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Encyclopedia > Gallipoli

A peninsula with the Aegean Sea to the west and the Dardanelles straits to the east, Gallipoli derives its name from the Greek Kallipolis (Καλλίπολις), meaning "Beautiful City". It has also been suggested that the name means "City of the Celts", (Gals), reflecting the influence of Celtic peoples here in the past.[citation needed] Gallipoli is a town of some 21,000 inhabitants in the province of Lecce. ... Look up Aegean Sea in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... The Dardanelles, a long narrow strait dividing the Balkans (Europe) along the Gallipoli peninsula from Asia Minor. ...

Satellite image of the Gallipoli peninsula and surrounding area
Satellite image of the Gallipoli peninsula and surrounding area

Contents

Image File history File links Download high resolution version (992x653, 1202 KB) Gallipoli in Turkey from space File links The following pages link to this file: Gallipoli ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (992x653, 1202 KB) Gallipoli in Turkey from space File links The following pages link to this file: Gallipoli ...

History

Antiquity, Byzantium and crusaders

Kallipolis (Greek), or in Latin Callipolis, was a city in the eastern part of the Thracian Chersonese ("Chersonesus Thracica" in Greek, now known as the Gallipoli Peninsula), on the right shore, and at the entrance of the Dardanelles. Callipolis is the commonly used latinized form of Kallipolis, the Greek name of several ancient cities, notably: Kallipolis in Caria Kallipolis, a Hellespont-port on the Thracian Chersonesus, the modern Gallipoli Callipolis in Calabria, southern Italy, a port on a peninsula into the Tarentine Gulf, which was granted by the... Map of the Thracian Chersonese The Thracian Chersonese (in Greek Χερσoνησoς Θραικια) was the ancient name of the Gallipoli peninsula, in the part of historic Thrace that is now part of modern Turkey. ...


The Byzantine Emperor Justinian II fortified the city and established there important military warehouses for grain and wine.[citation needed] Justinian II, known as Rhinotmetus (the Split-nosed) (669-711) was a Byzantine emperor of the Heraclian Dynasty, reigned from 685 to 695 and again from 704 to 711. ...


In 1304, Kallipolis briefly came under the control of the renegade Catalan group of mercenaries known as the Catalan Company, who, at that time, had just previously revolted against their Byzantine clients. In 1307, the Catalan Company, fearing retaliation by Byzantine forces, razed the city to the ground, and retreated to the relative safety of the area surrounding the city of Cassandria, leaving the city in ruins.[citation needed] Catalan can refer to: Catalan people Catalan language An inhabitant of Catalonia A Catalan speaker, whether or not from Catalonia proper (see Catalan Countries). ... The Catalan Company,[1] short name for the Catalan Company of the East (Companyia Catalana dOrient in Catalan), was a free company of mercenaries founded by Roger de Flor in early 14th-century Europe. ... The Catalan Company,[1] short name for the Catalan Company of the East (Companyia Catalana dOrient in Catalan), was a free company of mercenaries founded by Roger de Flor in early 14th-century Europe. ...


Ottoman era

After the devastating 1354 earthquake, the Greek city was almost abandoned, but swiftly reoccupied by Turks from Anatolia, the Asiatic side of the straits, making Gallipoli the first Ottoman possession in Europe, and the staging area for their expansion across the Balkans.[1] This article is about two nested areas of Turkey, a plateau region within a peninsula. ... Balkan redirects here. ...


The peninsula which was inhabited by populations of the Byzantine Empire was gradually conquered by the Ottoman Empire starting from 13th century onwards until the 15th. The Greeks living there were allowed to continue their everyday life. Gallipoli (in Turkish, Gelibolu) was made the chief town of a Kaymakamlik (district) in the vilayet (a Wali's province) of Adrianople, with about 30,000 inhabitants, Greeks, Turks, Armenians and Jews. Byzantine redirects here. ... Motto دولت ابد مدت Devlet-i Ebed-müddet (The Eternal State) Anthem Ottoman imperial anthem Borders in 1683, see: list of territories Capital Söğüt (1299–1326) Bursa (1326–1365) Edirne (1365–1453) Ä°stanbul (1453–1922) Government Monarchy Sultans  - 1281–1326 (first) Osman I  - 1918–22 (last) Mehmed VI Grand Viziers  - 1320... (12th century - 13th century - 14th century - other centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 13th century was that century which lasted from 1201 to 1300. ... (14th century - 15th century - 16th century - other centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 15th century was that century which lasted from 1401 to 1500. ... A kaymakam (also spelled kaimakam) is the title used for the governor of a provincial district in the Republic of Turkey; additionally, it was a title used for roughly the same official position in the Ottoman Empire. ... Vilâyet (also eyalet or pashaluk) was the Turkish name for the provinces of the Ottoman Empire. ... Edirne is a city in (Thrace), the westernmost part of Turkey, close to the borders with Greece and Bulgaria. ...


Gallipoli became a major encampment for British and French forces in 1854 during the Crimean War, and the harbour was also a stopping-off point on the way to Constantinople.[2][3] A military camp or bivouac is a minor, semi-permanent facility for the lodging of an army. ... For the board game, see 1854 (board game). ... Combatants Allies: Second French Empire British Empire Ottoman Empire Kingdom of Sardinia Russian Empire Bulgarian volunteers Casualties 90,000 French 35,000 Turkish 17,500 British 2,194 Sardinian killed, wounded and died of disease ~134,000 killed, wounded and died of disease The Crimean War (1853–1856) was fought... This article is about the city before the Fall of Constantinople (1453). ...


The peninsula did not see any more wars up until World War I when the British Empire allies trying to find a way to reach its troubled ally in the east, Imperial Russia, decided to try to obtain passage to the east. The Ottomans set up defensive fortifications along the peninsula with German help. “The Great War ” redirects here. ... For a comprehensive list of the territories that formed the British Empire, see Evolution of the British Empire. ... Imperial Russia is the term used to cover the period of history from the expansion of Russia under Peter the Great, through the expansion of the Russian Empire from the Baltic Sea to the Pacific Ocean, to the deposal of Nicholas II of Russia, the last tsar, at the start...


In 1920 after the defeat of the Russian White army of General Pyotr Wrangel, a significant number of emigre soldiers and their families evacuated to Gallipoli from the Crimea. From there many went to European countries where they found refuge, such as Yugoslavia. A stone monument was erected and a special "Gallipoli cross" was created to commemorate the soldiers who stayed in Gallipoli. The stone monument was destroyed during an earthquake, but in January of 2008 reconstruction of the monument had begun with the consent of the Turkish government. White Army redirects here. ... Pyotr Nikolaevich Wrangel (1878 - 1928) was a Russian general and counter-revolutionary. ... Sainte-Geneviève-des-Bois Russian Cemetery near Paris, the foremost necropolis of White Russians. ... Motto: ÐŸÑ€Ð¾Ñ†Ð²ÐµÑ‚ание в единстве(Russian) Protsvetanie v edinstve(transliteration) Prosperity in unity Anthem: ÐÐ¸Ð²Ñ‹ и горы твои волшебны, Родина(Russian) Nivy i gory tvoi volshebny, Rodina(transliteration) Your fields and mounts are wonderful, Motherland Location of Crimea (red) with respect to Ukraine (light blue). ... General location of the political entities known as Yugoslavia. ...


Battle of Gallipoli

Main article: Battle of Gallipoli

The Allied landing and subsequent campaign on the peninsula during World War I is usually known in Britain as the Dardanelles Campaign and in Turkey as the Battle of Çanakkale. In Australia, New Zealand, South Africa and Newfoundland, the term Gallipoli alone is used to describe the 8 month campaign. Belligerents British Empire Australia British India Newfoundland New Zealand United Kingdom Egyptian labourers[1] France Senegal Ottoman Empire German Empire[2] Austria-Hungary[3] Commanders Sir Ian Hamilton Lord Kitchener John de Robeck Otto Liman von Sanders Mustafa Kemal Strength 5 divisions (initial) 16 divisions (final) 6 divisions (initial) 15... Belligerents British Empire Australia British India Newfoundland New Zealand United Kingdom Egyptian labourers[1] France Senegal Ottoman Empire German Empire[2] Austria-Hungary[3] Commanders Sir Ian Hamilton Lord Kitchener John de Robeck Otto Liman von Sanders Mustafa Kemal Strength 5 divisions (initial) 16 divisions (final) 6 divisions (initial) 15... “The Great War ” redirects here. ... This article is about the Canadian province of Newfoundland and Labrador. ...


In early 1915 Russia was fighting a multi front war against Germany, Austria/Hungary, and Turkey. While it had a sizable army it struggled to deliver sufficient supplies to the troops. The landings at Gallipoli were an Allied attempt to clear a supply path through the Dardanelles to Russia. This would also assist them by putting pressure on Turkey by threatening Istanbul. On April 25, 1915, after failed attempts to force a passage through the Dardanelles by naval forces alone, a force of British Empire and French troops landed at multiple places along the peninsula. The battles over the next 8 months saw high casualties on both sides due to the exposed terrain, weather and closeness of the front lines. The invasion forces were successfully blocked by the Turkish troops and the subsequent Allied withdrawal meant the Russians would not be receiving supplies through the Dardanelles. is the 115th day of the year (116th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1915 (MCMXV) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday[1] of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ...


The battle is often referred to for its successful stealthy retreat which was completed with minimal casualties, the ANZAC forces completely retreating by December 19, 1915 and the remaining British elements by January 9, 1916. The Australian and New Zealand Army Corps was a First World War army corps of the Mediterranean Expeditionary Force that was formed in Egypt in 1915 and operated during the Battle of Gallipoli. ... is the 353rd day of the year (354th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1915 (MCMXV) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday[1] of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... is the 9th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1916 (MCMXVI) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Friday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ...


Overall, there were around 300,000 Allied casualties including around 100,000 deaths and 150,000 Turkish casualties including around 20,000 deaths. This campaign has become a "founding myth" for both Australia and New Zealand, and Anzac Day is still commemorated as a holiday in both countries. In fact, it is one of those rare battles that both sides seem to remember proudly. The Turks consider it a great turning point for their (future) nation and Australians and New Zealanders see it as the beginnings of the ANZAC spirit. A founding myth is a story or myth surrounding the foundation of a nation-state. ... Anzac Day is commemorated by Australia and New Zealand on 25 April every year to remember members of the Australian and New Zealand Army Corps (ANZAC) who landed at Gallipoli in Turkey during World War I. Anzac Day is also a public holiday in the Cook Islands, Niue, Samoa and... Simpson and his donkey statue by Peter Corlett outside the Australian War Memorial, Canberra. ...


Many mementos of the Gallipoli campaign can be seen in the museum at the Australian War Memorial in Canberra, Australia, and at the Auckland War Memorial Museum in Auckland, New Zealand. This campaign also put a dent in the armour of Winston Churchill, then the First Lord of the Admiralty, who had commissioned the plans to invade the Dardanelles. He talks about this campaign vividly in his memoirs. The Australian War Memorial is Australias national memorial to the members of all its armed forces and supporting organisations who have died or participated in the wars of the Commonwealth of Australia. ... For other uses, see Canberra (disambiguation). ... Auckland War Memorial Museum The Auckland War Memorial Museum is one of New Zealands most important national museums and war memorials. ... For other uses, see Auckland (disambiguation). ... Churchill redirects here. ... The First Lord of the Admiralty was a British government position in charge of the Admiralty. ...


The Gallipoli campaign gave an important boost to the career of Mustafa Kemal Atatürk, a little-known army commander who became a national hero, was promoted to Pasha, and became the founder of the modern Turkish state with the collapse of the Ottoman Empire, at the end of World War I. Kemal halted and eventually repelled the Allied advance, exceeding his authority and contravening orders to do so. His famous speech "I do not command you to fight, I command you to die. In the time it will take us to die we can be replenished by new forces" shows his courageous and determined personality. “Mustafa Kemal” redirects here. ... Pasha, pascha or bashaw (Turkish: paÅŸa) was a high rank in the Ottoman Empire political system, typically granted to governors and generals. ... Motto دولت ابد مدت Devlet-i Ebed-müddet (The Eternal State) Anthem Ottoman imperial anthem Borders in 1683, see: list of territories Capital Söğüt (1299–1326) Bursa (1326–1365) Edirne (1365–1453) Ä°stanbul (1453–1922) Government Monarchy Sultans  - 1281–1326 (first) Osman I  - 1918–22 (last) Mehmed VI Grand Viziers  - 1320...


Anzac Day

Main article: Anzac Day

On April 25, 2005, to mark the 90th anniversary of the Gallipoli landing, government officials from Australia and New Zealand, most of the last surviving Gallipoli veterans, and many Australian and New Zealand tourists travelled to Turkey for a special dawn service at Gallipoli. ANZAC Day is the most important national day of commemoration for Australians. The then Prime Minister of Australia, John Howard, and the Prime Minister of New Zealand, Helen Clark were also in attendance, and Clark was accompanied by the official NZ defence force party, veterans of several past wars and 10 New Zealand college students who won the New Zealand 'Prime Minister's Essay Competition' with their work on Gallipoli. Attendance at the ANZAC Day dawn service at Gallipoli has become popular since the 75th anniversary. Upwards of 10,000 people have attended services in Gallipoli. Anzac Day is commemorated by Australia and New Zealand on 25 April every year to remember members of the Australian and New Zealand Army Corps (ANZAC) who landed at Gallipoli in Turkey during World War I. Anzac Day is also a public holiday in the Cook Islands, Niue, Samoa and... An anniversary (from the Latin anniversarius, from the words for year and to turn, meaning (re)turning yearly; known in English since c. ... Anzac Day is commemorated by Australia and New Zealand on 25 April every year to remember members of the Australian and New Zealand Army Corps (ANZAC) who landed at Gallipoli in Turkey during World War I. Anzac Day is also a public holiday in the Cook Islands, Niue, Samoa and...


Until 1999 the Gallipoli dawn service was held at the Ari Burnu war cemetery at Anzac Cove, but the growing numbers of people attending resulted in the construction of a more spacious site on North Beach, known as the "Anzac Commemorative Site". Events of 2008: (EMILY) Me Lesley and MIley are going to China! This article is about the year. ... Castle Ashby Graveyard Northamptonshire A cemetery is a place in which dead bodies and cremated remains are buried. ... Anzac Cove looking towards Ari Burnu, 1915. ...


In the Gallipoli Peninsula Historical National Park, an 11,000 people capacity portable tribune has been built in the Anzac Cove and Lone Pine Memorial region. The preparation work for the Anzac Day Ceremonies in the Gallipoli Peninsula Historical National Park has been going on.


In the run up to the 2007 Anzac Day service, the Turkish authorities said that they would be expecting about 15,000 Australian and New Zealand Citizens for the ceremonies which would take place in the Gallipoli Peninsula Historical National Park. Extensive preparatory works had been undertaken prior to then.


Influence on the arts

The Battle of Gallipoli is the subject of a 1981 movie, entitled Gallipoli, directed by Peter Weir and starring Mel Gibson. The film has been criticised for portraying the campaign as a mainly Australian one[citation needed]. In fact around 21,000 British died, 10,000 French, 8,700 Australians, 2,700 New Zealanders and 1,370 Indians. Nearly twice as many Turks died (85,000) as all the Allies combined. However it must also be noted that, relative to its population, Australia suffered more losses than any other nation in World War I[citation needed]. AUGUST 25 1981 US Marine Sean Vance is Born on the 25th of August {ear nav|1981}} Year 1981 (MCMLXXXI) was a common year starting on Thursday (link displays the 1981 Gregorian calendar). ... This article is about motion pictures. ... Gallipoli is a 1981 Australian film, directed by Peter Weir and starring Mel Gibson, about several young men from rural Western Australia who enlist in the Australian Imperial Force during the First World War. ... For other persons named Peter Weir, see Peter Weir (disambiguation). ... Mel Columcille Gerard Gibson, AO (born January 3, 1956) is a two-time Academy Award-winning American-Australian actor, director, producer and screenwriter. ...


Eric Bogle wrote in 1972 his famous And the Band Played Waltzing Matilda after having watched, in Australia, a parade of elderly veterans of the Gallipoli campaign. Versions of this song were later separately recorded by June Tabor, The Skids and The Pogues, as well as Tommy Makem and Liam Clancy. Eric Bogle (born 23 September 1944) is a Scottish-born Australian singer and songwriter. ... Year 1972 (MCMLXXII) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... George Lamberts Anzac, the landing 1915, depicting the landing at Anzac Cove. ... June Tabor (born 1947) is an English folk singer. ... The Skids The Skids were an art-punk/punk rock and new wave band from Dunfermline, Scotland, founded in 1977 by Stuart Adamson (1958 - 2001, guitars / vocals / keyboards), Richard Jobson (vocals / guitar), Thomas Kellichan (drums) and William Simpson (bass guitar / vocals). ... The Pogues are a band of mixed Irish and English background, playing traditional Irish folk with influences from the English punk rock movement. ...


The BBC produced a feature-length television drama, All the King's Men, (not to be confused with the novel of the same name by Robert Penn Warren), that focused attention on a unit (the "Sandringham Company") that was decimated at Gallipoli and which included men from King George V's estate at Sandringham House. For other uses, see BBC (disambiguation). ... A scene from the drama For film adaptations of the American novel, see All the Kings Men. ... This article is about the book. ... Robert Penn Warren Robert Penn Warren (April 24, 1905 – September 15, 1989) was an American poet, novelist, and literary critic, and was one of the founders of The New Criticism. ... The Royal Norfolk Regiment, orignally formed as the Norfolk Regiment, was a regiment of the British Army. ... George V (George Frederick Ernest Albert; 3 June 1865 – 20 January 1936) was the first British monarch belonging to the House of Windsor, which he created from the British branch of the German House of Saxe-Coburg-Gotha. ... Sandringham House, Norfolk, England Sandringham House is a country house on 8,000 acres (32 km²) of land near the village of Sandringham in Norfolk, England, which is privately owned by the British Royal Family. ...


The campaign is also the subject of a 2005 documentary, also named Gallipoli, by the Turkish filmmaker Tolga Örnek, showing the bravery and the suffering on both sides through the use of surviving diaries and letters of the soldiers. For this film he has been awarded an honorary medal in the general division of the Order of Australia.[1] Documentary film is a broad category of visual expression that is based on the attempt, in one fashion or another, to document reality. ... Gallipoli (Turkish title Gelibolu) is a 2005 film by Turkish filmmaker Tolga Örnek. ... Tolga Örnek is a Turkish movie director who makes porn on his free hands for his 2005 documentary Gallipoli, was awarded an honorary medal in the general division of the Order of Australia [1]. Gallipoli Tolga Örnek at the Internet Movie Database Categories: | | | ...


Gallipoli is also a basis for the story "Solomons Song" by Bryce Courtenay.


Ecclesiastical history

Callipolis remains a Roman Catholic titular bishopric in the former Roman province of Thrace. Bishop Richard Pates, current auxiliary bishop of the Archdiocese of Saint Paul and Minneapolis and the Titular Bishop of Suacia. ... Thracian Tomb of Kazanlak  Thrace (Bulgarian: , Greek: , Attic Greek: ThrāíkÄ“ or ThrēíkÄ“, Latin: , Turkish: ) is a historical and geographic area in southeast Europe. ...


Callipolis was a suffragan of Heraclea. Lequien (I, 1123) mentions only six Greek bishops, the first as being present at the Council of Ephesus in 431, when the See was united to that of Coela (Coelia or Coele), the last about 1500. His list could easily be increased, for the Greek Orthodox See still exists; it was raised in 1904 to the rank of a metropolis, without suffragans, after the manner of most Greek metropolitan Sees. Lequien (III, 971) also gives the names of eight Latin bishops, from 1208 to 1518. (See Eubel, I, 269, note.) There are numerous schools and a small museum; a large cemetery is the resting place of many French soldiers who died of disease (chiefly cholera) during the Crimean War. The port is poor and trade unimportant, for want of roads. A Catholic mission was conducted in the Ottoman days by Assumpionist Fathers; there are also a number of Armenian and Greek Catholics, with priests of their respective rites. Perinthus (Turkish Eski Eregli, old Heraclea) was an ancient town of Thrace, on the Propontis, 22 miles west of Selymbria, strongly situated on a small peninsula on the bay of that name. ... Michel Le Quien (Boulogne-sur-Mer 8 October 1661–Paris 12 March 1733) was a French historian and theologian. ... Cyril of Alexandria The Council of Ephesus was held in the Church of Mary in Ephesus, Asia Minor in 431 under Emperor Theodosius II, grandson of Theodosius the Great; Ephesus was the city of Artemis (see Acts 19:28). ... For other uses, see Metropolis (disambiguation). ... Michel Le Quien (Boulogne-sur-Mer 8 October 1661–Paris 12 March 1733) was a French historian and theologian. ... Konrad Eubel (1842-1923) was a German Franciscan historian. ... Combatants Allies: Second French Empire British Empire Ottoman Empire Kingdom of Sardinia Russian Empire Bulgarian volunteers Casualties 90,000 French 35,000 Turkish 17,500 British 2,194 Sardinian killed, wounded and died of disease ~134,000 killed, wounded and died of disease The Crimean War (1853–1856) was fought... The Assumptionists (more properly called Augustinians of the Assumption) are a Roman Catholic religious order of brothers and priests. ...


See also

Gallipoli Star badge. ...

Sources and references

  1. ^ Crowley, Roger. 1453: The Holy War for Constantinople and the Clash of Islam and the West. New York: Hyperion, 2005. p 31 ISBN 1-4013-0850-3.
  2. ^ Crimea.
  3. ^ Crimea, Victorian Web.
The public domain comprises the body of all creative works and other knowledge—writing, artwork, music, science, inventions, and others—in which no person or organization has any proprietary interest. ... Not to be confused with New Catholic Encyclopedia. ... Les Carlyon was born in northern Victoria, Australia in 1942. ... National parks in Turkey includes: Yozgat Forest National Park Karatepe-ArslantaÅŸ National Park SoÄŸuksu National Park KuÅŸcenneti National Park UludaÄŸ National Park Yedigöller National Park Cape Dilek - Delta of Büyük Menderes National Park Mount Spil National Park Mount Kızıl National Park Mount G... AkdaÄŸ is the name of several different mountains in Turkey. ... Alaca Höyük or Alacahöyük (sometimes also spelt as Alacahüyük, Euyuk, or Evuk) is a village in the Çorum Province, Turkey, located 170 km east of Ankara. ... Ayvalık Islands are the group of islands around Ayvalık district of Turkey in Balıkesir Province in the Northeastern Aegean Sea. ... The Roman bath in Olympos - Turkey Olympos is a valley at the south coast of Turkey, 90 km southwest of Antalya city near the Town of Kemer. ... Mycale (also MycÇŽlé, Mukalê, Mykale and Mycali; called Samsun DaÄŸi in modern Turkey) is a mountain on the west coast of central Anatolia in Turkey, north of the mouth of the Maeander and opposite the island of Samos. ... The Büyük Menderes River (historically the Maeander also spelled Meander); Turkish: Büyük Menderes Nehri, Greek: Μαίανδρος) is a river in southwestern Turkey. ... Göreme, located among the fairy chimneys rock formations, is a town in Cappadocia, a historical region of Turkey. ... Wall of upper city in Termessos. ... The highest peak Kaçkar Dağı from Mezovit Çayiri Kaçkar mountains or Kaçkar DaÄŸları or simply Kaçkar(s) is a mountain range rising above along the Black Sea coast in Eastern Turkey. ... Karagöl (pronounced as kha-rag-oell) is a tourist attraction of Giresun Province located in eastern Black Sea Region of Türkiye. ... Karatepe, (Black Tell) Osmaniye Province Turkey, in the Taurus Mountains, on the right bank of the Ceyhan Nehri, about 23 km from Kadirli, is an ancient city of Cilicia that controlled a passage from eastern Anatolia to the plain of north Syria. ... The Kursunlu (Turkish: KurÅŸunlu)is a waterfall which is reduced to a mere trickle in the summer months. ... Lake KuÅŸ or Lake Manyas (Turkish: KuÅŸ Gölü meaning Bird Lake, or, Manyas Gölü) is a lake in eastern Turkey, located in the Balıkesir region. ... Lake Abant (Turkish: Abant Gölü) is a freshwater lake formed as a result of a great landslide in Turkeys Bolu Province in northwest Anatolia. ... Lake Bafa is a lake situated in southwest Turkey, part of it within the boundaries of Milas district of MuÄŸla Province and the northern part within Aydın Provinces Söke district. ... Lake BeyÅŸehir seen from space (false color) Lake BeyÅŸehir (Turkish: ) is a large freshwater lake in Isparta and Konya provinces, southwestern part of Turkey. ... Beaches of Marmaris on the Turkish Riviera Marmaris is an important port city and a tourist destination on the Mediterranean coast, located in southwest Turkey, in the MuÄŸla Province. ... Mount Ida, Turkish Kazdağı (pronounced Kaz DA-u, with a meaning of Goose Mountain[1]), Kaz DaÄŸları, or KarataÅŸ Tepesi, is a mountain in northwestern Turkey, southeast of the ruins of Troy, along the north coast of the Gulf of Edremit. ... Nemrut or Nemrud (Turkish: or Nemrut Dağı, Kurdish: , Armenian: Õ†Õ¥Õ´Ö€Õ¸Ö‚Õ© Սար) is a 2,134 meters (7000 ft. ... In Greek mythology, Mount Sipylus northeast of Smyrna in Lydia (southwestern Anatolia, now Turkey) was the region ruled by Tantalus. ... For the canyon, see Saklıkent Canyon Saklıkent is a winter resort in Turkey, 45 kilometres from Antalya and 60 kilometres from Antalya Airport. ... For other uses of Troy or Ilion, see Troy (disambiguation) and Ilion (disambiguation). ... Mount UludaÄŸ UludaÄŸ, the ancient Mysian Olympus, is a mountain in Bursa Province, Turkey, of altitude 2,543 m. ... Yedigöller National Park is located in Bolu, Turkey. ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
Gallipoli campaign - All About Turkey (3820 words)
The Gallipoli campaign took place between April and December 1915 in an effort to take the Dardanelles from the Turkish Ottoman Empire (an ally of Germany and Austria) and thus force it out of the war.
These forces were to be split into two groups, the first group was to seize the Seddulbahir area and open the Straits whilst the second was to land in the Kabatepe region, seize the Conkbayir area and obstruct the Turkish Forces moving down from the north.
Today Gallipoli (Gelibolu) peninsula is a national park nearby Canakkale and there are many war memorials and cemeteries belonging to Turks, Australians, New Zealanders, British and French.
Gallipoli - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1093 words)
It is located on the Gallipoli Peninsula (Gelibolu Yarımadası), with the Aegean Sea to the west and the Dardanelles straits to the east.
Gallipoli (in Turkish, Guelibolou) made was the chief town of a Kaïmakamlik (district) in the vilayet (Wali's province) of Adrianople, with about 30,000 inhabitants, Greeks, Turks, Armenians and Jews.
In Australia, New Zealand and Newfoundland, Gallipoli is the name given to the Allied Campaign on the peninsula during World War I, usually known in Britain as the Dardanelles Campaign and in Turkey as the Battle of Çanakkale.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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