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Encyclopedia > Furman University

Furman University

Furman Wordmark, from http://www. ...

Established 1826
Type Private
Endowment US$478.8 million [1]
President David Shi
Faculty 272
Undergraduates 2,550
Postgraduates 525
Location Greenville, South Carolina, United States
Campus Suburban
750 acre (3 km²)
Athletics 21 varsity teams
Nickname Paladins
Website www.furman.edu
The Bell Tower
The Bell Tower

Furman University is a private, coeducational, non-sectarian university in Greenville, South Carolina, United States. Furman is the oldest, largest and most selective private institution in South Carolina and is one of the top liberal arts colleges in the United States [citation needed]. The date of establishment or date of founding of an institution is the date on which that institution chooses to claim as its starting point. ... The oldest surviving photograph, Nicéphore Niépce, circa 1826 1826 (MDCCCXXVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Private schools, or independent schools, are schools not administered by local, state, or national government, which retain the right to select their student body and are funded in whole or in part by charging their students tuition rather than with public (state) funds. ... A financial endowment is a transfer of money or property donated to an institution, with the stipulation that it be invested, and the principal remain intact. ... University President is the title of the highest ranking officer within a university, within university systems that prefer that appellation over other variations such as Chancellor or rector. ... A faculty is a division within a university. ... In some educational systems, undergraduate education is post-secondary education up to the level of a Bachelors degree. ... Degree ceremony at Cambridge. ... Greenville is the third largest city in the state of South Carolina. ... Official language(s) English Capital Charleston(1670-1789) Columbia(1790-present) Largest city Columbia Largest metro area Columbia Area  Ranked 40th  - Total 34,726 sq mi (82,965 km²)  - Width 200 miles (320 km)  - Length 260 miles (420 km)  - % water 6  - Latitude 32° 2′ N to 35° 13′ N  - Longitude... Illustration of the backyards of a surburban neighbourhood Suburbs are inhabited districts located either on the outer rim of a city or outside the official limits of a city (the term varies from country to country), or the outer elements of a conurbation. ... An acre is the name of a unit of area in a number of different systems, including Imperial units and United States customary units. ... Square kilometre (US spelling: Square kilometer), symbol km², is an SI unit of surface area. ... The athletic nickname, or equivalently athletic moniker, of a university or college within the United States of America is the name officially adopted by that institution for at least the members of its athletic teams. ... For other uses, see Paladin (disambiguation). ... A website (alternatively, Web site or web site) is a collection of Web pages, images, videos and other digital assets that is hosted on one or several Web server(s), usually accessible via the Internet, cell phone or a LAN. A Web page is a document, typically written in HTML... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1536x2048, 1363 KB)Photo by Anet12 File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1536x2048, 1363 KB)Photo by Anet12 File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... A private university is a university that is run without the control of any government entity. ... Coeducation is the integrated education of males and females at the same school facilities. ... Representation of a university class, 1350s. ... Greenville is the third largest city in the state of South Carolina. ... Official language(s) English Capital Charleston(1670-1789) Columbia(1790-present) Largest city Columbia Largest metro area Columbia Area  Ranked 40th  - Total 34,726 sq mi (82,965 km²)  - Width 200 miles (320 km)  - Length 260 miles (420 km)  - % water 6  - Latitude 32° 2′ N to 35° 13′ N  - Longitude... Liberal arts colleges in the United States are primarily liberal arts colleges with an emphasis upon undergraduate study in the liberal arts. ...


Furman University emphasizes "engaged" learning in which professors encourage undergraduate students to author articles, participate in internships, and volunteer in their respective fields of study. The Furman Advantage program funds research projects between professors and students. Furman receives funds annually from The Duke Endowment for general operating support and for special projects and programs. The center of engaged learning is the Max and Trude Heller Service Corps, formerly CESC, one of the nation's largest collegiate service-learning organization. The Duke Endowment is a private foundation established in 1924 by industrialist and philanthropist James B. Duke. ...


Founded in 1826, Furman enrolls approximately 2,550 undergraduate and 525 graduate students on its 750 acre (3 km²) campus. Its current president is David Shi, who graduated from Furman in 1973. The oldest surviving photograph, Nicéphore Niépce, circa 1826 1826 (MDCCCXXVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... An acre is the name of a unit of area in a number of different systems, including Imperial units and United States customary units. ... Square kilometre (US spelling: Square kilometer), symbol km², is an SI unit of surface area. ...


Furman is best known for its chemistry, history, music, religion, political science, and psychology departments. The psychology, computer science, and chemistry departments have earned high marks among professional organizations spanning the sciences (social, applied, and basic), notable for a liberal arts institution of Furman's size [citation needed]. It also maintains a Great Books as an option for students. For other uses, see Chemistry (disambiguation). ... History studies time in human terms. ... For other uses, see Music (disambiguation). ... The Politics series Politics Portal This box:      Political Science is the field concerning the theory and practice of politics and the description and analysis of political systems and political behaviour. ... Psychology (from Greek: ψυχή, psukhÄ“, spirit, soul; λόγος, logos, knowledge) is both an academic and applied discipline involving the scientific study of mental processes and behavior. ... Great Books refers to a curriculum and a book list. ...


Furman University students have an unusually high acceptance rate into graduate schools. Approximately two-thirds of Furman students will earn graduate degrees. More of Furman University’s graduates have gone on to earn Ph.D. degrees in recent years than any other private liberal arts college in the South, according to a survey conducted by the University of Chicago's National Opinion Research Center. [2]. The University of Chicago is a private university located principally in the Hyde Park neighborhood of Chicago. ... The National Opinion Research Center (NORC),established in 1941, is one of the largest and highly respected national social research organizations in the United States. ...

Contents

History

Furman was founded in 1826 as a Men's Academy and Theological Institute in Greenville, South Carolina. The original school building from that campus is located on the current Greenville campus today. In 1933, students from the Greenville Women's College began attending classes with Furman students. Shortly thereafter, the two schools merged to form the present institution. Furman began construction on its new campus, just five miles north of downtown Greenville, in 1956. Classes on the new campus began in 1958. Now a private, non-religiously affiliated university, Furman was founded by, and affiliated with the South Carolina Baptist Convention [3] and the Southern Baptist Convention until separating in the 1991 - 1992 school year. The oldest surviving photograph, Nicéphore Niépce, circa 1826 1826 (MDCCCXXVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Greenville is the third largest city in the state of South Carolina. ... Year 1933 (MCMXXXIII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1956 (MCMLVI) was a leap year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1958 (MCMLVIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Southern Baptist Convention (SBC) is a United States-based cooperative ministry agency serving Baptist churches around the world. ... Year 1991 (MCMXCI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the 1991 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 1992 (MCMXCII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display full 1992 Gregorian calendar). ...


Rankings

Furman was ranked no. 15 in the Washington Monthly's Top US Liberal Arts Colleges Rankings based on its production of research valuable to society and its commitment to national service. [4]. Furman has one of the best undergraduate research programs in the country and has been ranked no.4 in U.S. News Best Undergraduate Research Programs along with MIT, Stanford and Michigan. [5]. The university's engaged learning academic program, which promotes problem-solving, project-oriented, experience-based education, has received high praise from The Princeton Review, Peterson's Competitive Colleges , The Fiske Guide to Colleges and The College Board College Handbook . In terms of input, meaning the quality of the students the institution attracts, Furman was ranked no. 30 in the SSRN's U.S Colleges and Universities Preference Rankings (based on the choice to enroll of high-achieving students in US) [6] The Chronicle of Higher Education also ranked Furman no. 32 in the nation for the percentage of National Merit Scholars in its 2005-2006 freshman class .[7] Furman is a member of the ficticious "Magnolia League" which attempts to create the southern equivalent of the Ivy League.(http://www.magnolialeague.com) The Washington Monthly is a magazine based in Washington DC which covers American politics and government. ...


Campus

A 40-acre (0.1-km²) lake is at the center of the 750-acre (3-km²), wooded campus. Many academic buildings and student residences stand around the lake, including the Bell Tower. The Bell Tower figures highly in school insignias and is a replica (within 1/16th of an inch) of the tower that once existed on the men's campus in downtown Greenville. Today, the campus is anchored by its newly expanded 128,000 square foot (12,000 m²) James B. Duke Library. Informally known as "The Country Club of the South," Furman was named one of the 362 most beautiful places in America by the American Society of Landscape Architects. The fall 1997 issue of Planning for Higher Education names Furman as a benchmark campus for its landscaping as well. To add to the campus's extensive merit for aesthetic beauty, the 1996 Fisk Guide to Colleges referred to Furman's campus as a "shining jewel." Also, the 1997 Princeton Review ranked Furman fifth in its list of beautiful campuses, this based on student ratings of campus beauty. Students are required to live on campus all four years. However, during a student's senior year, s/he may be eligible to live off campus through a lottery. There are two residence complexes (called Lakeside and South Housing), as well as four housing cabins which make up Bell Tower Housing. Most juniors and all seniors live in North Village Apartments, located near the Bell Tower. An acre is the name of a unit of area in a number of different systems, including Imperial units and United States customary units. ... Square kilometre (US spelling: Square kilometer), symbol km², is an SI unit of surface area. ... The American Society of Landscape Architects is the national professional association representing landscape architects, with more than 15,000 members and 48 chapters, representing all 50 American states, US territories, and 42 countries around the world. ...


Athletics

Furman Paladins logo
Furman Paladins logo

Furman competes in NCAA Division I athletics as the Paladins. The university is a member of the Southern Conference. In 1988 Furman won the NCAA I-AA National Football Championship. Furman also appeared in the 1985 and 2001 NCAA I-AA National Football Championship game, but lost (to Georgia Southern and Montana, respectively). Furman, Colgate and Lehigh remain the only private universities that have appeared in the I-AA Football Championship game, and Furman is the only private school to win it. Over the past few years, Furman's football team has been consistently ranked in the top 3 spots in the NCAA I-AA polls, and recently climbed to no. 1 in the nation in the latest Sports Network polls [8]. The Paladins have also claimed 12 Southern Conference football titles, more than any school in league history. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA, often pronounced N-C-Double-A or N-C-Two-A ) is a voluntary association of about 1,200 institutions, conferences, organizations and individuals that organizes the athletic programs of many colleges and universities in the United States. ... For other uses, see Paladin (disambiguation). ... The Southern Conference (or SoCon) is a college athletic conference affiliated with the NCAAs Division I. SoCon football teams compete in the Division I Football Championship Subdivision (formerly known as I-AA). ... On Forest Drive looking between the College of Education and the Nursing building towards the College of Information Technology. ... The Montana Grizzlies football program (or Griz) represents the University of Montana in the NCAA Division I Championship Subdivision, better known as Division I-AA. The Grizzlies won national championships in 1995 and 2001 and have qualified for a record 14 consecutive playoffs. ... Colgate in fall. ... Lehigh Mountain Hawks logo The Lehigh Mountain Hawks are the athletic teams representing Lehigh University in Bethlehem, Pennsylvania. ...


The men's soccer team has been ranked as high as no. 3 in the nation and has produced a share of professional players [9]. Former star Clint Dempsey was the only American player to score a goal at the 2006 FIFA World Cup in Germany [10]. Few collegiate woman golf programs have produced more outstanding professionals than Furman, which boasts 11 former Lady Paladins on the LPGA tour, including two Hall of Fame inductees (Betsy King and Beth Daniel). Furman men's tennis coach Paul Scarpa is only the fourth college tennis head coach in history to reach 700 wins. He is currently the third-winningest active coach in the NCAA's and has coached 108 All-Southern Conference players. Furman's Rugby Club team has also proved notable in recent years, winning the East Coast Collegiate Championship five out of the last six years[11].Started in 1998 by John Roberts, the club continues to excel in Division III rugby in the southeast with many accolades. Furman is the only liberal arts college to be ranked in Sports Illustrated Top 100 America's Best Sports Colleges [12]and has 32 former student-athletes competing at the professional level- the most of any Southern Conference member school. Clinton Drew Clint Dempsey a. ... “2006 World Cup” redirects here. ... // The World Golf Hall of Fame is located in St. ... Betsy King (born August 13, 1955 in Reading, Pennsylvania) is a professional golfer. ... Beth Daniel (born October 14, 1956 in Charleston, South Carolina) is a professional golfer. ...


Notable alumni

Athletes Charles Hard Townes (born July 28, 1915) is an American Nobel Prize-winning physicist and educator. ... Hannes Alfvén (1908–1995) accepting the Nobel Prize for his work on magnetohydrodynamics [1]. List of Nobel Prize laureates in Physics from 1901 to the present day. ... A hydrogen radio frequency discharge, the first element inside a hydrogen maser (see description below) A maser is a device that produces coherent electromagnetic waves through amplification due to stimulated emission. ... Experiment with a laser (US Military) In physics, a laser is a device that emits light through a specific mechanism for which the term laser is an acronym: Light Amplification by Stimulated Emission of Radiation. ... John Broadus Watson (January 9, 1878–September 25, 1958) was an American psychologist who established the psychological school of behaviorism, after doing research on animal behavior. ... Behaviorism (also called learning perspective) is a philosophy of psychology based on the proposition that all things which organisms do — including acting, thinking and feeling—can and should be regarded as behaviors. ... Psychology (from Greek: ψυχή, psukhÄ“, spirit, soul; λόγος, logos, knowledge) is both an academic and applied discipline involving the scientific study of mental processes and behavior. ... Dr Hans Einstein Dr. Hans E Einstein (born February 3, 1923) is the foremost authority on the lung disease Valley Fever. ... Coccidioidomycosis (also known as Valley fever, California valley fever, and (incorrectly) coccidiomycosis) is a fungal disease caused by Coccidioides immitis or . ... Herman W. Lay was a Nashville, Tennessee, USA businessman who started H.W. Lay Co. ... External links Frito-Lay Frito-Lay Canada Frito-Lay company history Frito-Lay company timeline Categories: Food and drink stubs | PepsiCo subsidiaries | Food companies of the United States | Snack companies of the United States ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Keith Lockhart (born November 1959, Poughkeepsie, New York, USA) is an orchestral conductor. ... The Boston Pops Orchestra was founded in 1885 as a subsection of the Boston Symphony Orchestra. ... Jan Hooks, Dolly Parton, and Jackson in a 1989 SNL sketch. ... This article is about the American television series. ... Ben Browder (born December 11, 1962) is an American film and television actor, who garnered minor feature film and television roles before accepting a lead role on the sci-fi TV series Farscape and later Stargate SG-1. ... The Saturn Award is an award presented annually by the Academy of Science Fiction, Fantasy & Horror Films to honor the top works in science fiction, fantasy and horror in film, television and home video. ... Farscape (1999–2003) is a science fiction television series, featuring a present-day astronaut who accidentally travels through a wormhole to a distant part of the galaxy. ... An Emmy Award. ... Vice Admiral John Michael Mike McConnell, USN Ret. ... Lt. ... “NSA” redirects here. ... The Director of National Intelligence (DNI) is the United States government official subject to the authority, direction and control of the President of the United States who is responsible under the Intelligence Reform and Terrorism Prevention Act of 2004 for: Serving as the principal adviser to the President of the... Richard Wilson Riley (born January 2, 1933), American politician, was the United States Secretary of Education under President Bill Clinton as well as the Governor of South Carolina, is a member of the Democratic Party. ... Official language(s) English Capital Charleston(1670-1789) Columbia(1790-present) Largest city Columbia Largest metro area Columbia Area  Ranked 40th  - Total 34,726 sq mi (82,965 km²)  - Width 200 miles (320 km)  - Length 260 miles (420 km)  - % water 6  - Latitude 32° 2′ N to 35° 13′ N  - Longitude... William Jefferson Bill Clinton (born William Jefferson Blythe III[1] on August 19, 1946) was the 42nd President of the United States, serving from 1993 to 2001. ... Marshall Mark Clement Sanford, Jr. ... For other uses, see Governor (disambiguation). ... Official language(s) English Capital Charleston(1670-1789) Columbia(1790-present) Largest city Columbia Largest metro area Columbia Area  Ranked 40th  - Total 34,726 sq mi (82,965 km²)  - Width 200 miles (320 km)  - Length 260 miles (420 km)  - % water 6  - Latitude 32° 2′ N to 35° 13′ N  - Longitude... Betsy Byars (August 7, 1928 – ) is an American childrens author. ... The John Newbery Medal is a literary award given by the Association for Library Service to Children of the American Library Association (ALA) to the author of the outstanding American book for children. ... The National Book Awards is one of the most preeminent literary prizes in the United States. ... The Edgar Allan Poe Awards (popularly called the Edgars), named after Edgar Allan Poe, are presented every year by the Mystery Writers of America. ... The Regina Medal award is an American Literary award of the Catholic Library Association. ... George Singleton is a Southern author who has written several collections of short stories and one novel. ... Maurice Bloomfield February 23, 1855 - June 12, 1928, American Sanskrit scholar, was born on the 23rd of February 1855, in Bielitz, in what was at that time Austrian Silesia (today it is in Poland). ... The Sanskrit language ( , for short ) is a classical language of India, a liturgical language of Hinduism, Buddhism, Sikhism, and Jainism, and one of the 23 official languages of India. ... Wilton Earle Hall (March 11, 1901 - February 25, 1980) was a United States Senator from South Carolina. ... The United States Senate is the upper house of the U.S. Congress, smaller than the United States House of Representatives. ... Official language(s) English Capital Charleston(1670-1789) Columbia(1790-present) Largest city Columbia Largest metro area Columbia Area  Ranked 40th  - Total 34,726 sq mi (82,965 km²)  - Width 200 miles (320 km)  - Length 260 miles (420 km)  - % water 6  - Latitude 32° 2′ N to 35° 13′ N  - Longitude... 1944 (MCMXLIV) was a leap year starting on Saturday. ... Year 1945 (MCMXLV) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar). ... Clement Furman Haynsworth, Jr. ... The Supreme Court Building, Washington, D.C. The Supreme Court Building, Washington, D.C., (large image) The Supreme Court of the United States, located in Washington, D.C., is the highest court (see supreme court) in the United States; that is, it has ultimate judicial authority within the United States... Baron Paul Hill (born June 23, 1953) is a Democratic member of the United States House of Representatives for Indianas 9th congressional district. ... Alexander Stubb Alexander Stubb (born on 1 April 1968 in Helsinki) is a Finnish politician and Member of the European Parliament with the National Coalition Party, part of the European Peoples Party and sits on the European Parliaments Committee on Budgetary Control and its Committee on Constitutional Affairs. ... A Member of the European Parliament (English abbreviation MEP)[1] is a member of the European Unions directly-elected legislative body, the European Parliament. ... The National Coalition Party (Kansallinen Kokoomus or Samlingspartiet) is a political party in Finland. ... Nick Theodore (born September 16, 1928) is an American politician who was the Lieutenant Governor of South Carolina from 1987 to 1995. ... A Lieutenant Governor is a government official who is the subordinate or deputy of a Governor or Governor-General. ... Official language(s) English Capital Charleston(1670-1789) Columbia(1790-present) Largest city Columbia Largest metro area Columbia Area  Ranked 40th  - Total 34,726 sq mi (82,965 km²)  - Width 200 miles (320 km)  - Length 260 miles (420 km)  - % water 6  - Latitude 32° 2′ N to 35° 13′ N  - Longitude... Year 1987 (MCMLXXXVII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link displays 1987 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 1995 (MCMXCV) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full 1995 Gregorian calendar). ... Roger Craft Peace (May 19, 1899 - August 20, 1968) was a United States Senator from South Carolina. ... The United States Senate is the upper house of the U.S. Congress, smaller than the United States House of Representatives. ... Official language(s) English Capital Charleston(1670-1789) Columbia(1790-present) Largest city Columbia Largest metro area Columbia Area  Ranked 40th  - Total 34,726 sq mi (82,965 km²)  - Width 200 miles (320 km)  - Length 260 miles (420 km)  - % water 6  - Latitude 32° 2′ N to 35° 13′ N  - Longitude... Joseph Haynsworth Earle (April 30, 1847 - May 20, 1897) was a United States Senator from South Carolina. ... The South Carolina House of Representatives is the lower house of the South Carolina General Assembly. ... 1878 (MDCCCLXXVIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... Year 1882 (MDCCCLXXXII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Friday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... The South Carolina Senate is the upper house of the South Carolina General Assembly. ... Year 1886 (MDCCCLXXXVI) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... In most common law jurisdictions, the Attorney General is the main legal adviser to the government, and in some jurisdictions may in addition have executive responsibility for law enforcement or responsibility for public prosecutions. ... Year 1890 (MDCCCXC) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar). ... The United States Senate is the upper house of the U.S. Congress, smaller than the United States House of Representatives. ... Official language(s) English Capital Charleston(1670-1789) Columbia(1790-present) Largest city Columbia Largest metro area Columbia Area  Ranked 40th  - Total 34,726 sq mi (82,965 km²)  - Width 200 miles (320 km)  - Length 260 miles (420 km)  - % water 6  - Latitude 32° 2′ N to 35° 13′ N  - Longitude... 1897 (MDCCCXCVII) was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... William Hayne Perry (June 9, 1839 - July 7, 1902) was a United States Representative from South Carolina. ... The House of Representatives is the larger of two houses that make up the U.S. Congress, the other being the United States Senate. ... Jay Bocook is a professional composer and arranger, and also the Director of Athletic Bands at Furman University in Greenville, South Carolina. ... This article is about the broadcast network. ...

Betsy King (born August 13, 1955 in Reading, Pennsylvania) is a professional golfer. ... The LPGA is the Ladies Professional Golf Association. ... // The World Golf Hall of Fame is located in St. ... Beth Daniel (born October 14, 1956 in Charleston, South Carolina) is a professional golfer. ... The LPGA is the Ladies Professional Golf Association. ... // The World Golf Hall of Fame is located in St. ... Dottie Pepper (b. ... The LPGA is the Ladies Professional Golf Association. ... The National Broadcasting Company (NBC) is an American television network headquartered in the GE Building in New York Citys Rockefeller Center. ... The Golf Channel, sometimes abbreviated as TGC, is an American cable television network with coverage focused on the game of golf. ... Brad Faxon (born August 1, 1961 in Oceanport, New Jersey) is an American golfer. ... The PGA Tour is an organization that operates the USAs main professional golf tours. ... The Ryder Cup is a golf trophy contested biennially in an event called the Ryder Cup Matches by teams from Europe and the United States. ... Bruce Fleischer (b. ... The U.S. Amateur Championship is the leading annual golf tournament in the United States for male amateur golfers. ... Year 1968 (MCMLXVIII) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The PGA Tour is an organization that operates the USAs main professional golf tours. ... The Champions Tour, a golf tour run by the PGA TOUR, hosts 30 events annually in the United States and Canada for golfers 50 and older. ... Scott Nelson (born September 6, 1985) is an American soccer player who currently plays for the Houston Dynamo team in Major League Soccer. ... Sherri Turner (b October 4 1956, Greenville, South Carolina) is a professional golfer. ... The LPGA Championship, currently known for sponsorship reasons as the McDonalds LPGA Championship, is the second-longest running tournament in the history of the Ladies Professional Golf Association surpassed only by the U.S. Womens Open. ... The FUTURES Tour is the second-tier womens professional golf tour in the United States. ... The Big Break VI: Trump National will be the sixth edition of The Golf Channels popular reality television series, The Big Break. ... Samuel David Wyche (born January 5, 1945 in Atlanta, Georgia) is a former American football player and head coach, who is best known as the head coach of the Cincinnati Bengals of the NFL. Perhaps best known for introducing the use of the No-huddle offense as a standard offense... City Cincinnati, Ohio Team colors Black, Orange and White Head Coach Marvin Lewis Owner Mike Brown Mascot Who Dey League/Conference affiliations American Football League (1968-1969) Western Division (1968-1969) National Football League (1970–present) American Football Conference (1970-present) AFC Central (1970-2001) AFC North (2002-present) Team... Date January 22, 1989 Stadium Joe Robbie Stadium City Miami, Florida MVP Jerry Rice, Wide receiver Favorite 49ers by 7 National anthem Billy Joel Coin toss Nick Buoniconti, Bob Griese, and Larry Little Referee Jerry Seeman Halftime show Be Bop Bamboozled - South Florida-area dancers and performers, and 3-D... Stanford Jamison Jennings (born March 12, 1962 in Summerville, South Carolina) is a former American football running back in the NFL. Jennings played seven seasons for the Cincinnati Bengals (1984-1990), and one each for the New Orleans Saints (1991) and Tampa Bay Buccaneers (1992). ... NFL logo For other uses of the abbreviation NFL, see NFL (disambiguation). ... City Cincinnati, Ohio Team colors Black, Orange and White Head Coach Marvin Lewis Owner Mike Brown Mascot Who Dey League/Conference affiliations American Football League (1968-1969) Western Division (1968-1969) National Football League (1970–present) American Football Conference (1970-present) AFC Central (1970-2001) AFC North (2002-present) Team... Date January 22, 1989 Stadium Joe Robbie Stadium City Miami, Florida MVP Jerry Rice, Wide receiver Favorite 49ers by 7 National anthem Billy Joel Coin toss Nick Buoniconti, Bob Griese, and Larry Little Referee Jerry Seeman Halftime show Be Bop Bamboozled - South Florida-area dancers and performers, and 3-D... Harry Ingle Martin IV (born August 15, 1982) is an American football quarterback, and currently a free agent. ... NFL logo For other uses of the abbreviation NFL, see NFL (disambiguation). ... “Packers” redirects here. ... 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Orlando Ruff (born September 28, 1976 in Charleston, South Carolina) is an American football player who currently plays linebacker for the Cleveland Browns. ... “Browns” redirects here. ... Luther Broughton is a former National Football League tight end who played for the Carolina Panthers and the Philadelphia Eagles. ... NFL logo For other uses of the abbreviation NFL, see NFL (disambiguation). ... The tight end (TE) is a position in American football on the offensive team. ... NFL logo For other uses of the abbreviation NFL, see NFL (disambiguation). ... City Atlanta, Georgia Team colors Black, Red, and White Head Coach Bobby Petrino Owner Arthur Blank General manager Rich McKay Mascot Freddie Falcon League/Conference affiliations National Football League (1966–present) Eastern Conference (1966) Western Conference (1967-69) Coastal Division (1967-1969) National Football Conference (1970-present) NFC West (1970... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... City Baltimore, Maryland Team colors Purple, Black, and Gold Head Coach Brian Billick Owner Steve Bisciotti General manager Ozzie Newsome Mascot The Ravens: Edgar, Allan, & Poe League/Conference affiliations National Football League (1996–present) American Football Conference (1996-present) AFC Central (1996-2001) AFC North (2002-present) Team history Baltimore... Franklin Delano Frank Selvy (born November 9, 1932 in Corbin, Kentucky) is a former basketball player. ... “NBA” redirects here. ... The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA, often pronounced N-C-Double-A or N-C-Two-A ) is a voluntary association of about 1,200 institutions, conferences, organizations and individuals that organizes the athletic programs of many colleges and universities in the United States. ... WNBA may also refer to WNBA-AM, a radio station in Illinois. ... Charlotte Sting logo 1997-2003 The Charlotte Sting was once a Womens National Basketball Association franchise based in Charlotte, North Carolina and it was one of the leagues eight original teams. ... Clinton Drew Clint Dempsey a. ... In the United States, Major League Soccer (MLS) has handed out a Rookie of the Year Award since its inception in 1996. ... First international Unofficial: USA 0 - 1 Canada  (Newark, NJ, USA; November 28, 1885) Official:  Sweden 2 - 3 USA (Stockholm, Sweden; August 20, 1916) Biggest win USA 8 - 1 Cayman Islands  (Mission Viejo, CA, USA; November 14, 1993) USA 7 - 0 El Salvador  (Los Angeles, CA, USA; December 5, 1993) USA... For the club competition, see FIFA Club World Cup. ... In association football a midfielder is a player whose position of play is midway between the attacking strikers and the defenders. ... Fulham is a suburban area of west London in the London Borough of Hammersmith and Fulham, located 3. ... The FA Premier League (often referred to as the Barclays English Premier League for sponsorship reasons) comprises the top 20 football clubs in the league system of English football. ... Ricardo Clark (born February 10, 1983 in Atlanta, Georgia) is an American soccer player, who currently plays defensive midfielder for Houston of Major League Soccer. ... Year founded 2005 League Major League Soccer Nickname Dynamo, Orange Crush, La Naranja, The Men in Orange, The Orange Stadium Robertson Stadium Houston, TX Coach Dominic Kinnear, 2006— Owner AEG First Game Houston Dynamo 5–2 Colorado Rapids (Robertson Stadium; April 2, 2006) Largest Win 4-0, three times Worst... In the United States, Major League Soccer (MLS) has handed out a Rookie of the Year Award since its inception in 1996. ... John Barry Nusum (born March 18, 1981 in Devonshire, Bermuda) is a Bermudian soccer player, who currently plays striker for the Toronto Lynx of the USL First Division and the Philadelphia Kixx of the MISL. Nusum played college soccer at Furman University, where he was thrice named an NSCAA All... Football is a ball game played between two teams of eleven players, each attempting to win by scoring more goals than their opponent. ... The Virginia Beach Mariners were an American soccer club, who formerly play in the USL First Division of the United Soccer Leagues, the second division in the US Soccer hierarchy behind Major League Soccer. ... The Philadelphia KiXX is an indoor soccer team, founded in 1995 as an NPSL expansion franchise, that plays its games at the Wachovia Spectrum in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. ... Sergei Raad (born August 3, 1982) is a Russian-born American soccer player who currently plays midfielder for the Kansas City Wizards of Major League Soccer. ... Year founded 1995 League Major League Soccer Nickname Wizards Stadium Arrowhead Stadium Kansas City, MO Coach Curt Onalfo Owner OnGoal, LLC. First Game Kansas City Wiz 3–0 Colorado Rapids (Arrowhead Stadium; April 13, 1996) Largest Win Kansas City Wizards 6–0 MetroStars (Arrowhead Stadium; June 20, 1999) Worst Defeat... Thomas R. Tom Mastny (born February 4, 1981 in East Bontang, Indonesia, on the island of Borneo) is a Major League baseball player. ... Major league affiliations American League (1901–present) Central Division (1994–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 3, 5, 14, 18, 19, 21, 42, 455 Name Cleveland Steamers (1915–present) Cleveland Naps (1905-1914) Cleveland Bronchos (1902-1904) Cleveland Blues (1901) Other nicknames The Steamers, The Tribe, The Wahoos Ballpark Jacobs Field... Angel Martino (born April 25, 1967 in Tuscaloosa, Alabama) is a former American swimmer. ... Derek Waugh is the head mens basketball coach at Stetson University. ...

Notable faculty

  • Judy Bainbridge - English
  • Jay Bocook - Music
  • Mike Bressler - IR
  • Charles Brewer - Psychology
  • Jim Edwards - Philosophy
  • Gilles Einstein - Psychology
  • Mark Kilstofte - Music, winner of the American Academy in Rome's Rome Prize for 2002-2003 [23]
  • Lon Knight - Chemistry
  • Hayden Porter - Computer Science
  • Rich Prior- Classics, author of 501 Latin Verbs
  • Chris Blackwell - Classics, author of Mythology for Dummies (co-authored with his wife, Amy Hackney Blackwell).
  • Albert Blackwell - Religion
  • Bingham Vick, Jr. - Music
  • William Thomas - Music
  • Jim Guth - Political Science, focusing on Religion and Politics

Jay Bocook is a professional composer and arranger, and also the Director of Athletic Bands at Furman University in Greenville, South Carolina. ... Mark Kilstofte (b. ... The American Academy in Rome The American Academy in Rome is a research and arts institution located on the Gianicolo (Janiculum Hill) in Rome. ... The Prix de Rome was a scholarship for art students. ... Hayden Porter is a computer scientist who helped create some of the most advanced atmospheric models used by NASA today. ...

Majors and concentrations

It has been suggested that Accounting scholarship be merged into this article or section. ... This article is about the philosophical concept of Art. ... Biology studies the variety of life (clockwise from top-left) E. coli, tree fern, gazelle, Goliath beetle Biology (from Greek: βίος, bio, life; and λόγος, logos, knowledge), also referred to as the biological sciences, is the study of living organisms utilizing the scientific method. ... For other uses, see Chemistry (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Classics (disambiguation). ... The term communications is used in a number of disciplines: Communications, also known as communication studies is the academic discipline which studies communication, generally seen as a mixture between media studies and linguistics. ... Computer science, or computing science, is the study of the theoretical foundations of information and computation and their implementation and application in computer systems. ... ‹ The template below is being considered for deletion. ... English studies is an academic discipline that includes the study of literatures written in the English language (including literatures from the U.K., U.S., Ireland, Canada, Australia, New Zealand, Hong Kong, the Philippines, India, South Africa, and the Middle East, among other areas), English linguistics (including English phonetics, phonology... History studies time in human terms. ... For other uses, see Latin (disambiguation). ... Euclid, Greek mathematician, 3rd century BC, as imagined by by Raphael in this detail from The School of Athens. ... For other uses, see Music (disambiguation). ... Drawing of the cells in the chicken cerebellum by S. Ramón y Cajal Neuroscience is a field that is devoted to the scientific study of the nervous system. ... The philosopher Socrates about to take poison hemlock as ordered by the court. ... This is a discussion of a present category of science. ... The Politics series Politics Portal This box:      Political Science is the field concerning the theory and practice of politics and the description and analysis of political systems and political behaviour. ... Engineering is the applied science of acquiring and applying knowledge to design, analysis, and/or construction of works for practical purposes. ... Psychology (from Greek: ψυχή, psukhÄ“, spirit, soul; λόγος, logos, knowledge) is both an academic and applied discipline involving the scientific study of mental processes and behavior. ... Sociology (from Latin: socius, companion; and the suffix -ology, the study of, from Greek λόγος, lógos, knowledge) is an academic and applied discipline that studies society and human social interaction. ... For other usages see Theatre (disambiguation) Theater (American English) or Theatre (British English and widespread usage among theatre professionals in the US) is that branch of the performing arts concerned with acting out stories in front of an audience using combinations of speech, gesture, music, dance, sound and spectacle &#8212... This article needs cleanup. ...

Social Organizations

Alpha Delta Pi (ΑΔΠ) was founded May 15, 1851 at Wesleyan College in Macon, Georgia making it the first female fraternal organization. ... Alpha Kappa Alpha (ΑΚΑ) Sorority, Incorporated, is Americas first Greek-letter organization established and incorporated by Black college women. ... Chi Omega (ΧΩ) is the largest womens fraternal organization in the National Panhellenic Conference. ... Delta Delta Delta (ΔΔΔ), also known as Tri Delta, is a national collegiate sorority founded on November 27, 1888. ... Delta Gamma (ΔΓ) is one of the oldest and largest womens fraternities[1] in the United States and Canada, with its Executive Offices based in Columbus, Ohio. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Kappa Delta (ΚΔ) is a sorority founded at the State Female Normal School, now Longwood University in Farmville, Virginia. ... Kappa Kappa Gamma (ΚΚΓ) is a college womens fraternity, founded on October 13, 1870 at Monmouth College, Illinois. ... Sigma Alpha Iota (ΣΑΙ) is a music fraternity for women. ... The Kappa Alpha Order (KA) is a secret collegiate Order of Knights. ... Kappa Alpha Psi (KAΨ) is the second-oldest collegiate Greek-letter fraternity with a predominantly African American membership and the first black intercollegiate fraternity incorporated as a national body. ... The ΦΜΑ Sinfonia (usually referred to as Sinfonia rather than ΦΜΑ) is a collegiate social fraternity for men of musicianly character. ... Pi Kappa Phi is a national social fraternity that was founded in the spirit of nu phi, meaning non-fraternity. ... Sigma Alpha Epsilon (ΣΑΕ) is a secret letter, social college fraternity. ... Sigma Chi (ΣΧ) is one of the largest and oldest all-male, college, Greek-letter social fraternities. ... ΣΝ (Sigma Nu) is an undergraduate college fraternity with chapters in the United States and Canada. ... Tau Kappa Epsilon (TKE or Teke, pronounced T-K-E or IPA , as in teak wood) is a college fraternity with chapters in the USA, and Canada, and affiliation with a German fraternity system known as the Corps of the Weinheimer Senioren Convent (WSC). ...

Points of interest

  • Furman University Japanese Garden
  • The amphitheatre, which features concerts and other performances. Site of the annual Black Swan Music Festival, and has been the place of concerts by artists such as Guster, Nickel Creek, Howie Day, and Robert Randolph and the Family Band.
  • The bunched arrowhead viewing platform.
  • The Bell Tower- The Burnside Carillon - 59 bell carillon by Van Bergen
  • Eugene Stone III Soccer Stadium - one of the finest soccer stadiums in South Carolina. Its opening featured Brazil national football team legend Pelé.

The Furman University Japanese Garden is a Japanese garden located on the campus of Furman University at 3300 Poinsett Highway, Greenville, South Carolina. ... For Eugene Stone III Stadium in Columbia, South Carolina see Stone Stadium. ... “Pele” redirects here. ...

External links

  • Furman University website
  • Furman University athletics website
  • Furman University admissions
  • The Paladin
  • Furman University Webshots
  • Greenville, South Carolina

Coordinates: 34°55′33″N, 82°26′8″W Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Furman University - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1521 words)
Furman, Colgate and Lehigh remain the only private universities that have appeared in the I-AA Football Championship game, and Furman is the only private school to win it.
Furman's Rugby Club team has also proved notable in recent years, winning the East Coast Collegiate Championship three out of the last four years[11].Started in 1998 by John Roberts, the club continues to excel in Division III rugby in the southeast with many accolades.
Furman is the only liberal arts college to be ranked in Sports Illustrated Top 100 America's Best Sports Colleges [12]and has 32 former student-athletes competing at the professional level- the most of any Southern Conference member school.
Engaged Learning in Psychology at Furman University - Psi Chi (2091 words)
Furman University is a small liberal arts college with approximately 2,500 students.
Furman University also supports our efforts to increase student participation in research and internships.
The broadest and most important stated goal of Furman University is to help students develop "a commitment to independent thought and lifelong learning." This summer 26 psychology students made progress toward this goal.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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