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Encyclopedia > Friedrich Schiller
Friedrich Schiller
Friedrich Schiller

Johann Christoph Friedrich von Schiller (November 10, 1759 Marbach am Neckar, Württemberg - May 9, 1805 Weimar, Saxe-Weimar), was a German poet, philosopher, historian, and dramatist. During the last several years of his life (1788–1805), Schiller struck a productive, if complicated, friendship with already famous and influential Johann Wolfgang Goethe, with whom he discussed much on issues concerning aesthetics, encouraging Goethe to finish works he left merely as sketches; this thereby gave way to a period now referred to as Weimar Classicism. They also worked together on Die Xenien (The Xenies), a collection of short but harshly satiric poems in which both Schiller and Goethe verbally attacked those persons they perceived to be enemies of their aesthetic agenda. Public domain image from http://www. ... Public domain image from http://www. ... As Familyname Armand Schiller, French Jewish journalist. ... November 10 is the 314th day of the year (315th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 51 days remaining. ... 1759 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... Marbach am Neckar (pop. ... Arms of the Kingdom of Württemberg The title of this article contains the character ü. Where it is unavailable or not desired, the name may be represented as Wuerttemberg. ... May 9 is the 129th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (130th in leap years). ... 1805 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... The city hall Goethe and Schiller in front of the Deutsche Nationaltheater Weimar is a city in Germany. ... Saxe-Weimar (German Sachsen-Weimar) was a Duchy in Thuringia. ... The poor poet A poet is a person who writes poetry. ... A philosopher is a person who thinks deeply regarding people, society, the world, and/or the universe. ... An historian is someone who writes history, a written accounting of the past. ... A dramatist is an author of dramatic compositions, usually plays. ... Johann Wolfgang Goethe  , IPA: , later von Goethe, (28 August 1749 – 22 March 1832) was a German polymath: he was a poet, novelist, dramatist, humanist, scientist, theorist, painter, and for ten years chief minister of state for the duchy of Weimar. ... Weimar Classicism is, as many historians and scholars argue, a disputed literary movement that took place in Germany and Continental Europe. ...

Contents

Biography

Walk of Ideas (Germany) - built in 2006 to commemorate Johannes Gutenberg's invention, c. 1445, of movable printing type.
Walk of Ideas (Germany) - built in 2006 to commemorate Johannes Gutenberg's invention, c. 1445, of movable printing type.

Schiller was born in Marbach, Württemberg (located at the river Neckar in southwest Germany, north of Stuttgart, the former Region of Swabia), as the only son, besides five sisters, of military doctor Johann Kaspar Schiller (1733-1796), and Elisabeth Dorothea Kodweiß (1732-1802). On 22 February 1790, he married Charlotte von Lengefeld (1766-1826). Four children were born between 1793 and 1804, the sons Karl and Ernst, and the daughters Luise and Emilie. The grandchild of Emilie, Baron Alexander of Gleichen-Rußwurm, died in 1947 at Baden-Baden, Germany, as the last living descendant of Schiller. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (540x720, 67 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Book Friedrich Schiller Talk:Book Walk of Ideas Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (540x720, 67 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Book Friedrich Schiller Talk:Book Walk of Ideas Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the... The Walk of Ideas is a set of six sculptures made on the on the occasion of 2006 FIFA World Cup Germany in Berlin unveiled on April 21, 2006 at Bebelplatz square near the Unterden Linden in front of Humboldt University. ... Movable metal type, and composing stick, descended from Gutenbergs invention Johannes Gensfleisch zur Laden zum Gutenberg (c. ... Marbach am Neckar (pop. ... Arms of the Kingdom of Württemberg The title of this article contains the character ü. Where it is unavailable or not desired, the name may be represented as Wuerttemberg. ... The Neckar is a 367 km long river in Germany, a major right tributary of the River Rhine, which it joins at Mannheim. ... City Center seen from Weinsteige Road Stuttgart Palace Square - New Palace Solitude Palace The 1956 TV Tower U.S. Army Kelley Barracks Stuttgart [], located in southern Germany, is the capital of the state of Baden-Württemberg with a population of 591,528 (as of April 2006) in the city... Germany. ...


His father was away in the Seven Years' War when Friedrich was born. He was named after Frederick II of Prussia (Friedrich is German for Frederick), the king of the country his father was fighting, Prussia, but he was called Fritz by nearly everyone.[1] Caspar Schiller was rarely home at the time, which was hard on the mother, but he did manage to visit the family once in a while and the mother and the children also visited him where he happened to be stationed at the time occasionally.[2] In 1763, the war ended. Schiller's father became a recruiting officer and was stationed in Schwäbisch Gmünd. The family moved with him, of course; but since the cost of living especially the rent soon turned out to be too expensive, the family moved to nearby Lorch, which was at the time still a fairly small village.[3] Combatants Kingdom of Prussia Kingdoms of Great Britain and Ireland Electorate of Hanover Kingdom of Portugal Brunswick Hesse-Kassel Holy Roman/Austrian Empire Kingdom of France Russian Empire Kingdom of Sweden Kingdom of Spain Electorate of Saxony Kingdom of Naples and Sicily Kingdom of Sardinia The Seven Years War (1754... Frederick II (German: ; January 24, 1712 – August 17, 1786) was a King of Prussia (1740–1786) and an enlightened monarch of the Hohenzollern dynasty. ... The following is a list of Kings of Prussia (Könige von Preußen) from the Hohenzollern family. ... Motto: Suum cuique Latin: To each his own Prussia at its peak, as leading state of the German Empire Capital Königsberg, later Berlin Political structure Duchy, Kingdom, Republic Duke1  - 1525–68 Albert I  - 1688–1701 Frederick III King1  - 1701–13 Frederick I  - 1888–1918 William II Prime Minister1,2... 1763 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... Schwäbisch Gmünd is a town in the eastern part of the German state of Baden-Württemberg. ... Lorch may refer to: Lorch (Rheingau), a town in Hesse, Germany Lorch (Württemberg), a town in Baden-Württemberg, Germany Lorch, Austria, part of Enns in Upper Austria Category: ...


Although the family was happy in Lorch, the father found his work unsatisfying. He did, however, take Friedrich Schiller with him occasionally.[4] In Lorch Schiller received his primary education, but the schoolmaster was lazy, so the quality of the lessons was fairly bad; therefore, Friedrich regularly cut class with his older sister.[5] Because his parents wanted Schiller to become a pastor himself, they had the pastor of the village instruct the boy in Latin and Greek. The man was a good teacher, which led Schiller to name the cleric in Die Räuber after Pastor Moser. Schiller was excited by the idea of becoming a clericalist and often put on black robes and pretended to preach.[6] Latin is an ancient Indo-European language originally spoken in Latium, the region immediately surrounding Rome. ... Die Räuber (The Robbers) is a drama by Friedrich Schiller. ...


In 1766, the family left Lorch for the Duke's residence town, Ludwigsburg. Schiller's father had not been paid for three years and the family had been living on their savings, but could no longer afford to do so. So Kaspar Schiller had himself relocated to the garrison in Ludwigsburg. The move was not easy for Friedrich, since Lorch had been a warm and comforting home for the child.[7] 1766 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... Ludwigsburg is a city in Germany, about 12 km north of Stuttgarts city center, near the river Neckar. ...


He came to the attention of Karl Eugen, Duke of Württemberg. He entered the Karlsschule Stuttgart (an elite, extremely strict, military academy founded by Duke Karl Eugen), in 1773, where he eventually studied medicine. During most of his short life, he suffered from illnesses that he tried to cure himself. Karl II Eugen, Duke of Württemberg (11 February 1728 - 24 October 1793) was the eldest son of Duke Karl I Alexander and Maria Augusta Anna of Thurn und Taxis (11 August 1706) - 1 February 1756). ... 1773 was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ...


While at the Karlsschule, Schiller read Rousseau and Goethe and discussed Classical ideals with his classmates. At school, he wrote his first play, Die Räuber (The Robbers), which dramatizes the conflict between two aristocratic brothers: the elder, Karl Moor, leads a group of rebellious students into the Bohemian forest where they become Robin Hood-like bandits, while Franz Moor, the younger brother schemes to inherit his father's considerable estate. The play's critique of social corruption and its affirmation of proto-revolutionary republican ideals astounded the original audience, and made Schiller an overnight sensation. Later, Schiller would be made an honorary member of the French Republic because of this play. Jean-Jacques Rousseau, (June 28, 1712 – July 2, 1778) was a Genevan philosopher of the Enlightenment whose political ideas influenced the French Revolution, the development of socialist theory, and the growth of nationalism. ...  , IPA: , (28 August 1749 – 22 March 1832), commonly known as Goethe, was a German poet, novelist, theorist, and scientist who is considered one of the giants of the literary world. ... Die Räuber (The Robbers) is a drama by Friedrich Schiller. ...


In 1780, he obtained a post as regimental doctor in Stuttgart, a job he disliked. 1780 was a leap year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... City Center seen from Weinsteige Road Stuttgart Palace Square - New Palace Solitude Palace The 1956 TV Tower U.S. Army Kelley Barracks Stuttgart [], located in southern Germany, is the capital of the state of Baden-Württemberg with a population of 591,528 (as of April 2006) in the city...


Following the remarkable performance of Die Räuber in Mannheim, in 1781, he was arrested and forbidden by Karl Eugen himself from publishing any further works. He fled Stuttgart, in 1783, coming via Leipzig and Dresden to Weimar, in 1787. In 1789, he was appointed professor of History and Philosophy in Jena, where he wrote only historical works. He returned to Weimar, in 1799, where Goethe convinced him to return to playwriting. He and Goethe founded the Weimar Theater which became the leading theater in Germany, leading to a dramatic renaissance. He remained in Weimar, Saxe-Weimar until his death at 45 from tuberculosis. Die Räuber (The Robbers) is a drama by Friedrich Schiller. ... Mannheim is a city in Germany. ... 1781 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... 1783 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ...   [] (Sorbian/Lusatian: Lipsk) is the largest city in the federal state of Saxony in Germany with a population of over 504,000. ... For other uses, see Dresden (disambiguation). ... For the locality in Texas called Weimar see Weimar, Texas, there is also Weimar bei Kassel and Weimar in Marburg-Biedenkopf. ... Year 1787 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... 1789 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... The Market Square in Jena. ... The city hall Goethe and Schiller in front of the Deutsche Nationaltheater Weimar is a city in Germany. ... Saxe-Weimar (German Sachsen-Weimar) was a Duchy in Thuringia. ... Tuberculosis (abbreviated as TB for Tubercle Bacillus) is a common and deadly infectious disease that is caused by mycobacteria, primarily Mycobacterium tuberculosis. ...


Freemasonry

Some Freemasons speculate that Schiller was Freemason, but this has not been established.[8] American Square & Compasses Freemasonry is a worldwide fraternal organization. ...


In 1787, in his tenth letter about Don Carlos Schiller wrote:

“I am neither Illuminati nor Mason, but if the fraternization has a moral purpose in common with one another, and if this purpose for the human society is the most important, ...”[9]

In 1829 in a letter from two Freemasons from Rudolstadt complain about the dissolving of their Lodge Günther zum stehenden Löwen that was honoured by the initiation of Schiller. According to Schiller's great-grandson Alexander von Gleichen-Rußwurm, Schiller ought to be brought to the Lodge by Wilhelm Heinrich Karl von Gleichen-Rußwurm, but no membership document exists.[9] Rudolstadt is a city in Germany. ...


Writing

Schiller was at once a playwright, poet, historian and philosopher and he wrote voluminously, particularly when one considers his relatively short life-span.


Philosophical papers

Goethe and Schiller in Weimar
Goethe and Schiller in Weimar

Schiller wrote many philosophical papers on ethics and aesthetics. He synthesized the thought of Immanuel Kant with the thought of Karl Leonhard Reinhold. He developed the concept of the Schöne Seele (beautiful soul), a human being whose emotions have been educated by his reason, so that Pflicht und Neigung (duty and inclination) are no longer in conflict with one another; thus "beauty," for Schiller, is not merely a sensual experience, but a moral one as well: the Good is the Beautiful. His philosophical work was also particularly concerned with the question of human freedom, a preoccupation which also guided his historical researches, such as The Thirty Years War and The Revolt of the Netherlands, and then found its way as well into his dramas (the "Wallenstein" trilogy concerns the Thirty Years War, while "Don Carlos" addresses the revolt of the Netherlands against Spain.) Schiller wrote two important essays on the question of the Sublime (das Erhabene), entitled "Vom Erhabenen" and "Über das Erhabene"; these essays address one aspect of human freedom as the ability to defy one's animal instincts, such as the drive for self-preservation, as in the case of someone who willingly dies for a beautiful idea. Download high resolution version (524x753, 69 KB)from de: see [1] (in German) for copyright details File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Download high resolution version (524x753, 69 KB)from de: see [1] (in German) for copyright details File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Johann Wolfgang von Goethe Johann Wolfgang von Goethe (pronounced [gø tə]) (August 28, 1749–March 22, 1832) was a German writer, politician, humanist, scientist, and philosopher. ... Ethics (from the Ancient Greek Ä“thikos, the adjective of Ä“thos custom, habit), a major branch of philosophy, including genetics is the study of values and customs of a person or group. ... The Parthenons facade showing an interpretation of golden rectangles in its proportions. ... Immanuel Kant (22 April 1724 – 12 February 1804), was a German philosopher from Königsberg in East Prussia (now Kaliningrad, Russia). ... Karl Leonhard Reinhold (October 26, 1757 - April 10, 1823) was in Austrian philosopher. ...


The Dramas

Schiller is considered by most Germans to be Germany's most important classical playwright. Critics like F.J. Lamport and Eric Auerbach have noted his innovative use of dramatic structure and his creation of new forms, such as the melodrama and the bourgeois tragedy. What follows is a brief, chronological description of the plays.

  • The Robbers (Die Räuber): The Robbers is considered by critics like Peter Brooks to be the first European melodrama. The play pits two brothers against each other in alternating scenes as one quests for money and power, while the other attempts to create a revolutionary anarchy in the Bohemian Forest. The play strongly critiques the hypocrisy of class and religion, the economic inequities of German society, and conducts a complicated inquiry into the nature of evil. The language of The Robbers is highly emotional and the depiction of physical violence in the play marks it as a quintessential work of Germany's Storm and Stress movement (Sturm und Drang).
  • Fiesco (Die Verschwörung des Fiesco zu Genua):
  • Intrigue and Love: The aristocratic Ferdinand von Walter wishes to marry Luisa Miller, the bourgeois daughter of the city's music instructor. Court politics involving the duke's beautiful but conniving mistress, Lady Milford and Ferdinand's ruthless father create a disastrous situation reminiscent of Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet. Schiller continues his critique of absolutism and bourgeois hypocrisy in this bourgeois tragedy. Giuseppe Verdi's opera Luisa Miller is based on this play.
  • Don Carlos: This play marks Schiller's entree into historical creation. Very loosely based on the events surrounding the real Don Carlos of Spain, Schiller's Don Carlos is yet another republican figure attempting to free Flanders from the despotic grip of his father, King Phillip. The Marquis Posa's famous speech to the king proclaims Schiller's continuing belief in personal freedom and democracy.
  • The Wallenstein Trilogy: These plays follow the fortunes of a treacherous commander during the Thirty Years' War.
  • Maria Stuart: This "revisionist" history of the Scottish queen who was Elizabeth I's rival makes of Mary Stuart a tragic heroine, misunderstood, and used by ruthless politicians, including and especially, Elizabeth herself.
  • The Maid of Orleans (Die Jungfrau von Orleans):
  • The Bride of Messina (Die Braut von Messina):
  • Wilhelm Tell:
  • Demetrius (unfinished):

Die Räuber (The Robbers) is a drama by Friedrich Schiller. ... Peter Brooks (born 1938) is Sterling Professor of Comparative Literature at Yale University. ... Sturm und Drang (literally: storm and stress) was a Germany literary movement that developed during the latter half of the 18th century. ... Intrigue and Love (or sometimes Love and Intrigue), (German, Kabale und Liebe), is a play, written by the German dramatist and writer Friedrich Schiller and first performed on 15 April 1784 in Frankfurt, and then two days later on 16 April 1784 in the National Theatre in Mannheim in Schiller... Title page of the Second Quarto of Romeo and Juliet (published 1599) For other meanings see Romeo (disambiguation) and Juliet (disambiguation). ... Giuseppe Fortunino Francesco Verdi (either October 9 or 10, 1813 – January 27, 1901) was an Italian Romantic composer, mainly of opera. ... Luisa Miller is an opera in three acts by Giuseppe Verdi to an Italian libretto by Salvatore Cammarano, based on the play Kabale und Liebe by Friedrich von Schiller. ... A dramatic play by Friedrich Schiller, on the basis of which several operas have been composed: 1844 opera by Michael Costa (libretto Leopold Tarentini, London) 1847 opera by Pasquale Bona (libretto Giorgio Giacchetti, Milan) 1850 opera by Antonio Buzzola (libretto Francesco Maria Piave, Venice) 1862 opera by Vincenzo Moscuzza (libretto... Mary Stuart is a play by Friedrich Schiller based on the life of Mary I of Scotland. ... Die Braut von Messina (English: The Bride of Messina) is a tragedy by Friedrich Schiller; it premiered on March 19, 1803 in Weimar. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ...

The Aesthetic Letters

Portrait of Friedrich von Schiller by Gerhard von Kügelgen.
Portrait of Friedrich von Schiller by Gerhard von Kügelgen.

A pivotal work by Schiller was On the Aesthetic Education of Man in a series of Letters, (Über die ästhetische Erziehung des Menschen in einer Reihe von Briefen) which was inspired by the great disenchantment Schiller felt about the French Revolution, its degeneration into violence and the failure of successive governments to put its ideals into practice. [10] Instead, it had become a bloodbath. Schiller wrote that "a great moment has found a little people," and wrote the Letters as a philosophical inquiry into what had gone wrong, and how to prevent such tragedies in the future. In the Letters he asserts that it is possible to elevate the moral character of a people, by first touching their souls with beauty, an idea that is also found in his poem Die Künstler (The Artists): "Only through Beauty's morning-gate, dost thou penetrate the land of knowledge." Image File history File links Download high resolution version (2024x2368, 382 KB) File links The following pages link to this file: Friedrich Schiller Portal:Germany/Anniversaries/May Portal:Germany/Anniversaries/May/May 9 ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (2024x2368, 382 KB) File links The following pages link to this file: Friedrich Schiller Portal:Germany/Anniversaries/May Portal:Germany/Anniversaries/May/May 9 ... The French Revolution (1789–1815) was a period of political and social upheaval in the political history of France and Europe as a whole, during which the French governmental structure, previously an absolute monarchy with feudal privileges for the aristocracy and Catholic clergy, underwent radical change to forms based on...


On the philosophical side, Letters put forth the notion of der sinnliche Trieb / Sinnestrieb ("the sensuous drive") and Formtrieb ("the formal drive"). In a comment to Immanuel Kant's philosophy, Schiller transcends the dualism between Form and Sinn, with the notion of Spieltrieb ("the play drive") derived from, as are a number of other terms, Kant's The Critique of the Faculty of Judgment. The conflict between man's material, sensuous nature, and his capacity for reason (Formtrieb being the drive to impose conceptual and moral order on the world), Schiller resolves with the happy union of Form and Sinn, the "play drive," which for him is synonymous with artistic beauty, or "living form." On the basis of Spieltrieb, Schiller sketches in Letters a future ideal state (an eutopia), where everyone will be content, and everything will be beautiful, thanks to the free play of Spieltrieb. Schiller's focus on the dialectical interplay between Form and Sinn has inspired a wide range of succeeding aesthetic philosophical theory. Immanuel Kant (22 April 1724 – 12 February 1804), was a German philosopher from Königsberg in East Prussia (now Kaliningrad, Russia). ... See Utopia (disambiguation) for other meanings of this word Utopia, in its most common and general meaning, refers to a hypothetical perfect society. ...


Historical Writings

Poetry

Ennoblement

10 Mark banknote from East Germany of 1964 showing Friedrich Schiller

For his achievements, Schiller was ennobled, in 1802, by the Duke of Weimar. His name changed from Johann Christoph Friedrich Schiller to Johann Christoph Friedrich von Schiller. Schiller on 20 Mark 1964 File links The following pages link to this file: Friedrich Schiller ... ISO 4217 Code DDM User(s) German Democratic Republic Pegged with Deutsche Mark = M11 Subunit 1/100 pfennig Symbol M Plural Mark pfennig Pfennig Coins Freq. ... A £20 Bank of England banknote. ... GDR redirects here. ...


Quotations

  • "Against stupidity the gods themselves contend in vain." — Maid of Orleans
  • "The voice of the majority is no proof of justice."
  • "Deeper meaning resides in the fairy tales told me in my childhood than in any truth that is taught in life."
  • "Eine Grenze hat die Tyrannenmacht", which literally means "A tyrant's power has a limit" - — Wilhelm Tell

Musical settings of Schiller's poems and stage plays

Ludwig van Beethoven said that a great poem is more difficult to set to music than a merely good one because the composer must improve upon the poem. In that regard, he said that Schiller's poems were greater than those of Goethe, and perhaps that is why there are relatively few famous musical settings of Schiller's poems. Two notable exceptions are Beethoven's setting of An die Freude (Ode to Joy) in the final movement of the Ninth Symphony, and the choral setting of Nänie by Johannes Brahms. Also, Giuseppe Verdi admired Schiller greatly and adapted several of his stage plays for his operas.[citation needed] 1820 portrait by Joseph Karl Stieler Ludwig van Beethoven (IPA: ), (baptized December 17, 1770[1] – March 26, 1827) was a German composer. ... Johann Wolfgang von Goethe Johann Wolfgang von Goethe (pronounced [gø tə]) (August 28, 1749–March 22, 1832) was a German writer, politician, humanist, scientist, and philosopher. ... To Joy (An die Freude in German, in English often familiarly called the Ode to Joy rather than To Joy) is an ode written in 1785 by the German poet and historian Friedrich Schiller, known especially for its musical setting by Ludwig van Beethoven in the fourth and final movement... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Giuseppe Fortunino Francesco Verdi (either October 9 or 10, 1813 – January 27, 1901) was an Italian Romantic composer, mainly of opera. ... The New Opera in Oslo, Norway The Teatro alla Scala in Milan, Italy. ...


Works

Plays

Die Räuber (The Robbers) is a drama by Friedrich Schiller. ... 1781 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... Intrigue and Love (or sometimes Love and Intrigue), (German, Kabale und Liebe), is a play, written by the German dramatist and writer Friedrich Schiller and first performed on 15 April 1784 in Frankfurt, and then two days later on 16 April 1784 in the National Theatre in Mannheim in Schiller... 1784 was a leap year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... A dramatic play by Friedrich Schiller, on the basis of which several operas have been composed: 1844 opera by Michael Costa (libretto Leopold Tarentini, London) 1847 opera by Pasquale Bona (libretto Giorgio Giacchetti, Milan) 1850 opera by Antonio Buzzola (libretto Francesco Maria Piave, Venice) 1862 opera by Vincenzo Moscuzza (libretto... Year 1787 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... Mike Poulton is an English translator and adapter of classic plays for contemporary audiences. ... // ON MAY 5 1853 MR.FADER HAD SEX WITH A MAN NAME MR WIEN THEN THEY HAD SON NAMEDMRS COTURE AND MR MANOOGIAN WENT INTO MRS HASKELLS OFFICE NAKED AND DANCED AROUND AND MASTERBATED ON HER CHEST AND SHE LICKED IT OFF THEN THEY HAD ORAL SEEX WITH NAPLOEAN OF... Samuel Taylor Coleridge(October 21, 1772 – July 25, 1834) (pronounced ) was an English poet, critic, and philosopher who was, along with his friend William Wordsworth, one of the founders of the Romantic Movement in England and one of the Lake Poets. ... // ON MAY 5 1853 MR.FADER HAD SEX WITH A MAN NAME MR WIEN THEN THEY HAD SON NAMEDMRS COTURE AND MR MANOOGIAN WENT INTO MRS HASKELLS OFFICE NAKED AND DANCED AROUND AND MASTERBATED ON HER CHEST AND SHE LICKED IT OFF THEN THEY HAD ORAL SEEX WITH NAPLOEAN OF... The Union Jack, flag of the newly formed United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland. ... Mary Stuart is a play by Friedrich Schiller based on the life of Mary I of Scotland. ... The Union Jack, flag of the newly formed United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland. ... Mike Poulton is an English translator and adapter of classic plays for contemporary audiences. ... // Turandot Carlo Gozzi wrote Turandot for the Comedia dellarte. ... --69. ... Die Braut von Messina (English: The Bride of Messina) is a tragedy by Friedrich Schiller; it premiered on March 19, 1803 in Weimar. ... 1803 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... 1804 was a leap year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ...

Histories

  • Geschichte des Abfalls der vereinigten Niederlande von der spanischen Regierung or The Revolt of the Netherlands
  • Geschichte des dreissigjährigen Kriegs or A History of the Thirty Years' War
  • Über Völkerwanderung, Kreuzzüge und Mittelalter or On the Barbarian Invasions, Crusaders and Middle Ages

Translations

A statue of Euripides Euripides (Greek: Ευριπίδης) (c. ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... Macbeth and Banquo meeting the witches on the heath by Théodore Chassériau. ... Jean Racine. ... Phèdre is a tragedy theatrical play written in 1677 by Jean Racine. ...

Prose

  • Der Geisterseher or The Ghost-Seer (unfinished novel) (started in 1786 and published periodically. Published as book in 1789)
  • Über die ästhetische Erziehung des Menschen in einer Reihe von Briefen (On the Aesthetic Education of Man in a series of Letters), 1794

Poems

To Joy (An die Freude in German, in English often familiarly called the Ode to Joy rather than To Joy) is an ode written in 1785 by the German poet and historian Friedrich Schiller, known especially for its musical setting by Ludwig van Beethoven in the fourth and final movement... 1820 portrait by Joseph Karl Stieler Ludwig van Beethoven (IPA: ), (baptized December 17, 1770[1] – March 26, 1827) was a German composer. ... Composer Ludwig van Beethoven 4th movement (European Union anthem) samples: Ode to Joy ( file info) — String version from 1997. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Franz Peter Schubert (January 31, 1797 – November 19, 1828) was an Austrian composer. ... Nänie is a composition for S A T B chorus and orchestra, opus #82 by Johannes Brahms, which sets to music the poem Nänie by Friedrich Schiller. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ...

References

postage stamp depicting Schiller
  1. ^ Lahnstein 1981, pg. 18
  2. ^ Lahnstein 1981, pg. 20
  3. ^ Lahnstein 1981, pg. 20-21
  4. ^ Lahnstein 1981, pg. 23
  5. ^ Lahnstein 1981, pg. 24
  6. ^ Lahnstein 1981, pg. 25
  7. ^ Lahnstein 1981, pg. 27
  8. ^ http://freemasonry.bcy.ca/biography/schiller_f/schiller_f.html
  9. ^ a b Eugen Lennhoff, Oskar Posner, Dieter A. Binder: Internationales Freimaurer Lexikon. Herbig publishing, 2006, ISBN 978-3-7766-2478-6
  10. ^ Shiller, On the Aesthetic Education of Man, Ed. Wilinson and Willoughby, 1967 (OED)

Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 471 pixelsFull resolution (2020 × 1190 pixel, file size: 299 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Other versions unknown File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 471 pixelsFull resolution (2020 × 1190 pixel, file size: 299 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Other versions unknown File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ...

Bibliography

  • Lahnstein, Peter [1981] (January 1984). Schillers Leben. Frankfurt am Main: Fischer. ISBN 3-596-25621-6. 

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Persondata
NAME Schiller, Friedrich
ALTERNATIVE NAMES Johann Christoph Friedrich von Schiller
SHORT DESCRIPTION German poet, philosopher, historian, and dramatist
DATE OF BIRTH November 10, 1759
PLACE OF BIRTH Marbach, Württemberg
DATE OF DEATH May 9, 1805
PLACE OF DEATH Weimar, Saxe-Weimar

  Results from FactBites:
 
Friedrich Schiller - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (976 words)
Johann Christoph Friedrich von Schiller (November 10, 1759 – May 9, 1805), usually known as Friedrich Schiller, was a German poet, philosopher, historian, and dramatist.
Portrait of Friedrich von Schiller by Gerhard von Kügelgen.
In a comment to Immanuel Kant's philosophy, Schiller transcends the dualism between Form and Stoff, with the notion of Spieltrieb ("the play drive") derived from, as are a number of other terms, Kants' The Critique of the Faculty of Judgment.
Friedrich Schiller - definition of Friedrich Schiller in Encyclopedia (890 words)
Johann Christoph Friedrich von Schiller (November 10, 1759 - May 9, 1805), usually known as Friedrich Schiller, was a German poet, philosopher, historian, and dramatist.
Schiller wrote many philosophical papers on ethics and aesthetics, finding that beauty must be conceived in the mind by applying reason to the senses and emotions.
Schiller wrote that "a great moment has found a little people," and wrote the Letters as a philosphical inquiry into what had gone wrong, and how to prevent such tragedies in the future.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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