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The GED, General Educational Development, or General Equivalence Degree Test, is a test that certifies the taker has attained American or Canadian high school-level academic skills. To pass the GED, the test taker must perform in at least the 40th percentile of high school seniors nationwide, though individual states can set their own requirements for passing. Some states also require that students take an additional test showing an understanding of federal, state, and/or local government. High school - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia /**/ @import /skins-1. ... This law-related article does not cite its references or sources. ... A state government is the government of a subnational entity in nation-states with federal forms of government, which shares political power with the federal government or national government. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Local government of the United States. ...


The GED is taken by individuals who did not earn a high school diploma. The GED tests were originally created to help veterans after World War II complete basic high school courses in preparation for returning to civilian life. Common reasons for GED recipients not having received a high school diploma include immigration to the United States or Canada; homeschooling; and leaving high school early due to a lack of interest, the inability to pass required tests, or personal problems. A diploma awarded for the completion of high school. ... Thomas Edison attended compulsory school for only three months, after which he was taught at home by his mother and a tutor. ...


More than 15 million students have received the GED since its inception. One in every seven Americans with high school credentials received the GED, as well as one in twenty college students. 70% of GED recipients complete at least the 10th grade before leaving school, and the same number are over the age of 19, with the average age being 24.


In addition to English, the GED test is available in Spanish, French, large print, audiocassette, and braille. Tests and test preparation are routinely offered in correctional facilities and on military bases in addition to more traditional settings. American and Canadian students living outside of those two countries can take the GED test on-line. The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... Typical 60-minute Compact Cassette. ... PREMIER - first The information about the historic site of Safdarjung’s tomb in Delhi, India. ... Dorchester Penitentiary in New Brunswick, Canada is an institution that is part of the Correctional Service of Canada. ... A military base is a facility, settlement, reservation, or installation that shelters military equipment and personnel. ...

Contents


History of the GED

The GED test was originally developed in 1942. Two primary reasons for developing the test were the number of American men being sent overseas to fight in World War II before they could complete their high school education, and the number of people leaving school early to join the largely industrial work force. This article is about the year. ... Combatants Allies: Poland, United Kingdom, Soviet Union, France/Free France, United States, China, Canada, India, Australia, New Zealand, South Africa, Greece,Norway and others Axis Powers: Germany, Italy, Japan, Bulgaria, Finland, Romania, Hungary, Burma, Slovakia Casualties Military dead: 17 million Civilian dead: 33 million Total dead: 50 million Military dead...


In 1972, a new series of the test was released. While the test designed in 1942 was adequate for a time period in which most jobs were industrial and required no education beyond high school, the marketplace in the 1970s required a broader understanding of academic subjects. The new series addressed this issue, and also better prepared students for education beyond the high school level. The 1972 series also required more critical thinking than the 1942 edition, which mainly required the student to recall general facts. 1972 (MCMLXXII) was a leap year starting on Saturday. ... The 1970s decade refers to the years from 1970 to 1979, inclusive. ...


The series was revised for the third time in 1988. The most noticeable change to the series was the addition of a writing sample, which had never been required before. A greater emphasis was placed on socially relevant topics, and more problem-solving skills needed to be demonstrated. For the first time, more students (65%) were taking the test to continue their education beyond high school than to get better employment (30%). 1988 (MCMLXXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


The GED series currently used is the 2002 series, which is considered to be the most challenging series so far. More business-related topics are covered, and the test contains more questions and written passages relevant to adults. Although students are not required to perform a scientific experiment, they must explain how to conduct one, interpret results, and apply information gathered. Written passages are also more multicultural, reflecting the large number of immigrants taking the test. For album titles with the same name, see 2002 (album). ... Wall Street, Manhattan is the location of the New York Stock Exchange and is often used as a symbol for the world of business. ... The term adult describes any mature organism, but normally it refers to a human: one that is no longer a child / minor and is now either a man or a woman. ...


Pretesting and registration

In order to register to take the GED testing battery, most students must show their level of competency by taking pretests. In most districts, students are required to take a mathematics pretest, followed by one additional test in a subject area of their choosing. (Students cannot take the essay portion, as they cannot be graded by anyone other than test administrators.) Each of these tests contain 25 questions which are representative of what will be asked on the actual GED test; no time limit is given. Euclid, a famous Greek mathematician known as the father of geometry, is shown here in detail from The School of Athens by Raphael. ...


In some districts, students must answer approximately 15-20 questions accurately in order to register to take the GED test. Proof of identity and residency are required in order to register; accepted forms of identification include driver's licenses, birth certificates, and passports. Students must then fill out forms that are submitted to their individual state and local school or adult education district(s) for review in order to ensure the student has officially withdrawn from the school system.(if under the age of 18) Depending on the district, a student will have to wait anywhere from one week to three months to take the actual GED test. current EU driving licence, German version - front 1. ... Mary Elizabeth Winblad (1895-1987) birth certificate In most countries, a birth certificate is an official legal document usually containing most of the following information: Name at birth Date and time of birth Sex Place of birth Birth registration number (NHS number in UK) Legal parent(s) (including in UK... The title page of European Union member state passports bears the name European Union, then the name of the issuing country, in the official languages of all EU countries. ...


In some states, if a student does not receive a desirable score on the pretests, they will most likely not be allowed to register for the GED test. In this case, they will be encouraged to privately study until they are ready to take the pretests again, or they will be enrolled in an adult education program in order to prepare for the GED test.


Test preparation

In response to the low pass rate (30%) for most people taking the test for the first time, local adult education boards have begun to offer intensive tutoring for GED seekers, often financed by state boards of education and frequently free of charge to students. A state of the United States (a U.S. state) is any one of the fifty states (four of which officially favor the term commonwealth) which, along with the District of Columbia, form the United States of America. ... A board of education or a school board or school committee is the title of the board of directors of a local school district. ...


During these classes, usually held at least once a week, students review the high school material that they learned in a traditional school setting, and they are also taught about subjects they did not receive formal instruction in. Textbooks are used for these classes, and homework is often assigned to students. Individual tutoring is also offered in some districts.


Due to the diverse subject areas covered by the GED test, many different topics are covered in preparatory classes and textbooks. Students will typically cover many topics in these classes that will not come up on the GED test itself. For example, a student may spend several months learning about medieval history, only to find that questions about the time period do not appear on their final test. This is done to ensure that the student truly does have a broad understanding of each of the topic areas, and has not simply "crammed" for the test prior to taking it. The Middle Ages formed the middle period in a traditional schematic division of European history into three ages: the classical civilization of Antiquity, the Middle Ages, and modern times, beginning with the Renaissance. ...


In addition to formal test preparation, students are also able and encouraged to prepare on their own in private. As with similar tests, many test preparation books are offered for the GED. These books offer practice tests, tips for passing the GED test, and guidelines to help students determine areas in which they need improvement. Many books also offer extensive information on the various subject areas covered by the test, similar to textbooks students use in traditional high school settings. Students can read books that cover all academic areas of the test, or just the area(s) in which they need more assistance. Some commercial tutoring centers also offer preparation specifically for the GED test. // English secondary schools In English Secondary Schools the Form Tutor is similar to an American Home Room Teacher. ...


How the test works

Although the term "GED test" is often used, students must pass 5 individual tests in order to obtain their GED. These are known collectively as the testing battery. The five tests in the battery are: Language Arts, Writing; Social Studies; Science; Language Arts, Reading; and Mathematics. The Language Arts, Writing test is further divided into Part I and Part II, and the Mathematics test is split into a calculator-optional portion and a calculator-free one. English grammar is the study of rules governing the use of the English language. ... The social sciences are groups of academic disciplines that study the human aspects of the world. ... Science in the broadest sense refers to any knowledge or trained skill, especially (but not exclusively) when this is attained by verifiable means. ... Old book bindings at the Merton College library. ... Euclid, a famous Greek mathematician known as the father of geometry, is shown here in detail from The School of Athens by Raphael. ... A modern basic arithmetic calculator For other uses, see Calculator (disambiguation). ...


Depending on the state and district, students may or may not have to take all of the tests at the same time. Due to the length of the testing battery, most districts divide the tests into two or more days, and testing sessions are not always consecutive. In larger districts, students are usually given the option of taking their tests on multiple consecutive days or evenings, or they can take them on two consecutive weekends, depending on which time frame is more convenient for them.


Language Arts, Writing

Part I

The Language Arts, Writing testing portion is divided into two parts. Part I covers sentence structure, organization, usage, and mechanics. Students are provided with passages which they are then asked to correct or improve according to Edited American English standards, or equivalent standards in the French version of the test offered in Canada. In linguistics, a sentence is a unit of language, characterised in most languages by the presence of a finite verb. ... American English (AmE) is the dialect of the English language used mostly in the United States of America. ...


30% of Part I covers structure, 15% organization, 30% usage, and 25% mechanics. Common questions include asking students to identify where punctuation should be placed and how sentences in a paragraph should be arranged for maximum clarity. Common misspellings, subject-verb agreement, and capitalization are also covered. Students receive 75 minutes to complete the 50 questions comprising Part I. The term punctuation has two different linguistic meanings: in general, the act and the effect of punctuating, i. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Wikipedia:Lists of common misspellings. ... English grammar is the study of rules governing the use of the English language. ... For any word written in a language with whose alphabet or alphabet equivalent has two cases, such as those using the Latin, Greek, Cyrillic, or Armenian alphabet, capitalization (or capitalisation) is the writing of that word with its first letter in majuscules (uppercase) and the remaining letters in minuscules (lowercase). ...


Part II

Part II of the Language Arts, Writing test requires the student to write an essay. Students have 45 minutes to complete the essay, though anyone who finishes Part I early can add the remaining time from that portion to their essay writing period. A passing essay must have at least 5 paragraphs and must contain a clearly defined introduction, body, and conclusion. The introduction must contain a thesis statement as well as preview sentences of the body. The body should contain three paragraphs, each containing separate yet related ideas that develop the main idea. The final paragraph must adequately and coherently summarize the whole essay. An essay is a short work that treats a topic from an authors personal point of view, often taking into account subjective experiences and personal reflections upon them. ... A pilcrow is used to indicate a paragraph. ... Look up thesis in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...


All essay subjects are assigned. The topics selected do not require any special knowledge or advance reading on the student's part; instead, they focus on general interest topics that most people are familiar with and comfortable discussing, verbally or in print. Example subjects include the influence of violent music on teenagers, the advantages or disadvantages of a "child-free" lifestyle, and the importance of receiving a diploma in modern society. A diploma (from Greek diploma) is a certificate or deed issued by an educational institution, such as a university, that testifies that the recipient has successfully completed a particular course of study, or confers an academic degree. ...


Part II is the only test within the GED testing battery that is not scored by computer. The essay is read by two reviewers within the state or testing district where the test has been taken. These reviewers each assign the essay a score between 1 (worst) and 4 (best); the scores are then averaged to find the final score. If a student receives an average score of less than 2, Part I is not scored and the student has to take both parts of the Language Arts, Writing test again. In some districts, a student must pass the essay before they are allowed to take any other tests in the battery. A Lego RCX Computer is an example of an embedded computer used to control mechanical devices. ...


Social Studies

The Social Studies portion of the GED testing battery covers 5 main content areas. 25% of the test focuses on American history, 15% on world history, 25% on civics and government, 20% on economics, and 15% on geography. Students are given 70 minutes to answer the 50 questions asked on the Social Studies test. The history of the United States has occurred at the regional, territorial, state and local level. ... For other senses of this word, see history (disambiguation). ... Civics is the science of comparative government and means of administering public trusts - the theory of governance as applied to state institutions. ... Buyers bargain for good prices while sellers put forth their best front in Chichicastenango Market, Guatemala. ...


Like the majority of the GED testing battery, the Social Studies test requires the student to read short passages, after which they select answers to questions using a multiple-choice format. Some of the passages used come from famous documents like the Declaration of Independence and United States Supreme Court decisions. Many use graphs, charts, and other types of images in addition to or in place of written passages, which the student then must use to arrive at the appropriate conclusion; on graphical questions, some basic mathematical skills may be required. Others involve editorial cartoons, typically with no context provided, that the student must examine critically. At least one question on each test asks the student to look at a photograph and identify a famous figure, moment in history, or the general scene being depicted, such as a political rally or child labor. To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... U.S. Declaration of Independence The Declaration of Independence is the document in which the Thirteen Colonies in North America declared themselves independent of the Kingdom of Great Britain and explained their justifications for doing so. ... The Supreme Court of the United States is the highest judicial body in the United States and leads the judicial branch of the United States federal government. ... William Lyon Mackenzie King is freed from his Conscription promise by Johnny Canuck. ... Rally refers to competition, as in rally racing with automobiles a political rally, a march or parade e. ... Child labor or labour is the term for the employment of children. ...


Questions involving civics and government and economics rely heavily on practical documents, such as tax forms, voter registration forms, and workplace and personal budgets. Topics such as global warming and environmental law are addressed by the questions about geography. Global mean surface temperatures 1856 to 2005 Mean surface temperature anomalies during the period 1995 to 2004 with respect to the average temperatures from 1940 to 1980 Global warming is the observed increase in the average temperature of the Earths atmosphere and oceans in recent decades. ... Environmental law is a body of law, which is a system of complex and interlocking statutes, common law, treaties, conventions, regulations and policies which seeks to protect the natural environment which may be affected, impacted or endangered by human activities. ...


Science

The Science test, which contains 50 questions that must be answered in 80 minutes, contains questions about life science (45%), earth and space science (20%), and physical science (35%). Biology is the branch of science dealing with the study of life. ... ... Space science, or the space sciences, are fields of science that are concerned with the study or utilization of outer space. ... Physical science is an encompassing term for the branches of natural science, and science (generally), that study non-living systems, in contrast to the biological sciences. ...


Most questions on the Science test involve a graphic such as a map, graph, chart, or diagram. Subjects covered include photosynthesis, weather and climate, geology, magnetism, energy, and cell division. Few of the questions require the student to demonstrate outside knowledge, since most are dependent on the text and graphics provided. Questions that do require outside knowledge are generally questions about common, everyday scientific matters, such as "Which household product can be hazardous when mixed with bleach?" (Answer: ammonia.) The leaf is the primary site of photosynthesis in plants. ... Weather is an all-encompassing term used to describe all of the many and varied phenomena that can occur in the atmosphere of a planet. ... The Blue Marble: The famous photo of the Earth taken en route to the Moon by Apollo 17s Harrison Schmitt on December 7, 1972. ... In physics, magnetism is one of the phenomena by which materials exert an attractive or repulsive force on other materials. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Commercial chlorine bleach To bleach something is to remove or lighten its color; a bleach is a chemical that can produce these effects, often via oxidization. ... Ammonia is a compound of nitrogen and hydrogen with the formula NH3. ...


Language Arts, Reading

The Language Arts, Reading test contains 40 questions that must be answered within 65 minutes. Passages from various texts are provided, after which students are asked to think critically about the subjects, characters, and ideas presented and answer approximately 5 questions about each passage. The questions asked are used to judge a student's level of comprehension as well as their skills with application, analysis, evaluation, and synthesis.


Two non-fiction and three fiction passages are presented, along with one passage from a poem and another from a dramatic play. Common sources for text selections are famous novels, such as My √Āntonia by Willa Cather, and the works of famous poets like Maya Angelou and Robert Frost. Students are not expected to have read these works prior to taking the test, though students who have a broad knowledge of literature are known to perform better on the Language Arts, Reading test due to their ability to place each passage in context more easily when thinking critically about them. Non-fiction is an account or representation of a subject which is presented as fact. ... The Three Graces, here in a painting by Sandro Botticelli, were the goddesses of charm, beauty, nature, human creativity and fertility in Greek mythology. ... Quatrain on Heavenly Mountain by Emperor Gaozong. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... My Ántonia is considered the greatest novel by American writer Willa Cather. ... Willa Cather photographed by Carl Van Vechten, 1936 Willa Sibert Cather (December 7, 1873 – April 24, 1947) is among the most eminent American authors. ... Maya Angelou Maya Angelou (born April 4, 1928) is an American poet, memoirist, actress and an important figure in the American Civil Rights Movement. ... Portrait of Frost c. ...


Mathematics

Like the Language Arts, Writing test, the Mathematics test is divided into two parts, though they are not as distinct as the former's parts. The test's 50 questions, to which students have 90 minutes to respond, are divided in half, with the first half being calculator-optional.


The Mathematics test focuses on four main mathematical disciplines: numbers and operations (20-30%), measurement and data analysis (20-30%), algebra (20-30%), and geometry (20-30%). Approximately 20% of the test uses standard grids and coordinate plane; these questions are not multiple choice. Numbers can mean: Number The Book of Numbers, the fourth book of the Bible NUMB3RS, a CBS television show This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... Various meters Measurement is the process of estimating the ratio of a magnitude of a quantity to a unit of the same type. ... Data is the plural of datum. ... Algebra (from Arabic: الجبر, al-ÄŸabr) is a branch of mathematics concerning the study of structure, relation and quantity. ... Table of Geometry, from the 1728 Cyclopaedia. ... Cartesian means relating to the French mathematician and philosopher Descartes, who, among other things, worked to merge algebra and Euclidean geometry. ...


Common topics covered include circumference, square roots, ratios and proportions, the multiplying and dividing of vulgar fractions and decimals, volume, exponents, angles, and the Pythagorean theorem. Students must have at least a basic knowledge of both the American measurement system as well as the metric system in order to answer many questions. The circumference is the distance around a closed curve. ... In mathematics, the principal square root of a non-negative real number is denoted and represents the non-negative real number whose square (the result of multiplying the number by itself) is For example, since This example suggests how square roots can arise when solving quadratic equations such as or... In number and more generally in algebra, a ratio is the linear relationship between two quantities of the same unit. ... In mathematics, two quantities are called proportional if they vary in such a way that one of the quantities is a constant multiple of the other, or equivalently if they have a constant ratio. ... In mathematics, multiplication is an arithmetic operation which is the inverse of division, and in elementary arithmetic, can be interpreted as repeated addition. ... In mathematics, especially in elementary arithmetic, division is an arithmetic operation which is the inverse of multiplication. ... In arithmetic, a vulgar fraction (or common fraction) consists of one integer divided by a non-zero integer. ... The decimal (base ten or occasionally denary) numeral system has ten as its base. ... GEE GUY dimensions is called content. ... In mathematics, exponentiation (frequently known colloquially as raising a number to a power) is a process generalized from repeated (or iterated) multiplication, in much the same way that multiplication is a process generalized from repeated addition. ... This article is about angles in geometry. ... In mathematics, the Pythagorean theorem or Pythagorass theorem is a relation in Euclidean geometry between the three sides of a right triangle. ... U.S. customary units, commonly known in the United States as English units or standard units, are units of measurement that are currently used in the U.S., in some cases alongside units from SI (the International System of Units—the modern metric system). ... Cover of brochure The International System of Units. ...


Calculators are issued at the testing site, and no external calculators may be used. Scrap paper is also provided so students may work problems out using pen or pencil, though no paper may be taken out of the testing room after completion in order to prevent students from giving their answers to others who may not have taken the test yet. Students are also provided with a list of common formulas, though this is controversial because some critics consider this to be too much assistance for those taking the test. In mathematics and in the sciences, a formula is a concise way of expressing information symbolically (as in a mathematical or chemical formula), or a general relationship between quantities. ...


Test administration

There are more than 3,500 testing sites in the United States and Canada. Testing sites differ from district to district, but they are most commonly municipal high schools or other public schools. // Public education is education mandated for the children of the general public by the government, whether national, regional, or local, provided by an institution of civil government, and paid for, in whole or in part, by taxes. ...


For students in large population areas, they often have a choice of two or more testing sites, which they can list according to preference when registering to take the GED test. The test administrator(s) will then determine which site each student may take their test at by reviewing factors such as distance from home; the number of students taking the test on any given day; and whether or not two students taking the test at the same place and time have ever been in school together previously, which could indicate a desire for them to cheat off of each other's work. A metropolitan area is a large population center consisting of a large city and its adjacent zone of influence, or of several neighboring cities or towns and adjoining areas, with one or more large cities serving as its hub or hubs. ...


GED testing sites are kept as controlled environments. The only items all students are allowed to bring into the testing room are pens, pencils, and erasers; in some districts, food and drink is allowed for students who are taking all 5 tests in the same day, in order to prevent them from becoming famished or ill during breaks. Any items other than writing implements, including food, coats, and hats, are subject to confiscation by the test administrator(s), and may only be given back at the test's conclusion unless a need is demonstrated. A ballpoint pen A pen is a writing instrument which applies ink to some surface. ... A selection of coloured pencils. ... A regular eraser An eraser (American English), primarily known as a rubber in British and Commonwealth English, is an article of stationery that is used for removing pencil writings. ...


There are approximately 25 different editions of the GED tests that are used by administrators. This is done to prevent students from cheating off of each other's work. Each edition of the test is assigned a number as well as a color; for example, one test edition might be both "3" and "yellow." Each student uses the same edition for the entire testing battery to make scoring easier. Other students taking the test at the same time and place will use a different edition of the test. All editions are judged to be at the same level of difficulty, and each version contains the same number of questions in each skill area. To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ...


Students with disabilities

For students with documented physical disabilities, there are numerous accommodations available. Students with vision impairments can use braille, audiocasette, or large print editions, as well as talking calculators. Students with physical disabilities can receive additional time, scribes, frequent breaks, use of a private room, and other accommodations as required. Sign language interpreters are available, and tests can be conducted at a person's home or health facility if they are unable to travel. To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... A sign language (also signed language) is a language which uses manual communication instead of sound to convey meaning - simultaneously combining handshapes, orientation and movement of the hands, arms or body, and facial expressions to fluidly express a speakers thoughts. ...


For students with learning disabilities, such as dyslexia, attention-deficit disorder, Asperger's syndrome, and dyscalculia, accommodations can be made with written proof of the disability. As with students with physical disabilities, students with learning disabilities can receive extra time, use of a private room, or any other accommodations deemed necessary. In the United States and Canada, the term learning disability is used to refer to psychological and neurological conditions that affect a persons communicative capacities and potential to be taught effectively. ... This article or section is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ... This article or section may be confusing or unclear for some readers, and should be edited to rectify this. ... Asperger described his patients as little professors. Aspergers syndrome (AS, or the more common shorthand Aspergers), is characterized as one of the five pervasive developmental disorders, and is commonly referred to as a form of high functioning autism. ... This article or section is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ...


In order to receive accommodations, students must present documentation of their disabilities to the test administrator well in advance of the testing date. If students do not submit their request for review by the deadline, they will most likely be turned down for accommodations. Exceptions to this rule include students who break a limb in the days before their test or are hospitalized. If a student requests accommodations and is turned down, they can either wait until the next testing date available or submit an appeal to their state's board of education.


Passing the GED testing battery

The maximum score anyone can receive on an individual GED test is 800. A score of 800 puts the student in the top 1% of all test-takers for that individual test nationally. The minimum passing score varies from state to state.


If a student passes some but not all tests within the battery, they are not required to retake the entire battery; instead, they only need to retake the portion(s) they did not pass. In most states, students are limited to a set amount of times they can take any portion of the battery each year, meaning that there will generally be a waiting period of a few months or more before they can take the failed test again. Students can take any test as many times as it takes them to pass, though most states charge a fee for each retest.


In most states, students must receive a minimum score on each individual test, as well as an overall average that is higher than the minimum individual score. The most common standard is no individual test score below 410, and an average score on all tests of no lower than 450. Minimum scores and averages are also set for honors diplomas. In some districts, graduation ceremonies are held for GED graduates, and scholarships are also awarded to the highest scorers each session. Academic procession during the University of Canterbury graduation ceremony. ...


The GED itself is issued by the state or territory in which the student resides, though it is scored by a national testing service located in Maryland. Like other diplomas, they are valid and accepted in each U.S. state. Official language(s) None (English, de-facto) Capital Annapolis Largest city Baltimore Area  Ranked 42nd  - Total 12,417 sq mi (32,160 km²)  - Width 90 miles (145 km)  - Length 249 miles (400 km)  - % water 21  - Latitude 37°53N to 39°43N  - Longitude 75°4W to 79°33...


Colleges, employers, and the GED

People who left high school without graduating often find that employers and post-secondary institutions will not accept them without showing some form of academic competency. Since adults often cannot or will not return to high school, receiving the GED allows them to demonstrate that they possess a skill level comparable to that of an average high school graduate. ...


Approximately 95% of colleges will accept GED graduates, though they will typically require them to take the SATs and/or ACT. Some admissions boards request extra letters of recommendation in addition to the standard number already required of applicants when reviewing GED applicants. (Homeschooled students who receive the GED are the main exception to this rule, since many homeschooled students cannot receive traditional diplomas and need to finish their high school careers with the GED.) If a 4-year college will not accept a GED graduate, they can attend any community college in the United States, after which they can transfer to almost any 4-year school. The SAT (pronounced S-A-T) Reasoning Test, formerly called the Scholastic Aptitude Test and Scholastic Assessment Test, is a type of standardized test frequently used by colleges and universities in the United States to aid in the selection of incoming students. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... In Canada and the United States, a community college, sometimes called a county college, a junior college or a city college, is an educational institution providing post-secondary education and lower-level tertiary education, granting certificates, diplomas, and Associates degrees. ...


The main problem GED recipients encounter when trying to transfer from community colleges to 4-year schools is the lack of SAT and/or ACT scores, which GED recipients typically do not have. Due to this and other factors, most colleges do not require transfer students to submit such scores when applying beyond a certain point in their college careers, typically after one year or earning approximately 30 college-level credits. Many colleges, especially public institutions, also offer scholarships and other forms of financial aid specifically for GED recipients in order to help them finance their education. A scholarship is an award of access to an institution or a financial aid award for an individual (a scholar) for the purposes of furthering their education. ... Financial aid refers to funding intended to help students pay tuition or other costs, such as room and board, for education at a college, university, or private school. ...


Eligibility

Most states and provinces do not allow students who are under the minimum age to take the GED test. Exceptions can be made for students who are over 16 years old, but below the minimum age requirment. These vary by location, but generally include:

  • acceptance into a post-secondary school upon successful completion
  • employer has indicated that it is required for promotion/employment
  • a military recruiter has shown that it is required to enlist in the armed forces.

Students under 16 years of age are usually not permitted to take the test under any circumstance. Post-secondary education is a form of secondary education that is taken after first attending a secondary school, such as a high school. ... The armed forces of a state are its government sponsored defense and fighting forces and organizations. ...


Criticism of the GED

For most purposes, a GED is considered to be the same as a high school diploma. Some feel the test is easier than it should be, and it is looked down upon by some employers as a lower form of degree than an actual high school diploma. Others believe the GED is harder than it should be; according to GED Testing Service statistics from the "2003 GED Statistical Report," the number of candidates who tested, completed, and passed the tests declined in 2002 and 2003. Some attribute this decline to the new test released in 2000 being too difficult. Employment is a contract between two parties, one being the employer and the other being the employee. ...


The most common criticism is of the test battery's mainly multiple choice format. Others argue that the reading comprehension test is too simplistic, and that there are too many basic operations on the mathematics portion and not enough advanced algebra and geometry questions.


Supporters argue that the 70% rate of incompletion on the first try at taking the test shows that it is harder than commonly believed, although this can be attributed to the majority of the test takers being high school dropouts or convicted felons. They also point out that the test is administered to a representative sample of graduating high school seniors each year, and about 30% fail.1


In response to these criticisms, the test was revised in 2002 to make it more difficult to pass. One of the most important revisions was one which made it more difficult to guess correct answers from the choices provided. This greater degree of difficulty is achieved by demanding students to show the process for finding the correct answer to a question, as opposed to simply providing a result. For example, a typical mathematics question will not ask what the second leg of a right-angled triangle is when the length of only the first leg and the hypotenuse is given, but instead which formula should be used to find the correct answer. This requires the student to not only know the correct answer, but also explain how to find it. It also uses both algebra and geometry, as opposed to just one discipline of mathematics. For album titles with the same name, see 2002 (album). ... A triangle is one of the basic shapes of geometry: a polygon with three vertices and three sides which are straight line segments. ...


A number of the questions also contain options such as "Not enough information given," "None of the above," and "No correction is necessary" as possible answers. These are found most frequently on the Mathematics and Language Arts, Writing: Part I tests.


Popular culture

Daniel Lawrence Whitney (born February 17, 1963 in Pawnee City, Nebraska), better known by the stage name Larry the Cable Guy, is an American stand-up comedian and one of the co-stars of the Blue Collar Comedy Tour and the subsequent series Blue Collar TV. He also starred in... Lazzi (from the Italian lazzo, a joke or witticism) is a bit of well-rehearsed comic action used in the Commedia dellarte. ... Chris Rock Chris Rock (born February 7, 1965 in Andrews, South Carolina) is an American stand-up comedian and actor. ... Screenshot from the No Sex in the Champagne Room music video. ... Baz Luhrmann (born Mark Anthony Luhrmann on September 17, 1962) is an Australian film director. ... Everybodys Free (To Wear Sunscreen) was a single released by Baz Luhrmann under the EMI Music Australia Pty. ...

Notable GED recipients

Some of the most famous GED recipients are: The following is a list of notable GED recipients. ...

A number of fictional characters have also received GEDs, including Kim Bauer from 24, James Evans, Sr. from Good Times, and Mr. Hooper from Sesame Street - 1976[citation needed]. Eduardo Gory Guerrero Llanes (October 9, 1967 – November 13, 2005), better known by his ring name, Eddie Guerrero, was a Mexican American professional wrestler. ... Harold John Elwin Bo Bice, III. (born November 1, 1975 in Huntsville, Alabama) is an American singer and musician who was the runner-up to Carrie Underwood in the fourth season of American Idol. ... Augusten Xon Burroughs (born October 23, 1965) is an American writer. ... Carter on the cover of his third album Oh Aaron (2001) Aaron Charles Carter (born December 7, 1987) is an American pop singer. ... Chad I. Ginsburg is the lead guitarist and mixer/producer of the modern rock band CKY. He also plays bass. ... Bill Cosby William Henry Bill Cosby, Jr. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... A comedian, or comic, is an entertainer who amuses an audience by making them laugh. ... Celebrities often have a symbiotic relationship with photographers. ... Jerome John Jerry Garcia (August 1, 1942 – August 9, 1995) was famous as the lead guitarist and vocalist of the psychedelic rock band the Grateful Dead, though his extensive career involved many other projects. ... The Grateful Dead was an American psychedelia-influenced rock band formed in 1965 in San Francisco. ... Michael J. Fox on the cover of his book, Lucky Man Michael J. Fox (born June 9, 1961) is a Canadian-born actor, made famous by his roles as Marty McFly in the Back to the Future trilogy and as Alex P. Keaton on the sitcom Family Ties from which... Paris Whitney Hilton (born February 17, 1981) is an heiress to the Hilton Hotel fortune, as well as her fathers real estate fortune. ... A socialite is a person (male or female, but more often used for a woman) of social prominence who is considered to be an influential social figure. ... Darryl Lynn D.L. Hughley (born March 6, 1963) is an African-American actor and comedian and star of the sitcom The Hughleys which ran from 1998 to 2002 first on ABC and then on UPN. D.L. Hughley grew up in South Central Los Angeles and had a rough... Peter Charles Archibald Ewart Jennings, CM (July 29, 1938 – August 7, 2005) was a Canadian-American news anchor for the ABC network. ... This article is about the American news organization. ... Waylon Jennings (June 15, 1937 – February 13, 2002) was a respected and influential American country music singer and guitarist, born in Littlefield, Texas. ... Ercole de Roberti: Concert, c. ... A guitarist is a musician who plays the guitar. ... Brandon Bruce Lee (李國豪, pinyin: Lǐ Guóháo February 1, 1965 – March 31, 1993) was an American actor. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Indy Racing League Logo The Indy Racing League, better known as IRL, is the sanctioning body of a predominantly American based open-wheel racing series. ... Mary Lou Retton (born January 24, 1968 in Fairmont, West Virginia) is an American gymnast. ... Chris Rock Chris Rock (born February 7, 1965 in Andrews, South Carolina) is an American stand-up comedian and actor. ... Rodriguez as Ana-Lucia Cortez in Lost Michelle Rodriguez (born Mayte Michelle Rodriguez[1] on July 12, 1978) is an American actress. ... Jessica Ann Simpson (born July 10, 1980) is an American pop singer who rose to fame during the late 1990s. ... Christian Slater shown on the DVD cover of Pump Up the Volume, 1990 Christian Slater (born Christian Michael Leonard Hawkins on August 18, 1969 in New York City) is an American actor. ... Dave Thomas Rex David Dave Thomas (July 2, 1932 – January 8, 2002) was an American businessman and philanthropist. ... Wendys is a chain of fast-food restaurants founded by the late Dave Thomas and owned by the United States corporation, Wendys International, Inc. ... Mark Wahlberg (left) and Eric West pose together at the MTV Video Music Awards (September 2000). ... Kimberly Bauer is a fictional character played by Elisha Cuthbert on the television series 24. ... 24 (twenty four) is a current U.S. television action/drama series, produced by the Fox Network and syndicated worldwide. ... James Evans, Sr. ... Good Times was an American sitcom that was originally broadcast from February 1, 1974 until August 1, 1979 on the CBS television network. ... Harold Hooper (known almost universally as just Mr. ... Sesame Street is an educational American childrens television series designed for preschoolers, and is recognized as a pioneer of the contemporary standard which combines education and entertainment in childrens television shows. ... 1976 (MCMLXXVI) was a leap year starting on Thursday. ...


References

  • Northcutt, Ellen [et al]. Steck-Vaughn Complete GED Preparation (2002). Austin: Steck-Vaughn Company. ISBN 0739828371
  • Rockowitz, Murray [et al]. Barron's How to Prepare for the GED High School Equivalency Exam (2004). New York: Barron's Educational Series, Inc. ISBN 0764126032
  • Mitchell, Robert. McGraw-Hill's GED: Science (2003). New York: The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. ISBN 0071407049
  • Larry Elowitz [et al]. GED Success: 2003 (2003). Lawrenceville, New Jersey: Peterson's. ISBN 0768909066
  • Note 1: Martz, Geoff. "Cracking the GED: 2002 Edition" (2001). pg 7. New York: Princeton Review Publishing, L.L.C. ISBN 0375761934

External links

  • GED Testing Service - official website
  • Online Preparation Courseware
  • A Complete (& FREE) GED Preparation Course
  • GED Preparation Resources on the Web
  • GED Registration in Bangladesh - You will find the information on how to register for GED in Bangladesh.

 
 

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