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Encyclopedia > Full rigged ship
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A full rigged ship or fully rigged ship is a square rigged sailing vessel with three or more masts, all of them square rigged. Square rig is a generic type of sailing vessel in which the main horizontal spars are perpendicular to the keel of the ship. ...


Sometimes such a vessel will merely be called a ship, particularly in 18th - early 19th Century and earlier usage, to distinguish it from other vessels such as schooners, barques, barquentines, brigs etc. Two-masted fishing schooner A schooner is a type of sailing ship characterized by the use of fore-and-aft sails on two or more masts. ... A barque, sometimes spelled bark, originally referred to a particular type of ship-rigged sailing vessel with a plain bluff bow and a full stern with windows. ... This article is about the ship. ... In sailing, a brig is a vessel with two masts at least one of which is square rigged. ...

Contents


Masts

The masts of a full rigged ship, from bow to stern, are:

There is no recognised name for a fifth mast on a ship-rigged vessel (though this may be called the spanker mast on a barque, schooner or barquentine) and indeed only one 5-masted full rigged ship was ever built before the launch in recent years of a few modern cruise sailing ships; even the fourth is relatively rare for full rigged ships. Ships with five and more masts are not normally fully rigged and their masts may be numbered rather than named in extreme cases. The mast of a sailing ship is a tall vertical pole which supports the sails. ... The mast of a sailing ship is a tall vertical pole which supports the sails. ... The mast of a sailing ship is a tall vertical pole which supports the sails. ... The mast of a sailing ship is a tall vertical pole which supports the sails. ...


If the masts are of wood, each mast is in three or more pieces. The lowest piece is the mast itself, or may be called the lower. Above it, the pieces in order are:

  • Topmast.
  • Topgallant mast.
  • Royal mast, if fitted.

On steel-masted vessels, the corresponding sections of the mast are named after the traditional wooden sections.


Sails on a mast

The lowest and normally largest sail on a mast is the course sail of that mast, and is referred to simply by the mast name: Foresail, mainsail, mizzen sail, jigger sail. In sailing, a course sail is the principal sail on a mast. ...


Above the course sail, in order, are:

There is some variation possible here, for example some ships have only one sail set on the topmast, in which case it is simply called the (fore, main, mizzen or jigger) topsail and even more often on the topgallant mast, in which case it is simply called the (fore, main, mizzen or jigger) topgallant. If all seven sails are present on the foremast, the fourth sail from the deck on the foremast would (just as an example) be called the fore lower topgallant sail. A topsail is a sail set above another sail; on square-rigged vessels further sails may be set above topsails. ... A topsail is a sail set above another sail; on square-rigged vessels further sails may be set above topsails. ... On a square rigged sailing vessel, a topgallant sail is the square-rigged sail or sails immediately above the topsail or topsails. ... On a square rigged sailing vessel, a topgallant sail is the square-rigged sail or sails immediately above the topsail or topsails. ...


Jibs are carried from the foremast, and have varying naming conventions. See also: Jib (television) A jib is a triangular staysail set ahead of the foremost mast of a sailing boat. ...


Staysails may be carried between any other mast and the one in front of it or from the foremast to the bowsprit. They are named after the mast from which the are hoisted, so for example a staysail hoisted to the top of the mizzen topgallant on a stay running to the top of the main topmast would be called the mizzen topgallant staysail. A staysail is a fore-and-aft rigged sail whose luff is affixed to a stay running forward (and most often but not always downwards) from a mast to the deck, the bowsprit or to another mast. ...


In light winds studding sails, or "stu'nsails" may be carried on either side of any or all of the square rigged sails except royals and skysails. They are named after the adjacent sail and the side of the vessel on which they are set, for example main topgallant starboard studsail. USS Monongahela with a full set of studding sails set A studding sail or studsail is a sail used to increase the sail area of a square rigged vessel in light winds. ...


One or two spankers are carried aft of the aftmost mast, if two they are called the upper spanker and lower spanker. A fore-and-aft topsail may be carried above the upper or only spanker, and is called the gaff sail.
A spanker is either of two kinds of sail. ... A topsail is a sail set above another sail; on square-rigged vessels further sails may be set above topsails. ...


See also

This article is about the rigging of ships, and is based on the detailed article in the 1911 Encyclopedia Britannica, now in the public domain. ... A sail-plan is a formal set of drawings, usually prepared by a marine architect. ... A sail is any type of surface intended to generate thrust by being placed in a wind —in essence a vertically-oriented wing. ...

External Links

  • [The Development of the Full-Rigged Ship From the Carrack to the Full-Rigger]


Types of sailing vessels and rigs

Bark | Barque | Barquentine | Bilander | Brig | Brigantine | Caravel | Carrack | Catamaran | Catboat | Clipper | Dutch Clipper | Cog | Corvette | Cutter | Dhow | Fluyt | Fore & Aft Rig | Frigate | Full Rigged Ship | Gaff Rig | Galleon | Gunter Rig | Hermaphrodite Brig | Junk | Ketch | Mersey Flat | Multihull | Nao | Norfolk Wherry | Pink | Pocket Cruiser | Polacca | Pram | Proa | Schooner | Ship of the Line | Sloop | Smack | Snow | Square Rig | Tall Ship | Thames Sailing Barge | Trimaran | Wherry | Windjammer | Xebec | Yacht | Yawl Jump to: navigation, search Wooden sailing boat Sailing is the skillful art of controlling the motion of a sailing ship or smaller boat, across a body of water using wind as the source of power. ... This article is about the rigging of ships, and is based on the detailed article in the 1911 Encyclopedia Britannica, now in the public domain. ... A barque, sometimes spelled bark, originally referred to a particular type of ship-rigged sailing vessel with a plain bluff bow and a full stern with windows. ... A barque, sometimes spelled bark, originally referred to a particular type of ship-rigged sailing vessel with a plain bluff bow and a full stern with windows. ... This article is about the ship. ... A bilander, also spelled billander or belandre, was a small European merchant ship with two masts, used in the Netherlands for coast and canal traffic and occasionally seen in the North Sea but more frequently to be seen in the Mediterranean Sea. ... In sailing, a brig is a vessel with two masts at least one of which is square rigged. ... Description In sailing, a brigantine is a vessel with two masts, at least one of which is square rigged. ... A caravel is a small, highly maneuverable, three-masted ship used by the Portuguese and Spanish for long voyages of exploration beginning in the 15th century. ... The Santa Maria at anchor by Andries van Eertvelt, painted c. ... Two Hobie catamarans, showing the typical Hobie raised platform joining the two hulls, and tall mast. ... // Description The occupied boats are catboats, but with a mast and boom rig A catboat (alternate spelling: cat boat), or a cat-rigged sailboat, is a sailing vessel characterized by a single mast carried well forward (, near the front of the boat). ... Jump to: navigation, search A model of a vessel of the clipper type, the four-masted barque named Belle Étoile A clipper was a very fast multiple-masted sailing ship of the 19th century. ... While the majority of the clipper ships sailed under British and American flags, more then a hundred clippers were built in the Netherlands. ... The earliest development seems to have been Celtic, though the cog was first noted in the Dutch city of Muiden in the 10th century. ... French steam corvette Dupleix (1856-1887) Canadian corvettes on antisubmarine convoy escort duty during World War II. A corvette is a small, maneuverable, lightly armed warship, smaller than a frigate. ... For other meanings, see cutter (baseball), cutter (tool) and self-harm. ... A dhow is a traditional boat design with one or more triangular sails, called lateens. ... A fluyt or a flute (pronounced as flight) is a type of sailing ship originally designed as a dedicated cargo vessel. ... A fore-and-aft rig is a sailing rig consisting mainly of sails that are set along the line of the keel rather than perpendicular to it. ... Frigate is a name which has been used for several distinct types of warships at different times. ... Gaff rig is a sailing rig in which the mainsail is a four-cornered fore-and-aft rigged sail controlled at its head by a spar called the gaff. ... Jump to: navigation, search A Spanish galleon A galleon was a large, multi-decked sailing ship used primarily by the nations of Europe from the 16th to 18th centuries. ... In sailing, a gunter is a wire that leads from one end of a gaff to the other. ... A hermaphrodite brig, or brig-schooner, is a type of two-masted sailing ship which has square sails on the foremast combined with a schooner rig on the mainmast (triangular topsail over a gaff mainsail). ... The Junk is a Chinese sailing vessel. ... Square Topsl Gaff Ketch Hawaiian Chieftain on San Francisco Bay A ketch is a sailing craft with two masts: A main mast, and a mizzen mast abaft the main mast. ... A Mersey flat is a two masted, doubled-ended barge with rounded bilges, carvel build and fully decked. ... A multihull is a sailing ship with more than one hull. ... The Santa Maria at anchor by Andries van Eertvelt, painted c. ... The Norfolk wherry is a black-sailed trader, type of boat on the Norfolk Broads and Suffolk Broads, now part of The Broads National Park, in Norfolk, England. ... There are two classifications of Pink. ... A Pocket Cruiser, Microcruiser or Pocket Yacht is a small sailboat with a cabin, whose length is at or under 20 feet (6 meters), with some examples as short as 10 to 12 feet in length (3 to 3. ... A polacca is a type of seventeenth-century sailing vessel, similar to the xebec. ... A pram or pramm was a ship, during the Napoleonic Wars that carried 10-20 guns on 1 gun deck. ... A Proa is a two hulled vessel with unequal parallel hulls, superficially similar to an outrigger canoe. ... Two-masted fishing schooner A schooner is a type of sailing ship characterized by the use of fore-and-aft sails on two or more masts. ... Ships of the line were 1st, 2nd, or 3rd-rated ships in the rating system of the Royal Navy. ... A sloop-rigged J-24 sailboat In sailing, a sloop is a vessel with a single mast on which is hoisted a fore-and-aft rigged mainsail and a single jib, plus extras such as a spinnaker. ... See: To strike with an open palm, such as to smack a child. ... This article is about snow, the merchant vessel. ... Square rig is a generic type of sailing vessel in which the main horizontal spars are perpendicular to the keel of the ship. ... Kaskalot at the 2004 Bristol Harbour festival in England. ... The distinctive sailing barges that were once a common sight on Londons River Thames, were commercial craft relying on sail power alone. ... A trimaran is a multihull boat consisting of a main hull and two smaller outrigger hulls (amas), attached to the main hull with lateral struts (akas). ... A wherry (meaning boat) is a boat used for carrying cargo on rivers and canals in England. ... A windjammer is a type of sailing ship with a large iron hull, usually used for cargo in the nineteenth century. ... XEBEC is an a subsidary of the anime studio Production I.G. that specialises in the production of television anime. ... Jump to: navigation, search A yacht A yacht was originally defined as a light, fast sailing vessel used to convey important persons. ... A yawl is a two-masted sailing craft similar to a sloop or cutter but with an additional mizzen mast well aft of the main mast, often right on the transom. ...



  Results from FactBites:
 
The Rigging of a Sailing Ship (1268 words)
Sailing ship rigs can be divided into two broad categories: the "fore and aft rig" (left image), in which the sails lie along the same plane as the ship's fore and aft line; and the "square rig" (right image), in which the sails are rigged athwart (across) the ship.
Ships with this rig could point higher into the wind and were usually more maneuverable when working in the changing winds along the coast.
A fore and aft rigged vessel with one mast is a sloop.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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