FACTOID # 13: New York has America's lowest percentage of residents who are veterans.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Fundamental domain

In mathematics, given a lattice Γ in a Lie group G, a fundamental domain is a set D of representatives for the cosets G/Γ, that is also a well-behaved set topologically, in a sense that can be made precise in one of several ways. One typical condition is that D is almost an open set, in the sense that D is the symmetric difference of an open set in G with a set of measure 0, for the Haar measure on G.


For example, when G is Euclidean space of dimension n, and Γ is Zn, the quotient G/Γ is the n-torus. A fundamental domain (also called fundamental region) here can be taken to be [0,1)n, which is the open set (0,1)n up to a set of measure zero. In practice the main use of a fundamental domain may be to compute integrals on G/Γ, in which case the set of measure zero is mentioned only to keep straight the pedantic assertion that D is exactly a set of coset representatives, and may quickly be forgotten. Other uses, for example in ergodic theory, are similarly based on having a reasonable set D up to sets of measure zero.


The existence and description of a fundamental domain is in general something requiring painstaking work to establish. For the case of the modular group, there is a famous diagram appearing in all classical books on elliptic modular functions, showing a set in the upper half plane that is the basis for the construction of a fundamental domain (in this case the modular group is given as a subgroup of SL2(R), which has dimension 3, but the other dimension is accounted for by a U(1) group which being compact is nothing serious).


In other usages, a fundamental domain is simply required to map finite-to-one in the quotient.


See also: Brillouin zone


  Results from FactBites:
 
Fundamental domain - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (883 words)
In geometry, the fundamental domain of a symmetry group of an object or pattern is a part of the pattern, as small as possible, which, based on the symmetry, determines the whole object or pattern.
For example, for wallpaper groups the fundamental domain is a factor 1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 8, or 12 smaller than the primitive cell.
In practice the main use of a fundamental domain may be to compute integrals on G/Γ, in which case the set of measure zero is mentioned only to keep straight the pedantic assertion that D is exactly a set of coset representatives, and may quickly be forgotten.
Domain (910 words)
Domain object A domain object is an object from a domain model.
Domain slamming Domain slamming is a form of spamming when the scam is in the form of a letter or e-mail.
Fundamental domain In Haar measure on G. For example, when G is up to sets of measure zero.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m