FACTOID # 3: South Carolina has the highest rate of violent crimes and aggravated assaults per capita among US states.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > G scale

"G Scale" is a misnomer. As there are a whole raft of scales involved, the grouping is correctly termed "G Gauge" because the gauge is consistant over all the scales involved.


The one near constant in scale modelling is the height of an adult male at around 6 feet or 1.83 meters. For 1:20.3 this scales to 90mm and for 1:29 63mm. The scales are obviously not compatible.


G scale is a scale for model railways, and the most popular scale for garden railways. The name comes from the German gross (meaning "big"). Originally and correctly, G scale is the use of 45mm gauge track, as used in standard gauge I scale (NEM 010), aka 3/8" scale (NMRA S-1), for modelling metre gauge narrow gauge railways, using the correct scale of 1:22.5. Metre gauge is the most common narrow gauge in Europe. This article needs cleanup. ... The National Model Railroad Association or NMRA is a non-profit organization for those involved in the hobby or business of model railroading. ... Narrow-gauge railways are railroads (railways) with track spaced at less than the standard gauge of 4 ft 8½ in (1. ... Narrow-gauge railways are railroads (railways) with track spaced at less than the standard gauge of 4 ft 8 in (1. ...


Because of its size and durability, G scale is often used outdoors. Such installations are known as garden railways. Mamod live steam locomotive and train on a garden railway layout A garden railroad or garden railway is a model railway system set up outdoors in a garden. ...


In the United States, the commonly used narrow gauge is 3 feet; modelling this correctly with a 45mm track gauge gives a scale of 1:20.3, which is commonly used by American manufacturers. Correctly speaking, these are not really G scale, but they are frequently called that. Some people call 1:20.3 "F scale". Other scales are used to model other narrow gauges; although some call models of standard gauge equipment to 45mm track gauge 'G scale', these models are actually I scale (NEM) or 3/8" scale (NMRA). As railways developed and expanded one of the key issues to be decided was that of the rail gauge (the distance between the two rails of the track) which should be used. ...


The major European manufacturer, and the one that really made garden railways popular, is Ernst Paul Lehman Patentwerk, and is sold under the brand name of LGB (Lehmann Grosse Bahn, or "Lehmann Big Train"). The company was founded in 1881 and started producing LGB in 1968. Today it produces models of European and US originals, of steam, diesel and electric prototypes as well as a large range of coaches, trucks and accessories. LGB is the standard acronym for Lehmann Gross Bahn - the Lehmann Big Train in German. ...


LGB track is made of brass and so can remain outside in all weathers - a quick wipe and it is ready for use. Track can also be had in equally durable stainless steel, but it is significantly more expensive. Brass is an alloy of copper and zinc (a copper alloy), a solid solution. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
G scale - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (379 words)
The one near constant in scale modelling is the height of an adult male at around 6 feet or 1.83 meters.
For 1:20.3 this scales to 90mm and for 1:29 63mm.
G scale is a scale for model railways, and the most popular scale for garden railways.
G scale - definition of G scale in Encyclopedia (300 words)
G scale is a scale for model railways, and the most popular scale for garden railways - indeed this explains the name.
Originally and correctly, G scale is the use of 45mm gauge track, as used in standard gauge I scale (NEM 010), aka 3/8" scale (NMRA S-1), for modelling metre gauge narrow gauge railways, using the correct scale of 1:22.5.
The major European manufacturer, and the one that really made garden railways popular, is Ernst Paul Lehman Patentwerk, and is sold under the brand name of LGB (Lehmann Gross Bahn or Lehmann Big Train).
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m