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Encyclopedia > Galesburg, Illinois
Galesburg
City
Country United States
State Illinois
County Knox
Coordinates 40°57′8″N 90°22′7″W / 40.95222, -90.36861
Area 17.1 mi² (44 km²)
 - land 17.1 mi² (44 km²)
Density 1,994.9 /mi² (770 /km²)
Timezone CST (UTC-6)
 - summer (DST) CDT (UTC-5)
Postal code 61401
Area code XXX
Location of Galesburg within Illinois
Wikimedia Commons: Galesburg, Illinois

Galesburg is a city in Knox County, Illinois, in the United States. As of the 2000 census, the city population was 33,706. It is the county seat of Knox County.GR6 Galesburg is home to Knox College, a private four-year liberal arts college, and Carl Sandburg College, a two-year community college. List of cities in Illinois, arranged in alphabetical order. ... Official language(s) English[1] Capital Springfield Largest city Chicago Largest metro area Chicago Metropolitan Area Area  Ranked 25th  - Total 57,918 sq mi (140,998 km²)  - Width 210 miles (340 km)  - Length 390 miles (629 km)  - % water 4. ... Knox County is a county located in the state of Illinois. ... A square mile is an English unit of area equal to that of a square with sides each 1 statute mile (≈1,609 m) in length. ... Square kilometre (U.S. spelling: square kilometer), symbol km², is a decimal multiple of SI unit of surface area square metre, one of the SI derived units. ... A square mile is an English unit of area equal to that of a square with sides each 1 statute mile (≈1,609 m) in length. ... Square kilometre (U.S. spelling: square kilometer), symbol km², is a decimal multiple of SI unit of surface area square metre, one of the SI derived units. ... A square mile is an English unit of area equal to that of a square with sides each 1 statute mile (≈1,609 m) in length. ... Square kilometre (U.S. spelling: square kilometer), symbol km², is a decimal multiple of SI unit of surface area square metre, one of the SI derived units. ...  CST or UTC-6 The Central Time Zone observes standard time by subtracting six hours from UTC during standard time (UTC-6) and five hours during daylight saving time (UTC-5). ... −12 | −11 | −10 | −9:30 | −9 | −8 | −7 | −6 | −5 | −4 | −3:30 | −3 | −2:30 | −2 | −1 | −0:25 | UTC (0) | +0:20 | +0:30 | +1 | +2 | +3 | +3:30 | +4 | +4:30 | +4:51 | +5 | +5:30 | +5:40 | +5:45 | +6 | +6:30 | +7 | +7:20 | +7...  CST or UTC-6 The Central Time Zone observes standard time by subtracting six hours from UTC during standard time (UTC-6) and five hours during daylight saving time (UTC-5). ... -12 | -11 | -10 | -9:30 | -9 | -8 | -7 | -6 | -5 | -4 | -3:30 | -3 | -2:30 | -2 | -1 | -0:25 | UTC (0) | +0:20 | +0:30 | +1 | +2 | +3 | +3:30 | +4 | +4:30 | +4:51 | +5 | +5:30 | +5:40 | +5:45 | +6 | +6:30 | +7 | +7:20 | +7... Area code 309 is the telephone area code serving the state of Illinois. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 443 × 600 pixelsFull resolution‎ (768 × 1,040 pixels, file size: 811 KB, MIME type: image/png) Please see the file description page for further information. ... Image File history File links Illinois_-_outline_map. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Knox County is a county located in the state of Illinois. ... Official language(s) English[1] Capital Springfield Largest city Chicago Largest metro area Chicago Metropolitan Area Area  Ranked 25th  - Total 57,918 sq mi (140,998 km²)  - Width 210 miles (340 km)  - Length 390 miles (629 km)  - % water 4. ... The Twenty-second United States Census, conducted by the Census Bureau, determined the resident population of the United States on April 1, 2000, to be 281,421,906, an increase of 13. ... A county seat is a term for an administrative center for a county, primarily used in the United States. ... Knox County is a county located in the state of Illinois. ... Knox College is a four-year coeducational private liberal arts college located in Galesburg, Illinois. ... Carl Sandburg College is a two-year community college based in Galesburg, Illinois and serving the west-central Illinois region. ...

"Welcome to Galesburg" sign
"Welcome to Galesburg" sign

Contents

Image File history File links Galesburg-city-sign. ... Image File history File links Galesburg-city-sign. ...

Geography

Galesburg is located at 40°57′8″N, 90°22′7″W (40.952292, -90.368545).GR1 According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 44.2 km² (17.1 mi²). 43.8 km² (16.9 mi²) of it is land and 0.5 km² (0.2 mi²) of it (1.05%) is water. The United States Census Bureau (officially Bureau of the Census as defined in Title ) is a part of the United States Department of Commerce. ... A square metre (US spelling: square meter) is by definition the area enclosed by a square with sides each 1 metre long. ... A square mile is an English unit of area equal to that of a square with sides each 1 statute mile (≈1,609 m) in length. ...

Outline of the Township area and the City of Galesburg in Knox County.
Outline of the Township area and the City of Galesburg in Knox County.

Image File history File links Size of this preview: 481 × 600 pixel Image in higher resolution (494 × 616 pixel, file size: 13 KB, MIME type: image/png) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 481 × 600 pixel Image in higher resolution (494 × 616 pixel, file size: 13 KB, MIME type: image/png) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ...

History

Galesburg was founded by George Washington Gale, a Presbyterian minister from New York state, who dreamed of establishing a manual labor college which became Knox College. A committee from New York purchased 17 acres (69,000 m²) in Knox County in 1835, and the first 25 settlers arrived in 1836. They built temporary cabins in Log City near current Lake Storey, just north of Galesburg, having decided that no log cabins were to be built inside the town limits. George Washington Gale (Born 1789 in New York) was a Presbyterian minister who traveled out to what would become Galesburg, Illinois to found Knox College (then called the Knox Manual Labor College) in 1837. ... This article is about the state. ... College (Latin collegium) is a term most often used today to denote an educational institution. ... Knox College is a four-year coeducational private liberal arts college located in Galesburg, Illinois. ... This article is about the state. ... This article is about the unit of measure known as the acre. ...


"Galesburg was home to the first anti-slavery society in Illinois, founded in 1837, and was a stop on the Underground Railroad [1]". The city was the site of the fifth Lincoln-Douglas debate, on a temporary speaker's platform attached to Knox College's Old Main building on October 7, 1858. Knox College continues to maintain and use Old Main to this day. An Underground Railroad Museum and Lincoln-Douglas Debate Museum are planned for Knox College's Alumni Hall after it is renovated. This article is about a 19th-century slave escape route. ... The Lincoln-Douglas debates of 1858 were a series of seven debates between Abraham Lincoln, a Republican, and Stephen A. Douglas, a Democrat, for an Illinois seat in the United States Senate. ... Knox College is a four-year coeducational private liberal arts college located in Galesburg, Illinois. ... is the 280th day of the year (281st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1858 (MDCCCLVIII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ...


Galesburg was the home of Mary Ann Bickerdyke, who provided hospital care for Union soldiers during the American Civil War. After the Civil War, Galesburg was the birthplace of poet, author, and historian Carl Sandburg, poet and artist Dorothea Tanning, and former Major League Baseball star Jim Sundberg. Carl Sandburg's boyhood home is now operated by the Illinois Historic Preservation Agency as the Carl Sandburg State Historic Site. The site contains the cottage Sandburg was born in, a modern museum, the rock under which he and his wife Lilian are buried, and a performance venue. Mary Ann Bickerdyke (July 19, 1817-November 8, 1901), also known as Mother Bickerdyke, was a hospital administrator for Union soldiers during the American Civil War. ... Combatants United States of America (Union) Confederate States of America (Confederacy) Commanders Abraham Lincoln, Ulysses S. Grant Jefferson Davis, Robert E. Lee Strength 2,200,000 1,064,000 Casualties 110,000 killed in action, 360,000 total dead, 275,200 wounded 93,000 killed in action, 258,000 total... For the passenger train service, see Carl Sandburg (Amtrak). ... Tannings Etched Murmurs (etching) 1984 Dorothea Tanning (born 25 August 1910) is an American painter, printmaker, sculptor and writer. ... Major Leagues redirects here. ... James Howard Sundberg (born May 18, 1951 in Galesburg, Illinois) is a former professional baseball catcher for a number of teams, most significantly the Texas Rangers. ... The Illinois Historic Preservation Agency is a governmental agency of the U.S. state of Illinois. ...


Throughout much of its history, Galesburg has been inextricably tied to the railroad industry. Local businessmen were major backers of the first railroad to connect Illinois' (then) two biggest cities—Chicago and Quincy—as well as a third leg initially terminating across the river from Burlington, Iowa, eventually connecting to it via bridge and thence onward to the Western frontier. The Chicago, Burlington and Quincy Railroad sited major rail sorting yards here, including the first to use hump sorting. This is the top-level page of WikiProject trains Rail tracks Rail transport refers to the land transport of passengers and goods along railways or railroads. ... Nickname: Motto: Urbs in Horto (Latin: City in a Garden), I Will Location in the Chicago metro area and Illinois Coordinates: , Country State Counties Cook, DuPage Settled 1770s Incorporated March 4, 1837 Government  - Mayor Richard M. Daley (D) Area  - City 234. ... : Gem City United States Illinois Adams 14. ... Burlington is a city in Des Moines County, Iowa, United States. ... The Chicago, Burlington and Quincy Railroad (AAR reporting mark CBQ) was a railroad that operated in the Midwestern United States. ... A classification yard or marshalling yard (including hump yards) is a railroad yard found at some freight train stations, used to separate railroad cars on to one of several tracks. ...

A BNSF train passes through central Galesburg.
A BNSF train passes through central Galesburg.

In the late 19th century, when the Atchison, Topeka and Santa Fe Railway connected its service through to Chicago, it also laid track through Galesburg, making this city one of relatively few to be served by multiple railroads and even fewer to have multiple railroad depots. (Indeed, it was not until the 1990s that Amtrak finally closed the old Santa Fe depot and consolidated all passenger operations at the site of the former Burlington Northern depot.) A series of mergers eventually united both tracks under the ownership of BNSF Railway, carrying an average of seven trains per hour between them. As of the closing of the Maytag plant in fall of 2004, BNSF is once again the largest private employer in Galesburg. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1555x715, 245 KB) A BNSF locomotive passing through Galesburg, Illinois. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1555x715, 245 KB) A BNSF locomotive passing through Galesburg, Illinois. ... The Atchison, Topeka and Santa Fe Railway (AAR reporting marks ATSF), often abbreviated as Santa Fe, was one of the largest railroads in the United States. ... For the band, see 1990s (band). ... The high-speed Acela Express in West Windsor, New Jersey. ... The BNSF Railway (AAR reporting marks BNSF), headquartered in Fort Worth, Texas, is one of the four remaining transcontinental railroads and one of the largest railroad networks in North America (only one competitor, the Union Pacific Railroad, is larger in size). ... Headquarters of the Maytag Corporation, Newton, Iowa Maytag Corporation (NYSE: MYG), is a $4. ...


Transportation

Amtrak, the national passenger rail system, provides service to Galesburg, operating the California Zephyr, the Illinois Zephyr, the Carl Sandburg, and the Southwest Chief daily in both directions between Chicago and points west from Galesburg (Amtrak station). The high-speed Acela Express in West Windsor, New Jersey. ... Two California Zephyr express trains meet at a railroad siding (Grizzly) in Garfield County, Colorado beside the Colorado River on March 21, 1949. ... The Illinois Zephyr is a 258-mile (415 km) passenger train operated by Amtrak that runs between Chicago and Quincy, Illinois. ... The Carl Sandburg is a 258-mile (415 km) passenger train operated by Amtrak that runs between Chicago and Quincy, Illinois. ... The Southwest Chief snaking through Apache Canyon, NM The Southwest Chief (formerly the Southwest Limited) is a passenger train operated by Amtrak along a 2256-mile (3631-km) route through the Midwestern and Southwestern United States. ... The Great Hall of Chicago Union Station, Daniel Burnham, architect Union Station is a Chicago, Illinois train station which was built 1913–1925, during the time when Chicago reigned as the undisputed railroad center of the United States. ... Other information Code GBB Traffic Passengers (2006) 76,464 4. ...


Demographics

Historical populations
Census Pop.  %±
1850 323
1860 4,953 1433.4%
1870 10,158 105.1%
1880 11,437 12.6%
1890 15,264 33.5%
1900 18,607 21.9%
1910 22,089 18.7%
1920 23,834 7.9%
1930 28,830 21.0%
1940 28,876 0.2%
1950 31,425 8.8%
1960 37,243 18.5%
1970 36,290 -2.6%
1980 35,305 -2.7%
1990 33,530 -5.0%
2000 33,706 0.5%
Decennial US Census

As of the censusGR2 of 2000, there were 33,706 people, 13,237 households, and 7,902 families residing in the city. The population density was 770.1/km² (1,994.9/mi²). There were 14,133 housing units at an average density of 322.9/km² (836.5/mi²). The racial makeup of the city was 84.23% White, 10.20% African American, 0.22% Native American, 1.03% Asian, 0.02% Pacific Islander, 2.46% from other races, and 1.84% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 5.01% of the population. The Seventh Census of the United States, conducted by the Bureau of the Census, determined the resident population of the United States to be 23,191,876 — an increase of 35. ... The United States Census of 1860 was the eighth Census conducted in the United States. ... The Ninth United States Census was taken in 1870. ... 1880 US Census The United States Census of 1880 was the tenth United States Census. ... The Eleventh United States Census was taken June 1, 1890. ... 1900 US Census The Twelfth United States Census, conducted by the Census Bureau, determined the resident population of the United States to be 76,212,168, an increase of 21. ... The Thirteenth United States Census was taken in 1910. ... The Fourteenth United States Census was taken in 1920. ... The Fifteenth United States Census was taken in 1930. ... The Sixteenth United States Census, conducted by the Census Bureau, determined the resident population of the United States to be 132,164,569, an increase of 7. ... The Seventeenth United States Census was taken in 1950. ... The Eighteenth United States Census was taken in 1960. ... The Nineteenth United States Census was taken in 1970. ... The Twentieth United States Census, conducted by the Census Bureau, determined the resident population of the United States to be 226,545,805, an increase of 11. ... The Twenty-first United States Census, conducted by the Census Bureau, determined the resident population of the United States to be 248,709,873, an increase of 9. ... 2000 US Census logo The Twenty-Second United States Census, known as Census 2000 and conducted by the Census Bureau, determined the resident population of the United States on April 1, 2000, to be 281,421,906, an increase of 13. ... Image:1870 census Lindauer Weber 01. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... It has been suggested that Ethnicity (United States Census) be merged into this article or section. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ...


There were 13,237 households out of which 26.3% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 43.6% were married couples living together, 12.4% had a female householder with no husband present, and 40.3% were non-families. 34.6% of all households were made up of individuals and 16.1% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.24 and the average family size was 2.87. Matrimony redirects here. ...


In the city the population was spread out with 21.1% under the age of 18, 11.8% from 18 to 24, 27.0% from 25 to 44, 22.0% from 45 to 64, and 18.1% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 38 years. For every 100 females there were 100.3 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 98.1 males.


The median income for a household in the city was $31,987, and the median income for a family was $41,796. Males had a median income of $31,698 versus $21,388 for females. The per capita income for the city was $17,214. About 10.7% of families and 14.7% of the population were below the poverty line, including 23.4% of those under age 18 and 6.3% of those age 65 or over. The per capita income for a group of people may be defined as their total personal income, divided by the total population. ... Map of countries showing percentage of population who have an income below the national poverty line The poverty line is the level of income below which one cannot afford to purchase all the resources one requires to live. ...


Galesburg will soon be home to the National Railroad Hall of Fame. Efforts are underway to raise funds for the $60 million project which got a major boost in 2006, when the United States Congress passed a bill to charter the establishment, and provided some federal funding for the project. It is hoped that the Museum will bring tourism and a financial boost to the community. The US National Railroad Hall of Fame was established in 2003 and recognized by Congressional resolutions in 2003 and 2004. ...


Festivals

Galesburg is the home of the Railroad Days festival held on the fourth weekend of June. The festival began in 1978. During the festival, Carl Sandburg College hosts one of the largest model railroad train shows and layouts in the U.S. Midwest. Labor Day weekend in September hosts the Stearman Fly in. Also held in September are the Great Cardboard Boat Regatta and the Annual Rubber Duck Race held out at Lake Storey. The third weekend of every August a Civil war and Pre 1840's Rendezvous is held at Lake Storey Park. This article needs cleanup. ... Midwest States (United States of America, ND to OH) The Midwest is a common name for a region of the United States of America. ... Boeing Stearman PT-17 Stearman Aircraft Corporation was an aircraft manufacturer established by Lloyd Stearman at Wichita, Kansas in 1927. ...


There is also a kite festival every May at Lake Storey Park.


Trivia

  • According to legend, it was in Galesburg, Illinois in 1914 where the four Marx Brothers (Groucho, Chico, Harpo, and Gummo) first received their nicknames. Nicknames ending in -o were popular in the early part of the 20th century, and a fellow Vaudevillian, Art Fisher, supposedly bestowed them upon the brothers during a poker game there. Zeppo Marx received his nickname later.[verification needed]
  • Galesburg features prominently in the Mountain Goats' song Weekend in Western Illinois from the album Full Force Galesburg.
  • The Carr Mansion in Galesburg was the site of the first presidential cabinet meeting held outside of Washington, DC

Image File history File links Broom_icon. ... This article is about the comedian siblings. ... Groucho Marx poses for an NBC promotional photograph Julius Henry Marx, known as Groucho Marx (October 2, 1890 - August 19, 1977), was an American comedian, working both with his siblings, the Marx Brothers, and on his own. ... Leonard Marx, known as Chico, (March 22, 1887 – October 11, 1961) was one of the Marx Brothers. ... This article is about Harpo Marx, brother of Groucho et al. ... Milton Marx (October 23, 1892 - April 21, 1977), known as Gummo, was one of the Marx Brothers. ... Groucho, Gummo, Minnie (mother), Zeppo, Frenchy (father), Chico and Harpo. ... Herbert Marx (February 25, 1901 – November 29, 1979) is best known as Zeppo Marx, the name he used when he performed with his brothers, The Marx Brothers. ... The Mountain Goats is the name of prolific American singer-songwriter John Darnielles long-running musical project. ... The Prestige is a novel by British writer Christopher Priest. ...

Media

Galesburg has multiple radio stations and newspapers delivering a mix of local, regional and national news. WGIL-AM, WAAG-FM, WLSR-FM and WKAY-FM are all owned by Galesburg Broadcasting while Prairie Radio Communications owns WAIK-AM. The Galesburg Register-Mail is the result of the merger of the Galesburg Republican-Register and the Galesburg Daily Mail in 1928. Those two papers can trace their roots back to the mid-1800s. A daily, it is the main newspaper of the city, and was owned by Copley Press out of San Diego until it was sold to Gate House Media in April 2007. "The Zephyr" was started in 1989, is published on Thursdays and is the only locally-owned newspaper. There is also "The Paper," which is delivered without subscription to all households every Wednesday and is also owned by Gate House Media.


FM Radio

WVKC are the call letters for (90. ... Hard Rock redirects here. ... Radio Data System, or RDS, is a standard from the European Broadcasting Union for sending small amounts of digital information using conventional FM radio broadcasts. ... country music, see Country music (disambiguation) Country music, the first half of Billboards country and western music category, is a blend of popular musical forms originally found in the Southern United States and the Appalachian Mountains. ... Adult contemporary music, frequently abbreviated AC, is a type of radio format that plays mainstream contemporary pop music, excluding hip hop, hard rock, and some teen pop music, which is intended for an adult audience. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Contemporary Christian Music (or CCM; also by its religious neutral term inspirational music) is a genre of popular music which is lyrically focused on matters concerned with the Christian faith. ... Adult contemporary music, frequently abbreviated AC, is a type of radio format that plays mainstream contemporary pop music, excluding hip hop, hard rock, and some teen pop music, which is intended for an adult audience. ...

AM Radio

Window RAM or WRAM is an obsolete type of semiconductor computer memory that was designed to replace video RAM (VRAM) in graphics adapters. ... country music, see Country music (disambiguation) Country music, the first half of Billboards country and western music category, is a blend of popular musical forms originally found in the Southern United States and the Appalachian Mountains. ... For other uses, see Talk Radio. ... For other uses, see Talk Radio. ...

Print

Notable residents

George Radcliffe Colton (1865 or 1866—1916) was the Governor of Puerto Rico from November 6, 1909 to November 5, 1913, a position to which he was appointed by President William Howard Taft. ... The Governor of Puerto Rico is the Head of Government of the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico. ... Edwin Hurd Conger (March 7, 1843 – May 18, 1907) was a nineteenth century politician, lawyer and banker from Illinois and Iowa. ... Ira Clifton Copley (b. ... Copley Press is a privately held newspaper business, originally founded in Illinois, but now based in La Jolla, California. ... George Washington Gale Ferris, Jr. ... A Ferris wheel on the boardwalk in Ocean City, New Jersey, USA. A Ferris wheel (or, more commonly in the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland [UK], big wheel) is a nonbuilding structure consisting of an upright wheel with passenger gondolas suspended from the rim. ... // Basic Info Aaron Fike is a NASCAR BUSCH Series driver from Galesburg, Illinois. ... A.J. Fike is an American racecar driver. ... Jeff Burton (99), Elliott Sadler (38), Ricky Rudd (21), Dale Jarrett (88), Sterling Marlin (40), Jimmie Johnson (48), and Casey Mears (41) practice for the 2004 Daytona 500 The National Association for Stock Car Auto Racing (NASCAR) is the largest sanctioning body of motorsports in the United States. ... William Todd Hamilton (born October 18, 1965) is an American professional golfer. ... This article is about the sport. ... Philip G. Phil Hare (born February 21, 1949) is currently the Democratic Congressman representing Illinoiss 17th congressional district (map). ... Reagan redirects here. ... George Reeves (January 5,[1] 1914 – June 16, 1959) was an American actor, best known for his role as Superman in the 1950s television program Adventures of Superman and his controversial death at the age of 45. ... For the passenger train service, see Carl Sandburg (Amtrak). ... This article is about the art form. ... This article is about the study of the past in human terms. ... This article is about the literary concept. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... James Howard Sundberg (born May 18, 1951 in Galesburg, Illinois) is a former professional baseball catcher for a number of teams, most significantly the Texas Rangers. ... Major Leagues redirects here. ... Tannings Etched Murmurs (etching) 1984 Dorothea Tanning (born 25 August 1910) is an American painter, printmaker, sculptor and writer. ... Charles Rudolph Walgreen (October 9, 1873 – 1939) was a United States drugstore businessman. ... Walgreen Co. ... Pete Weber Pete Weber is also the name of a professional bowler. ... Sewall Green Wright ForMemRS (December 21, 1889 – March 3, 1988) was an American geneticist known for his influential work on evolutionary theory. ... This article is about evolution in biology. ... Population genetics is the study of the distribution of and change in allele frequencies under the influence of the four evolutionary forces: natural selection, genetic drift, mutation, and migration. ...

External links

  • Mr. Lincoln and Freedom: Lincoln-Douglas Debate in Galesburg
  • City of Galesburg
  • CarlSandburg.net: A Research Website for Sandburg Studies
  • Carl Sandburg Historic Site Association
  • The Galesburg Project lists famous Galesburgers and visitors. Links to Galesburg history articles
  • Local papers:
    • The Register-Mail (daily)
    • The Zephyr (weekly)
    • The Paper (weekly, free)
  • Galesburg, Illinois is at coordinates 40°57′08″N 90°22′07″W / 40.952292, -90.368545Coordinates: 40°57′08″N 90°22′07″W / 40.952292, -90.368545

  Results from FactBites:
 
Galesburg: Weather and Much More from Answers.com (1634 words)
Galesburg was founded by Presbyterians from the Mohawk valley, N.Y., under the leadership of George Washington Gale.
Galesburg was founded by George Washington Gale, a minister of the gospel from New York state, who dreamed of establishing a manual labor college which became Knox College.
Galesburg was home to the first anti-slavery society in Illinois, founded in 1837, and was a stop on the Underground Railroad.
Galesburg, Illinois (168 words)
Knox is located in Galesburg, a city whose red brick streets and Victorian homes epitomize the warmth and unpretentious grace of the Midwest.
Knox is a few short blocks from the center of town and through internships, consultancies and volunteer activity, both students and faculty are actively engaged in the social, political and cultural life of Galesburg.
Galesburg boasts theatres, malls, shopping complexes, a symphony orchestra, over 80 restaurants and 800 hotel rooms, and 23 city parks that include a public beach and wooded biking and walking trails.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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