, Clamcoëhs), played a pivotal part in early Texas history. ... Location of the San Jacinto river The Akokisa were a people that lived on Galveston Bay and the lower Trinity and San Jacinto rivers in Texas. ... Álvar Núñez Cabeza de Vaca (c. ... René Robert Cavelier, Sieur de La Salle (November 22, 1643 - March 19, 1687) was a French cleric and explorer. ... Louis XIV King of France and Navarre By Hyacinthe Rigaud (1701) Louis XIV (Louis-Dieudonné) (September 5, 1638–September 1, 1715) reigned as King of France and King of Navarre from May 14, 1643 until his death. ...


The island was named in honor of Bernardo de Gálvez y Madrid, Count of Gálvez, in 1785 by Spanish explorer José de Evia, who charted the Gulf Coast. The first permanent European settlements on the island were constructed around 1816 by the pirate Louis-Michel Aury as a base of operations to support Mexico's rebellion against Spain. In 1817 Aury returned from an unsuccessful raid against Spain to find Galveston occupied by the pirate Jean Lafitte, who took up residence there after having been driven from his stronghold in Barataria Bay off the coast of New Orleans, Louisiana. Lafitte organized Galveston into a pirate "kingdom" he called "Campeachy" (or "Campeche"), anointing himself the island's "head of government." Lafitte remained in Galveston until 1821 when he and his raiders were given an ultimatum by the United States Navy: leave or be destroyed. Lafitte burned his settlement to the ground and sailed under cover of night for parts unknown. There are still rumors that Lafitte's treasure is buried somewhere between Galveston Island, Bolivar Peninsula and High Island. Bernardo de Gálvez, Count of Gálvez Bernardo de Gálvez y Madrid, Viscount of Galveston and Count of Gálvez (Spanish: Bernardo de Gálvez y Madrid, vizconde de Gálveztown y conde de Gálvez) (July 23, 1746, Málaga, Spain—November 30, 1786, Mexico City) was... Louis-Michel Aury was a French pirate operating in the Gulf of Mexico during the early 19th century. ... Jean Lafitte (1776 - 1854?), was a famous pirate in the Gulf of Mexico in the early 19th century. ... NOLA redirects here. ... USN redirects here. ...


Following its successful revolution from Spain, Mexico designated Galveston a port of entry in 1825, erecting a customs house in 1830. During the Texas Revolution, Galveston served as the main port for the Texas navy. Galveston also served briefly as the capital of the Republic of Texas in 1836. Combatants Texas Mexico Commanders Stephen F. Austin Sam Houston Antonio López de Santa Anna Martin Perfecto de Cos Strength c. ... Capital Washington-on-the-Brazos, Harrisburg, Galveston, Velasco, Columbia (1836) Houston (1837–1839) Austin (1839–1845) Language(s) English (de facto) Spanish, French, German and Native American languages regionally Government Republic President1  - 1836-1838 Sam Houston  - 1838-1841 Mirabeau B. Lamar  - 1841-1844 Sam Houston  - 1844-1845 Anson Jones Vice...


In 1836, Michel B. Menard, a native of Canada, along with several associates purchased 4,605 acres (18.64 km²) of land for $50,000 from the Austin Colony to found the town that would become the modern city of Galveston. Menard and his associates began selling plots on April 20, 1838. In 1839, the City of Galveston adopted a charter and was incorporated by the Congress of the Republic of Texas. is the 110th day of the year (111th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... | Jöns Jakob Berzelius, discoverer of protein 1838 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... Capital Washington-on-the-Brazos, Harrisburg, Galveston, Velasco, Columbia (1836) Houston (1837–1839) Austin (1839–1845) Language(s) English (de facto) Spanish, French, German and Native American languages regionally Government Republic President1  - 1836-1838 Sam Houston  - 1838-1841 Mirabeau B. Lamar  - 1841-1844 Sam Houston  - 1844-1845 Anson Jones Vice...


The Battle of Galveston was fought in Galveston Bay and on the island on January 1, 1863, during the American Civil War when Confederate forces under Major General John B. Magruder attacked and expelled occupying Union troops from the city, which remained in Confederate hands for the duration of the war. The Battle of Galveston occurred on January 1, 1863 when Confederate forces under Gen. ... Galveston Bay is a large estuary located along Texass coastline. ... is the 1st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1863 (MDCCCLXIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Combatants United States of America (Union) Confederate States of America (Confederacy) Commanders Abraham Lincoln, Ulysses S. Grant Jefferson Davis, Robert E. Lee Strength 2,200,000 1,064,000 Casualties 110,000 killed in action, 360,000 total dead, 275,200 wounded 93,000 killed in action, 258,000 total... Some Confederate soldiers The Confederate States Army (CSA) was organized in February 1861 to defend the newly formed Confederate States of America from military action by the United States government. ... Insignia of a United States Air Force Major General German Generalmajor Insignia Major General is a military rank used in many countries. ... John B. Magruder John Bankhead Magruder (May 1, 1807 – February 19, 1871) was a U.S. Army officer in the Mexican War, and a Confederate general in the American Civil War. ... The 21st Michigan Infantry, a company of Shermans veterans. ...


Juneteenth, which is the oldest nationally celebrated commemoration of the ending of slavery in the United States, owes its origins to the announcement of the Emancipation Proclamation upon the return of Union forces to Galveston in 1865. Juneteenth celebration in Austin, Texas on 19 June 1900 Juneteenth, also known as Freedom Day or Emancipation Day, is an annual holiday in fourteen states of the United States. ... Wikisource has original text related to this article: Emancipation Proclamation Reproduction of the Emancipation Proclamation at the National Underground Railroad Freedom Center in Cincinnati, Ohio The Emancipation Proclamation consists of two executive orders issued by United States President Abraham Lincoln during the American Civil War. ...


In the late 1890s, the Fort Crockett defenses and coastal artillery batteries were constructed in Galveston and along the Bolivar Roads. [3] Fort Crockett is a government reservation originally built as a defense installation on Galveston Island overlooking the Gulf of Mexico. ...


Growth

The Beach Hotel catered to vacationers until a fire in 1898.
The Beach Hotel catered to vacationers until a fire in 1898.
"Old Red", the original UTMB Galveston building.
"Old Red", the original UTMB Galveston building.
A street sign in Galveston's Historical District
A street sign in Galveston's Historical District

At the end of the 19th century, the city of Galveston was a booming metropolis with a population of 37,000 (more than Houston in 1900). Its position on the natural harbor of Galveston Bay along the Gulf of Mexico made it the center of trade in Texas, and one of the largest cotton ports in the nation, in competition with New Orleans. Between 1838 and 1842, 18 newspapers were started to serve the island's rapidly growing population (The Galveston County Daily News is the sole survivor). A causeway linking the island with the mainland was finished in 1860, which paved the way for railroad expansion. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1849x1198, 588 KB) Summary Licensing File links The following pages link to this file: Galveston, Texas User:Laurascudder/Images Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner used to create or digitize it. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1849x1198, 588 KB) Summary Licensing File links The following pages link to this file: Galveston, Texas User:Laurascudder/Images Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner used to create or digitize it. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (3072x2304, 1603 KB) Summary Old Red, the original building on UTMBs campus in Galveston, Texas. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (3072x2304, 1603 KB) Summary Old Red, the original building on UTMBs campus in Galveston, Texas. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2272x1704, 832 KB) Summary Galveston Street Sign Fair use Taken by WhisperToMe Licensing I, the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2272x1704, 832 KB) Summary Galveston Street Sign Fair use Taken by WhisperToMe Licensing I, the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... “Houston” redirects here. ... Galveston Bay is a large estuary located along Texass coastline. ... The Hindenburgdamm rail causeway across the Wadden Sea to the island of Sylt in Schleswig-Holstein, Germany In modern usage, a causeway is a road or railway elevated by a bank, usually across a broad body of water or wetland. ...


During this era, Galveston was also home to a number of state firsts, including: the first post office (1836), the first naval base (1836), the first Texas chapter of a Masonic order (1840); the first cotton compress (1842), first Roman Catholic Cathedral (St. Mary's Cathedral Basilica) (1847), the first insurance company (1854), the first gas lights (1856), first Jewish Reform Congregation (Congregation B'nai Israel) (1868), the first opera house (1870), the first orphanage (1876), the first telephone (1878), the first electric lights (1883), the first medical college (now the University of Texas Medical Branch) (1891), and the first school for nurses (1890). American Square & Compasses Freemasonry is a worldwide fraternal organization. ... St. ... There are very few or no other articles that link to this one. ... The University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston (UTMB) is a component of the University of Texas System located in Galveston, Texas. ...


Storm of 1900

In 1900, the island was struck by a devastating hurricane, an event that still holds the record as the United States' deadliest natural disaster. Lowest pressure 936 mbar (hPa; 27. ... Cyclone Catarina, a rare South Atlantic tropical cyclone viewed from the International Space Station on March 26, 2004 Hurricane and Typhoon redirect here. ... Mount Pinatubo eruption, 1991 A natural disaster is the consequence of a natural hazard (e. ...


In the early morning of September 8, high surf despite prevailing winds out of the north heralded the oncoming Storm. By noon low-lying areas near the Gulf and the Bay side of the city were taking on water and the winds increased. Near 4 p.m. a storm surge approximately 15 feet (5 m) high slammed into the coast. According to many personal accounts, the storm subsided before midnight. Wind speeds reached up to 125 mph (an estimate, since the anemometer was blown off the U.S. Weather Bureau building). The city was devastated, and an estimated 6,000 to 8,000 people on the island were killed. is the 251st day of the year (252nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... A hemispherical cup anemometer of the type invented in 1846 by John Thomas Romney Robinson An anemometer is a device for measuring the velocity or the pressure of the wind, and is one instrument used in a weather station. ...

A marker along The Strand indicating a building that survived the 1900 hurricane. Many of the island's most impressive mansions in Galveston's historical East End near downtown survived.

After the storm cleared, the city decided to shore up its defenses against future storms: a permanent concrete seawall was built along a large portion of the beach front (1902-1904) and the entire grade of the city was raised some 17 feet (5 m) behind the wall to a few feet near the Bay (1904-1910). Just after the hurricane, the city originated the City Commission form of city government (which became known as the "Galveston Plan"), although the city has since adopted the Council-Manager form of government. Image File history File links A memorial marker placed on many buildings along The Strand in Galveston, Texas, commemorating the building having survived the Hurricane of 1900. ... Image File history File links A memorial marker placed on many buildings along The Strand in Galveston, Texas, commemorating the building having survived the Hurricane of 1900. ... Galveston Seawall during construction The Galveston Seawall, USA, constructed in 1902, is a seawall that was built after the Galveston Hurricane of 1900 for protection from future hurricanes. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Local government of the United States. ... The council-manager government is one of two main variations of representative municipal government in the United States. ...


Despite attempts to draw new investment to the city after the hurricane, Galveston never fully returned to its former importance or prosperity. Development was also hindered by the construction of the Houston Ship Channel, which brought the Port of Houston into direct competition with the natural harbor of Galveston Bay for sea traffic. To further her recovery, and rebuild her population, Galveston actively solicited immigration. Through the efforts of Rabbi Henry Cohen and Congregation B'nai Israel, Galveston became the focus of a 1907 immigration plan called the Galveston Movement that in the following years diverted roughly 10,000 Eastern European Jewish immigrants from the crowded cities of the Northeastern United States. The Port of Houston is the port of Houston, Texas, the fourth largest city in the United States. ... The Port of Houston The Port of Houston is the port of Houston, Texas, the fourth-largest city in the United States. ... Galveston Bay is a large estuary located along Texass coastline. ... There are very few or no other articles that link to this one. ... The Galveston Movement operated between 1907 and 1914 to divert Jews fleeing Russia and eastern Europe away from crowded East Coast cities. ... Pre-1989 division between the West (grey) and Eastern Bloc (orange) superimposed on current national boundaries: Russia (dark orange), other countries of the former USSR (medium orange),members of the Warsaw pact (light orange), and other former Communist regimes not aligned with Moscow (lightest orange). ... The word Jew ( Hebrew: יהודי) is used in a wide number of ways, but generally refers to a follower of the Jewish faith, a child of a Jewish mother, or someone of Jewish descent with a connection to Jewish culture or ethnicity and often a combination...


Galveston today

A historic building in Downtown Galveston
A historic building in Downtown Galveston

Though the storm stalled economic development and the city of Houston grew into the region's principal metropolis, Galveston has regained some of its former glory. Today it is considered a major tourist destination and remains a port of entry and a destination for cruise ships, and a port of call and repairs for cargo ships. Galveston is currently ranked the number 1 cruise port on the Gulf Coast and number 4 in North America (2007). Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2946x2304, 1557 KB) Summary The Stewart Building on Kempner Street in Galveston, Texas. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2946x2304, 1557 KB) Summary The Stewart Building on Kempner Street in Galveston, Texas. ... Legend of the Seas moored at San Diego, California A cruise ship, or less commonly cruise liner, is a passenger ship used for pleasure voyages, where the voyage itself and the amenities of the ship are considered an essential part of the experience. ...


Galveston's historic downtown and abundant beaches are major tourist destinations. Houstonians and visitors from around the world purchase beach homes and condominiums and make Galveston their second home.


Other attractions in Galveston include Moody Gardens, the Galveston Railroad Museum, Schlitterbahn, the Strand and the Lone Star Flight Museum. Galveston is also home to several historic ships: the tall ship Elissa (the official Tall Ship of Texas) at the Texas Seaport Museum and USS Cavalla and USS Stewart, both berthed at Seawolf Park on nearby Pelican Island. Galveston is also home to a symphony orchestra and a small ballet company. Moody Gardens is a tourist complex in Galveston, Texas. ... The Galveston Railroad Museum is owned and operated by the Center for Transportation and Commerce, a non-profit organization. ... Schlitterbahn is the name used for either of three water parks located in Texas. ... The Strand District, in downtown Galveston, Texas (USA), is a National Historic Landmark District of mainly Victorian era buildings that now house restaurants, antique stores, and curio shops. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Lone Star Flight Museum. ... The tall ship Elissa is a sailing ship launched on October 27, 1877. ... USS Cavalla (SS/SSK/AGSS-244), a Gato-class submarine, was a ship of the United States Navy named for the cavalla, a salt water fish of the pompano family inhabiting waters off the eastern coast of the Americas from Cape Cod to Rio de la Plata. ...


The Galveston County Daily News, the city's main newspaper, is the oldest continuously printed newspaper in Texas since 1842. [4] The Galveston County Daily News is a newspaper published in Galveston, Texas. ...


Galveston has been the home of the University of Texas Medical Branch (UTMB) since 1891. UTMB is a major teaching and indigent-care hospital which now encompasses 84 acres (340,000 m²)., UTMB is the largest employer in Galveston CountyGR6, creating over 15,000 jobs and bringing about $300 million into the local economy. The Shriners Hospital adjacent to UTMB is a 30-bed pediatric burn hospital providing comprehensive acute care and reconstructive and rehabilitative care to children who have been burned. American National Insurance Company, one of the larger life insurance companies in the United States, and Moody National Bank are headquartered in Galveston. The University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston (UTMB) is a component of the University of Texas System located in Galveston, Texas. ... Galveston County Courts Building Galveston County is a county located in the U.S. state of Texas within the Houston–Sugar Land–Baytown metropolitan area. ...

Galveston beach on the Gulf of Mexico
Galveston beach on the Gulf of Mexico
Galveston contains many restored Victorian homes.
Galveston contains many restored Victorian homes.

Galveston's beaches are much cleaner than in the past. With the island's population showing greater concern for their environment, washed-up seaweed is now only moved back from the water's edge to allow the natural buildup and preservation of the beaches. The beaches are now cleaned daily by the Galveston Park Board. Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 206 pixelsFull resolution (6364 × 1638 pixel, file size: 1. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 206 pixelsFull resolution (6364 × 1638 pixel, file size: 1. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2259x2199, 1153 KB) Summary Victorian home on Ball and 17th St. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2259x2199, 1153 KB) Summary Victorian home on Ball and 17th St. ...


In the 2000s, property values rose after expensive projects were completed [5] and demand for second homes increased. [6] This led some middle class families to move from Galveston to other areas such as League City, Texas City, and La Marque. The city population grew by seven tenths of a percent from 2000 to 2005 according to the U.S. Census Bureau. The tax base of the Galveston ISD grew by 13% in 2005 while Galveston ISD lost many district-zoned non-Hurricane Katrina evacuee students.[7] League City is a city located in Galveston County, Texas within the Houston–Sugar Land–Baytown Metropolitan Area. ... Texas City is a city in Galveston County in the U.S. state of Texas within the Houston-Sugar Land-Baytown metropolitan area. ... La Marque (formerly Lamarque) is a city in Galveston County, Texas within the Houston–Sugar Land–Baytown Metropolitan Area. ... The United States Census Bureau (officially Bureau of the Census) is a part of the United States Department of Commerce. ... Galveston Independent School District is a school district based in Galveston, Texas. ... This article is about the Atlantic hurricane of 2005. ...


In 2007 The Associated Press compiled a list of the most vulnerable places to hurricanes in the U.S. and Galveston was one of five areas named. Among the reasons cited were low elevation and the single evacuation route off the island which is blocked by the nation's fourth largest city, Houston.[8] Houston redirects here. ...


Architecture

Buildings in Galveston notable for their architecture include many in the Historic Strand District, The Hotel Galvez, the Moody Mansion, Ashton Villa, and Bishop's Palace. The restored Grand 1894 Opera House is still in use. The Grand 1894 Opera House in Galveston, Texas is a historic theater currently operated as a not-for-profit performing arts theater. ...


Tallest Buildings in Galveston

  • Palisade Palms Trade Winds Tower (Under construction)
  • Palisade Palms Beach Club (Under construction)
  • The Emerald Condominiums (Under construction)
  • Ocean Grove Condominiums (Under construction)
  • East Beach Resort & Spa (Under construction)
  1. American National Insurance Company Tower (One Moody Plaza)
  2. San Luis Resort South Tower
  3. San Luis Resort North Tower
  4. The Breakers Condominiums
  5. The Galvestonian Resort and Condos
  6. One Shearn Moody Plaza
  7. US National Bank Building
  8. By The Sea Condominiums
  9. John Sealy Hospital Towers at UTMB
  10. Medical Arts Building (aka Two Moody Plaza)

American National Insurance Company is one of the largest life insurance companies in the United States. ... John Sealy Hospital (opened on January 10, 1890) was founded in Galveston, by the widow and brother of one of the richest citizens of Texas, John Sealy, after his death, by using his generous donation left for public aid organizations. ...

The Port of Galveston

The Port of Galveston, also called Galveston Wharves, began as a trading post in 1825. Today, the port has grown to 850 acres (3.4 km²) of port facilities. The port is located on the Gulf Intracoastal Waterway, on the north side of Galveston Island, with some facilities on Pelican Island. The port has facilities to handle all types of cargo including containers, dry and liquid bulk, breakbulk, RO/RO, refrigerated, and project cargoes. The port of Galveston also serves as a passenger cruise ship terminal for cruise ships operating in the Caribbean. Cranes at the Port of Galveston container terminal The Port of Galveston is the port of the city of Galveston, Texas. ... Cranes at the Port of Galveston container terminal The Port of Galveston is the port of the city of Galveston, Texas. ...


Geography and Climate

Galveston is located at 29°16′52″N, 94°49′33″W (29.281137, -94.825945)GR1.


According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 539.6 km² (208.4 mi²). 119.5 km² (46.2 mi²) of it is land and 420.1 km² (162.2 mi²) of it (77.85%) is water. The United States Census Bureau (officially Bureau of the Census as defined in Title ) is a part of the United States Department of Commerce. ... Square kilometre (U.S. spelling: square kilometer), symbol km², is a decimal multiple of SI unit of surface area square metre, one of the SI derived units. ... A square mile is an English unit of area equal to that of a square with sides each 1 statute mile (≈1,609 m) in length. ...


All Time Record High Temperature: 104 °F set on September 5, 2000.


All Time Record Low Temperature: 8 °F set on February 12, 1899.


Greatest one day rainfall: 13.93 inches set on October 8, 1901.

Monthly Normal and Record High and Low Temperatures
Month Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec
Rec High °F 78 83 85 92 94 99 101 100 96 94 85 80
Norm High °F 61.9 64.4 70 75.2 81.4 86.6 88.7 89.3 86.5 79.7 71.3 64.3
Norm Low °F 49.7 51.5 58.2 64.7 72.3 77.8 79.8 79.5 75.6 68.4 59.4 51.8
Rec Low °F 11 8 26 38 52 57 66 67 52 39 26 14
Precip (in) 4.08 2.61 2.76 2.56 3.7 4.04 3.45 4.22 5.76 3.49 3.64 3.53
Source: USTravelWeather.com [1]

Demographics

As of the censusGR2 of 2000, there were 57,247 people, 23,842 households, and 13,732 families residing in the city. The population density was 478.9/km² (1,240.4/mi²). There were 30,017 housing units at an average density of 251.1/km² (650.4/mi²). The racial makeup of the city was 58.66% White, 25.49% Black or African American, 0.42% Native American, 3.21% Asian, 0.07% Pacific Islander, 9.73% from other races, and 2.41% from two or more races. 25.77% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race. Image:1870 census Lindauer Weber 01. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... It has been suggested that Ethnicity (United States Census) be merged into this article or section. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... It has been suggested that Ethnicity (United States Census) be merged into this article or section. ... Hispanics in the United States, or Hispanic Americans, are American citizens or residents of Hispanic ethnicity who identify themselves as having Hispanic Cultural heritage. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ...


There were 23,842 households out of which 26.3% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 36.6% were married couples living together, 16.9% had a female householder with no husband present, and 42.4% were non-families. 35.6% of all households were made up of individuals and 11.2% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.30 and the average family size was 3.03. Marriage is an interpersonal relationship with governmental, social, or religious recognition, usually intimate and sexual, and often created as a contract, or through civil process. ...


In the city the population was spread out with 23.4% under the age of 18, 11.3% from 18 to 24, 29.8% from 25 to 44, 21.8% from 45 to 64, and 13.7% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 36 years. For every 100 females there were 93.4 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 90.4 males.


The median income for a household in the city was $28,895, and the median income for a family was $35,049. Males had a median income of $30,150 versus $26,030 for females. The per capita income for the city was $18,275. About 17.8% of families and 22.3% of the population were below the poverty line, including 32.1% of those under age 18 and 14.2% of those age 65 or over. The per capita income for a group of people may be defined as their total personal income, divided by the total population. ... Map of countries showing percentage of population who have an income below the national poverty line The poverty line is the level of income below which one cannot afford to purchase all the resources one requires to live. ...


Notable Galvestonians

Nicholas Joseph Clayton (November 1, 1840 in Cloyne, County Cork - December 9, 1916 in Galveston, Texas) was a prominent Victorian architect in Galveston. ... John Arthur Johnson (March 31, 1878 – June 10, 1946), better known as Jack Johnson and nicknamed the Galveston Giant, was an American boxer and arguably the best heavyweight of his generation. ... Albert Lasker (1870?-1950) is often considered to be the founder of modern advertising. ... King Vidor King Wallis Vidor (February 8, 1894 – November 1, 1982) was an American film director. ... Douglas Corrigan from the frontispiece of his 1938 autobiography Douglas Wrong Way Corrigan (January 22, 1907–December 9, 1995) was an American aviator born in Galveston, Texas. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Katherine Marie Helmond (July 5, 1928, Galveston, Texas) is an American film, theater and television actress. ... Kathryn Ann Bailey Hutchison, usually known as Kay Bailey Hutchison (born July 22, 1943, in Galveston, Texas), is the senior United States Senator from Texas. ... A senate is a deliberative body, often the upper house or chamber of a legislature. ... On the cover of Playboy, August 1981 Valerie Ritchie Perrine (born September 3, 1943) is an American actress and model. ... Larry Coryell Larry Coryell (April 2, 1943-) is an American jazz guitarist. ... Barry Eugene White (born Barrence Eugene Carter, September 12, 1944) – July 4, 2003) was a Grammy Award winning American record producer, songwriter and singer responsible for the creation of numerous hit soul and disco songs. ... For other uses, see Soul music (disambiguation). ... Jonathan Jay Pollard (born August 7, 1954 in South Bend, Indiana) is a convicted Israeli spy and a former United States Naval civilian intelligence analyst. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Mikhael Ricks (born November 14, 1974 in Galveston, Texas) is a former National Football League tight end/wide receiver (1998-2004). ... Steve McKinney (born October 15, 1975 in Galveston, Texas) is an American football player who currently plays center for the Houston Texans. ... Damon Darron Jones (born August 25, 1976 in Galveston, Texas), nicknamed DJ, is an American professional basketball player currently with the Cleveland Cavaliers of the National Basketball Association. ... Michael Paul Bishop (born May 15, 1976 in Galveston, Texas) is a quarterback in the Canadian Football League with the Toronto Argonauts. ... Casey Hampton (born September 3, 1977 in Galveston, Texas) is an American Football nose tackle who currently plays for the Pittsburgh Steelers of the National Football League. ... Brandon Allen Backe (born April 5, 1978 in Galveston, Texas) is a starting pitcher in Major League Baseball for the Houston Astros. ... Javon Lataff Walker (born October 14, 1978 in Galveston, Texas) is a professional American football player who is currently a wide receiver for the NFLs Denver Broncos. ... Randy Hymes is a wide reciever who plays for the Baltimore Ravens, and attended Grambling State. ... Angela Jeanine Beyince (born May 14, 1982 in Houston, Texas)is an African-American songwriter and mostly known as her cousin Beyoncé Knowles personal assistant. ... Alexandra Ann McLeod (born in Galveston, Texas) is an American television host and entertainment news correspondent best known for being the original hostof TLC’s hit cable show, Trading Spaces. ... Information Regina Thompson is a fictional character on the SOAPnet drama series, General Hospital: Night Shift. ...

Transportation

Island Transit, which also runs the Galveston Island Trolley, operates Galveston Island's public transportation services. Island Transit is a public transit company operating in Galveston, Texas. ... Galverton Island Trolley is a heritage streetcar in Galveston, Texas. ...


Interstate 45 terminates in Galveston and serves as a main artery to Galveston from mainland Galveston County and Houston. FM 3005 connects Galveston to Brazoria County via the San Luis Pass-Vacek toll bridge. And State Highway 87, via the free Bolivar Ferry, connects the island to the Bolivar Peninsula. Interstate 45 (I-45) is an Interstate Highway located entirely within the U.S. state of Texas. ... Houston redirects here. ... Brazoria County is a county in the U.S. state of Texas located on the Gulf Coast within the Houston–Sugar Land–Baytown metropolitan area. ... Texas State Highway 87 or SH 87 runs for 249. ... Bolivar Peninsula is a narrow strip of land in Galveston County, Texas that separates the eastern part of Galveston Bay from the Gulf of Mexico. ...


Scholes International Airport at Galveston, a general aviation and military airport, is located in Galveston. Scholes International Airport at Galveston (IATA: GLS, ICAO: KGLS) is an airport located three miles southwest of Galveston, Texas. ...


Galveston in Pop Culture

The Jimmy Buffett song, "Who's the Blonde Stranger?" and Glen Campbell's "Galveston" are set in Galveston, as are ZZ Top's "Balinese", and Gene Autry's "Gallivantin' Galveston Gal." Jimmy Buffett (born James William Buffett on December 25, 1946, in Pascagoula, Mississippi) is a singer, songwriter, author, businessman, and recently a film producer best known for his island escapism lifestyle and music including hits such as Margaritaville (No. ... For the Scottish broadcaster, see Glenn Campbell (broadcaster). ... ZZ Top is an American blues rock band formed in 1969 in Houston, Texas. ... Orvon Gene Autry (September 29, 1907 – October 2, 1998) was an American performer who gained fame as The Singing Cowboy on the radio, in movies and on television. ...


The Galveston shoreline was the filming location for the infamous beach-driving scene between Jack Nicholson and Shirley MacLaine in the 1983 Oscar winning film Terms of Endearment. Nicholson as Wilbur Force in The Little Shop of Horrors (1960). ... Shirley MacLaine (born April 24, 1934) is an Academy Award-winning American film and theatre actress, well-known not only for her acting, but for her devotion to her belief in reincarnation. ... For the Drawn Together episode, see Terms of Endearment (Drawn Together episode). ...


Education

Colleges and universities

The city is home to three post-secondary institutions: Galveston College (a junior college opened in 1967), Texas A&M University at Galveston, and University of Texas Medical Branch. Galveston College is a comprehensive community college located on Galveston Island in Galveston, Texas. ... Texas A&M University at Galveston, also known as TAMUG, is a public university located in Galveston, Texas, USA. It serves as an ocean-oriented branch campus of Texas A&M University. ... The University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston (UTMB) is a component of the University of Texas System located in Galveston, Texas. ...


Primary and Secondary schools

Public Schools

The city of Galveston is served by Galveston Independent School District. Galveston Independent School District is a school district based in Galveston, Texas (USA). ...


GISD Elementary Schools

GISD Middle Schools Burnet Elementary School is a Pre-K through 5th grade school. ...

GISD High School Central Middle School is located in Galveston, Texas, and is currently a sixth through eighth grade school. ...

Ball High School is a public secondary school in Galveston, Texas. ...

State Charter Schools

Charter Schools is state-funded schools not affiliated with the local school district. Charter schools are publicly funded elementary or secondary schools in the United States which have been freed from some of the rules, regulations, and statutes that apply to other public schools, in exchange for some type of accountability for producing certain results, which are set forth in each charter school...

  • Ambassadors Preparatory Academy [9] (K thru 5th)
  • Odyssey Academy [10] (Pre-K thru 8th)

Private Schools

Elementary

  • Galveston Catholic School (K thru 8th) - operated by the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Galveston-Houston.
  • Satori Elementary School [11] (K thru 6th) - non-religious, parent cooperative school.
  • Trinity Episcopal School[12] (Pre-K thru 8th) - operated by the Episcopal Church.

High School The Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Galveston-Houston (Latin: Archidioecesis Galvestoniensis Houstoniensis) encompasses 8,880 square miles of ten counties in the southeastern area of Texas: Galveston; Harris; Austin; Brazoria; Fort Bend; Grimes; Montgomery; San Jacinto; Walker; and Waller. ... This article is about the Episcopal Church in the United States. ...

  • O'Connell Consolidated High School [13] (9-12) - affiliated with the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Galveston-Houston.

K thru 12th OConnell Consolidated High School (formerly OConnell High School) is a 4-year coeducational parochial/private high school that offers college preparatory programs at its campus located in Galveston, Texas. ... The Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Galveston-Houston (Latin: Archidioecesis Galvestoniensis Houstoniensis) encompasses 8,880 square miles of ten counties in the southeastern area of Texas: Galveston; Harris; Austin; Brazoria; Fort Bend; Grimes; Montgomery; San Jacinto; Walker; and Waller. ...

  • Heritage Christian Academy (K thru 12th)
  • Seaside Christian Academy[14] (K thru 12th) - affiliated with Seaside Baptist Church in Jamaica Beach

Jamaica Beach is a city located in Galveston County, Texas. ...

Public libraries

The city is served by the Rosenberg Library. [15] Rosenberg Library is a public library serving Galveston, Texas is one of the oldest continuously operating libraries in the U.S. State of Texas. ...


Postal service

The United States Postal Service operates three post offices in Galveston: USPS and Usps redirect here. ...

  • Galveston Main Post Office - 601 25th Street, 77550-9998
  • Bob Lyons Post Office Station - 5826 Broadway Street, 77551-9998
  • Medical Branch Unit on the campus of the University of Texas Medical Branch, 77555-9998

The University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston (UTMB) is a component of the University of Texas System located in Galveston, Texas. ...

Closed Stations

  • West Galveston Station (77554-9998) - This station was located in Jamaica Beach. Station closed in June 2007 when the landlord declined to renew the lease. According to the Galveston Postmaster, there are no plans to re-open the station at a new location. The area is now served by the Bob Lyons station 15 miles (24 km) away.

Community information

The Galveston County YMCA is located in Galveston. Not to be confused with YWCA. This article is about the association. ...


Sister cities

Galveston has five sister cities, as designated by Sister Cities International: Sign denoting twin towns of Neckarsulm, Germany Town twinning is a concept whereby towns or cities in geographically and politically distinct areas are paired with the goal of fostering human contact and cultural links. ... Sister Cities International is a non-profit organization dedicated to promoting and fostering town twinning, especially between a city in the United States and a city in another country. ...

Image File history File links Flag_of_India. ... , Thiruvananthapuram   (Malayalam: തിരുവനന്തപുരം TiruvanÅ­ntapuraṁ), also known as Trivandrum, is the capital of the Indian state of Kerala and the headquarters of the Thiruvananthapuram District. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Mexico. ... Veracruz from space, July 1997 The city of Veracruz is a major port city and municipality on the Gulf of Mexico in the Mexican state of Veracruz. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Norway. ... County District Jæren Municipality NO-1103 Administrative centre Stavanger Mayor (1995-) Leif Johan Sevland (H) Official language form BokmÃ¥l Area  - Total  - Land  - Percentage Ranked 406 71 km² 68 km² 0. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Japan. ... Niigata ) is the capital and the most populous city of Niigata Prefecture, Japan. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_South_Africa. ... Nickname: Motto: Spes Bona (Latin for Good Hope) Location of the City of Cape Town in Western Cape Province Coordinates: , Country Province Municipality City of Cape Town Metropolitan Municipality Founded 1652 Government [1]  - Type City council  - Mayor Helen Zille  - City manager Achmat Ebrahim Area  - City 2,499 km²  (964. ...

See also

John Sealy Hospital (opened on January 10, 1890) was founded in Galveston, by the widow and brother of one of the richest citizens of Texas, John Sealy, after his death, by using his generous donation left for public aid organizations. ... USS Cavalla (SS/SSK/AGSS-244), a Gato-class submarine, was a ship of the United States Navy named for the cavalla, a salt water fish of the pompano family inhabiting waters off the eastern coast of the Americas from Cape Cod to Rio de la Plata. ...

Notes

  1. ^ http://www.scottarnoldpc.com/br/historyofBalinese.htm
  2. ^ http://news.galvestondailynews.com/story.lasso?ewcd=cecba57d52dda271
  3. ^ http://galveston.ssp.nmfs.gov/aboutus/fortcrockett/index.html
  4. ^ http://http://galvestondailynews.com/history.lasso
  5. ^ http://www.statesman.com/business/content/business/stories/realestate/07/22coastal.html
  6. ^ http://www.chron.com/disp/story.mpl/headline/metro/4571804.html] ("Workers in Galveston increasingly can't afford to live there", Houston Chronicle, February 22, 2007)
  7. ^ http://news.galvestondailynews.com/story.lasso?ewcd=cecba57d52dda271]
  8. ^ http://www.decaturdaily.com/decaturdaily/news/070601/next.shtml
  9. ^ http://www.apagalv.org/
  10. ^ http://www.odyssey-academy.com/
  11. ^ http://www.satorischool.com/
  12. ^ http://www.tesgalv.org
  13. ^ http://www.ochsgalv.org/
  14. ^ http://www.seasideacademy.org/
  15. ^ http://www.rosenberg-library.org/

The Houston Chronicle is a daily newspaper in Houston, Texas, United States. ...

External links

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