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Encyclopedia > Gaelic Athletic Association
Gaelic Athletic Association


Image File history File links Acap. ... GAA may refer to: Global Action on Aging, an NGO based at the UN. Generic Authentication Architecture, a 3GPP standard. ... Image File history File links GAA_Corporate_Logo. ...

Formation 1884
Type Sports organisation
Headquarters Croke Park, Dublin, Ireland
Membership Assorted governing bodies and clubs
President Nickey Brennan
Website http://www.gaa.ie/
A stylised Celtic cross serves as the traditional logo of the GAA.
A stylised Celtic cross serves as the traditional logo of the GAA.

The Gaelic Athletic Association (GAA) (Irish: Cumann Lúthchleas Gael) is an organisation primarily focused on promoting Gaelic games - traditional Irish sports, mainly hurling and Gaelic football but also handball and rounders. The organisation also promotes Irish music, dance, and the Irish language. It is the largest and most popular organisation in Ireland with some 800,000 members out of the island's population of almost 6 million.[1] The date of establishment or date of founding of an institution is the date on which that institution chooses to claim as its starting point. ... Year 1884 (MDCCCLXXXIV) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Sunday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Croke Park (Irish: Páirc an Chrócaigh) in Dublin, Ireland is the largest sports stadium in Ireland and the principal stadium and headquarters of the Gaelic Athletic Association (GAA), Irelands biggest sporting organisation. ... For other uses, see Dublin (disambiguation). ... // This list is incomplete; you can help by expanding it. ... The role of President of Gaelic Athletic Association has existed since the foundation of the GAA . ... Nickey Brennan (born December 3, 1953) is the President of the Gaelic Athletic Association in Ireland. ... A website (alternatively, Web site or web site) is a collection of Web pages, images, videos or other digital assets that is hosted on one or several Web server(s), usually accessible via the Internet, cell phone or a LAN. A Web page is a document, typically written in HTML... Gaelic Athletic Association - logo - fairuse This work is copyrighted. ... For the band, see Celtic Cross (band). ... Gaelic games are the native sports of Ireland: principally Hurling, Gaelic Football and Camogie. ... For the Cornish sport, see Cornish Hurling. ... Gaelic Football (Irish: Peil, Peil Gaelach or Caid ), commonly referred to as football, or Gaelic , is a form of football played mainly in Ireland. ... Gaelic handball (Irish: Liathróid Láimhe) (also known as handball, Irish handball, court handball or wall handball) is a sport similar to racquetball and squash in that it is one of the four Gaelic Games organised by the Gaelic Athletic Association. ... For the movie, see Rounders (film). ... Ireland is an island in the North Atlantic politically divided between the Republic of Ireland and Northern Ireland. ... Irish dancers at St. ... This article is about the modern Goidelic language. ...


Gaelic football and hurling are the most popular activities promoted by the organisation, and the most popular sports in the country[2]. The women's version of these games, Ladies' Gaelic football and Camogie, are organised by the independent but very closely linked associations of Ladies' Gaelic Football Association and Camogie Association of Ireland respectively. Ladies Gaelic Football is the most prominent amateur team sport for women in Ireland. ... Camogie (in Irish, camógaíocht) is a Celtic team sport, the womens variant of hurling. ... The Ladies Gaelic Football Association (Irish: Cumann Peil Gael na mBan) is the organisation which promotes and regulates ladies Gaelic football in Ireland. ... The Camogie Association of Ireland organise and promote the sport of Camogie in Ireland and across the world. ...

Contents

Evolution of the Gaelic Athletic Association

Foundation and aims

The corporate logo of the GAA, is used on branding and merchandise. The colours of the logo change to reflect each county's colours
Further information: History of the Gaelic Athletic Association

The GAA was founded by Michael Cusack from County Clare. At his Civil Service Academy in Dublin he set up one of the first hurling clubs [3]. Cusack, a native Irish speaker[4] was troubled by declining participation in specifically Irish games.[5] Image File history File links GAA_Corporate_Logo. ... This page meets Wikipedias criteria for speedy deletion. ... A GAA county or County board is a geographic region of control within the Gaelic Athletic Association (GAA), based on the counties of Ireland as they were in 1884, and administered by a county board. ... Foundation and Early History The man directly involved in the founding of the GAA was a Clareman named Michael Cusack. ... Michael Cusack (1847 - 1906) was an Irish teacher and founder of the Gaelic Athletic Association. ... County Clare (Contae an Chláir in Irish) is in the Irish province of Munster. ...


To remedy this situation and to re-establish hurling as the national pastime, Cusack met with several other enthusiasts, most notably Maurice Davin was troubled by declining participation in specifically Irish games.[6] and the Gaelic Athletic Association was established on Saturday, November 1, 1884 in Hayes' Hotel, Thurles, County Tipperary. The seven founder members were Michael Cusack, Maurice Davin (who presided) John Wyse Power, John McKay, J. K. Bracken, Joseph O'Ryan and Thomas St. George McCarthy. Also admitted later by Cusack to have been present was Frank Moloney of Nenagh, while the following six names were published as having attended by the more detailed press reports of the time: William Foley, - Dwyer, - Culhane, William Delehunty, John Butler and William Cantwell. All these were from Thurles except Foley, who was from Carrick-on-Suir, like Davin. Of note, given later controversies about playing of 'foreign games' and the later banning of members of the British armed forces and police from joining, was that Thomas St. George Mc Carthy, a native of Bansha village, County Tipperary, was a capped rugby international player, having played for Ireland against Wales in 1883 and was also a District Inspector of the Royal Irish Constabulary (RIC). Also J.K. Bracken was the father of Brendan Bracken who was a member of the British cabinet during World War II. Maurice Davin (1842 - 1927) was an Irish farmer who became co-founder of the Gaelic Athletic Association. ... is the 305th day of the year (306th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1884 (MDCCCLXXXIV) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Sunday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... WGS-84 (GPS) Coordinates: 52. ... Statistics Province: Munster County Town: North: Nenagh South: Clonmel Code: North: TN South: TS Area: 4,303 km² Population (2006) 149,040[[1]] County Tipperary (Contae Thiobraid Árann in Irish) is a county in the Republic of Ireland, and situated in the province of Munster. ... Joseph Kevin Bracken was a founder member of the GAA from Templemore, Co. ... Statistics Province: Munster County: County Tipperary Population (2002)  - Town:  - Rural:   300 1,200 Bansha (Irish: An Bháinseach - a grassy place) is a village in south-west county Tipperary in Ireland and forms part of the Roman Catholic parish of Bansha & Kilmoyler (united 1858). ... The Royal Irish Constabulary (RIC) was one of Irelands two police forces in the early twentieth century, alongside the Dublin Metropolitan Police. ... Brendan Bracken (1901 - 1958) was an Irish-born British Conservative cabinet minister. ...


Aims

The initial plan was to resurrect the ancient Tailteann Games and establish an independent Irish organisation for promoting athletics, but hurling and Gaelic football eventually predominated. The following goals were set out: The Tailteann Games were an ancient sporting event held in Ireland in honor of Queen Tailte. ...

  1. To foster and promote the native Irish pastimes.
  2. To open athletics to all social classes.
  3. To aid in the establishment of hurling and football clubs which would organise matches between counties.

The association's aim today is to be

A National organisation which has as its basic aim the strengthening of the National Identity of a 32 County Ireland through the preservation and promotion of Gaelic games and pastimes.[7]

The Gaelic Athletic Association in the twentieth century

In 1918 the GAA was banned by the British government, but the games were still played in defiance of the ban.[8] In 1922 it passed the job of promoting athletics over to the National Athletic and Cycling Association.[9] UEC logo UCI logo Cycling Ireland is the national governing body of cycle racing in the Republic of Ireland and Northern Ireland. ...


In 1984 the GAA celebrated its 100th year in existence. This anniversary was celebrated by the GAA with numerous events throughout the country and the All-Ireland Senior Hurling Championship final was moved to Semple Stadium in Thurles to honour the town in which the GAA was founded. The All-Ireland Senior Hurling Championship (known for sponsorship reasons as the Guinness Hurling Championship) is the premier knockout competition in the game of hurling played in Ireland. ... The grounds of where Semple Stadium is built were put up for sale in 1910 at the wish of Canon M. K. Ryan. ... WGS-84 (GPS) Coordinates: 52. ...


Modern challenges

Ireland has changed rapidly since the mid 1990s. EU enlargement, combined with the Celtic Tiger economy, has led to a large influx of foreign nationals from the EU's new member states in Eastern Europe.[10] This means that a large proportion of the country's population is now outside the traditional native-born family structure through with the GAA was passed from generation to generation. This presents a challenge to an organisation that was previously not geared towards marketing itself to people who have not heard of it or its games, and instead relied on people being brought up playing hurling and Gaelic football often following their parents' example.The GAA has launched a number of projects to attract non traditional members such as consulting with the Australian Football League[11] and running leagues aimed at non nationals [12][13] Changing demographics in Ireland, with more people living in cities, present challenges to the GAA[14][15][16] This article is about the national league in Australian rules football. ...


Also, maintaining the GAA's activities in the overseas units presents a challenge with the number of Irish emergrating overseas in decline [17], despite the large Irish diaspora, Gaelic games remain fairly unknown outside of the Irish expatriate community. Initiatives such as full-time development officers and high-profile competitions such as the Continental Youth Championship are helping to bring the games to non-Irish people everywhere, while the British GAA is promoting Gaelic games to youth in the UK.[18] The CYC logo showing part of an American flag, Canadian maple leaf and the GAA logo The Continental Youth Championship (CYC) is an annual weekend tournament of gaelic football and hurling organised by the Gaelic Athletic Association. ... The British Council of the Gaelic Athletic Association (Irish: Cumann Lúthchleas Gael An Bhreatain) or British GAA is one of the boards of the Gaelic Athletic Association outside Ireland, and is responsible for Gaelic Games in Great Britain. ...


Structure

Further information: Structure of the GAA

The GAA is a democratic association consisting of various boards, councils, and committees organised in a structured hierarchy, with world headquarters at Croke Park. All of the association's activities are governed by a book called the Official Guide. Each County Board may have its own by-laws, none of which may conflict with the Official Guide. Each Divisional Board may have its own regulations, none of which may duplicate or contradict the Official Guide or county by-laws. The Structure of the Gaelic Athletic Association is a voluntary, democratic association consisting of various boards, councils, and committees organised in a structured hierarchy, and the world headquarters are at Croke Park. ... Croke Park (Irish: Páirc an Chrócaigh) in Dublin, Ireland is the largest sports stadium in Ireland and the principal stadium and headquarters of the Gaelic Athletic Association (GAA), Irelands biggest sporting organisation. ...

All of these bodies are elected on a democratic basis and the members are volunteers. There is a small paid staff. The role of President of Gaelic Athletic Association has existed since the foundation of the GAA . ... Provincial councils are organisational bodies within the Gaelic Athletic Association, each made up of several GAA counties. ... A GAA county or County board is a geographic region of control within the Gaelic Athletic Association (GAA), based on the counties of Ireland as they were in 1884, and administered by a county board. ...


Cultural activities

Through a division of the association known as Scór the GAA promotes Irish cultural activities, running competitions in music, singing, dancing and storytelling. Logo of Scór Scór (English: Score) is a sub-group, and series of annual competitions, as part of the Gaelic Athletic Association that actively pursues the goals of Rule 4 of the GAAs official guide; The Association shall actively support the Irish language, traditional Irish dancing, music, song...


Rule 4 of the association states:

The Association shall actively support the Irish language, traditional Irish dancing, music, song, and other aspects of Irish culture. It shall foster an awareness and love of the national ideals in the people of Ireland, and assist in promoting a community spirit through its clubs.|[19] This article is about the modern Goidelic language. ... Girls in traditional costume performing Irish dance in a St. ... Ireland is an island in the North Atlantic politically divided between the Republic of Ireland and Northern Ireland. ... A page from the Book of Kells. ...

The group was formally founded in 1969, and is promoted through various GAA clubs throughout Ireland (as well as some clubs outside of Ireland).


Achievements

Further information: Achievements of the GAA

The GAA has grown to become the largest and most popular organisation in Ireland with some 800,000 members out of the island's 6 million people.[20] The achievements of the Gaelic Athletic Association range from the preservation of Gaelic Games that were on the verge of extinction to its modern status as a major influence in Irish sporting, cultural, and community life. ...


It saved the ancient game of hurling from extinction and both hurling and Gaelic football were standardised. This standardisation helped to spur the growth of the modern games since they were now being organised on a structured basis. On the other hand, both handball and rounders have faded over time.


The GAA is the largest amateur sports association in Ireland, with more than 2,500 member clubs and runs about 500 grounds throughout the country.[21] The Gaelic games of hurling and football are also the most popular spectator sports in Ireland; 1,962,769 people attended GAA games in 2003.[22] // This list is incomplete; you can help by expanding it. ...


Thanks to the success of a policy of having at least one club in every parish, clubs are fairly evenly distributed throughout the country in both urban and rural areas (though south Dublin had few clubs for many years), and the organisation's reach is therefore considerable. This huge presence means that the GAA has become a major player in the sporting and cultural life of Ireland. The association is recognised as a major generator of social capital thanks to its promotion of healthy pastimes, volunteering, and community involvement.[23]


The GAA also provided an all-Ireland structure in which people could participate, both on a sporting and on an organisational level. This has helped to entrench a sense of local identity. For example, the county identities that have been fostered by over a century of local rivalries in the provincial championships are so prominent in society that many people feel emotionally attached to their county. Indeed, the GAA still adheres to the original county system, that no longer fully coincides with that used by local government, and yet it is the traditional / GAA county boundaries that people most identify with.[24]


In the GAA's structures (parish, county, province and national) it created a conduit for national and communal loyalty, an achievement given that the various elements owed their origins to a variety of sources: Catholicism (the parishes), British law (the counties), and Irish history (the provinces and the nation). Its achievement in popularising counties was particularly marked. It made the counties seem a natural sense of local definition. The traditional Irish counties were largely a creation of British law such as County Londonderry (or County Derry, is it is referred to by the GAA), only some owing their origins to ancient Irish regions (such as County Tyrone). An attempt in recent years to create North Dublin and South Dublin teams was never implemented. Counties with a history of no success whatsoever in the championships retain their county teams rather than merge with far more successful neighbouring counties. For other places with similar names, see Londonderry (disambiguation) and Derry (disambiguation). ... Statistics Province: Ulster County Town: Omagh Area: 3,155 km² Population (est. ...


Criticisms and questions

Accusation of exclusivity

The perception of the GAA in unionist circles in Northern Ireland made its members and clubhouses targets for loyalist paramilitaries during the Troubles. A number of GAA supporters were killed and clubhouses damaged.[25][26] Unionism, in Ireland, is a belief in the desirability of a full constitutional and institutional relationship between Ireland and Great Britain based on the terms and order of government of the Act of Union 1800 which had merged both countries in 1801 to form the United Kingdom of Great Britain... Northern Ireland (Irish: , Ulster Scots: Norlin Airlann) is a constituent country of the United Kingdom lying in the northeast of the island of Ireland, covering 5,459 square miles (14,139 km², about a sixth of the islands total area). ... For other uses, see Loyalist (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Troubles (disambiguation) and Trouble. ...


The GAA would argue that it has always promoted Irish rather than Catholic identity, although its administrative units are based on Roman Catholic parishes and has had members of minority religions playing an active role from its inception up to the present day which included Jack Boothman who was president of the organisation in the 1990's. In Northern Ireland, however, Gaelic sports are virtually exclusively played by Roman Catholics. The GAA Official Guide forbids sectarianism.[27] The Roman Catholic Church, most often spoken of simply as the Catholic Church, is the largest Christian church, with over one billion members. ... A parish is a type of administrative subdivision. ...


In 2007 Fermanagh player Darren Graham, who represented the county at both Gaelic football and hurling, temporarily left the sport. Graham had received sectarian abuse from some fans, due to being a Protestant. However he received support from both his Lisnaskea team mates and the GAA board, who stated "Abuse of any players, officials or referees is not acceptable and all official reports of it will be dealt with seriously."[28] County Fermanagh (Fear Manach in Irish) is often referred to as Northern Irelands Lake District. ...


Bans on other sports and Rule 42

Until 1971 members were prohibited by Rule 42 (Rule 44 in the 2007 rulebook) from playing non-GAA sports or even attending those sports events as spectators, and up until recently, such sports were officially barred from using GAA grounds. In particular, sports with a British origin, except for golf, were commonly referred to formerly as garrison games.[29][30] On 16 April 2005 the GAA's congress voted to temporarily relax its Rule 42 requirement that GAA-owned premesis are used by the GAA only, in respect of Croke Park, to enable the Football Association of Ireland and the Irish Rugby Football Union to play their international fixtures in Ireland while the Lansdowne Road stadium is being rebuilt.[31] The GAA's governing Central Council agreed that the first soccer and rugby union games in Croke Park could take place in early 2007. The first such fixture was Ireland's home match of the Six Nations Rugby Union Championship against France which was won by France 20-17. This article is about the sport. ... is the 106th day of the year (107th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Football Association of Ireland (FAI; Irish: Cumann Peile na h-Éireann) is the organising body for the sport of association football (soccer) in the Republic of Ireland. ... The Irish Rugby Football Union (IRFU) is the body managing rugby union in Ireland. ... A DART train passes under the Lansdowne Road Rugby Football Stadium and over the level crossing as it enters the station of the same name. ... The RBS 6 Nations Championship, (referred to as RBS 6 Nations for sponsorship reasons) known before 2000 as the Five Nations Championship, is an annual international rugby union competition held between six European sides: France, England, Ireland, Italy, Scotland and Wales. ...


Naming of competitions, grounds and clubs after nationalists

There are some GAA competitions, grounds and clubs named after Irish national heroes. For example Casement Park in Belfast is named after Sir Roger Casement, a member of the Irish Republican Brotherhood. The trophy for the main all-Ireland Gaelic football competition is the Sam Maguire Cup, named for Sam Maguire, who, although a member of the Church of Ireland[32][33] was an officer in the Irish Republican Army. An other example is Kevin Lynch's Hurling Club which is affiliated with the Derry County Board and is named in honour of Kevin Lynch, a member of the Irish National Liberation Army (INLA) , who died on hunger strike in 1981. The GAA prohibits clubs being named after people who are still alive. Casement Park is the principal GAA stadium in Belfast, Ireland, home to the Antrim football and hurling teams. ... Sir Roger David Casement (September 1, 1864 - August 3, 1916) was a British diplomat by profession and a poet, Irish revolutionary and nationalist by inclination. ... The Irish Republican Brotherhood (IRB; Bráithreachas na Poblachta in Irish) was a secret fraternal organisation dedicated to fomenting armed revolt against the British state in Ireland in the nineteenth century and early twentieth century. ... The Sam Maguire Cup is the name of the Cup that Gaelic football-teams play for in the final of the Bank of Ireland All-Ireland Senior Football Championship, the premier knockout competition in the game of Gaelic football played in Ireland. ... Samuel (Sam) Maguire (1879 - February 6, 1927), an Irish Republican and Gaelic footballer, is chiefly remembered as the eponym of the Sam Maguire Cup, given to the All-Ireland Senior Champions of Gaelic football. ... The Church of Ireland (Irish: ) is an autonomous province of the Anglican Communion, operating seamlessly across the border between the Republic of Ireland and Northern Ireland. ... This article is about the historical army of the Irish Republic (1919–1922) which fought in the Irish War of Independence 1919–21, and the Irish Civil War 1922–23. ... Kevin Lynchs Hurling Club, of Dungiven are one of the few hurling clubs as part of the Gaelic Athletic Association in the South Derry area. ... The Derry County Board of the Gaelic Athletic Association (Irish: Cummann Luthchleas Gael Coiste Contae Doire) or Derry GAA is one of the 32 county boards of the GAA in Ireland, and is responsible for Gaelic Games in County Derry. ... Kevin Andrew Lynch (1918 Chicago, Illinois - 1984 Marthas Vineyard, Massachusetts), American urban planner and author. ... The Irish National Liberation Army (INLA) is an Irish republican paramilitary organization which was formed on December 8, 1974. ... A mural in Derrys Bogside, commemorating Irish hunger strikers. ...


Competitions

Further information: GAA Competitions

GAA Competitions or Gaelic Athletic Association Competitions are competitive events which are organised either by the Gaelic Athletic Association (GAA) on its own or in association with other organisations in which Gaelic Games or a set of compromised rules are played // International Rules - An annual two-game series played between...

Domestic

The GAA organises competitive games in both codes and at all levels from youth all the way up to adult senior.


The highest level of competitions in the GAA are the inter-county All-Ireland Championships where the 32 counties of Ireland Compete to win the Provincial championships, All-Ireland Senior Football Championship and All-Ireland Senior Hurling Championship. Before 1892, the winning club in each county championship contested the All-Ireland championship representing their county. In 1892, Congress granted permission for the winning club in each county championship to use players from other clubs in the county. The Inter County scene of today was thus created. Provincial Championships A Provincial Championship occurs in Gaelic Games in Ireland. ... The Gaelic Athletic Association The All-Ireland Senior Football Championship (known for sponsorship reasons as the Bank of Ireland Football Championship) is the premier knockout competition in the game of Gaelic football played in Ireland. ... The All-Ireland Senior Hurling Championship (known for sponsorship reasons as the Guinness Hurling Championship) is the premier knockout competition in the game of hurling played in Ireland. ...


Internationals

While some units of the GAA outside Ireland participate in Irish competitions, the GAA does not hold internationals played according to the rules of either Gaelic football or hurling, however compromise rules have been reached with two "related sports."


Hurlers play an annual fixture against a national Shinty team from Scotland. // A shinty game in progress Shinty (Scottish Gaelic camanachd or iomain) is a team sport played with sticks and a ball. ... This article is about the country. ...


International Rules Football matches have taken place between an Irish national team drawn from the ranks of Gaelic footballers, against an Australian national team drawn from the Australian Football League. The venue alternates between Ireland and Australia. As of December 9, 2006 the International series between Australia and Ireland has been called off due to excessive violence in past matches. International Rules Football match at the Telstra Dome - Australia vs Ireland. ... The Ireland international rules football team is the representative team for Ireland (both Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland) in international rules football, a compromise between Gaelic football and Australian rules football. ... The Australia international rules football team is Australias senior representative team in international rules football, a hybrid of Australian rules football and Gaelic football. ... This article is about the national league in Australian rules football. ... is the 343rd day of the year (344th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ...

The counties of Ireland, coloured by which Gaelic game is popular. Yellow indicates a football county, blue a hurling county and green a "dual county", where both sports have considerable support.

Image File history File links Countieshf. ... Image File history File links Countieshf. ... For much of its history, the island of Ireland was divided into 32 counties (Irish language contae or condae, pronounced IPA: ). Two historical counties, County Desmond and County Coleraine, no longer exist, while several county names have changed. ... Gaelic Football (Irish: Peil, Peil Gaelach or Caid ), commonly referred to as football, or Gaelic , is a form of football played mainly in Ireland. ... For the Cornish sport, see Cornish Hurling. ... Dual county is a term used in gaelic games to describe a county that competes at a similar level in both hurling and gaelic football. ...

Grounds

Main Article:List of GAA Stadiums by Capacity This article or section is incomplete and may require expansion and/or cleanup. ...


The GAA has many stadiums in Ireland and beyond such as Gaelic Park used by New York GAA. Every county, and nearly all clubs, have a GAA ground on which to play their home games, with varying capacities and utilities. Gaelic Park is the principal GAA stadium in New York City. ... The New York County Board of the Gaelic Athletic Association (GAA), or New York GAA, is one of the county boards of the GAA in outside Ireland, and is responsible for Gaelic Games in the New York metropolitan area. ...


The hierarchical structure of the GAA is applied to the used of grounds. Clubs with play at their own ground for the early rounds of the club championship while the latter rounds from quarter-finals to finals are usually held at the county ground.This is the ground where the Inter county games take place or the County Board are based. In practice a team like Gweedore GAA will play most of its games at Páirc Mhic Eiteagáin if they reach the final of the club championship, the game will be played in MacCumhail Park. The Structure of the Gaelic Athletic Association is a voluntary, democratic association consisting of various boards, councils, and committees organised in a structured hierarchy, and the world headquarters are at Croke Park. ... GAA Competitions or Gaelic Athletic Association Competitions are competitive events which are organised either by the Gaelic Athletic Association (GAA) on its own or in association with other organisations in which Gaelic Games or a set of compromised rules are played // International Rules - An annual two-game series played between... A GAA county or County board is a geographic region of control within the Gaelic Athletic Association (GAA), based on the counties of Ireland as they were in 1884, and administered by a county board. ... MacCumhail Park is a GAA stadium in Ballybofey, County Donegal, Ireland. ...

The Gweedore GAA clubhouse in Gweedore, Co. Donegal.
The Gweedore GAA clubhouse in Gweedore, Co. Donegal.

The provincial championship finals are usually played at the same venue every year, however, this trend has been called into question somewhat in Ulster, when in 2004 and 2005, the Ulster Football Finals were played in Croke Park, due to the fact that the anticipated attendance was likely to far exceed the capacity of St. Tiernach's Park, Clones. WGS-84 (GPS) Coordinates: , Irish Grid Reference B847228 Statistics Province: Ulster County: Dáil Éireann: Donegal South West Dialling Code: 074, +000 353 74 Population (2002)  - Town:  - Rural:   1,388  1,253 Website: http://www. ... Statistics Province: Ulster County Town: Lifford Code: DL Area: 4,841 km² Population (2006) 146,956 Website: www. ... External links Ulster Council website Category: ... The Ulster Senior Football Championship (known for sponsorship reasons as the Bank of Ireland Ulster Championship) is the premier knockout competition in the game of football played in the province of Ulster in Ireland. ... St. ... WGS-84 (GPS) Coordinates: , Statistics Province: Ulster County: Elevation: 71 m Population (2006)  - Town:  - Rural: 321 The word clones is also used as the plural of clone. ...


Croke Park is the GAA's flagship venue, known colloquially as Croker or Headquarters, owing to the fact that the venue doubles as the GAA's base. With a capacity of 82,500, it ranks among the top 5 stadiums in Europe by capacity, having undergone extensive renovations for most of the 1990s and early 21st century. Every September, Croke Park hosts the All-Ireland Hurling and Football Finals, as the conclusion to the summer championship. Croke Park (Irish: Páirc an Chrócaigh) in Dublin, Ireland is the largest sports stadium in Ireland and the principal stadium and headquarters of the Gaelic Athletic Association (GAA), Irelands biggest sporting organisation. ...


The next three biggest grounds are all in Munster - Semple Stadium in Thurles, Co. Tipperary with a capacity of 53,000, the Gaelic Grounds in Limerick which holds 50,000 and FitzGerald Stadium in Killarney, Co. Kerry which can accommodate 43,000. Statistics Area: 24,607. ... The grounds of where Semple Stadium is built were put up for sale in 1910 at the wish of Canon M. K. Ryan. ... WGS-84 (GPS) Coordinates: 52. ... Statistics Province: Munster County Town: North: Nenagh South: Clonmel Code: North: TN South: TS Area: 4,303 km² Population (2006) 149,040[[1]] County Tipperary (Contae Thiobraid Árann in Irish) is a county in the Republic of Ireland, and situated in the province of Munster. ... The Gaelic Grounds or Páirc na nGael is the principal Gaelic Athletic Association stadium in Limerick City, Ireland, home to the Limerick hurling and football teams. ... For other uses, see Limerick (disambiguation). ... FitzGerald Stadium is the principal GAA stadium in Killarney, Ireland, home to the Kerry football team. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... County Kerry (Irish: Ciarraí) is a county in the southwest of Ireland, in the Munster province of the Republic of Ireland, the county is informally referred to as The Kingdom. ...


Other notable grounds include:

Pearse Stadium (Irish: Páirc an Phiarsaigh) is the principal Gaelic Athletic Association stadium in Galway, Ireland. ... WGS-84 (GPS) Coordinates: , Irish Grid Reference M300256 Statistics Province: Connacht County: Dáil Éireann: Galway West European Parliament: North-West Dialling Code: 091 Postal District(s): G Area: 50. ... International Rules Football match at the Telstra Dome - Australia vs Ireland. ... Páirc Uí Chaoimh is a GAA stadium in Cork City in Ireland, where major hurling and Gaelic football matches are played. ... Originally Flower Lodge, home to several Cork soccer teams, the old stadium was aquired by the GAA, and, to give a false air of tradition and Irish-ness, renamed Páirc Uí Rinn (Ring Park in the near-extinct Irish language). ... The Football League of Ireland, usually known simply as the League of Ireland or later the eircom League (from the leagues sponsorship by Irish telecommunications company eircom), was the old league of football clubs in Ireland that existed from 1921 until 2006. ... Soccer redirects here. ... St. ... WGS-84 (GPS) Coordinates: , Irish Grid Reference M300256 Statistics Province: Connacht County: Dáil Éireann: Galway West European Parliament: North-West Dialling Code: 091 Postal District(s): G Area: 50. ...

See also

This article or section is incomplete and may require expansion and/or cleanup. ... Micheál Ó Muircheartaigh (born 1930) is an Irish Gaelic games commentator for Radio Telifís Éireann. ... The Vodafone GAA All Stars is a Gaelic Games award given annually to the best Gaelic footballers and hurlers in Ireland. ... Micheál OHehir (June 2, 1920–November 24, 1996) was an Irish sports commentator and journalist. ... Michael Cusack (1847 - 1906) was an Irish teacher and founder of the Gaelic Athletic Association. ... The Sunday Game is Radio Telefís Éireanns main Gaelic Games television programme. ... Up for the Match is a very popular television programme broadcast in Ireland on RTÉ One. ... Top 20 GAA Moments was a poll of the best moments of Gaelic football and hurling in the television era. ... Logo of The Irish Sports Council Sport on the island of Ireland is popular and widespread. ... Féile na nGael is GAA club based on an Irish festival held to promote Gaelic sports of Hurling, Camogie and Handball in which both boys and girls under 14 years of age from across Ireland represent their local GAA club in a competion. ...

References

  1. ^ Go Ireland The gaelic athletic association. Retrieved on 2008-03-03.
  2. ^ ireland-information.com. Retrieved on 2008-03-06.
  3. ^ Michael Cusack, Maurice Davin and the Gaelic Athletic Association. Retrieved on 2008-03-16.
  4. ^ Michael Cusack, Maurice Davin and the Gaelic Athletic Association. Retrieved on 2008-03-16.
  5. ^ Michael Cusack, Maurice Davin and the Gaelic Athletic Association. Retrieved on 2008-03-16.
  6. ^ Michael Cusack, Maurice Davin and the Gaelic Athletic Association. Retrieved on 2008-03-16.
  7. ^ GAA Rules and Constitution GAA official guide 2003.
  8. ^ Gaelic football, Hurling are Irish Passions. Retrieved on 2006-11-27.
  9. ^ The Origins of the GAA.
  10. ^ AIB report says almost 160,000 non-nationals in employment in Ireland - 8% of workforce; Magnitude of inflows may slow; Many buying property. Retrieved on 2008-03-03.
  11. ^ INTERNATIONAL RULES - CONTEXT & PERSPECTIVE. Retrieved on 2008-03-03.
  12. ^ GAA should open its doors. Retrieved on 2008-03-03.
  13. ^ Foreign Nationals. Retrieved on 2008-03-03.
  14. ^ ‘We all know the best-known phone number for advice in the GAA world starts with 021. Retrieved on 2008-03-03.
  15. ^ Leinster population trends ‘big challenge’. Retrieved on 2008-03-03.
  16. ^ GAA club officer seminar in GMIT. Retrieved on 2008-03-03.
  17. ^ Hurlingin America Has a Problem -Too Few Irishme. Retrieved on 2008-03-03.
  18. ^ Warwickshire Schools GAA. Retrieved on 2008-03-03.
  19. ^ GAAs Official Guide. Retrieved on 2008-03-03.
  20. ^ The gaelic athletic association. Retrieved on 2008-03-03.
  21. ^ Organisation of the GAA (English). Retrieved on 2008-02-04.
  22. ^ GAA attendance figures. Retrieved on 2006-11-27.
  23. ^ ESRI Report: Social and Economic Value of Sport in Ireland (English). Retrieved on 2006-12-22.
  24. ^ County Identity and Social Capital – the View from Cavan (English). Retrieved on 2006-12-22.
  25. ^ CAIN: Chronology of the Conflict 1991. Retrieved on 2008-03-03.
  26. ^ CAIN: Chronology of the Conflict 1997. Retrieved on 2008-03-03.
  27. ^ "The Association shall be non-sectarian." Official guide 2003. Retrieved on 2008-03-03.
  28. ^ GAA player quitting over 'abuse'. Retrieved on 2008-03-03.
  29. ^ Frank Henderson's Easter Rising: Recollections of a Dublin Volunteer. Retrieved on 2008-03-03.
  30. ^ Scotland and Nationalism: Scottish Society and Politics, 1707 to the present. Retrieved on 2008-03-03.
  31. ^ Ireland must wait to enjoy Croke craic. Retrieved on 2007-02-11.
  32. ^ A History Of Sam Maguire. Retrieved on 2007-04-30.
  33. ^ Rebel GAA,Sam Maguire. Retrieved on 2007-04-30.

2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 62nd day of the year (63rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 65th day of the year (66th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 75th day of the year (76th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 75th day of the year (76th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 75th day of the year (76th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 75th day of the year (76th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 331st day of the year (332nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 62nd day of the year (63rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 62nd day of the year (63rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 62nd day of the year (63rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 62nd day of the year (63rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 62nd day of the year (63rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 62nd day of the year (63rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 62nd day of the year (63rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 62nd day of the year (63rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 62nd day of the year (63rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 62nd day of the year (63rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 62nd day of the year (63rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 35th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 331st day of the year (332nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 356th day of the year (357th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 356th day of the year (357th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 62nd day of the year (63rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 62nd day of the year (63rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 62nd day of the year (63rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 62nd day of the year (63rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 62nd day of the year (63rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 62nd day of the year (63rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 42nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 120th day of the year (121st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 120th day of the year (121st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links

  • GAA official website
  • An Fear Rua: The GAA Unplugged! - analysis, discussion forums, satire and humour on GAA topics.
  • Hogan Stand
  • Radio Beo - Live commentary from club games, on the Internet.

Other Links

  • National GAA Results and Fixtures on Aertel
  • GAA World by The Irish News
  • Index of GAA club sites
  • Squareball - The First GAA Fashion Brand
  • GAA Results
  • Hurling Blog - News, analysis, stats and opinion on hurling
  • Michael Cusack Visitor Centre

  Results from FactBites:
 
NationMaster - Encyclopedia: Antrim GAA (2645 words)
The Antrim County Board of the Gaelic Athletic Association (Irish: Cumann Lúthchleas Gael Coiste Chontae Aontroma) or Antrim GAA is one of the 32 county boards of the GAA in Ireland, and is responsible for Gaelic Games in County Antrim.
Wexford The Armagh County Board of the Gaelic Athletic Association (Irish: Cumann Lúthchleas Gael Coiste Chontae Ard Mhacha) or Armagh GAA is one of the 32 county boards of the GAA in Ireland, and is responsible for Gaelic Games in County Armagh.
Tyrone The Armagh County Board of the Gaelic Athletic Association (Irish: Cumann Lúthchleas Gael Coiste Chontae Ard Mhacha) or Armagh GAA is one of the 32 county boards of the GAA in Ireland, and is responsible for Gaelic Games in County Armagh.
Multitext - History of the Gaelic Athletic Association (GAA) (5464 words)
All agreed to be associated with the new organisation.
The increasing politicisation of the GAA was sharply evident and deeply disruptive at this AGM.
Cusack on the importance of the Gaelic Athletic Association.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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