FACTOID # 5: Minnesota and Connecticut are both in the top 5 in saving money and total tax burden per capita.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Friedrich Schiller University of Jena
Friedrich Schiller University of Jena
Friedrich-Schiller-Universität Jena
Seal of the University of Jena
Latin: Universitas Litterarum Jenensis

Established 1558
Type Public university
Staff 2,180
Rector Prof. Klaus Dicke
Students 19,700
Location Jena,  Germany
Affiliations Coimbra Group, EUA
Website www.uni-jena.de

Friedrich Schiller University of Jena (FSU) is located in Jena, Thuringia in Germany and was named for the German writer Friedrich Schiller in 1934. Image File history File links Uni-Jena-logo. ... Latin was the language originally spoken in the region around Rome called Latium. ... The date of establishment or date of founding of an institution is the date on which that institution chooses to claim as its starting point. ... Events January 7 - French troops led by Francis, Duke of Guise take Calais, the last continental possession of England July 13 - Battle of Gravelines: In France, Spanish forces led by Count Lamoral of Egmont defeat the French forces of Marshal Paul des Thermes at Gravelines. ... The word rector (ruler, from the Latin regere) has a number of different meanings. ... Jena is a town in central Germany on the River Saale. ... Founded in 1985 and formally constituted by Charter in 1987, the Coimbra Group is a network of European universities which gathers 39 of the older universities, including Oxford, Cambridge, Salamanca, Bristol, Leuven/Louvain, Montpellier, Uppsala, Göttingen, Heidelberg, Jagiellonian, Dublin, Bologna, Siena, Leiden, Coimbra, Barcelona and Granada. ... The European University Association (EUA) is the main voice of the higher education community in Europe. ... This page as shown in the aol 9. ... FSU may refer to: F___ State University: Fairmont State University Fayetteville State University Ferris State University Florida State University Fresno State University Frostburg State University Figure Skating Universe, a figure skating message board the Finance Sector Union, a trade union in Australia the Former Soviet Union, that is, the nations... Jena is a town in central Germany on the River Saale. ... The Free State of Thuringia (German: Freistaat Thüringen) lies in central Germany and is among the smaller of the countrys sixteen Bundesländer (federal states), being eleventh in size with an area of 16,200 km² and twelfth most populous with 2. ... Friedrich Schiller Schiller redirects here. ... 1934 (MCMXXXIV) was a common year starting on Monday (link will take you to calendar). ...


As of 2004, the university has around 19,000 students enrolled and 340 professors. Its current rector, Klaus Dicke, is the 317th rector in the history of the university.

Contents


Organisation

The university is organised into the following ten faculties:

Theology is reasoned discourse concerning God (Greek θεος, theos, God, + λογος, logos, word or reason). It can also refer to the study of other religious topics. ... Jurisprudence is essentially the theory and philosophy of law. ... Buyers bargain for good prices while sellers put forth their best front in Chichicastenango Market, Guatemala. ... Master of Business Administration (MBA) is a tertiary degree in business management. ... Philosopher in Meditation (detail), by Rembrandt Philosophy is a field of study that includes diverse subfields such as aesthetics, epistemology, ethics, logic, and metaphysics, in which people ask questions such as whether God exists, whether knowledge is possible, and what makes actions right or wrong. ... The social sciences are a group of academic disciplines that study the human aspects of the world. ... Behavioural sciences (or Behavioral science) is a term that encompasses all the disciplines that explores the behaviour and strategies within and between organisms in the natural world. ... Euclid, detail from The School of Athens by Raphael. ... Computer science is the study of the theoretical foundations of information and computation and their implementation and application in computer systems. ... Physics is the science of Nature. ... Radio telescopes are among many different tools used by astronomers Astronomy (Greek: αστρονομία = άστρον + νόμος, astronomia = astron + nomos, literally, law of the stars) is the science of celestial objects and phenomena that originate outside the Earths atmosphere, such as stars, planets, comets, auroras, galaxies, and the cosmic background radiation. ... Chemistry (derived from alchemy) is the science of matter at or near the atomic scale. ... Earth science (also known as geoscience or the geosciences), is an all-embracing term for the sciences related to the planet Earth. ... Biology is the branch of science dealing with the study of life. ... Pharmacology (in Greek: pharmacon (φάρμακον) meaning drug, and logos (λόγος) meaning science) is the study of how chemical substances interact with living systems. ... Medicine is the branch of health science and the sector of public life concerned with maintaining human health or restoring it through the treatment of disease and injury. ...

History

The elector John Frederick, Elector of Saxony first thought of a plan to establish a university at Jena in 1547 while he was being held captive by emperor Charles V. The plan was put into motion by his three sons and, after having obtained a charter from the emperor Ferdinand I, the university was established on February 2, 1558. Portrait by Lucas Cranach the Elder, 1531 Johann Friedrich I, Elector of Saxony (30 June 1503 - 3 March 1554), called John the Magnanimous, was head of the Protestant Confederation of Germany (the Schmalkaldic League), Champion of the Reformation. He was the son of John the Steadfast of Saxony and born... Jena is a town in central Germany on the River Saale. ... Events January 16 - Grand Duke Ivan IV of Muscovy becomes the first Tsar of Russia. ... Charles V, Holy Roman Emperor and King of Aragon and Castile. ... Ferdinand I, Holy Roman Emperor (March 10, 1503 - July 27, 1564) was one of the Habsburg emperors that at various periods during his life ruled over Austria, Germany, Bohemia, and Hungary. ... February 2 is the 33rd day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... Events January 7 - French troops led by Francis, Duke of Guise take Calais, the last continental possession of England July 13 - Battle of Gravelines: In France, Spanish forces led by Count Lamoral of Egmont defeat the French forces of Marshal Paul des Thermes at Gravelines. ...


Prior to the 20th century, University enrollment peaked in the 18th century. The universities reputation peaked under the auspices of duke Charles Augustus, Goethe's patron (1787–1806), when Gottlieb Fichte, Georg Hegel, Friedrich Schelling, Friedrich von Schlegel and Friedrich Schiller were on its teaching staff. (17th century - 18th century - 19th century - more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 18th century refers to the century that lasted from 1701 through 1800. ... Johann Wolfgang von Goethe. ... Johann Gottlieb Fichte Johann Gottlieb Fichte (May 19, 1762 - January 27, 1814) has significance in the history of Western philosophy as one of the progenitors of German idealism and as a follower of Kant. ... Georg Wilhelm Friedrich Hegel [] (August 27, 1770–November 14, 1831) was a German philosopher born in Stuttgart, Württemberg, in present-day southwest Germany. ... Friedrich Wilhelm Joseph von Schelling (January 27, 1775 - August 20, 1854) was a German philosopher. ... Karl Wilhelm Friedrich von Schlegel (March 10, 1772 - January 11, 1829), German poet, critic and scholar, was the younger brother of August Wilhelm von Schlegel. ... Friedrich Schiller Schiller redirects here. ...


Founded as a home for the new religious opinions of the sixteenth century, it has since been one of the most politically radical universities in Germany. Jena was noted among other German universities at the time for allowing students to duel and to have a passion for Freiheit, which were popularly regarded as the necessary characteristics of German student life. The University of Jena has preserved a historical detention room or Karzer with famous caricatures by Swiss painter Martin Disteli. The examples and perspective in this article or section may not represent a worldwide view. ... The Karzer at Göttingen University Graffiti in the Heidelberg Karzer Incarceration of students in a particular lock-up (detention room, slammer) administered for the purpose by the university, known in German as a Karzer, was a common disciplinary punishment used by universities with a larger or smaller degree of...


At the end of the 18th and the beginning of the 19th centuries, the German government militated against the university, which remained unpopular until recent times. This is believed to have been caused by the opening of new universities and the suspicions of the various German governments in regard to the democratic ideas coming out of Jena. (17th century - 18th century - 19th century - more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 18th century refers to the century that lasted from 1701 through 1800. ... Alternative meaning: Nineteenth Century (periodical) (18th century — 19th century — 20th century — more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 19th century was that century which lasted from 1801-1900 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar. ...


In 1905, Jena had 1100 students enrolled, and its teaching staff (including privatdozenten) numbered 112. Amongst its numerous auxiliaries are the library, with 200,000 volumes; the observatory; the meteorological institute; the botanical garden; the seminaries of theology, philology, and education; and the well-equipped clinical, anatomical, and physical institutes. 1905 (MCMV) was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ...


During the 20th century, the cooperation between Zeiss corporation, and the university brought new prosperity and attention to Jena, resulting in a dramatic increase in funding and enrollment. Carl Zeiss The Carl Zeiss AG is a German manufacturer of optical systems, industrial measurements and medical devices, located in Oberkochen with important subsidiaries in Aalen and Jena. ...


Notable alumni

Eva Ahnert-Rohlfs (August 11, 1912 – March 9, 1954) was a German astronomer. ... Radio telescopes are among many different tools used by astronomers Astronomy (Greek: αστρονομία = άστρον + νόμος, astronomia = astron + nomos, literally, law of the stars) is the science of celestial objects and phenomena that originate outside the Earths atmosphere, such as stars, planets, comets, auroras, galaxies, and the cosmic background radiation. ... 1951 (MCMLI) was a common year starting on Monday; see its calendar. ... Gottfried Benn (May 2, 1886 – July 7, 1956) was a German essayist, novelist and expressionist poet. ... Alfred Edmund Brehm Alfred Edmund Brehm (born February 2, 1829 in Unterrenthendorf, now called Renthendorf; died November 11, 1884 in Renthendorf) was a German zoologist and writer, the son of Christian Ludwig Brehm. ... Friedrich Ludwig Gottlob Frege (8 November 1848, Wismar – 26 July 1925, Bad Kleinen) was a German mathematician who evolved into a logician and philosopher. ... Roland Freisler (October 30, 1893 - February 3, 1945) was a prominent Nazi. ... Arvid and Mildred Harnack in the early 1930s Arvid Harnack (born 24 May 1901 in Darmstadt; died 22 December 1942 in Berlin, executed) was a German jurist, economist, and resistance fighter in Nazi Germany. ... Gerhart Hauptmann Gerhart Hauptmann (November 15, 1862 - June 6, 1946), German dramatist, was born on at Obersalzbrunn, Prussia (now Szczawno Drój, Poland) in Silesia, the son of a hotel-keeper. ... Cuno Hoffmeister (February 2, 1892 - January 2, 1968) was a German astronomer. ... Image:Robert Ley in Uniform. ... Karl Heinrich Marx (May 5, 1818 Trier, Germany – March 14, 1883 London) was an immensely influential German philosopher, political economist, sociologist, and revolutionary. ... take you to calendar). ... Count Axel Gustafsson Oxenstierna   listen? or Oxenstjerna (June 16, 1583 - August 28, 1654), Lord High Chancellor of Sweden, was born at FÃ¥nö in Uplandia, and received his education with his brothers at the universities of Rostock, Jena and Wittenberg. ... Baron Samuel von Pufendorf (January 8, 1632 - October 13, 1694), was a German jurist. ... Arthur Schopenhauer (February 22, 1788 – September 21, 1860) was a German philosopher. ... Kurt Tucholsky Kurt Tucholsky (Berlin, January 9, 1890 – December 21, 1935 in Gothenburg) was a German journalist, satirist and writer. ...

Reference

Supporters contend that the Eleventh Edition of the Encyclopædia Britannica (1910-1911) represents the sum of human knowledge at the beginning of the 20th century; indeed, it was advertised as such. ...

External links

  • University of Jena
  • University of Jena, statistics
  • Coimbra Group (a network of leading European universities)
Coimbra Group (of European research universities)|
Aarhus | Barcelona | Bergen | Bologna | Bristol | Budapest | Cambridge | Coimbra | Dublin | Edinburgh | Galway | Geneva | Göttingen | Granada | Graz | Groningen | Heidelberg | Jena | Kraków | Leiden | Leuven | Louvain-la-Neuve | Lyon | Montpellier | Oxford | Padua | Pavia | Poitiers | Prague | Salamanca | Siena | Tartu | Thessaloniki | Turku I | Turku II | Uppsala | Würzburg

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m