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Encyclopedia > GNOME
GNOME
GNOME logo

A GNOME 2.20 desktop
Developed by GNOME developers
Latest release 2.22.3 / July 6, 2008 (2008-07-06); 7 days ago
OS Cross-platform
Available in Multilingual (more than 35)
Genre Desktop environment
License GNU Lesser General Public License
GNU General Public License
Website www.gnome.org

GNOME (pronounced /gəˈnoʊm/) is a desktop environment—the graphical user interface which sits on top of a computer operating system—composed entirely from free software. It is an international project that includes creating software development frameworks, selecting application software for the desktop, and working on the programs which manage application launching, file handling, and window and task management. Gnome usually refers to a gnome, one of a mythical race of small people, or to: Gnome (Dungeons & Dragons) — a race in Dungeons & Dragons role-playing game Noldor — one of the tribes of Elves in Tolkiens fictional Middle-earth, called Gnomes in Tolkiens early works. ... Image File history File links Gnomelogo. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... For other uses, see Software developer (disambiguation). ... Code complete redirects here. ... is the 187th day of the year (188th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Common Era (or Anno Domini), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... An operating system (OS) is a software that manages computer resources and provides programmers with an interface used to access those resources. ... A cross-platform (or platform independent) programming language, software application or hardware device works on more than one system platform (e. ... This article is about the properties of language in general. ... Computer software can be organized into categories based on common function, type, or field of use. ... Information in this article or section has not been verified against sources and may not be reliable. ... A software license is a legal agreement which may take the form of a proprietary or gratuitous license as well as a memorandum of contract between a producer and a user of computer software. ... The GNU Lesser General Public License (formerly the GNU Library General Public License) or LGPL is a free software license published by the Free Software Foundation. ... GPL redirects here. ... A website (alternatively, web site or Web site) is a collection of Web pages, images, videos or other digital assets that is hosted on one or more web servers, usually accessible via the Internet. ... Information in this article or section has not been verified against sources and may not be reliable. ... GUI redirects here. ... An operating system (OS) is a software that manages computer resources and provides programmers with an interface used to access those resources. ... Free software is software that can be used, studied, and modified without restriction, and which can be copied and redistributed in modified or unmodified form either without restriction, or with minimal restrictions only to ensure that further recipients can also do these things. ... “Software development” redirects here. ... Application software is a subclass of computer software that employs the capabilities of a computer directly and thoroughly to a task that the user wishes to perform. ...


GNOME is part of the GNU Project and can be used with various Unix-like operating systems, most notably GNU/Linux, and as part of Java Desktop System in Solaris. The GNU logo, drawn by Etienne Suvasa The GNU Project was announced in 1983 by Richard Stallman. ... Diagram of the relationships between several Unix-like systems A Unix-like operating system is one that behaves in a manner similar to a Unix system, while not necessarily conforming to or being certified to any version of the Single UNIX Specification. ... Unix systems filiation. ... Java Desktop System (JDS) is a desktop environment from Sun Microsystems, available for Solaris, and formerly Linux. ... The Solaris Operating System, usually known simply as Solaris, is a free Unix-based operating system introduced by Sun Microsystems in 1992 as the successor to SunOS. Solaris is known for its scalability, especially on SPARC systems, as well for being the origin for many innovative features such as DTrace...


The name originally stood for GNU Network Object Model Environment, though this acronym is deprecated.[1]

Contents

Aims

The GNOME project provides two things: The GNOME desktop environment, an intuitive and attractive desktop for users, and the GNOME development platform, an extensive framework for building applications that integrate into the rest of the desktop.
 
— GNOME website[2]

The GNOME project puts heavy emphasis on simplicity, usability, and making things “just work”. The other aims of the project are:

  • Freedom—to create a desktop environment that will always have the source code available for re-use under a free software license.
  • Accessibility—ensuring the desktop can be used by anyone, regardless of technical skill or physical disability.
  • Internationalization and localization—making the desktop available in many languages. At the moment GNOME is being translated to over 100 languages.[3]
  • Developer-friendliness—ensuring it is easy to write software that integrates smoothly with the desktop, and allow developers a free choice of programming language.
  • Organization—a regular release cycle and a disciplined community structure.
  • Support—ensuring backing from other institutions beyond the GNOME community.

Free software is software which grants recipients the freedom to modify and redistribute the software. ... In human-computer interaction, computer accessibility refers to the usability of a computer system by people with disabilities or age-related limitations. ... Internationalization redirects here. ...

History

In 1996, the KDE project was started. Although KDE was free software, it relied on the then non-free Qt widget toolkit. Members of the GNU project became concerned with the use of such a toolkit for building a free software desktop environment. In August 1997, two projects were started in response to KDE: the Harmony toolkit (a free replacement for the Qt libraries) and GNOME (a different desktop without Qt and built entirely on top of free software).[4] The initial project leaders for GNOME were Miguel de Icaza and Federico Mena. For the NYSE stock ticker symbol KDE, see 4Kids Entertainment. ... For other uses, see Qt. ... In computer programming, widget toolkits (or GUI toolkits) are sets of basic building units for graphical user interfaces. ... The Harmony toolkit is a never completed, free software toolkit that aimed to be API compatible with the (at the time, proprietary) Qt toolkit, but wanted to add functionality such as multi-threaded applications and pluggable themes. ... Miguel de Icaza (born c. ... Federico Mena Quintero is a Mexican computer programmer. ...


In place of the Qt toolkit, GTK+ was chosen as the base of the GNOME desktop. GTK+ uses the GNU Lesser General Public License (LGPL), a free software license that allows GPL-incompatible software (including proprietary software) to link to it. The GNOME desktop itself is licensed under the LGPL for its libraries, and the GPL for applications that are part of the GNOME project itself. Having the toolkit and libraries under the LGPL allows applications written for GNOME to use a much wider set of licenses (including proprietary software licenses).[5] While Qt is dual-licensed under both the QPL and the GPL, the freedom to link proprietary software with GTK+ at no charge makes it differ from Qt. GTK+, or the GIMP Toolkit, is one of the two most popular widget toolkits for the X Window System for creating graphical user interfaces. ... The GNU Lesser General Public License (formerly the GNU Library General Public License) or LGPL is a free software license published by the Free Software Foundation. ... Proprietary software is software with restrictions on copying and modifying as enforced by the proprietor. ... The Q Public License (QPL) is a copyleft license created by Trolltech for its free edition of the Qt toolkit. ... The GNU logo For other uses of GPL, see GPL (disambiguation). ...


The name “GNOME” was proposed as an acronym of GNU Network Object Model Environment by Elliot Lee, one of the authors of ORBit and the Object Activation Framework.[citation needed] It refers to GNOME’s original intention of creating a distributed object framework similar to Microsoft’s OLE.[6] This no longer reflects the core vision of the GNOME project, and the full expansion of the name is now considered obsolete. As such, some members of the project advocate dropping the acronym and re-naming “GNOME” to “Gnome”.[1] Two bodies with a slight difference in mass orbiting around a common barycenter. ... Software modules that are designed to work together but reside in multiple computer systems throughout the organization. ... Microsoft Corporation, (NASDAQ: MSFT, HKSE: 4338) is a multinational computer technology corporation with global annual revenue of US$44. ... Object Linking and Embedding (OLE) is a technology that allows embedding and linking to documents and other objects, developed by Microsoft. ...


Project structure

As with most free software projects, the GNOME project is loosely managed. Discussion chiefly occurs on a number of public mailing lists.[7]


In August 2000 the GNOME Foundation was set up to deal with administrative tasks and press interest and to act as a contact point for companies interested in developing GNOME software. While not directly involved in technical decisions, the Foundation does coordinate releases and decide which projects will be part of GNOME. Membership is open to anyone who has made a non-trivial contribution to the project.[8] Members of the Foundation elect a board of directors every November, and candidates for the positions must be members themselves. The GNOME Foundation is a non-profit organization based in Boston, Massachusetts, coordinating the efforts in the GNOME project. ...


Developers and users of GNOME gather at an annual meeting known as GUADEC in order to discuss the current state of the project and its future direction.[9] The GNOME User and Developer European Conference, or GUADEC, is an annual conference taking place in Europe, around the GNOME desktop environment. ...


GNOME often incorporates standards from freedesktop.org into itself to allow GNOME applications to appear more integrated into other desktops (and vice versa), and encourages cooperation as well as competition. freedesktop. ...


Major subprojects

GNOME is built from a large number of different projects. A few of the major ones are listed below:

  • Bonobo – a compound document technology.
  • GConf – for storing application settings.
  • GVFS – a virtual file system.
  • GNOME Keyring – for storing encryption keys and security information.
  • GNOME Translation Project – translate documentation and applications into different languages.
  • GTK+ – a widget toolkit used for constructing graphical applications. The use of GTK+ as the base widget toolkit allows GNOME to benefit from certain features such as theming (the ability to change the look of an application) and smooth anti-aliased graphics. Sub-projects of GTK+ provide object oriented programming support (GObjects), extensive support of international character sets and text layout (Pango) and accessibility (ATK). GTK+ reduces the amount of work required to port GNOME applications to other platforms such as Windows and Mac OS X.
  • Human interface guidelines (HIG) – research and documentation on building easy-to-use GNOME applications.
  • LibXML – an XML library.
  • ORBit – a CORBA ORB for software componentry.

A number of language bindings are available allowing applications to be written in a variety of programming languages, such as C++ (gtkmm), Java (java-gnome), Ruby (ruby-gnome2), C#, (Gtk#), Python (PyGTK), Perl (gtk2-perl) and many others. The only languages currently used in applications that are part of an official GNOME desktop release are C, C# and Python.[10] Bonobo is a component model for compound documents used in GNOME, a desktop environment. ... Example of a compound document in Microsoft Office Word In computing, a compound document is a document type typically produced using word processing software, and is a regular text document intermingled with e. ... GConf is a system used by the GNOME desktop environment for storing configuration settings for the desktop and applications. ... GVFS[1] is a replacement for GnomeVFS,[2] the GNOME Virtual File System. ... A virtual file system (VFS) or virtual filesystem switch is an abstraction layer on top of a more concrete file system. ... GNOME Keyring is similar to the Mac OS keyring. ... Encrypt redirects here. ... GTK+, or the GIMP Toolkit, is one of the two most popular widget toolkits for the X Window System for creating graphical user interfaces. ... This article is about computing. ... Accessibility Toolkit refers in particular to the GNOME ATK. The ATK is a developer toolkit which allows programmers to use common GNOME accessibility features in their applications. ... Human Interface Guidelines (HIG) is a software development document which offers application developers a set of recommendations. ... libXML is a library for parsing XML documents. ... Two bodies with a slight difference in mass orbiting around a common barycenter. ... In computing, Common Object Request Broker Architecture (CORBA) is a standard for software componentry, created and controlled by the Object Management Group (OMG). ... In distributed computing, an object request broker (ORB) is a piece of middleware software that allows programmers to make program calls from one computer to another, via a network. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Component-based software engineering. ... In computing, a binding from a language to a library or OS service is an API providing that service in the language. ... C++ (pronounced ) is a general-purpose programming language. ... gtkmm is the official C++ interface for the popular GUI library GTK+. Highlights include typesafe callbacks, widgets extensible via inheritance and a comprehensive set of widgets. ... Java language redirects here. ... java-gnome is a set of language bindings for the Java programming language, for use in the GNOME desktop environment. ... Ruby is a reflective, object-oriented programming language. ... Ruby-GNOME2 is a set of Ruby language bindings for the GNOME 2. ... C# (see section on name, pronunciation) is an object-oriented programming language developed by Microsoft as part of the . ... Gtk#, a GUI Toolkit, is a set of . ... Python is a general-purpose, high-level programming language. ... Screenshot of WingIDE which is written using PyGTK. More screenshots PyGTK is a set of Python wrappers for the GTK+ GUI library. ... For other uses, see Perl (disambiguation). ... GTK2-Perl is a set of Perl wrappers for the GTK+ GUI library and the other GNOME platform libraries. ...


Look and feel

GNOME is designed around the traditional computing desktop metaphor. Its handling of windows, applications and files is similar to that of contemporary desktop operating systems. In its default configuration, the desktop has a launcher menu for quick access to installed programs and file locations; open windows may be accessed by a taskbar along the bottom of the screen and the top-right corner features a notification area for programs to display notices while running in the background. However these features can be moved to almost anywhere the user desires, replaced with other functions or removed altogether. It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Desktop_environment. ...


GNOME uses Metacity as its default window manager. Users can change the appearance of their desktop through the use of themes, which are sets consisting of an icon set, window manager border and GTK+ theme engine and parameters. Popular GTK+ themes include Bluecurve and Clearlooks (the current default theme). Metacity (pronounced to rhyme with capacity with the stress on the second syllable[3]) is a compositing window manager used by default in the GNOME desktop environment. ... This article is about the religious artifacts. ... Bluecurve is a desktop theme for GNOME and KDE created by the Red Hat Artwork project. ... Clearlooks Theme on Ubuntu Linux Clearlooks is a theme engine for GTK+, the main widget toolkit used by the GNOME desktop environment. ...


GNOME puts emphasis on being easy for everyone to use. The HIG helps guide developers in producing applications which look and behave similarly, in order to provide a cohesive GNOME interface.

Usability

Since GNOME v2.0, a key focus of the project has been usability. As a part of this, the GNOME Human Interface Guidelines (HIG) were created, which is an extensive guide for creating quality, consistent and usable GUI programs, covering everything from GUI design to recommended pixel-based layout of widgets. Usability is a term used to denote the ease with which people can employ a particular tool or other human-made object in order to achieve a particular goal. ...


During the v2.0 rewrite, many settings were deemed to be of little or no value to the majority of users and were removed. For instance, the preferences section of the Panel were reduced from a dialog of six tabs to one with two tabs. Havoc Pennington summarized the usability work in his 2002 essay "Free Software UI", emphasizing the idea that all preferences have a cost, and it's better to "unbreak the software" than to add a UI preference to do that:[11] Robert Sanford Havoc Pennington is currently a Red Hat Desktop manager/engineer, but his fame in the FLOSS world is big due to his work on GNOME, Metacity, GConf, D-BUS, and more. ...

A traditional free software application is configurable so that it has the union of all features anyone's ever seen in any equivalent application on any other historical platform. Or even configurable to be the union of all applications that anyone's ever seen on any historical platform (Emacs *cough*).

Does this hurt anything? Yes it does. It turns out that preferences have a cost. Of course, some preferences also have important benefits - and can be crucial interface features. But each one has a price, and you have to carefully consider its value. Many users and developers don't understand this, and end up with a lot of cost and little value for their preferences dollar.

Some people believe that GNOME should be more functional. One of these is Linus Torvalds, creator of the Linux kernel, who commented in a usability-related discussion on the GNOME usability mailing list:[12] Linus Benedict Torvalds ( ; ; born December 28, 1969 in Helsinki, Finland) is a Finnish software engineer best known for initiating the development of the Linux kernel. ... The Linux kernel is a Unix-like operating system kernel. ...

This "users are idiots, and are confused by functionality" mentality of Gnome is a disease. If you think your users are idiots, only idiots will use it. I don't use Gnome, because in striving to be simple, it has long since reached the point where it simply doesn't do what I need it to do. Please, just tell people to use KDE.

For the NYSE stock ticker symbol KDE, see 4Kids Entertainment. ...

Releases

Each of the parts making up the GNOME project has its own version number and release schedule. However, individual module maintainers coordinate their efforts to create a full GNOME stable release on a roughly six-month schedule.


Stable releases

The releases listed in the table below are classed as stable. Software development stages In computer programming, development stage terminology expresses how the development of a piece of software has progressed and how much further development it may require. ...

Version Date Information
August 1997[13] GNOME development announced
1.0 March 1999[14] First major GNOME release
1.0.53 October 1999[15] "October"
1.2 May 2000[16] "Bongo"
1.4 April 2001[17] "Tranquility"
2.0 June 2002[18] Major upgrade based on GTK2. Introduction of the Human Interface Guidelines.
2.2 February 2003[19] Multimedia and file manager improvements.
2.4 September 2003[20] "Temujin": Epiphany, accessibility support.
2.6 March 2004[21] Nautilus changes to a spatial file manager, and a new GTK+ file dialog is introduced. A short-lived fork of GNOME, GoneME, is created as a response to the changes in this version.
2.8 September 2004[22] Improved removable device support, adds Evolution.
2.10 March 2005[23] Lower memory requirements and performance improvements. Adds: new panel applets (modem control, drive mounter and trashcan); and the Totem and Sound Juicer applications
2.12 September 2005[24] Nautilus improvements; improvements in cut/paste between applications and freedesktop.org integration. Adds: Evince PDF viewer; New default theme: Clearlooks; menu editor; keyring manager and admin tools. Based on GTK+ 2.8 with cairo support.
2.14 March 2006[25] Performance improvements (over 100% in some cases); usability improvements in user preferences; GStreamer 0.10 multimedia framework. Adds: Ekiga video conferencing application; Deskbar search tool; Pessulus lockdown editor; Fast user switching; Sabayon system administration tool.
2.16 September 2006[26] Performance improvements. Adds: Tomboy notetaking application; Baobab disk usage analyser; Orca screen reader; GNOME Power Manager (improving laptop battery life); improvements to Totem, Nautilus; compositing support for Metacity; new icon theme. Based on GTK+ 2.10 with new print dialog.
2.18 March 2007[27] Performance improvements. Adds: Seahorse GPG security application, allowing encryption of emails and local files; Baobab disk usage analyser improved to support ring chart view; Orca screen reader; improvements to Evince, Epiphany and GNOME Power Manager, Volume control; two new games, GNOME Sudoku and glchess. MP3 and AAC audio encoding.
2.20 September 2007[28] Tenth anniversary release. Evolution backup functionality; improvements in Epiphany, EOG, GNOME Power Manager; password keyring management in Seahorse. Adds: PDF forms editing in Evince; integrated search in the file manager dialogs; automatic multimedia codec installer.
2.22 March 2008[29] Addition of Cheese, a tool for taking photos from webcams and Remote Desktop Viewer; basic window compositing support in Metacity; introduction of GVFS; improved playback support for DVDs and Youtube, MythTV support in Totem; internationalised clock applet; Google Calendar support and message tagging in Evolution; improvements in Evince, Tomboy, Sound Juicer and Calculator.

Human Interface Guidelines (HIG) is a software development document which offers application developers a set of recommendations. ... Epiphany is a web browser for the GNOME computer desktop. ... Nautilus is the official file manager for the GNOME desktop. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... In computing, a File dialog (Also called File Selector/Chooser, or open and save dialog) is a dialog box that allows users to choose a file from the file system. ... Evolution or Novell Evolution (formerly Ximian Evolution, prior to Novells 2003 acquisition of Ximian) is the official personal information manager and workgroup information management tool for GNOME. It combines e-mail, calendar, address book, and task list management functions. ... Totem Movie Player is a media player (audio and video) for the GNOME personal computer desktop environment which runs on Linux, Solaris, BSD and other UNIX and UNIX-like systems. ... Sound Juicer is a CD ripping tool. ... Evince is a free software document viewer for both Portable Document Format (PDF) and PostScript documents for the GNOME desktop environment. ... Ekiga (formerly called GnomeMeeting) is a free and open source VoIP and video conferencing application for GNOME and Windows. ... Categories: Wikipedia cleanup | Groupware | Telecommunications stubs ... Fast user switching is a feature on some modern multi-user operating systems such as Windows XP, Windows Vista, Mac OS X, OpenSUSE (linux), Ubuntu (linux) and Fedora (linux)[1]. It allows users to switch between user accounts on a single PC without quitting applications and logging out. ... Tomboy is an open-source desktop notetaking application for Unix-like systems written in C# using Gtk#. It uses a Wiki-like linking system to connect notes together. ... Baobab, or Disk Usage Analyzer, is a GNOME graphical disk-space analyzer. ... Orca is a free, open source, flexible, extensible, and powerful assistive technology for people with visual impairments. ... In visual effects post-production, compositing refers to creating new images or moving images by combining images from different sources – such as real-world digital video, film, synthetic 3-D imagery, 2-D animations, painted backdrops, digital still photographs, and text. ... Seahorse is a GNOME front-end application for managing PGP and SSH keys. ... The GNU Privacy Guard (GnuPG or GPG) is a free software replacement for the PGP suite of cryptographic software, released under the GNU General Public License. ... A keyring is a ring of material, usually metal or plastic, that holds keys and other small items, which are sometimes connected to keychains. ... A codec is a device or program capable of encoding and/or decoding a digital data stream or signal. ... Cheese is a GNOME webcam application, Photo Booth-like. ... Vinagre is a VNC client for the GNOME desktop environment. ... Metacity (pronounced to rhyme with capacity with the stress on the second syllable[3]) is a compositing window manager used by default in the GNOME desktop environment. ... GVFS[1] is a replacement for GnomeVFS,[2] the GNOME Virtual File System. ... Totem Movie Player is a media player (audio and video) for the GNOME personal computer desktop environment which runs on Linux, Solaris, BSD and other UNIX and UNIX-like systems. ... Evolutions email client Evolution or Novell Evolution (formerly Ximian Evolution) is the official personal information manager and workgroup information management tool for GNOME. It combines e-mail, calendar, address book, and task list management functions. ... Evince is a free software document viewer for both Portable Document Format (PDF) and PostScript documents for the GNOME desktop environment. ... Tomboy is an open-source desktop notetaking application for Unix-like systems written in C# using Gtk#. It uses a Wiki-like linking system to connect notes together. ... Sound Juicer is a CD ripping tool. ...

Upcoming releases

Version Target date Information
2.24 September 2008 Better GNOME panel theming, integration of bookmarks and browsing history for GNOME-wide access, and new applet library for GNOME panel,[30] new version of Ekiga featuring a revamped user interface and SIP presence support, Empathy instant messaging client utilising the Telepathy communications framework, column and list views in Nautilus, completion of the port from GnomeVFS to GIO.[31]

Ekiga (formerly called GnomeMeeting) is a free and open source VoIP and video conferencing application for GNOME and Windows. ... The Session Initiation Protocol (SIP) is an application-layer control (signaling) protocol for creating, modifying, and terminating sessions with one or more participants. ... Empathy is a re-usable collection of Graphical User Interface widgets for developing instant messaging clients for the GNOME desktop. ... Telepathy is a software framework which can be used to make software for interpersonal communications such as instant messaging, Voice over IP or videoconferencing. ... Nautilus is the official file manager for the GNOME desktop. ... GnomeVFS is short for GNOME Virtual File System. ... GVFS[1] is a replacement for GnomeVFS,[2] the GNOME Virtual File System. ...

Source code

GNOME releases are made to the ftp.gnome.org FTP server[32] in the form of source code with configure scripts, which are compiled by operating system vendors and integrated with the rest of their systems before distribution. Most vendors use only stable and tested versions of GNOME, and provide it in the form of easily installed, pre-compiled packages. The source code of every stable and development version of GNOME is stored in the GNOME Subversion source code repository.[33] Source code (commonly just source or code) is any series of statements written in some human-readable computer programming language. ... The introduction to this article provides insufficient context for those unfamiliar with the subject matter. ... In computing, Subversion (SVN) is a version control system (VCS) initiated in 2000 by CollabNet Inc. ...


A number of build-scripts (such as JHBuild or GARNOME) are available to help automate the process of compiling the source code. Scripting programming languages (commonly called scripting languages or script languages) are computer programming languages designed for scripting the operation of a computer. ... JHBuild is a program that can be used to pull a number of modules from CVS and build them in the correct order. ... GARNOME is a build utility for the GNOME Desktop. ...


Future developments

There are many sub-projects under the umbrella of the GNOME project, and not all of them are currently included in GNOME releases. Some are considered purely experimental concepts, or for testing ideas that will one day migrate into stable GNOME applications; others are code that is being polished for direct inclusion. Some examples include:

  • Project Soylent – making “people” and their interactions first-class objects within the GNOME framework.[34]
  • Project Ridley – to consolidate several small undermaintained libraries into GTK+, such as libgnome and libgnomeprint.[35]

Usage

GNOME is the default desktop environment for several Linux distributions, most notably Debian, Fedora and Ubuntu. Foresight Linux showcases the latest releases of GNOME. Debian is a free operating system. ... For other uses, see Fedora (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Ubuntu (disambiguation). ... Foresight Desktop Linux is a GNU/Linux distribution of free and non-free software. ...


For derived and other distributions, see Comparison of Linux distributions and Comparison of Linux LiveDistros. Technical variations include support for different hardware devices and systems or software package configurations. ... A LiveDistro is a Linux distribution that is executed upon boot, without installation on a hard drive. ...


See also

Free software portal

Image File history File links Free_Software_Portal_Logo. ... This is a list of applications designed for use with the GNOME desktop environment. ... The tone or style of this article or section may not be appropriate for Wikipedia. ... GnomeFiles is a software repository for the Gtk graphical toolkit and the GNOME desktop environment. ... The GNOME Speech API allows developers to incorporate speech technology into user interfaces for their GNOME applications. ... Information in this article or section has not been verified against sources and may not be reliable. ...

References

  1. ^ a b "Desktop Development mailing list". Retrieved on 2006-05-07.
  2. ^ "About GNOME". Retrieved on 2005-09-08.
  3. ^ "GNOME Languages". Retrieved on 2008-01-20.
  4. ^ Richard Stallman (2000-09-05). "Stallman on Qt, the GPL, KDE, and GNOME". Retrieved on 2005-09-09.
  5. ^ "GNU Lesser General Public License - Free Software Foundation". Retrieved on 2008-01-20.
  6. ^ Pennington, Havoc (1999). "GTK+ / Gnome Application Development". Retrieved on 2006-09-08.
  7. ^ "GNOME mailing lists, rules and FAQs".
  8. ^ "Membership of the GNOME foundation". Retrieved on 2005-09-08.
  9. ^ "About GUADEC".
  10. ^ Newren, Elijah (2006-04-20). "Mono bindings a blessed dependency? [Was: Tomboy in 2.16]". desktop-devel mailing list. Retrieved on 2007-09-20.
  11. ^ ""Free Software UI"". Retrieved on 2007-03-08.
  12. ^ Linus Torvalds (2005-12-12). "Printing dialog and GNOME". Retrieved on 2007-12-13.
  13. ^ de Icaza, Miguel. "The story of the GNOME project".
  14. ^ GNOME press release for version 1.0
  15. ^ Lee, Elliot (1999-10-12). ""October GNOME" release now available". gnome-announce mailing list. Retrieved on 2007-09-20.
  16. ^ GNOME press release for version 1.2
  17. ^ GNOME press release for version 1.4
  18. ^ Waugh, Jeff (2002-06-27). "GNOME 2.0 Desktop and Developer Platform Released!". desktop-devel mailing list. Retrieved on 2007-09-20.
  19. ^ GNOME press release for version 2.2
  20. ^ Waugh, Jeff (2003-09-11). "Announcing the GNOME 2.4.0 Desktop & Developer Platform". gnome-announce mailing list. Retrieved on 2007-09-20.
  21. ^ Sobala, Andrew (2004-03-31). "Announcing the GNOME 2.6.0 Desktop & Developer Platform". gnome-announce mailing list. Retrieved on 2007-09-20.
  22. ^ GNOME press release for version 2.8
  23. ^ GNOME press release for version 2.10
  24. ^ GNOME press release for version 2.12
  25. ^ GNOME press release for version 2.14
  26. ^ Newren, Elijah (2006-09-06). "Celebrating the release of GNOME 2.16!". gnome-announce mailing list. Retrieved on 2007-09-20.
  27. ^ Newren, Elijah (2007-03-14). "Celebrating the release of GNOME 2.18!". gnome-announce mailing list. Retrieved on 2007-09-20.
  28. ^ "GNOME 2.20 officially released". Ars Technica (2007-09-19). Retrieved on 2007-09-20.
  29. ^ Untz, Vincent (2008-03-12). "Celebrating the release of GNOME 2.22!". gnome-announce-list mailing list. Retrieved on 2008-03-12.
  30. ^ "GNOME Roadmap".
  31. ^ "GNOME 2.22 Release Notes".
  32. ^ "GNOME stable release ftp server".
  33. ^ "Information about the GNOME source code repository".
  34. ^ "Project Soylent homepage".
  35. ^ "ProjectRidley - GNOME Live!". Retrieved on 2008-01-20.

Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 127th day of the year (128th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 251st day of the year (252nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Common Era (or Anno Domini), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... January 20 is the 20th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2000 (MM) was a leap year starting on Saturday. ... is the 248th day of the year (249th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 252nd day of the year (253rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Common Era (or Anno Domini), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... January 20 is the 20th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Robert Sanford Havoc Pennington is currently a Red Hat Desktop manager/engineer, but his fame in the FLOSS world is big due to his work on GNOME, Metacity, GConf, D-BUS, and more. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 251st day of the year (252nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 251st day of the year (252nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 110th day of the year (111th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... September 20 is the 263rd day of the year (264th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 67th day of the year (68th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Linus Benedict Torvalds ( ; ; born December 28, 1969 in Helsinki, Finland) is a Finnish software engineer best known for initiating the development of the Linux kernel. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 346th day of the year (347th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 347th day of the year (348th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events of 2008: (EMILY) Me Lesley and MIley are going to China! This article is about the year. ... is the 285th day of the year (286th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... September 20 is the 263rd day of the year (264th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ... is the 178th day of the year (179th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... September 20 is the 263rd day of the year (264th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 254th day of the year (255th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... September 20 is the 263rd day of the year (264th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 90th day of the year (91st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... September 20 is the 263rd day of the year (264th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 249th day of the year (250th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... September 20 is the 263rd day of the year (264th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 73rd day of the year (74th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... September 20 is the 263rd day of the year (264th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Ars Technica is a technology-related website catering to PC enthusiasts. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 262nd day of the year (263rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... September 20 is the 263rd day of the year (264th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Common Era (or Anno Domini), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 71st day of the year (72nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Common Era (or Anno Domini), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 71st day of the year (72nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Common Era (or Anno Domini), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... January 20 is the 20th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ...

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Image File history File links Wikibooks-logo-en. ... Wikibooks logo Wikibooks, previously called Wikimedia Free Textbook Project and Wikimedia-Textbooks, is a wiki for the creation of books. ... Miguel de Icaza (born c. ... Federico Mena Quintero is a Mexican computer programmer. ... Robert Sanford Havoc Pennington is currently a Red Hat Desktop manager/engineer, but his fame in the FLOSS world is big due to his work on GNOME, Metacity, GConf, D-BUS, and more. ... The GNOME Foundation is a non-profit organization based in Boston, Massachusetts, coordinating the efforts in the GNOME project. ... The GNOME User and Developer European Conference, or GUADEC, is an annual conference taking place in Europe, around the GNOME desktop environment. ... Image File history File links Gnomelogo. ... Baobab, or Disk Usage Analyzer, is a GNOME graphical disk-space analyzer. ... GNOME Dictionary, also identified as gnome-dictionary, is a DICT client written by Emmanuele Bassi and others. ... Ekiga (formerly called GnomeMeeting) is a free and open source VoIP and video conferencing application for GNOME and Windows. ... A screenshot of Epiphany. ... Evince is a free software document viewer for both Portable Document Format (PDF) and PostScript documents for the GNOME desktop environment. ... Evolution or Novell Evolution (formerly Ximian Evolution, prior to Novells 2003 acquisition of Ximian) is the official personal information manager and workgroup information management tool for GNOME. It combines e-mail, calendar, address book, and task list management functions. ... Eye of GNOME is a simple image viewer for the GNOME desktop environment. ... File-roller is an archive manager for the GNOME environment. ... The correct title of this article is gedit. ... GNOME terminal, also identified as gnome-terminal, is a terminal emulator written by Havoc Pennington and others. ... Metacity (pronounced to rhyme with capacity with the stress on the second syllable[3]) is a compositing window manager used by default in the GNOME desktop environment. ... Nautilus is the official file manager for the GNOME desktop. ... Gnome-panel is a highly configurable launcher and task bar for X windowing environments. ... Rhythmbox is an audio player that plays and helps organize digital music. ... Sound Juicer is a CD ripping tool. ... Gnome-screenshot is a utility used in the GNOME Desktop Environment for Unix-like operating systems for taking screenshots. ... Tomboy is an open-source desktop notetaking application for Unix-like systems written in C# using Gtk#. It uses a Wiki-like linking system to connect notes together. ... Totem Movie Player is a media player (audio and video) for the GNOME personal computer desktop environment which runs on Linux, Solaris, BSD and other UNIX and UNIX-like systems. ... This is a list of applications designed for use with the GNOME desktop environment. ... Accessibility Toolkit refers in particular to the GNOME ATK. The ATK is a developer toolkit which allows programmers to use common GNOME accessibility features in their applications. ... Bonobo is a component model for creating reusable software components and compound documents. ... D-Bus is a free software project which offers a simple way for applications to communicate with one another. ... In computing, the Enlightened Sound Daemon (ESD or EsounD) is the sound server for Enlightenment and GNOME. It mixes several sound streams into one for output. ... Gamin is a file and directory monitoring system that is an independent implementation of a subset of FAM, the File Alteration Monitor. ... GConf is a system used by the GNOME desktop environment for storing configuration settings for the desktop and applications. ... GLib is a cross-platform utility library. ... GNOME Keyring is similar to the Mac OS keyring. ... GVFS[1] is a replacement for GnomeVFS,[2] the GNOME Virtual File System. ... A typical piece of GObject class initialization code. ... GStreamer is a multimedia framework written in the C programming language with the type system based on GObject. ... GTK+, or the GIMP Toolkit, is one of the two most popular widget toolkits for the X Window System for creating graphical user interfaces. ... Mono is a project led by Novell (formerly by Ximian) to create an Ecma standard compliant . ... Two bodies with a slight difference in mass orbiting around a common barycenter. ... This article is about computing. ... freedesktop. ... For the NYSE stock ticker symbol KDE, see 4Kids Entertainment. ... Xfce ([1]) is a free software desktop environment for Unix and other Unix-like platforms, such as Linux, Solaris and BSD. It aims to be fast and lightweight, while still being visually appealing and easy to use. ... CDE on Unix (Solaris 8) DECwindows CDE on OpenVMS 7. ... The GNU logo, drawn by Etienne Suvasa The GNU Project was announced in 1983 by Richard Stallman. ... The GNU Manifesto was written by Richard Stallman at the beginning of the GNU Project, to ask for participation and support. ... The Free Software Foundation (FSF) is a non-profit corporation founded in October 1985 by Richard Stallman to support the free software movement (free as in freedom), and in particular the GNU project. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... GPL redirects here. ... The GNU Lesser General Public License (formerly the GNU Library General Public License) or LGPL is a free software license published by the Free Software Foundation. ... // Affero General Public License The Affero General Public License (or AGPL) is a free software license derived from the General Public License with an addition section to cover use over a computer network. ... “GFDL” redirects here. ... Some free software projects, notably GNU Guile,[1] the run-time libraries of GNAT,[1] and GNU Classpath,[2] distribute code under the terms of the GNU General Public License (GPL) but with an additional section known as the GPL linking exception. ... GNU (pronounced ) is a computer operating system composed entirely of free software. ... GNU variants are operating systems based on GNU but not using the Hurd. ... Hurd redirects here. ... Gnuzilla, or GNUzilla, is a derivation of the Mozilla Application Suite created by the GNU Project as an attempt to be entirely free software. ... GNU IceCat, formerly known as GNU IceWeasel,[2] is a web browser distributed by the GNU Project. ... Gnash is a project which aims to create a player and browser plugin for the Adobe Flash file format which is free software, replacing the proprietary software niche currently occupied by Adobe Flash Player. ... This article is about the Unix shell. ... The GNU Compiler Collection (usually shortened to GCC) is a set of programming language compilers produced by the GNU Project. ... GNU Emacs is one of the two most popular versions of Emacs (see also XEmacs). ... Glibc is the GNU projects C standard library. ... The GNU Core Utilities or coreutils is a package of GNU software containing many of the basic tools such as cat, ls, and rm needed for Unix-like operating systems. ... The GNU build system is a suite of tools produced by the GNU project that assist in making packages portable to many UNIX-like systems. ... This is an incomplete list of the software packages developed for or maintained by the Free Software Foundation for GNU, a free UNIX-compatible operating system whose development started in 1984. ... Robert (aka Bob) Chassell was one of the founding directors of Free Software Foundation (FSF) in 1985. ... Loïc Dachary is a pioneer of the GNU Project and notably active in free software development since 1987. ... Ricardo Galli Ricardo Adolfo Galli Granada, also known as gallir, is a doctor of computer science at the University of the Balearic Islands, where he teaches operating system design. ... Georg C. F. Greve (born March 10, 1973 in Helgoland, Germany) is initiator and president of the Free Software Foundation Europe. ... Federico Heinz is a Latin-American programmer and Free Software advocate living in Argentina. ... Benjamin Mako Hill (b. ... He was Chief Executive of Free Software Foundation and is now CTO of Software Freedom Law Center (SFLC). ... Eben Moglen is a professor of law and legal history at Columbia University, and is the founder, Director-Counsel and Chairman of Software Freedom Law Center, whose client list includes numerous pro bono clients, such as the Free Software Foundation. ... Richard Matthew Stallman (born March 16, 1953), often abbreviated rms,[2] is an American software freedom activist, hacker,[3] and software developer. ... William John Sullivan (more commonly known as John Sullivan[2]) (born December 6th, 1976) is a software freedom activist, hacker, and writer. ... Leonard Len H. Tower Jr. ... The GNU/Linux naming controversy is a dispute among members of the free and open source software community about how to refer to the computer operating systems commonly called Linux. GNU/Linux is the term promoted by the Free Software Foundation (FSF), its founder Richard Stallman, and its supporters, for... Promotional poster for two disc edition of Revolution OS Revolution OS is a documentary which traces the history of GNU, Linux, Free Software and the Open Source movement. ... Free software is software that can be used, studied, and modified without restriction, and which can be copied and redistributed in modified or unmodified form either without restriction, or with minimal restrictions only to ensure that further recipients can also do these things. ... The logo of the Open Source Initiative For other uses, see open source. ... The Common Unix Printing System (CUPS) is a modular computer printing system for Unix-like operating systems that allows a computer to act as a powerful print server. ... The Free Software Definition is a definition published by Free Software Foundation (FSF) for what constitutes free software. ... The GNU logo, drawn by Etienne Suvasa The GNU Project was announced in 1983 by Richard Stallman. ... This is a list of open-source software packages: computer software licensed under an open-source license. ... Open source refers to projects that are open to the public and which draw on other projects that are freely available to the general public. ... “X11” redirects here. ... Image File history File links Official_gnu. ... Image File history File links Tux. ... Image File history File links Portal. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... This timeline shows the development of the Linux kernel. ... Mozilla was the official, public, original name of Mozilla Application Suite by the Mozilla Foundation, currently known as SeaMonkey suite. ... Mozilla Application Suite began as an open source base of the Netscape suite. ... The Mozilla Firefox project was created by Dave Hyatt and Blake Ross as an experimental branch of the Mozilla project. ... Originally launched as Minotaur shortly after Phoenix (the original name for Mozilla Firefox), the project failed to gain momentum. ... These tables compare the various free software / open source operating systems. ... BSD redirects here. ... Darwin is a free and open source, Unix-like operating system first released by Apple Inc. ... GNU (pronounced ) is a computer operating system composed entirely of free software. ... This article is about operating systems that use the Linux kernel. ... MINIX is a free/open source, Unix-like operating system (OS) based on a microkernel architecture. ... OpenSolaris is an open source project created by Sun Microsystems to build a developer community around Solaris Operating System technology. ... ReactOS is a project to develop an operating system that is binary-compatible with application software and device drivers for Microsoft Windows NT version 5. ... Open source software development is the process by which open source software (or similar software whose source is publicly available) is developed. ... The GNU Compiler Collection (usually shortened to GCC) is a set of programming language compilers produced by the GNU Project. ... The Low Level Virtual Machine, generally known as LLVM, is a compiler infrastructure, written in C++, which is designed for compile-time, link-time, run-time, and idle-time optimization of programs written in arbitrary imperative programming languages. ... Java language redirects here. ... For other uses, see Perl (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see PHP (disambiguation). ... Python is a general-purpose, high-level programming language. ... Ruby is a reflective, dynamic, object-oriented programming language. ... The tone or style of this article or section may not be appropriate for Wikipedia. ... In Unix computing, Blackbox is a window manager for the X Window System. ... EDE or Equinox Desktop Environment is a small desktop environment that is meant to be simple and fast. ... Enlightenment, also known simply as E, is a free software/open source window manager for the X Window System which can be used alone or in conjunction with a desktop environment such as GNOME or KDE. It has a rich feature set, including extensive support for themes and advanced graphics... Étoilé is a GNUstep-based free software desktop environment built from the ground up on highly modular and light components with project and document orientation in mind, in order to allow users to create their own workflow by reshaping or recombining provided Services (aka Applications), Components, etc. ... In Unix computing, Fluxbox is an X window manager based on Blackbox. ... In Unix computing, IceWM is a window manager for the X Window System graphical infrastructure, written by Marko Maček. ... For the NYSE stock ticker symbol KDE, see 4Kids Entertainment. ... screenshot of a LiteStep enabled Windows computer, running the NonStep II theme LiteStep is a Windows shell replacement licensed under the GPL, for Windows 9x and up. ... Openbox is a free window manager for the X Window System, licensed under the GNU General Public License. ... A screenshot of the ROX desktop. ... Window Maker is a window manager for the X Window System, which allows graphical applications to be run on Unix-like operating-systems. ... Xfce ([1]) is a free software desktop environment for Unix and other Unix-like platforms, such as Linux, Solaris and BSD. It aims to be fast and lightweight, while still being visually appealing and easy to use. ... The Free Software Foundation (FSF) is a non-profit corporation founded in October 1985 by Richard Stallman to support the free software movement (free as in freedom), and in particular the GNU project. ... The Free Software Foundation Europe (FSFE, or FSF Europe) was founded in 2001 as an official European sister organization of the U.S.-based Free Software Foundation (FSF) to take care of all aspects of free software in Europe. ... The Free Software Foundation India (FSF-India), founded in 2001, is a sister organisation to Free Software Foundation. ... Free Software Foundation Latin America (FSFLA) is the Latin American sister organisation of Free Software Foundation. ... The Linux Foundation (LF) is a non-profit consortium dedicated to fostering the growth of Linux. ... The Mountain View office shared by the Mozilla Foundation and the Mozilla Corporation The Mozilla Foundation (abbreviated MF or MoFo) is a non-profit organization that exists to support and provide leadership for the open source Mozilla project. ... The Open Source Initiative is an organization dedicated to promoting open source software. ... A free software licence is a software licence which grants recipients rights to modify and redistribute the software which would otherwise be prohibited by copyright law. ... The Apache License (Apache Software License previous to version 2. ... The BSD daemon BSD licenses represent a family of permissive free software licenses. ... GPL redirects here. ... The GNU Lesser General Public License (formerly the GNU Library General Public License) or LGPL is a free software license published by the Free Software Foundation. ... The MIT License, also called the X License or the X11 License, originated at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, is a license for the use of certain types of computer software. ... -1... Permissive free software licences are software licences for a copyrighted work that offer many of the same freedoms as releasing a work to the public domain. ... License Proliferation refers to the problems created when additional software licenses are written for software packages. ... This article is about drivers. ... Digital rights management (DRM) is an umbrella term that refers to access control technologies used by publishers and copyright holders to limit usage of digital media or devices. ... // Open source software security is the measure of assurance or guarantee in the freedom from danger, risk, etc in an open source software system. ... Proprietary software is software with restrictions on copying and modifying as enforced by the proprietor. ... The SCO-Linux controversies are a series of legal and public disputes between the software company SCO Group (SCO) and various Linux vendors and users. ... Opposition to software patents is widespread in the free software community. ... Tivoization is the creation of a system that incorporates software under the terms of a copyleft software license, but uses hardware to prevent users from running modified versions of the software on that hardware. ... Logo of Trusted Computing Group, an initiative to implement Trusted Computing Trusted Computing (commonly abbreviated TC) is a technology developed and promoted by the Trusted Computing Group (TCG). ... From the early 90s onward, alternative terms for free software have come into common use, with much debate in the free software community. ... // The free software community is also called the open source community or the Linux community. ... The free software movement, also known as the free software philosophy, began in 1983 when Richard Stallman announced the GNU Project. ... For the specific comparison of the open source Linux operating system with the closed source Windows Operating system please see Comparison of Windows and Linux Open source (or free software) and closed source (or proprietary software) are two approaches to the control, exploitation and commercializing of computer software. ... Free and Open Source Software, also F/OSS or FOSS, is software which is liberally licensed to grant the right of users to study, change, and improve its design through the availability of its source code. ... Promotional poster for two disc edition of Revolution OS Revolution OS is a documentary which traces the history of GNU, Linux, Free Software and the Open Source movement. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
The GNOME Foundation (388 words)
The GNOME Project is an effort to create a complete, free and easy-to-use desktop environment for users, as well as a powerful application development framework for software developers.
GNOME is part of the GNU Project, and is Free Software (sometimes referred to as Open Source software).
The GNOME Foundation will work to further the goal of the GNOME project: to create a computing platform for use by the general public that is completely free software.
GNOME - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (2222 words)
GNOME is used in conjunction with an operating system, such as a GNU/Linux distribution or Sun Microsystems' Solaris, to create a fully functional computer system.
GNOME is the official desktop of the GNU Project and the correct pronunciation of the name is /gəˈnoʊm/ (guh-nome), although /noʊʊm/ (as in the English word "gnome") is also in common usage.
GNOME releases are made in the form of source code, which is then compiled and integrated with the rest of the system.
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