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Encyclopedia > Fyodor Dostoevsky
Fyodor Dostoevsky

Born November 11, 1821(1821-11-11)
Moscow, Russian Empire
Died February 9, 1881 (aged 59)
Saint Petersburg, Russian Empire
Occupation Novelist

Fyodor Mikhailovich Dostoevsky (Russian: Фёдор Михайлович Достоевский, Russian pronunciation: [ˈfʲodər mʲɪˈxajləvʲɪtɕ dəstɐˈjɛfskʲɪj], sometimes transliterated Dostoyevsky, Dostoievsky, Dostojevskij or Dostoevski listen ) (November 11 [O.S. October 30] 1821February 9 [O.S. January 28] 1881) was a Russian novelist and writer of fiction whose works include Crime and Punishment and The Brothers Karamazov. Image File history File links Dostoevsky. ... is the 315th day of the year (316th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1821 (MDCCCXXI) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... For other uses, see Moscow (disambiguation). ... The subject of this article was previously also known as Russia. ... is the 40th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1881 (MDCCCLXXXI) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Saint Petersburg (Russian: Санкт-Петербу́рг, English transliteration: Sankt-Peterburg), colloquially known as Питер (transliterated Piter), formerly known as Leningrad (Ленингра́д, 1924–1991) and Petrograd (Петрогра́д, 1914–1924), is a city located in Northwestern Russia on the delta of the river Neva at the east end of the Gulf of Finland... The subject of this article was previously also known as Russia. ... This article is about work. ... A novel is an extended work of written, narrative, prose fiction, usually in story form; the writer of a novel is a novelist. ... Cervantes redirects here. ... Dickens redirects here. ... Edgar Allan Poe (January 19, 1809 – October 7, 1849) was an American poet, short story writer, playwright, editor, literary critic, essayist and one of the leaders of the American Romantic Movement. ... Friedrich Schiller “Schiller” redirects here. ... Honoré de Balzac Honoré de Balzac (May 20, 1799 - August 18, 1850), was a French novelist. ... Nikolai Vasilievich Gogol (Russian: ; IPA: ; Ukrainian: ) (April 1, 1809 — March 4, 1852) was a Russian-language writer of Ukrainian origin. ... Victor-Marie Hugo (pronounced ) (February 26, 1802 — May 22, 1885) was a French poet, playwright, novelist, essayist, visual artist, statesman, human rights campaigner, and perhaps the most influential exponent of the Romantic movement in France. ... ETA Hoffman Ernst Theodor Amadeus Hoffmann (January 24, 1776 - June 25, 1822), was a German romantic and fantasy author and composer. ... Lermontov redirects here. ... Aleksandr Pushkin by Vasily Tropinin Aleksandr Sergeyevich Pushkin (Russian: Алекса́ндр Серге́евич Пу́шкин, Aleksandr Sergeevič PuÅ¡kin,  ) (June 6, 1799 [O.S. May 26] – February 10, 1837 [O.S. January 29]) was a Russian Romantic author who is considered to be the greatest Russian poet[1] [2][3] and the founder of modern Russian... Mikhail Alexandrovich Bakunin (Russian: Михаил Александрович Бакунин, Michel Bakunin on the grave in Bern), (May 18 (30 N.S.), 1814 – June 19 (July 1 N.S.), 1876) was a well-known Russian revolutionary, and often considered one of the “fathers of modern anarchism. Born in the Russian Empire to a family of Russian... Vissarion Grigorievich Belinskii (Виссарио́н Григо́рьевич Бели́нский) (1811 - 1848) was Russian writer, literary critic, philosopher and revolutionary activist (a Westernizer). ... Chernyshevsky redirects here. ... Hegel redirects here. ... Alexander Herzen in 1867 Aleksandr Ivanovich Herzen (Алекса́ндр Ива́нович Ге́рцен) (April 6, 1812 - January 21, 1870) was a major Russian pro_Western writer and thinker known as the father of Russian socialism. He is held responsible for creating a political climate leading to the emancipation of the serfs in 1861. ... Konstantin Nikolayevich Leontyev (1831-1891) was a maverick Russian philosopher who advocated closer cultural ties of Russia with the East in order to oppose catastrophic egalitarian and revolutionary influences from the West. ... Adam Mickiewicz. ... Sergey Gennadiyevich Nechayev (also Sergei Nechaev, Сергей Геннадиевич Нечаев), born October 2, 1847, died either November 21 or December 3, 1882) was a Russian revolutionary figure associated with the Nihilist movement and known for his single-minded pursuit of revolution by any means necessary, including political violence. ... Mikhail Vasilyevich Butashevich-Petrashevsky, commonly known as Mikhail Petrashevsky (Russian: ) (13 November [O.S. 1 November] 1821–19 December [O.S. 7 December] 1866) was a Russian thinker and public figure. ... The name Vladimir Solovyov, with alternate transliterations Soloviev, Soloviyov, Solovyev may refer to one of the following people. ... Saint Tikhon of Zadonsk (1724 - 1783) was born in the village of Korotsk, in the Novgorod region, Russia. ... Knut Hamsun (31 years old) in 1890 Knut Hamsun (August 4, 1859 – February 19, 1952) was a leading Norwegian author and recipient of the Nobel Prize in Literature for 1920. ... Richard Gary Brautigan (January 30, 1935 – ca. ... Bukowski redirects here. ... For other uses, see Camus. ... Witold Marian Gombrowicz (August 4, 1904 in MaÅ‚oszyce, near Kielce, Congress Poland, Russian Empire – July 24, 1969 in Vence, near Nice, France) was a Polish novelist and dramatist. ... Kafka redirects here. ... Jack Kerouac (pronounced ) (March 12, 1922 – October 21, 1969) was an American novelist, writer, poet, and artist from Lowell, Massachusetts. ... CzesÅ‚aw MiÅ‚osz  ; (June 30, 1911 – August 14, 2004), was a Polish poet, writer, academic, and translator. ... Yukio Mishima ) was the public name of Kimitake Hiraoka , January 14, 1925–November 25, 1970), a Japanese author and playwright, famous for both his highly notable nihilistic post-war writings and the circumstances of his ritual suicide by seppuku. ... Alberto Moravia. ... Dame Jean Iris Murdoch DBE (July 15, 1919 – February 8, 1999) was an Irish-born British writer and philosopher, best known for her novels, which combine rich characterization and compelling plotlines, usually involving ethical or sexual themes. ... Friedrich Wilhelm Nietzsche (October 15, 1844 – August 25, 1900) (IPA: ) was a nineteenth-century German philosopher and philologist. ... Proust redirects here. ... Ayn Rand (IPA: , February 2 [O.S. January 20] 1905 – March 6, 1982), born Alisa Zinovyevna Rosenbaum (Russian: ), was a Russian-born American novelist and philosopher. ... Jean-Paul Charles Aymard Sartre (June 21, 1905 – April 15, 1980), normally known simply as Jean-Paul Sartre (pronounced: ), was a French existentialist philosopher and pioneer, dramatist and screenwriter, novelist and critic. ... Aleksandr Isayevich Solzhenitsyn (Russian: , IPA:  ; born December 11, 1918) is a Russian novelist, dramatist and historian. ... WisÅ‚awa Szymborska WisÅ‚awa Szymborska (IPA: [], born July 2, 1923, Bnin - now a district of Kórnik), Poland) is a Polish poet, essayist and translator. ... Irvine Welsh (born Leith, Edinburgh, September 27, 1958) is an acclaimed contemporary Scottish novelist, most famous for his novel Trainspotting. ... Sigmund Freud (IPA: ), born Sigismund Schlomo Freud (May 6, 1856 – September 23, 1939), was an Austrian neurologist and psychiatrist who founded the psychoanalytic school of psychology. ... Wittgenstein redirects here. ... For the musician, see Cormac McCarthy (musician). ... Kenneth Elton Kesey (September 17, 1935 – November 10, 2001) was an American author, best known for his novel, One Flew Over the Cuckoos Nest, and as a counter-cultural figure who, some consider, was a link between the beat generation of the 1950s and the hippies of the 1960s. ... There exist many possible systems for transliterating the Cyrillic alphabet of the Russian language to English or the Latin alphabet. ... Image File history File links Ru-Dostoevsky. ... is the 315th day of the year (316th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Old Style redirects here. ... Year 1821 (MDCCCXXI) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... is the 40th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Old Style redirects here. ... Year 1881 (MDCCCLXXXI) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Russians (Русские - Russkie) are an ethnic group of East Slavic people, which live primarily in Russia and neighboring countries. ... For other uses, see Novel (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Fiction (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Crime and Punishment (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see The Brothers Karamazov (disambiguation). ...


Dostoevsky's literary output explores human psychology in the troubled political, social and spiritual context of 19th-century Russian society. Considered by many as a founder or precursor of 20th century existentialism, his Notes from Underground (1864), written in the embittered voice of the anonymous "underground man", was called by Walter Kaufmann the "best overture for existentialism ever written."[2] Psychological science redirects here. ... Politics is the process by which decisions are made within groups. ... Social refers to human society or its organization. ... Spirituality, in a narrow sense, concerns itself with matters of the spirit. ... Existentialism is a philosophical movement that posits that individuals create the meaning and essence of their lives, as opposed to deities or authorities creating it for them. ... This article is about the short novel by Fyodor Dostoevsky. ... Walter Arnold Kaufmann (July 1, 1921 - September 4, 1980) was a 20th-century Jewish German philosopher, scholar, and poet. ...

Contents

Biography

Family origins

Dostoevsky was Russian on his mother's side. His paternal ancestors were from a place called Dostoyeve, natives of the government of Minsk, not far from Pinsk. The last name of the paternal family is assumed to be 'Rdishev' prior to its assumption of the township eponym 'Dostoevsky', though the ethnic origins of his paternal ancestors remain in dispute. According to one theory, Dostoevsky's paternal ancestors were Polonized nobles (szlachta) and went to war bearing Polish Radwan Coat of Arms. Dostoevsky (Polish "Dostojewski") Radwan armorial bearings were drawn for the Dostoevsky Museum in Moscow. The family eventually passed into Ukraine. (Dostoyevsky 2001, pp. 1, 6-7) Location of Minsk, shown within the Minsk Voblast Coordinates: Country Subdivision Belarus Minsk Founded 1067 Government  - Mayor Mikhail Pavlov Area  - City 305. ... For other uses, see Pinsk (disambiguation). ... StanisÅ‚aw Antoni Szczuka, a Polish nobleman Szlachta ( ) was the noble class in Poland and the Grand Duchy of Lithuania, the two countries that later jointly formed the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth. ... Radwan is a Polish Coat of Arms. ... For other uses, see Moscow (disambiguation). ...


Early life

Dostoevsky was the second of seven children born to Mikhail and Maria Dostoevsky. Dostoevsky's father Mikhail was a retired military surgeon and a violent alcoholic, who served as a doctor at the Mariinsky Hospital for the Poor in Moscow. The hospital was situated in one of the worst areas in Moscow. Local landmarks included a cemetery for criminals, a lunatic asylum, and an orphanage for abandoned infants. This urban landscape made a lasting impression on the young Dostoevsky, whose interest in and compassion for the poor, oppressed, and tormented was apparent. Though his parents forbade it, Dostoevsky liked to wander out to the hospital garden, where the suffering patients sat to catch a glimpse of sun. The young Dostoevsky loved to spend time with these patients and hear their stories. King Alcohol and his Prime Minister circa 1820 Alcoholism is the consumption of or preoccupation with alcoholic beverages to the extent that this behavior interferes with the alcoholics normal personal, family, social, or work life. ... For other uses, see Moscow (disambiguation). ...


There are many stories of Dostoevsky's father's despotic treatment of his children. After returning home from work, he would take a nap while his children, ordered to keep absolutely silent, stood by their slumbering father in shifts and swatted at any flies that came near his head. However, it is the opinion of Joseph Frank, a biographer of Dostoevsky, that the father figure in The Brothers Karamazov is not based on Dostoevsky's own father. Letters and personal accounts demonstrate that they had a fairly loving relationship. For other uses, see The Brothers Karamazov (disambiguation). ...


Shortly after his mother died of tuberculosis in 1837, Dostoevsky and his brother were sent to the Military Engineering Academy at Saint Petersburg. Fyodor's father died in 1839. Though it has never been proven, it is believed by some that he was murdered by his own serfs.[3] According to one account, they became enraged during one of his drunken fits of violence, restrained him, and poured vodka into his mouth until he drowned. Another story holds that Mikhail died of natural causes, and a neighboring landowner invented the story of his murder so that he might buy the estate inexpensively. Some have argued that his father's personality had influenced the character of Fyodor Pavlovich Karamazov, the "wicked and sentimental buffoon", father of the main characters in his 1880 novel The Brothers Karamazov, but such claims fail to withstand the scrutiny of many critics. Tuberculosis (abbreviated as TB for tubercle bacillus or Tuberculosis) is a common and deadly infectious disease caused by mycobacteria, mainly Mycobacterium tuberculosis. ... Saint Petersburg (Russian: Санкт-Петербу́рг, English transliteration: Sankt-Peterburg), colloquially known as Питер (transliterated Piter), formerly known as Leningrad (Ленингра́д, 1924–1991) and Petrograd (Петрогра́д, 1914–1924), is a city located in Northwestern Russia on the delta of the river Neva at the east end of the Gulf of Finland... Costumes of Slaves or Serfs, from the Sixth to the Twelfth Centuries, collected by H. de Vielcastel, from original Documents in the great Libraries of Europe. ... Vodka bottling machine, Shatskaya Vodka Shatsk, Russia Vodka (Polish: wódka, Russian: водка) is one of the worlds most popular distilled beverages. ... For other uses, see The Brothers Karamazov (disambiguation). ...


Dostoevsky had epilepsy and his first seizure occurred when he was 9 years old.[4] Epileptic seizures recurred sporadically throughout his life, and Dostoevsky's experiences are thought to have formed the basis for his description of Prince Myshkin's epilepsy in his novel The Idiot and that of Smerdyakov in The Brothers Karamazov, among others. The Idiot is a novel written by the Russian author Fyodor Dostoevsky and first published in 1869. ...


At the Saint Petersburg Academy of Military Engineering, Dostoevsky was taught mathematics, a subject he despised. However, he also studied literature by Shakespeare, Pascal, Victor Hugo and E.T.A. Hoffmann. Though he focused on areas different from mathematics, he did well on the exams and received a commission in 1841. That year, he is known to have written two romantic plays, influenced by the German Romantic poet/playwright Friedrich Schiller: Mary Stuart and Boris Godunov. The plays have not been preserved. Dostoevsky described himself as a "dreamer" when he was a young man, and at that time revered Schiller. However, in the years during which he yielded his great masterpieces, his opinions changed and he sometimes poked fun at Schiller. For other meanings of mathematics or uses of math and maths, see Mathematics (disambiguation) and Math (disambiguation). ... Shakespeare redirects here. ... Blaise Pascal (pronounced ), (June 20 [[1624 // ]] – August 19, 1662) was a French mathematician, physicist, and religious philosopher. ... Victor-Marie Hugo (pronounced ) (February 26, 1802 — May 22, 1885) was a French poet, playwright, novelist, essayist, visual artist, statesman, human rights campaigner, and perhaps the most influential exponent of the Romantic movement in France. ... ETA Hoffman Ernst Theodor Amadeus Hoffmann (January 24, 1776 - June 25, 1822), was a German romantic and fantasy author and composer. ... Friedrich Schiller “Schiller” redirects here. ... Mary Stuart is a play by Friedrich Schiller based on the life of Mary I of Scotland. ... Tsar Boris I Boris Feodorovich Godunov (Бори́с Фёдорович Годуно́в) (c. ... Johann Christoph Friedrich von Schiller (November 10, 1759 - May 9, 1805), usually known as Friedrich Schiller, was a German poet, philosopher, historian, and dramatist. ...


Beginnings of a literary career

Dostoevsky was made a lieutenant in 1842, and left the Engineering Academy the following year. He completed a translation into Russian of Balzac's novel Eugénie Grandet in 1843, but it brought him little or no attention. Dostoevsky started to write his own fiction in late 1844 after leaving the army. In 1845, his first work, the epistolary short novel, Poor Folk, published in the periodical The Contemporary (Sovremennik), was met with great acclaim. As legend has it, the editor of the magazine, poet Nikolai Nekrasov, walked into the office of liberal critic Vissarion Belinsky and announced, "a new Gogol has arisen!" Belinsky, his followers and many others agreed and after the novel was fully published in book form at the beginning of the next year, Dostoevsky became a literary celebrity at the age of 24. Lieutenant is a military, naval, paramilitary, fire service or police officer rank. ... Honoré de Balzac Honoré de Balzac (May 20, 1799 - August 18, 1850), was a French novelist. ... Eugénie Grandet (1833) is a novel by Honoré de Balzac about miserliness, and how it is bequeathed from the father to the daughter, Eugénie, through her unsatisfying love attachment with her cousin. ... Poor Folk was first novel by Fyodor Dostoevsky, which he wrote over the span of nine months. ... The Title Page of the issue printed after the death of Alexander Pushkin Sovremennik (Russian: , literally: The Contemporary) was a Russian literary, social and political magazine, published in St. ... Nikolai Alekseevich Nekrasov (November 28, 1821 – January 8, 1878 {O.S.: December 28, 1877}) was a Russian poet, best remembered as the long-standing publisher of Современник (The Contemporary) (from 1846 until July 1866, when the journal was shut down by the government in connection with the arrest of its radical... Vissarion Grigorievich Belinskii (Виссарио́н Григо́рьевич Бели́нский) (1811 - 1848) was Russian writer, literary critic, philosopher and revolutionary activist (a Westernizer). ... Nikolai Vasilievich Gogol (Russian: ; IPA: ; Ukrainian: ) (April 1, 1809 — March 4, 1852) was a Russian-language writer of Ukrainian origin. ...


In 1846, Belinsky and many others reacted negatively to his novella, The Double, a psychological study of a bureaucrat whose alter ego overtakes his life. Dostoevsky's fame began to cool. Much of his work after Poor Folk met with mixed reviews and it seemed that Belinsky's prediction that Dostoevsky would be one of the greatest writers of Russia was mistaken. Poor Folk was first novel by Fyodor Dostoevsky, which he wrote over the span of nine months. ...


Exile in Siberia

Dostoevsky was arrested and imprisoned on April 23, 1849 for being a part of the liberal intellectual group, the Petrashevsky Circle. Czar Nicholas I after seeing the Revolutions of 1848 in Europe was harsh on any sort of underground organization which he felt could put autocracy into jeopardy. On November 16 that year Dostoevsky, along with the other members of the Petrashevsky Circle, was sentenced to death. After a mock execution, in which he and other members of the group stood outside in freezing weather waiting to be shot by a firing squad, Dostoevsky's sentence was commuted to four years of exile with hard labor at a katorga prison camp in Omsk, Siberia. Dostoevsky described later to his brother the sufferings he went through as the years in which he was "shut up in a coffin." Describing the dilapidated barracks which, as he put in his own words, "should have been torn down years ago", he wrote: is the 113th day of the year (114th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1849 (MDCCCXLIX) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Look up liberal on Wiktionary, the free dictionary Liberal may refer to: Politics: Liberalism American liberalism, a political trend in the USA Political progressivism, a political ideology that is for change, often associated with liberal movements Liberty, the condition of being free from control or restrictions Liberal Party, members of... The Petrashevsky Circle was a literary discussion group organized by Mikhail Vasilevich Petrashevsky (1819-1867). ... Tsar, (Bulgarian цар�, Russian царь; often spelled Czar or Tzar in English), was the title used for the autocratic rulers of the First and Second Bulgarian Empires since 913, in Serbia in the middle of the 14th century, and in Russia from 1547 to 1917. ... Nicholas I (Russian: Николай I Павлович, Nikolaj I Pavlovič), July 6 (June 25, Old Style), 1796 – March 2 (18 February Old Style), 1855), was the Emperor of Russia from 1825 until 1855, known as one of the most reactionary of the Russian monarchs. ... The European Revolutions of 1848, known in some countries as the Spring of Nations or the Year of Revolution, were a revolutionary wave which erupted in Sicily and then, further triggered by the revolutions of 1848 in France, soon spread to the rest of Europe and as far afield as... For other uses, see Europe (disambiguation). ... Forms of government Part of the Politics series Politics Portal This box:      An autocracy is a form of government in which the political power is held by a single self appointed ruler. ... is the 320th day of the year (321st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Capital punishment, also referred to as the death penalty, is the judicially ordered execution of a prisoner as a punishment for a serious crime, often called a capital offense or a capital crime. ... A mock execution is a method of psychological torture, whereby the subject is made to believe that they are being led to their execution. ... Execution by firing squad is a method of capital punishment, especially in times of war. ... Exile (band) may refer to: Exile - The American country music band Exile - The Japanese pop music band Category: ... -1... Omsk (Russian: ) is a city in southwest Siberia in Russia, the administrative center of Omsk Oblast. ... This article is about Siberia as a whole. ...

In summer, intolerable closeness; in winter, unendurable cold. All the floors were rotten. Filth on the floors an inch thick; one could slip and fall...We were packed like herrings in a barrel...There was no room to turn around. From dusk to dawn it was impossible not to behave like pigs...Fleas, lice, and black beetles by the bushel...

[5]

He was released from prison in 1854, and was required to serve in the Siberian Regiment. Dostoevsky spent the following five years as a private (and later lieutenant) in the Regiment's Seventh Line Battalion, stationed at the fortress of Semipalatinsk, now in Kazakhstan. While there, he began a relationship with Maria Dmitrievna Isaeva, the wife of an acquaintance in Siberia. They married in February 1857, after her husband's death. NASA satellite photo of Semey Semey, in Eastern Kazakstan Semey (Kazakh: ; also transliterated as Semij or Semei, and known by its Imperial Russian name of Semipalatinsk (Семипалатинск)) is a city in Kazakhstan, in the northeastern province of East Kazakhstan, near the border with Siberia, around 1,000 km north of Almaty...


Post-prison maturation as writer

Dostoevsky's experiences in prison and the army resulted in major changes in his political and religious convictions. Firstly, his ordeal somehow caused him to become disillusioned with 'Western' ideas; he repudiated the contemporary Western European philosophical movements, and instead paid greater tribute in his writing to traditional, rural-based, rustic Russian 'values'. But even more significantly, he had what his biographer Joseph Frank describes as a conversion experience in prison, which greatly strengthened his Christian, and specifically Orthodox, faith (Dostoevsky would later depict his conversion experience in the short story, The Peasant Marey (1876)). Religious conversion is the adoption of a new religious identity, or a change from one religious identity to another. ... For other uses, see Christian (disambiguation). ... The Russian Orthodox Church (Русская Православная церковь) is that body of Christians who are united under the Patriarch of Moscow, who in turn is in communion with the other patriarchs of the Eastern Orthodox Church. ... The Peasant Marey is a short story by Fyodor Dostoevsky written in 1876. ...


Dostoevsky now displayed a much more critical stance on contemporary European philosophy and turned with intellectual rigour against the Nihilist and Socialist movements; and much of his post-prison work -- particularly the novel, The Possessed and the essays, The Diary of a Writer -- contains both criticism of socialist and nihilist ideas, as well as thinly-veiled parodies of contemporary Western-influenced Russian intellectuals (Timofey Granovsky), revolutionaries (Sergey Nechayev), and even fellow novelists (Ivan Turgenev). [6][7] In social circles, Dostoevsky allied himself with well-known conservatives, such as the statesman Konstantin Pobedonostsev. His post-prison essays praised the tenets of the Pochvennichestvo movement, a late-19th Russian nativist ideology closely aligned with Slavophilism. The Nihilist movement was an 1860s Russian cultural movement which rejected existing authorities and values. ... Socialism refers to the goal of a socio-economic system in which property and the distribution of wealth are subject to control by the community. ... For the theatrical adaptation by Albert Camus, see The Possessed (play). ... An English translation of A Writers Diary A Writers Diary is a novel by Fyodor Dostoevsky. ... Timofey Nikolayevich Granovsky (March 9, 1813 - October 4, 1855) was a founder of medieval studies in the Russian Empire. ... Sergey Gennadiyevich Nechayev (also Sergei Nechaev, Сергей Геннадиевич Нечаев), born October 2, 1847, died either November 21 or December 3, 1882) was a Russian revolutionary figure associated with the Nihilist movement and known for his single-minded pursuit of revolution by any means necessary, including political violence. ... Ivan Turgenev, photo by Félix Nadar (1820-1910) “Turgenev” redirects here. ... Konstantin Petrovich Pobedonostsev (Константин Иванович Победоносцев in Russian) (1827 - 1907) was a Russian jurist, statesman, and thinker. ... Pochvennichestvo - A.K.A. (Return to the Soil) was a late 19th century Russian nativist movement tied in closely with its contemporary ideology, the Slavophile movement. ... A Slavophile was an advocate of the supremacy of Slavic culture over that of others, especially Western European culture. ...


In short, Dostoevsky's post-prison fiction abandoned the European-style domestic melodramas and quaint character studies of his youthful work in favor of dark, complex story-lines and situations, played-out by brooding, tortured characters -- often styled partly on Dostoevsky himself -- who agonized over existential themes of spiritual torment, religious awakening, and the psychological confusion caused by the conflict between traditional Russian culture and the influx of modern, Western philosophy. Dostoevsky's novels focused on the idea that utopias and positivist ideas being utilitarian were unrealistic and unobtainable.[8] Existentialism is a philosophical movement that posits that individuals create the meaning and essence of their lives, as opposed to deities or authorities creating it for them. ... See Utopia (disambiguation) for other meanings of this word Utopia, in its most common and general meaning, refers to a hypothetical perfect society. ... This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... Utilitarianism is a suggested theoretical framework for morality, law and politics, based on quantitative maximisation of some definition of utility for society or humanity. ...


Later literary career

In December 1859, Dostoevsky returned to Saint Petersburg, where he ran a series of unsuccessful literary journals, Vremya (Time) and Epokha (Epoch), with his older brother Mikhail. The latter had to be shut down as a consequence of its coverage of the Polish Uprising of 1863. That year Dostoevsky traveled to Europe and frequented the gambling casinos. There he met Apollinaria Suslova, the model for Dostoevsky's "proud women," such as the two characters named Katerina Ivanovna, in Crime and Punishment and The Brothers Karamazov. Saint Petersburg (Russian: Санкт-Петербу́рг, English transliteration: Sankt-Peterburg), colloquially known as Питер (transliterated Piter), formerly known as Leningrad (Ленингра́д, 1924–1991) and Petrograd (Петрогра́д, 1914–1924), is a city located in Northwestern Russia on the delta of the river Neva at the east end of the Gulf of Finland... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... Look up epoch in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Polonia (Poland), 1863, by Jan Matejko, 1864, oil on canvas, 156 × 232 cm, National Museum, Kraków. ... For other uses, see Crime and Punishment (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see The Brothers Karamazov (disambiguation). ...


Dostoevsky was devastated by his wife's death in 1864, which was followed shortly thereafter by his brother's death. He was financially crippled by business debts and the need to provide for his wife's son from her earlier marriage and his brother's widow and children. Dostoevsky sank into a deep depression, frequenting gambling parlors and accumulating massive losses at the tables. For other uses, see Depression. ...


Dostoevsky suffered from an acute gambling compulsion as well as from its consequences. By one account Crime and Punishment, possibly his best known novel, was completed in a mad hurry because Dostoevsky was in urgent need of an advance from his publisher. He had been left practically penniless after a gambling spree. Dostoevsky wrote The Gambler simultaneously in order to satisfy an agreement with his publisher Stellovsky who, if he did not receive a new work, would have claimed the copyrights to all of Dostoevsky's writings. The Gambler is a novel by Fyodor Dostoyevsky about a young tutor in the employment of a formerly wealthy Russian General. ...


Motivated by the dual wish to escape his creditors at home and to visit the casinos abroad, Dostoevsky traveled to Western Europe. There, he attempted to rekindle a love affair with Suslova, but she refused his marriage proposal. Dostoevsky was heartbroken, but soon met Anna Grigorevna Snitkina, a twenty-year-old stenographer. Shortly before marrying her in 1867, he dictated The Gambler to her. This period resulted in the writing of what are generally considered to be his greatest books. From 1873 to 1881 he published the Writer's Diary, a monthly journal full of short stories, sketches, and articles on current events. The journal was an enormous success. A current understanding of Western Europe. ... Shorthand is a writing method that can be done at speed because an abbreviated or symbolic form of language is used. ...


Dostoevsky is also known to have influenced and been influenced by the philosopher Vladimir Sergeyevich Solovyov. Solovyov is noted as the inspiration for the character Alyosha Karamazov.[9] Vladimir Sergeyevich Soloviev (Владимир Сергеевич Соловьёв) (1853 - 1900) was a famous Russian philosopher. ... Dostoevskys notes for chapter 5 of The Brothers Karamazov The Brothers Karamazov (Братья Карамазовы in Russian) is generally considered one of the greatest novels by the Russian author Fyodor Dostoevsky and the culmination of his lifes work. ...


In 1877, Dostoevsky gave the keynote eulogy at the funeral of his friend, the poet Nekrasov, to much controversy. On June 8, 1880, shortly before he died, he gave his famous Pushkin speech at the unveiling of the Pushkin monument in Moscow [10]. Look up eulogy in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Nikolai Alekseevich Nekrasov (November 28, 1821 - January 8, 1878 {O.S.: December 28, 1877}) was a Russian poet, best remembered as the long standing publisher of Современник (The Contemporary) (from 1846 until July 1866, when the journal was shut down by the government in connection with the arrest of its... Pushkin redirects here. ...


In his later years, Fyodor Dostoevsky lived for a long time at the resort of Staraya Russa in northwestern Russia, which was closer to Saint Petersburg and less expensive than German resorts. He died on February 9 (January 28 O.S.), 1881 of a lung hemorrhage associated with emphysema and an epileptic seizure. He was interred in Tikhvin Cemetery at the Alexander Nevsky Monastery in Saint Petersburg. Forty thousand mourners attended his funeral.[11] His tombstone reads "Verily, Verily, I say unto you, Except a corn of wheat fall into the ground and die, it abideth alone: but if it die, it bringeth forth much fruit." from John 12:24, which is also the epigraph of his final novel, The Brothers Karamazov. Staraya Russa (Russian: ) is an old Russian town located 99 km south of Veliky Novgorod. ... Saint Petersburg (Russian: Санкт-Петербу́рг, English transliteration: Sankt-Peterburg), colloquially known as Питер (transliterated Piter), formerly known as Leningrad (Ленингра́д, 1924–1991) and Petrograd (Петрогра́д, 1914–1924), is a city located in Northwestern Russia on the delta of the river Neva at the east end of the Gulf of Finland... is the 40th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 28th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Julian calendar was a reform of the Roman calendar which was introduced by Julius Caesar in 46 BC and came into force in 45 BC (709 ab urbe condita). ... Epilepsy (often referred to as a seizure disorder) is a chronic neurological condition characterized by recurrent unprovoked seizures. ... Tikhvin Cemetery (Тихвинское кладбище) is located at the Alexander Nevsky Monastery, in St. ... View of the monastery in the early 19th century Alexander Nevsky Monastery was founded by Peter the Great in 1710 at the southern end of the Nevsky Prospect in St Petersburg to house the relics of Alexander Nevsky, patron saint of the newly-founded Russian capital. ... Saint Petersburg (Russian: Санкт-Петербу́рг, English transliteration: Sankt-Peterburg), colloquially known as Питер (transliterated Piter), formerly known as Leningrad (Ленингра́д, 1924–1991) and Petrograd (Петрогра́д, 1914–1924), is a city located in Northwestern Russia on the delta of the river Neva at the east end of the Gulf of Finland... For other uses, see Gospel of John (disambiguation). ... In literature, an epigraph is a quotation that is placed at the start of a work or section that expresses in some succinct way an aspect or theme of what is to follow. ...


Works and influence

Dostoevsky's tomb at the Alexander Nevsky Monastery.
Dostoevsky's tomb at the Alexander Nevsky Monastery.

Dostoevsky's influence has been acclaimed by a wide variety of writers, including Marcel Proust, William Faulkner, Charles Bukowski, Albert Camus, Friedrich Nietzsche, Franz Kafka, Henry Miller, Yukio Mishima, Cormac McCarthy, Gabriel García Márquez, Jack Kerouac, Allen Ginsberg, Orhan Pamuk and Joseph Heller.[citation needed] American novelist Ernest Hemingway cited Dostoevsky as a major influence on his work in his autobiographical novella A Moveable Feast. Image File history File links Tomb of Feodor Dostoyevsky at the Tikhvin Cemetery. ... Image File history File links Tomb of Feodor Dostoyevsky at the Tikhvin Cemetery. ... View of the monastery in the early 19th century Alexander Nevsky Monastery was founded by Peter the Great in 1710 at the southern end of the Nevsky Prospect in St Petersburg to house the relics of Alexander Nevsky, patron saint of the newly-founded Russian capital. ... Proust redirects here. ... William Cuthbert Faulkner (born William Falkner), (September 25, 1897–July 6, 1962) was an American author. ... Bukowski redirects here. ... For other uses, see Camus. ... Friedrich Wilhelm Nietzsche (October 15, 1844 – August 25, 1900) (IPA: ) was a nineteenth-century German philosopher and philologist. ... Kafka redirects here. ... Henry Miller photo taken by Carl Van Vechten, 1940 Henry Valentine Miller (December 26, 1891 – June 7, 1980) was an American writer and, to a lesser extent, painter. ... Yukio Mishima ) was the public name of Kimitake Hiraoka , January 14, 1925–November 25, 1970), a Japanese author and playwright, famous for both his highly notable nihilistic post-war writings and the circumstances of his ritual suicide by seppuku. ... For the musician, see Cormac McCarthy (musician). ... Gabriel José de la Concordia García Márquez (born March 6, 1927[1]) is a Colombian novelist, short-story writer, screenwriter and journalist. ... Jack Kerouac (pronounced ) (March 12, 1922 – October 21, 1969) was an American novelist, writer, poet, and artist from Lowell, Massachusetts. ... Irwin Allen Ginsberg (IPA: ) (June 3, 1926 – April 5, 1997) was an American poet. ... Ferit Orhan Pamuk (born on June 7, 1952 in Istanbul) is a Nobel Prize-winning Turkish novelist. ... Joseph Heller (May 1, 1923 – December 12, 1999) was an American satirical novelist and playwright. ... Ernest Miller Hemingway (July 21, 1899 — July 2, 1961) was an American novelist, short-story writer, and journalist. ... For the holy day whose date is not fixed, or the mobile repast, see Moveable feast A Moveable Feast is also the title of a live album by Fairport Convention Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to: A Moveable Feast A Moveable Feast is a set of memoirs by...


In a book of interviews with Arthur Power (Conversations with James Joyce), James Joyce praised Dostoevsky's influence: This article is about the writer and poet. ...

...he is the man more than any other who has created modern prose, and intensified it to its present-day pitch. It was his explosive power which shattered the Victorian novel with its simpering maidens and ordered commonplaces; books which were without imagination or violence.

In her essay The Russian Point of View, Virginia Woolf stated that, For the American writer, see Virginia Euwer Wolff. ...

The novels of Dostoevsky are seething whirlpools, gyrating sandstorms, waterspouts which hiss and boil and suck us in. They are composed purely and wholly of the stuff of the soul. Against our wills we are drawn in, whirled round, blinded, suffocated, and at the same time filled with a giddy rapture. Out of Shakespeare there is no more exciting reading.

[12]

Dostoevsky displayed a nuanced understanding of human psychology in his major works. He created an opus of vitality and almost hypnotic power, characterized by feverishly dramatized scenes where his characters are, frequently in scandalous and explosive atmosphere, passionately engaged in Socratic dialogues à la Russe; the quest for God, the problem of Evil and suffering of the innocents haunt the majority of his novels. Socratic dialogue (Greek Σωκρατικός λόγος or Σωκρατικός διάλογος), is a prose literary form developed in Greece at the turn of the fourth century BCE, preserved today in the dialogues of Plato and the Socratic works of Xenophon - either dramatic or narrative - in which characters discuss moral and philosophical problems. ... In the philosophy of religion and theology, the problem of evil is the problem of reconciling the existence of evil or suffering in the world with the existence of a god. ...


His characters fall into a few distinct categories: humble and self-effacing Christians (Prince Myshkin, Sonya Marmeladova, Alyosha Karamazov, Starets Zosima), self-destructive nihilists (Svidrigailov, Smerdyakov, Stavrogin, the underground man), cynical debauchees (Fyodor Karamazov), and rebellious intellectuals (Raskolnikov, Ivan Karamazov, Ippolit); also, his characters are driven by ideas rather than by ordinary biological or social imperatives. In comparison with Tolstoy, whose characters are realistic, the characters of Dostoevsky are usually more symbolic of the ideas they represent, thus Dostoevsky is often cited as one of the forerunners of Literary Symbolism in specific Russian Symbolism (see Alexander Blok). Topics in Christianity Preaching Prayer Ecumenism Relation to other religions Movements Music Liturgy Calendar Symbols Art Criticism Christianity Portal This box:      Christianity is a monotheistic[1] religion centered on the life and teachings of Jesus of Nazareth as presented in the New Testament. ... Pevear and Volokhonsky translation of The Idiot The Idiot is a novel written by the Russian writer Fyodor Dostoevsky in 1869. ... Crime and Punishment (Russian: Преступление и наказание) is a novel written and published in 1866 by Russian author Fyodor Dostoevsky. ... Dostoevskys notes for chapter 5 of The Brothers Karamazov The Brothers Karamazov (Братья Карамазовы in Russian) is generally considered one of the greatest novels by the Russian author Fyodor Dostoevsky and the culmination of his lifes work. ... Hieroschemamonk Ambrose Born sixth of eight children, Ambrose had a very lively humor and sociable character which conflicted with his more stoic spiritual discipline. ... This article is about the philosophical position. ... Smerdyakov is a character in Fyodor Dostoevskys novel The Brothers Karamazov. ... This article lacks information on the importance of the subject matter. ... Notes from Underground (also translated in English as Notes from the Underground or Letters from the Underworld) (1864) is a short novel by Fyodor Dostoevsky. ... Dostoevskys notes for chapter 5 of The Brothers Karamazov For other uses, see The Brothers Karamazov (disambiguation). ... Rodion Romanovitch Raskolnikov is the protagonist of Crime and Punishment by Dostoevsky. ... Dostoevskys notes for chapter 5 of The Brothers Karamazov For other uses, see The Brothers Karamazov (disambiguation). ... Count Lev Nikolayevich Tolstoy (September 9 [O.S. August 28] 1828 – November 20 [O.S. November 7] 1910) (Russian: , Russian pronunciation:  ), commonly referred to in English as Leo (Lyof, Lyoff) Tolstoy, was a Russian writer – novelist, essayist, dramatist and philosopher – as well as pacifist Christian anarchist and educational reformer. ... // Literary realism most often refers to the trend, beginning with certain works of nineteenth-century French literature and extending to late-nineteenth- and early-twentieth-century authors in various countries, towards depictions of contemporary life and society as they were. In the spirit of general realism, Realist authors opted for... Fyodor Dostoevsky. ... Fyodor Dostoevsky. ... Symbolism is the applied use of symbols: iconic representations that carry particular conventional meanings. ... Mikhail Nesterovs painting Vision to Youth Bartholomew (1890) is often taken as a starting point of Russian Symbolism. ... Blok in 1907 Alexander Blok (Александр Александрович Блок, November 28 [O.S. November 16] 1880 – August 7, 1921), was perhaps the most gifted lyrical poet produced by Russia after Alexander Pushkin. ...

Statue of Dostoyevsky in Omsk.
Statue of Dostoyevsky in Omsk.

Dostoevsky's novels are compressed in time (many cover only a few days) and this enables the author to get rid of one of the dominant traits of realist prose, the corrosion of human life in the process of the time flux — his characters primarily embody spiritual values, and these are, by definition, timeless. Other obsessive themes include suicide, wounded pride, collapsed family values, spiritual regeneration through suffering (the most important motif), rejection of the West and affirmation of Russian Orthodoxy and Tsarism. Literary scholars such as Bakhtin have characterized his work as 'polyphonic': unlike other novelists, Dostoevsky does not appear to aim for a 'single vision', and beyond simply describing situations from various angles, Dostoevsky engendered fully dramatic novels of ideas where conflicting views and characters are left to develop unevenly into unbearable crescendo. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (960x1280, 231 KB) Summary 13. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (960x1280, 231 KB) Summary 13. ... Omsk (Russian: ) is a city in southwest Siberia in Russia, the administrative center of Omsk Oblast. ... For other uses, see Realism (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Suicide (disambiguation). ... The Russian Orthodox Church (Русская Православная церковь) is that body of Christians who are united under the Patriarch of Moscow, who in turn is in communion with the other patriarchs of the Eastern Orthodox Church. ... Also spelled Czarism, a system of government ruled by a Tsar, an autocratic ruler with broad powers. ... Mikhail Bakhtin. ... Polyphony (literature) is a feature of narrative, which includes a diversity of points of view and voices. ...


Dostoevsky and the other giant of late 19th century Russian literature, Lev Nikolayevich Tolstoy, never met in person, even though each praised, criticized and influenced each other (Dostoevsky remarked of Tolstoy's Anna Karenina that it was a "flawless work of art"; Henri Troyat reports that Tolstoy once remarked of Crime and Punishment that, "Once you read the first few chapters you know pretty much how the novel will end up").[citation needed] There was, however, a meeting arranged, but there was a confusion about where the meeting place was and they never rescheduled. Tolstoy reportedly burst into tears when he learnt of Dostoevsky's death. A copy of The Brothers Karamazov was found on the nightstand next to Tolstoy's deathbed at the Astapovo railway station. Since their time, the two are considered by the critics and public as two of the greatest novelists produced by their homeland. Leo Tolstoy, pictured late in life Count Lev Nikolayevich Tolstoy (help· info) (Russian: Лев Никола́евич Толсто́й; commonly referred to in English as Leo Tolstoy) (September 9, 1828 – November 20, 1910, N.S.; August 28, 1828 – November 7, 1910, O.S.) was a Russian novelist, social reformer, pacifist, Christian anarchist, vegetarian, moral thinker and... This article refers to the novel by Tolstoy. ... Henri Troyat (born Levon Aslan Torossian (or Lev Aslanovich Tarasov), November 1, 1911 - March 4, 2007) is a French author, biographer, historian and novelist of Armenian descent. ... For other uses, see Crime and Punishment (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see The Brothers Karamazov (disambiguation). ... Lev Tolstoy (Russian: ) is a settlement in the northern part of Lipetsk Oblast, Russia, located at , It is the administrative center of Lev-Tolstovsky District. ...


Dostoevsky has also been noted as having expressed anti-Semitic sentiments. In the recent biography by Joseph Frank, The Mantle of the Prophet, Frank spent much time on A Writer's Diary - a regular column which Dostoevsky wrote in the periodical The Citizen from 1873 to the year before his death in 1881. Frank notes that the Diary is "filled with politics, literary criticism, and pan-Slav diatribes about the virtues of the Russian Empire, [and] represents a major challenge to the Dostoevsky fan, not least on account of its frequent expressions of anti-Semitism."[13] Frank, in his foreword that he wrote for the book Dostoevsky and the Jews, attempts to place Dostoevsky as a product of his time. Frank notes that Dostoevsky did make anti-semitic remarks, but that Dostoevsky's writing and stance by and large was one where Dostoevsky held a great deal of guilt for his comments and positions that were anti-semitic.[14] Steven Cassedy, for example, alleges in his book, Dostoevsky's Religion, that much of the points made that depict Dostoevsky’s views as an anti-Semite, do so by denying that Dostoevsky expressed support for the equal rights of and for the Russian Jewish population, a position that was not widely supported in Russia at the time.[15] Cassedy also notes that this criticism of Dostoevsky also appears to deny his sincerity in the statements that Dostoevsky made, that he was for equal rights for the Russian Jewish populace, and the Serfs of his own country (since neither group at that point in history had equal rights).[15] Cassedy further notes that the criticism maintains that Dostoevsky was insincere when he stated that he did not hate Jewish people and was not an Anti-Semite.[15] According to Cassedy, this position was maintained without taking into consideration Dostoevsky's expressed desire to peacefully reconcile Jews and Christians into a single universal brotherhood of all mankind.[15] A Peasant Leaving His Landlord on Yuriev Day, painting by Sergei V. Ivanov. ...


Dostoevsky and Existentialism

With the publication of Crime and Punishment in 1866, Fyodor Dostoevsky became one of Russia's most prominent authors in the nineteenth century. Dostoevsky has also been called one of the founding fathers of the philosophical movement known as existentialism. In particular, his Notes from Underground, first published in 1864, has been depicted as a founding work of existentialism. For Dostoevsky, war is the rebellion of the people against the idea that reason guides everything. And thus, reason is the ultimate principle of guidance for neither history nor mankind. Having been exiled to the city of Omsk (Siberia) in 1849, many of Dostoevsky's works entail notions of suffering and despair. For other uses, see Crime and Punishment (disambiguation). ... Existentialism is a philosophical movement that posits that individuals create the meaning and essence of their lives, as opposed to deities or authorities creating it for them. ... This article is about the short novel by Fyodor Dostoevsky. ... -1... For other uses, see Reason (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see History (disambiguation). ... Look up Mankind in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Omsk (Russian: ) is a city in southwest Siberia in Russia, the administrative center of Omsk Oblast. ... Suffering, or pain in this sense,[1] is a basic affective experience of unpleasantness and aversion associated with harm or threat of harm in an individual. ...


Nietzsche referred to Dostoevsky as "the only psychologist from whom I have something to learn: he belongs to the happiest windfalls of my life, happier even than the discovery of Stendhal." He said that Notes from the Underground "cried truth from the blood." According to Mihajlo Mihajlov's "The great catalyzer: Nietzsche and Russian neo-Idealism", Nietzsche constantly refers to Dostoevsky in his notes and drafts through out the winter of 1886-1887. Nietzsche also wrote abstracts of several of Dostoevsky's works. Friedrich Nietzsche, 1882 Friedrich Wilhelm Nietzsche (October 15, 1844 - August 25, 1900) was a highly influential German philosopher. ... Stendhal. ... Kontinent was a dissident journal which focused on the politics of the Soviet Union and its satellites. ... Friedrich Nietzsche, 1882 Friedrich Wilhelm Nietzsche (October 15, 1844 - August 25, 1900) was a highly influential German philosopher. ...


Freud wrote an article entitled Dostoevsky and Parricide that asserts that the greatest works in world literature are all about parricide (though he is critical of Dostoevsky's work overall, the inclusion of The Brothers Karamazov in a set of the three greatest works of literature is remarkable). Sigmund Freud His famous couch Sigmund Freud (May 6, 1856 - September 23, 1939) was an Austrian neurologist and the founder of the psychoanalytic school of psychology, a movement that popularized the theory that unconscious motives control much behavior. ... Dostoevsky and Parricide is a 1928 article by Sigmund Freud that argues that the greatest works of world literature all concern parricide: Oedipus the King, Hamlet, and The Brothers Karamazov. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Patricide. ... For other uses, see The Brothers Karamazov (disambiguation). ...


Major works

Poor Folk was first novel by Fyodor Dostoevsky, which he wrote over the span of nine months. ... The name Netochka Nezvanova, which can be translated roughly as nameless nobody, is widely believed to be a pseudonym taken from the name of the eponymous title character in Fyodor Dostoevskys early unfinished novel. ... The Village of Stepanchikovo is a book written by Fyodor Dostoevsky and first published in 1859. ... The Insulted and Humiliated (also known as The Insulted and the Injured) is a novella by Fyodor Dostoevsky, first published in 1861, is a book about the huge contradictions present in life. ... Penguin Edition of the House of the Dead The House of the Dead, Notes from the Dead House or Memoirs from the House of The Dead is a novel published in 1862 by Russian author Fyodor Dostoevsky, which portrays the life of convicts in a Siberian prison camp. ... This article is about the short novel by Fyodor Dostoevsky. ... For other uses, see Crime and Punishment (disambiguation). ... The Gambler is a novel by Fyodor Dostoyevsky about a young tutor in the employment of a formerly wealthy Russian General. ... The Idiot is a novel written by the Russian author Fyodor Dostoevsky and first published in 1869. ... For the theatrical adaptation by Albert Camus, see The Possessed (play). ... The Raw Youth or The Adolescent (Russian: Подросток), is a novel of Russian writer Fyodor Dostoevsky. ... For other uses, see The Brothers Karamazov (disambiguation). ... An English translation of A Writers Diary A Writers Diary is a novel by Fyodor Dostoevsky. ...

Short stories

  • Mr Prokharchin (1846)
  • Novel in Nine Letters (1847)
  • Polzunkov (1847)
  • The Landlady (1847)
  • The Jealous Husband (1848)
  • White Nights (Белые ночи) (1848)
  • A Christmas Tree and a Wedding (Елка и свадьба) (1848)
  • A Weak Heart (Слабое сердце) (1848)
  • An Honest Thief (Честный вор) (1848)
  • The Little Hero (1849)
  • A Nasty Story (1862)
  • Winter Notes on Summer Impressions (1863)
  • The Crocodile (1865)
  • Bobok (1873)
  • The Peasant Marey (Мужик Марей) (1876)
  • The Heavanly Christmas Tree (1876)
  • A Gentle Creature (Кроткая, sometimes translated as The Meek Girl) (1876)
  • The Dream of a Ridiculous Man (Сон смешного человека) (1877)

This article is about the Dostoevsky short story. ... A Christmas Tree and a Wedding is a short story by Dostoevsky. ... An Honest Thief is an 1848 short story by Dostoevsky. ... This article does not cite its references or sources. ... The Peasant Marey is a short story by Fyodor Dostoevsky written in 1876. ... A Gentle Creature, sometimes also translated as The Meek One, is a short story written by Fyodor Dostoevsky in 1876. ... The Dream of a Ridiculous Man is a short story by Fyodor Dostoevsky written in 1877. ...

References

  1. ^ Dostoevsky's other Quixote.(influence of Miguel de Cervantes' Don Quixote on Fyodor Dostoevsky's The Idiot) Fambrough, Preston
  2. ^ Existentialism from Dostoevsky to Sartre Walter Kaufmann ISBN-10: 0452009308 page 12
  3. ^ Notes from the Underground Coradella Collegita Bookshelf edition, About the Author.
  4. ^ epilepsy.com Famous authors with epilepsy.
  5. ^ Frank 76. Quoted from Pisma, I: 135-137.
  6. ^ Dostoevsky the Thinker James P. Scanlan. Dostoevsky the Thinker. Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 2002. xiii, 251 pp.
  7. ^ Dostoevsky's View of Evil Reprinted from In Communion, April 1998.
  8. ^ Sirotkina, Irina (1996). Diagnosing Literary Genius: A Cultural History of Psychiatry in Russia, 1880. Johns Hopkins University Press, 55. ISBN 0801867827. 
  9. ^ Zouboff, Peter, Solovyov on Godmanhood: Solovyov’s Lectures on Godmanhood Harmon Printing House: Poughkeepsie, New York, 1944; see Czeslaw Milosz’s introduction to Solovyov’s War, Progress and the End of History. Lindisfarne Press: Hudson, New York 1990.
  10. ^ az.lib.ru
  11. ^ Dostoevsky, Fyodor; Introduction to The Idiot, Wordsworth Ed. Ltd, 1996.
  12. ^ The Russian Point of View Virginia Woolf.
  13. ^ Dostoevsky's leap of faith This volume concludes a magnificent biography which is also a cultural history. Orlando Figes. SUNDAY TELEGRAPH (LONDON). Pg. 13. September 29, 2002.
  14. ^ Dostoevsky and the Jews (University of Texas Press Slavic series) (Hardcover) 2 Joseph Frank, "Foreword" pg. xiv. by David I. Goldstein ISBN-10: 0292715285
  15. ^ a b c d Cassedy, Steven (2005). Dostoevsky's Religion. Stanford University Press, 67-80. ISBN 0804751374. 
  • Dostoyevsky, Aimée (2001), FYODOR DOSTOYEVSKY: A STUDY, Honolulu, HAWAII: University Press of the Pacific, ISBN 0898751659, <http://worldcat.org/oclc/61397936> .

The Johns Hopkins University Press is a publishing house and division of Johns Hopkins University that engages in academic publishing. ... The Stanford University Press is a publishing house, a division of Stanford University, that is highly respected in academic publishing. ...

See also

Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Pope · Archbishop of Canterbury Patriarch of Constantinople Christianity Portal This box:      This article does not cite any... The Eastern Orthodox Churches trace their roots back to the Apostles and Jesus Christ. ... // The Russian Orthodox Church is traditionally said to have been founded by the Apostle Andrew, who is thought to have visited Scythia and Greek colonies along the northern coast of the Black Sea. ... Anti-Catholicism is discrimination, hostility or prejudice directed at Catholics or the Catholic Church. ... Ivan Ilyin Ivan Alexandrovich Ilyin (Russian: Иван Александрович Ильин) (March 28, 1883 - December 21, 1954) was a Russian religious and political philosopher, and émigré anti-communist publicist associated with the White movement. ... For other uses, see: information entropy (in information theory) and entropy (disambiguation). ... Nikolai Alexandrovich Berdyaev (Николай Александрович Бердяев) (March 18 [O.S. March 6] 1874 – March 24, 1948) was a Russian religious and political philosopher. ... From the bookcover Ayn Rand: The Russian Radical by C.M. Sciabarra Nikolai Onufriyevich Lossky Николай Онуфриевич Лосский, (November 24 N.S. December 6, 1870–January 24, 1965) was a Russian philosopher, representative of Russian idealism, intuitionism, personalism, ethics and his intuitivism. ... Existentialism is a philosophical movement that posits that individuals create the meaning and essence of their lives, as opposed to deities or authorities creating it for them. ... Vladimir Sergeyevich Soloviev (Владимир Сергеевич Соловьёв) (1853 - 1900) was a famous Russian philosopher. ... Mikhail N. Epstein (Epshtein) (born 1950) is an American literary theorist and critical thinker of Russian-Jewish origin. ... Russian philosophy is a broad field, little known to most non-Russians, dominated by religious and humanistic figures such as Vladimir Soloviev and social or political philosophers such as Mikhail Bakunin. ... Nikolay Nikolayevich Strakhov Nikolay Nikolayevich Strakhov, also transliterated as Nikolai Strahov (Russian: Страхов Николай Николаевич) (October 16, 1828 - January 24, 1896) was a Russian philosopher, publicist and literary critic who shared the ideals of pochvennichestvo. ... Lev Isaakovich Shestov (Russian: ), born Yehuda Leyb Schwarzmann (Russian: )) was a Russian - Jewish existentialist philosopher. ... The Russian Orthodox Church of the Moscow Patriarchate (Russian: ), also known as the Orthodox Christian Church of Russia, is a body of Christians who are united under the Patriarch of Moscow, who in turn is in communion with the other patriarchs and primates of the Eastern Orthodox Church. ... Søren Aabye Kierkegaard (pronounced , but usually Anglicized as ;  ) (5 May 1813 – 11 November 1855) was a prolific 19th century Danish philosopher and theologian. ... Aleksandr Isayevich Solzhenitsyn (Russian: , IPA:  ; born December 11, 1918) is a Russian novelist, dramatist and historian. ... The Philokalia (Gk. ... Hesychasm (Greek hesychasmos, from hesychia, stillness, rest, quiet, silence) is an eremitic tradition of prayer in the Eastern Orthodox Church, and some other Eastern Churches of the Byzantine Rite, practised (Gk: hesychazo: to keep stillness) by the Hesychast (Gr. ... This article is about the philosophical position. ... Free-Will is a Japanese independent record label founded in 1986. ... This article is about the general notion of determinism in philosophy. ... Voluntarism is a descriptive term for a school of thought which regards the will as superior to the intellect and to emotion. ... Negative theology - also known as the Via Negativa (Latin for Negative Way) and Apophatic theology - is a theology that attempts to describe God by negation, to speak of God only in terms of what may not be said about God. ... For other uses, see Camus. ... Jean-Paul Charles Aymard Sartre (June 21, 1905 – April 15, 1980), normally known simply as Jean-Paul Sartre (pronounced: ), was a French existentialist philosopher and pioneer, dramatist and screenwriter, novelist and critic. ... Vasily Vasilievich Rozanov (Василий Васильевич Розанов) (1856 - 1919) was one of the most controversial Russian writers and philosophers of the pre-revolutionary epoch. ... Mikhail Bakhtin. ...

External links

  • FyodorDostoevsky.com - The definitive Dostoevsky fan site: discussion forum, essays, e-texts, photos, biography, quotes, and links.
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Persondata
NAME Dostoevsky, Fyodor Mikhailovich
ALTERNATIVE NAMES Dostoyevsky, Fyodor Mikhailovich; Фёдор Миха́йлович Достое́вский (Russian)
SHORT DESCRIPTION Russian novelist
DATE OF BIRTH November 11, 1821(1821-11-11)
PLACE OF BIRTH Moscow
DATE OF DEATH February 9, 1881
PLACE OF DEATH Saint Petersburg

Image File history File links Wikisource-logo. ... The original Wikisource logo. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Wikiquote is one of a family of wiki-based projects run by the Wikimedia Foundation, running on MediaWiki software. ... Project Gutenberg, abbreviated as PG, is a volunteer effort to digitize, archive and distribute cultural works. ... This article is about the short novel by Fyodor Dostoevsky. ... The Internet Book List (IBList) is an online database with information about books, authors, short stories, etc. ... Poor Folk was first novel by Fyodor Dostoevsky, which he wrote over the span of nine months. ... The name Netochka Nezvanova, which can be translated roughly as nameless nobody, is widely believed to be a pseudonym taken from the name of the eponymous title character in Fyodor Dostoevskys early unfinished novel. ... The Village of Stepanchikovo is a book written by Fyodor Dostoevsky and first published in 1859. ... The Insulted and Humiliated (also known as The Insulted and the Injured) is a novella by Fyodor Dostoevsky, first published in 1861, is a book about the huge contradictions present in life. ... Penguin Edition of the House of the Dead The House of the Dead, Notes from the Dead House or Memoirs from the House of The Dead is a novel published in 1862 by Russian author Fyodor Dostoevsky, which portrays the life of convicts in a Siberian prison camp. ... This article is about the short novel by Fyodor Dostoevsky. ... For other uses, see Crime and Punishment (disambiguation). ... The Gambler is a novel by Fyodor Dostoyevsky about a young tutor in the employment of a formerly wealthy Russian General. ... The Idiot is a novel written by the Russian author Fyodor Dostoevsky and first published in 1869. ... For the theatrical adaptation by Albert Camus, see The Possessed (play). ... The Raw Youth or The Adolescent (Russian: Подросток), is a novel of Russian writer Fyodor Dostoevsky. ... For other uses, see The Brothers Karamazov (disambiguation). ... Image File history File links Dostoevsky. ... This article is about the Dostoevsky short story. ... A Christmas Tree and a Wedding is a short story by Dostoevsky. ... An Honest Thief is an 1848 short story by Dostoevsky. ... The Peasant Marey is a short story by Fyodor Dostoevsky written in 1876. ... The Dream of a Ridiculous Man is a short story by Fyodor Dostoevsky written in 1877. ... A Gentle Creature, sometimes also translated as The Meek One, is a short story written by Fyodor Dostoevsky in 1876. ... This article does not cite its references or sources. ... An English translation of A Writers Diary A Writers Diary is a novel by Fyodor Dostoevsky. ... Standalone copy of the chapter The Grand Inquisitor Wikisource has original text related to this article: The Grand Inquisitor The Grand Inquisitor is a parable told by Ivan to Alyosha in Fyodor Dostoevskys novel, The Brothers Karamazov (1879-1880). ... Rodion Romanovich Raskolnikov (Russian: Родион Романович Раскольников) is the fictional protagonist of Crime and Punishment by Fyodor Dostoevsky. ... Nastasya Filippovna is the principle heroine in Fyodor Dostoevskys novel The Idiot. ... is the 315th day of the year (316th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1821 (MDCCCXXI) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... is the 40th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1881 (MDCCCLXXXI) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Fyodor Dostoevsky - Biography and Works (1169 words)
Fyodor Dostoevsky (1821-1881) was a Russian novelist, journalist, short-story writer whose psychological penetration into the human soul had a profound influence on the 20th century novel.
Dostoevsky was born in Moscow, as the second son of a former army doctor.
The sentence was commuted to imprisonment in Siberia.
Encyclopedia4U - Fyodor Dostoevsky - Encyclopedia Article (553 words)
Fyodor Mikhailovich Dostoevsky (1821-1881) was a Russian writer and is sometimes referred to as one of the founders of existentialism.
Dostoevsky was arrested and imprisoned in 1849 for engaging in revolutionary activity against Tsar Nicholas I.
Fyodor Dostoevsky died on January 28, 1881 and was interred in Tikhvin Cemetery at the Alexander Nevsky Monastery, St.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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