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Encyclopedia > Galactica 1980
Galactica 1980

Galactica 1980 intro
Genre Science fiction
Created by Glen A. Larson
Starring Lorne Greene
Herb Jefferson, Jr.
Barry Van Dyke
Richard Lynch
Country of origin Flag of United States United States
No. of episodes 10
Production
Running time approx. 45 mins
Broadcast
Original channel ABC
Original run January 27, 1980May 4, 1980
Links
IMDb profile
TV.com summary

Galactica 1980 is a science fiction television series, and a spin-off from the 19781979 series Battlestar Galactica. It was first broadcast on the ABC network in the United States from January 27, 1980, to May 4, 1980. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Glen A. Larson (born 1937) is a television writer and producer. ... Lorne Greene in his role as Ben Cartwright in Bonanza Lorne Greene as Commander Adama in Battlestar Galactica Lorne Greene O.C., LL.D. (February 12, 1915 – September 11, 1987) was a Canadian actor best known for two iconic roles on American television. ... Herbert Jefferson, Jr. ... Barry Van Dyke is the second son of legendary entertainer, Dick Van Dyke. ... Richard Hugh Lynch (b. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... The following is a complete list episodes for the original continuity of Battlestar Galactica. ... The American Broadcasting Company ( oftenly known as ABC) operates television and radio networks in the United States and is also shown on basic cable in Canada. ... January 27 is the 27th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1980 (MCMLXXX) was a leap year starting on Tuesday. ... May 4 is the 124th day of the year (125th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1980 (MCMLXXX) was a leap year starting on Tuesday. ... Battlestar Galactica. ... Battlestar Galactica is an American science fiction franchise. ... Science fiction is a form of speculative fiction principally dealing with the impact of imagined science and technology, or both, upon society and persons as individuals. ... A television program is the content of television broadcasting. ... A spin-off (or spinoff) is a new organization or entity formed by a split from a larger one such as a new company formed from a university research group. ... 1978 (MCMLXXVIII) was a common year starting on Sunday. ... For the song by the Smashing Pumpkins, see 1979 (song). ... Battlestar Galactica is an American science fiction television series, produced in 1978 by Glen Larson and starring Lorne Greene, Richard Hatch and Dirk Benedict. ... The American Broadcasting Company ( oftenly known as ABC) operates television and radio networks in the United States and is also shown on basic cable in Canada. ... January 27 is the 27th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1980 (MCMLXXX) was a leap year starting on Tuesday. ... May 4 is the 124th day of the year (125th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1980 (MCMLXXX) was a leap year starting on Tuesday. ...

Contents

Development

A massive write-in campaign began with the cancellation of the original Battlestar Galactica. Such things were uncommon in those days, and it prompted ABC to re-think their reasons for canceling the show. After some deliberation, they contacted Glen Larson to see about reviving the series, albeit in some modified and less-expensive format. Battlestar Galactica. ... Look up ABC in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Glen A. Larson (born 1937) is a television writer and producer. ...


Both Larson and the network felt the show needed some major change of focus to re-launch it as a spinoff, and Larson and Donald P. Bellisario decided to set the new series five years after "The Hand of God," the final episode of the original series. This would allow them to weed the cast of many supporting characters who were now considered superfluous - Colonel Tigh, Athena, Cassiopea, Boxey, etc - which would bring down production costs. The only major characters to return from the original series would be Commander Adama, Colonel Boomer (Replacing Tigh), Apollo, Starbuck, and Baltar. Baltar was to have somehow made atonement for betraying the Colonies to the Cylons, and was now the President of the Council of Twelve. Donald Paul Bellisario (born August 8, 1935 in North Charleroi, Pennsylvania) is an American television producer and scriptwriter. ... Hand of God may refer to: an Act of God, in religious or legal contexts (force majeure) a hand-shaped protective amulet in Jewish folklore the Hand of God goal scored by Diego Maradona in the 1986 football world cup This is a disambiguation page, a list of pages that... Colonel Tigh is the Executive Officer of Battlestar Galactica, and was played by Terry Carter. ... Helmeted Athena, of the Velletri type. ... This page is a candidate for speedy deletion. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Captain Troy. ...


Upon discovering a 'present day' Earth completely unable to defend itself from the Cylons, Adama decided to just head off into deep space to lead the Cylons away from the planet, but Baltar suggested using Time Travel Technology to alter Earth's history so it's technology would develop more rapidly up to a Colonial level. The Council votes this suggestion down, so Baltar steals a ship capable of time travel and heads into Earth's past to carry out his plan anyway. After some deliberation, Starbuck and Apollo are sent after him to bring him back or at least un-do his changes to history. Episodes would feature a new "Time Mission" every week, generaly with Apollo at some different time in the past, and Starbuck flying back and forth between "Now" and "Then" to give information and support to Apollo. ABC approved this pitch, and gave the go-ahead to develop a pilot for the series. Time travel is a concept that has long fascinated humanity—whether it is Merlin experiencing time backwards, or religious traditions like Mohammeds trip to Jerusalem and ascent to heaven, returning before a glass knocked over had spilt its contents. ... Look up ABC in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...


Dirk Benedict was unavailable at the time, and Richard Hatch didn't want to be connected with the series at that time, so after a quick re-think it was decided the series would take place thirty years after the end of the original series rather than five, and that Boxey would take Apollo's role, while "Lt. Dillon" would take over the Starbuck part. President Baltar was written out entirely, and Xavier was created to take up his role as resident bad guy. Dirk Benedict (born Dirk Niewoehner on March 1, 1945) is an American movie and television actor, perhaps best known for playing the characters Lt. ... Richard Hatch is a name used by the following people: Richard Hatch (actor), played Apollo in the original Battlestar Galactica. ...


After the pilot was completed, the Network was unhappy with the Time Travel aspects of the story, and agreed to pick up the series only if that subject was dropped. Larson and Bellisario reluctantly agreed, and the series instead became focused on Troy and Dillon's attempts to protect some colonial orphans on Earth. Bellisario later re-tooled the original time travel concept and re-used it as the basis of the considerably more successful Quantum Leap (TV series) [1] Quantum Leap is an American science fiction television series that ran for 95 episodes from March 1989 to May 1993 on the NBC network. ...


Synopsis

Set during the year 1980, and a generation after the original series, the Galactica and its fleet of 220 civilian ships have finally discovered Earth, only to find that the planet cannot defend itself against the Cylons as originally hoped. Therefore, teams of Colonial warriors are covertly sent to the planet to work incognito with various members of the scientific community, hoping to advance Earth's technology. Adjectives: Terrestrial, Terran, Telluric, Tellurian, Earthly Atmosphere Surface pressure: 101. ... Old Cylon Centurion shown in a museum display in the 2003 Battlestar Galactica miniseries The Cylons are a cybernetic civilization at war with the Twelve Colonies of humanity in the Battlestar Galactica science fiction franchise, in the original 1978/1980 series and movie, as well as the 2003 reimagining. ... Secrecy is the condition of hiding information from others. ... The eight planets and three dwarf planets of the Solar System. ...


Commander Adama and Lt. Colonel Boomer—now second-in-command in place of Colonel Tigh—on the advice of a mysterious teenager named Doctor Zee who serves as Adama's advisor, sends Captain "Boxey" Troy, who is the adopted son of Adama's own son Apollo, and Lt. Dillon to North America, where they become entangled with TV journalist Jamie Hamilton. After an initial, epic time travel adventure to Nazi Germany in the 1940s (to stop rebel Galactican, Commander Xavier, trying to change the future to improve Earth's technology level), the three friends devise ways to help Earth's scientists and outwit the Cylons in the present day. Meanwhile, Adama sends a group of children from the Galactica fleet to Earth in order to begin the process of integrating with the population; due to differences in gravity and physiology, however, the children also have to learn to deal with the fact they have near-superhuman powers on Earth. Commander Adama redirects here. ... The original Boomer. ... Colonel Tigh is the Executive Officer of Battlestar Galactica, and was played by Terry Carter. ... Doctor Zee was a recurring character in the short lived science fiction series Galactica 1980. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Boxey. ... Captain Apollo is the name of a fictitious character in the original Battlestar Galactica film and television series. ... World map showing North America A satellite composite image of North America. ... Time travel is a concept that has long fascinated humanity—whether it is Merlin experiencing time backwards, or religious traditions like Mohammeds trip to Jerusalem and ascent to heaven, returning before a glass knocked over had spilt its contents. ... Nazi Germany, or the Third Reich, commonly refers to Germany in the years 1933–1945, when it was under the firm control of the totalitarian and fascist ideology of the Nazi Party, with the Führer Adolf Hitler as dictator. ...


The fate of several characters from the original series are indicated during the course of the series. Apollo is apparently dead (cause unknown). Starbuck was apparently marooned on a desert planet although the script for the episode The Wheel of Fire (unfilmed at the time of cancellation) indicated that Starbuck was eventually rescued from the planet by the inhabitants of the Ships of Light and became one of the inhabitants. Captain Troy is revealed to be Boxey, and Lt. Boomer is now Adama's second in command. The fate of several other characters—Adama's daughter Athena, Colonel Tigh, Starbuck's girlfriend Cassiopeia, and the evil Count Baltar—are not revealed, and all four characters are absent from the series. The Ship of Lights was an advanced spacecraft from the original Battlestar Galactica, first seen in the episode War of the Gods. ... The Seraphs (singular: Seraph) were an alien race in the original Battlestar Galactica series from 1978/79, and its spinoff series, Galactica 1980. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Captain Troy. ... Maren Jensen as Athena Battlestar Galactica Lieutenant Athena is the name of a fictional character in the original Battlestar Galactica television series which ran on ABC from 1978 to 1979. ... Colonel Tigh is the Executive Officer of Battlestar Galactica, and was played by Terry Carter. ... Cassiopeia was a fictional character in the original Battlestar Galactica which ran on ABC from 1978 to 1979. ... In the original 1978 Battlestar Galactica movie and ABC television series, Count Baltar was a leading antagonist character who betrayed the human race to its enemy, the robot race of Cylons. ...


Cast

Greene (Adama) and Jefferson (Boomer) were the only major cast members of the original series to return, with Richard Hatch and Dirk Benedict both unable to return due to commitments to other projects, although as noted below, Benedict did appear in an episode using previously unscreened footage from the original program. Lorne Greene in his role as Ben Cartwright in Bonanza Lorne Greene as Commander Adama in Battlestar Galactica Lorne Greene O.C., LL.D. (February 12, 1915 – September 11, 1987) was a Canadian actor best known for two iconic roles on American television. ... Commander Adama redirects here. ... Jamie Hamilton could refer to: Jamie Hamilton - a Scottish professional football player Jamie Hamilton - a half American half Scot British book publisher, founder of Hamish Hamilton, champion rower and Olympic medallist Jamie Hamilton - a character from the Battlestar Galactica 1980 series - the Galactica 1980 Jamie Hamilton - a wrestler from Canada... Herbert Jefferson, Jr. ... The original Boomer. ... Richard Hugh Lynch (b. ... Kent McCord (born Kent Franklin McWhirter on September 26, 1942 in Los Angeles, California) is an American actor. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Boxey. ... Allan Miller (born 14 February 1929 in Brooklyn, New York) is an American actor. ... James Patrick Stuart is an actor who was born June 16, 1968 in Encino, California to Chad of the group Chad and Jeremy. ... Doctor Zee was a recurring character in the short lived science fiction series Galactica 1980. ... Robbie Rist (born April 4, 1964) is an American actor. ... Doctor Zee was a recurring character in the short lived science fiction series Galactica 1980. ... Barry Van Dyke is the second son of legendary entertainer, Dick Van Dyke. ... Richard Hatch (b. ... Dirk Benedict (born Dirk Niewoehner on March 1, 1945) is an American movie and television actor, perhaps best known for playing the characters Lt. ...


Short life

The series had a promising start with a three-hour adventure that saw Troy, Dillon and Jamie sent back in time to Nazi Germany to save the future, but the series could not sustain this momentum. For example, the next two episodes, "The Super Scouts" story, were widely ridiculed; many fans regarded the "aliens acquire super powers because of gravitational differences" aspect of the story as a rather blatant "borrowing" from Superman. Fans were also curious as to why these super powers had not been noticed by any of the characters during the first three episodes, although all characters visiting earth in the first three episodes had been born on one of the twelve colonies of Kobol rather than on Galactica whose increased gravity led to such "powers". Nazi Germany, or the Third Reich, commonly refers to Germany in the years 1933–1945, when it was under the firm control of the totalitarian and fascist ideology of the Nazi Party, with the Führer Adolf Hitler as dictator. ... Superman is a fictional character and comic book superhero , originally created by American writer Jerry Siegel and Canadian artist Joe Shuster and published by DC Comics. ...


The show was unceremoniously cancelled after only ten episodes, many of which were multi-part stories, or what would be referred to now as arcs. The final episode—"Return of Starbuck"—featured unscreened footage of Dirk Benedict as Lt. Starbuck from the original series in a flashback episode. Despite its popularity with fans, to the point that Glen Larson had written a sequel episode entitled "The Wheel of Fire", it was not enough to save the series, which was cancelled before it could be filmed[2]. This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Dirk Benedict (born Dirk Niewoehner on March 1, 1945) is an American movie and television actor, perhaps best known for playing the characters Lt. ... In literature and film, a flashback (also called analepsis) takes the narrative back in time from the point the story has reached, to recount events that happened before and give the back-story. ...


Many fans do not consider Galactica 1980 to be canonical with the original series[citation needed], save perhaps "Return of Starbuck". Both Dirk Benedict and Richard Hatch had jumped-ship after reading what they considered terrible scripts and ridiculous plotlines[citation needed], hence them being hastily written-out of the Galactica saga[citation needed]. This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ...


Many cite Galactica 1980 as one of the worst shows in science fiction history[citation needed]. Furthermore, the books written based on the series conflict with Galactica 1980 in many respects, most prominently the death of Adama in the books[citation needed].


In the short lived documentary special of "Sciography" that ran on the SCI-FI Channel in early 2000 which did a one hour show on the series, it was stated that almost all mainstream fans of the original Battlestar Galactica won't even admit that this version ever existed.


Syndication and beyond

The ten Galactica 1980 episodes were rolled into the television syndication package for Battlestar Galactica and were given the same title as its parent program. In the television industry (as in radio), syndication is the sale of the right to broadcast programs to multiple stations, without going through a broadcast network. ...


A feature called Conquest of the Earth was released on home video only. This feature was stitched together from sections of the three "Galactica Discovers Earth" episodes and the two "The Night the Cylons Landed" episodes. A scene of John Colicos, playing Baltar, was also spliced in to this release. The latter footage was actually taken from an episode of the original series—Baltar makes no appearance in any Galactica 1980 episode—and is partially dubbed, so as to make the speech sound relevant to the Galactica's new situation. Several early scenes involving Adama and Dr Zee are also partially dubbed, to add more explanatory detail and to explain why two actors appear playing the role of Dr. Zee. In all cases, the dubbing is of a low technical standard. The home video business rents and sells videocassettes and DVDs to the public. ...


Episode list

Main article: List of Battlestar Galactica (1978-1980) episodes

The following is a complete list episodes for the original continuity of Battlestar Galactica. ...

See also

Battlestar Galactica is a science fiction television program created by Ronald D. Moore that first aired on October 18, 2004 in the United Kingdom and Ireland on Sky One, and January 14, 2005 in the United States on the Sci Fi Channel. ... In 1978, Mattel released a handheld electronic game called Battlestar Galactica Space Alert based on the original Battlestar Galactica movie and television series. ...

External links

  • UGO Galactica 1980 site
  • Galactica 1980 at the Internet Movie Database
  • Galactica 1980 at TV.com
  • GALACTICA.TV Battlestar Galactica website that focusses on the people in front of and behind the camera of all Battlestar Galactica series
  • Battlestar Galactica Wiki: Galactica 1980
  • Galactica 1980 site on SCIFI.com

  Results from FactBites:
 
Galactica 1980 - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (962 words)
Galactica 1980 is a science-fiction television series, and a spin-off from the 1978-1979 series Battlestar Galactica.
Many fans do not consider Galactica 1980 to be canonical with the original series (save perhaps for the Starbuck flashback episode); many cite Galactica 1980 as one of the worst shows in science fiction history.
The ten Galactica 1980 episodes were rolled into the television syndication package for Battlestar Galactica and were given the same title as its parent program.
Battlestar Galactica - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1750 words)
Battlestar Galactica is a franchise of American science fiction films and television series, the first of which was produced in 1978.
Glen A. Larson, the Executive Producer of Battlestar Galactica, has stated in interviews that he originally conceived of the Galactica premise in the late 1960's, which he originally called Adam's Ark. However, he was unable to get the project greenlit for many years.
Initially, Battlestar Galactica was envisioned by Larson as a series of made-for-TV movies (a three-hour pilot and two two-hour episodes) for the ABC television network.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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