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Encyclopedia > Fumarole
Fumaroles escape through Fourpeaked Glacier covering Fourpeaked Volcano in Alaska on September 24, 2006
Fumaroles escape through Fourpeaked Glacier covering Fourpeaked Volcano in Alaska on September 24, 2006

A fumarole (Latin fumus, smoke) is an opening in Earth's (or any other astronomical body's) crust, often in the neighbourhood of volcanoes, which emits steam and gases such as carbon dioxide, sulfur dioxide, hydrochloric acid, and hydrogen sulfide. The name solfatara, from the Italian solfo, sulfur (via the Sicilian dialect), is given to fumaroles that emit sulfurous gases. Sulfur at the solfatara crater Solfatara is a shallow volcanic crater at Pozzuoli, near Naples, and is part of the Campi Flegrei volcanic area. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Fourpeaked Glacier is a tidewater glacier covering much of Fourpeaked Mountain, also known as Fourpeaked Volcano. ... Fourpeaked Mountain also known as Fourpeaked volcano is an active stratovolcano in Alaska. ... For other uses, see Latin (disambiguation). ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... This article is about Earth as a planet. ... See lists of astronomical objects for a list of the various lists of astronomical objects in Wikipedia. ... Earth cutaway from core to exosphere. ... For other uses, see Volcano (disambiguation). ... It has been suggested that this article be split into articles entitled steam and water vapor, accessible from a disambiguation page. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... In order to meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article requires cleanup. ... Sulfur dioxide (or Sulphur dioxide) has the chemical formula SO2. ... The chemical compound hydrochloric acid is the aqueous (water-based) solution of hydrogen chloride gas (HCl). ... Hydrogen sulfide (hydrogen sulphide in British English), H2S, is a colorless, toxic, flammable gas that is responsible for the foul odor of rotten eggs and flatulence. ... Sicily ( in Italian and Sicilian) is an autonomous region of Italy and the largest island in the Mediterranean Sea, with an area of 25,708 km² (9,926 sq. ... A dialect (from the Greek word διάλεκτος, dialektos) is a variety of a language characteristic of a particular group of the languages speakers. ... General Name, Symbol, Number sulfur, S, 16 Chemical series nonmetals Group, Period, Block 16, 3, p Appearance lemon yellow Standard atomic weight 32. ...


Fumaroles may occur along tiny cracks or long fissures, in chaotic clusters or fields, and on the surfaces of lava flows and thick deposits of pyroclastic flows. A fumarole field is an area of thermal springs and gas vents where magma or hot igneous rocks at shallow depth are releasing gasses or interacting with groundwater. From the perspective of groundwater, fumaroles could be described as a hot spring that boils off all its water before the water reaches the surface. Look up lava, Aa, pahoehoe in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Pyroclastic flows sweep down the flanks of Mayon Volcano, Philippines, in 1984 Pyroclastic flows are a common and devastating result of some volcanic eruptions. ... Green Dragon Spring at Norris Geyser A hot spring is a place where warm or hot groundwater issues from the ground on a regular basis for at least a predictable part of the year, and is significantly above the ambient ground temperature (which is usually around 55~57°F or... Magma is molten rock located beneath the surface of the Earth (or any other terrestrial planet), and which often collects in a magma chamber. ... Volcanic rock on North America Plutonic rock on North America Igneous rocks form when rock (magma) cools and solidifies, with or without crystallization, either below the surface as intrusive (plutonic) rocks or on the surface as extrusive (volcanic) rocks. ... Groundwater is water located beneath the ground surface in soil pore spaces and in the fractures of lithologic formations. ...


A good example of fumarole activity on Earth is the famous Valley of Ten Thousand Smokes, which was formed during the 1912 eruption of Novarupta in Alaska. Initially, there were thousands of fumaroles in the cooling ash from the eruption, but over time most of them have become extinct. Fumaroles may persist for decades or centuries if they are above a persistent heat source, or disappear within weeks to months if they occur atop a fresh volcanic deposit that quickly cools. There are also an estimated four thousand fumaroles within the boundaries of Yellowstone National Park. The Valley of Ten Thousand Smokes is a valley within Katmai National Park and Preserve in Alaska which is filled with ash flow from the eruption of Novarupta on June 6-June 8, 1912. ... 1912 (MCMXII) was a leap year starting on Monday in the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Tuesday in the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Novarupta, meaning new eruption, is a volcano located on the Alaska Peninsula in the Katmai area, about 290 miles southwest of Anchorage. ... Official language(s) English[1] Spoken language(s) English 85. ... Ash plume from Mt Cleveland, a stratovolcano Diamond Head, a well-known backdrop to Waikiki in Hawaii, is an ash cone that solidified into tuff Volcanic ash consists of very fine rock and mineral particles less than 2 mm in diameter that are ejected from a volcanic vent. ... Yellowstone National Park is the centerpiece of the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem, the largest intact ecosystem in the Earths northern temperate zone. ...


Another example is an array of fumaroles in the Valley of Desolation in Morne Trois Pitons National Park in Dominica. Morne Trois Pitons National Park is a World Heritage Site (since 1997) located in Dominica. ...

Sulfurous fumaroles, Whakaari/White Island, New Zealand
Sulfurous fumaroles, Whakaari/White Island, New Zealand

Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 532 pixelsFull resolution (3008 × 2000 pixel, file size: 1. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 532 pixelsFull resolution (3008 × 2000 pixel, file size: 1. ...

See also

Sulfur deposits near a fumarole
Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
Fumaroles

Photo taken by Daniel Mayer and released under terms of the GNU FDL. File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Photo taken by Daniel Mayer and released under terms of the GNU FDL. File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File links Commons-logo. ... A mudpot or paint pot is a sort of hot spring or fumarole consisting of a pool of usually bubbling mud. ... A gaseous mud volcano The term mud volcano or mud dome is used to refer to formations created by geologically excreted liquids and gases, although there are several different processes which may cause such activity. ...

References

  • USGS Photo Glossary: Fumarole

  Results from FactBites:
 
Reference.com/Encyclopedia/Fumarole (289 words)
A fumarole (Latin fumus, smoke) is an opening in Earth's (or any other astronomical body's) crust, often in the neighborhood of volcanoes, which emit steam and gases such as carbon dioxide, sulfur dioxide, hydrochloric acid, and hydrogen sulfide.
Fumaroles may occur along tiny cracks or long fissures, in chaotic clusters or fields, and on the surfaces of lava flows and thick deposits of pyroclastic flows.
A fumarole field is an area of thermal springs and gas vents where magma or hot igneous rocks at shallow depth are releasing gasses or interacting with groundwater.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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