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Encyclopedia > Frieda (Peanuts)
Frieda
Peanuts character
Gender Female
Family Mother, Daddy, Faron (cat), others are unknown
Original voice actor Ann Altieri
Other voice actors Lynda Mendelson
Linda Ercoli
Michelle Muller
Birthday unknown
For other uses of the name see Frida (disambiguation)

Frieda is a character in the comic strip Peanuts by Charles Schulz. According to Schulz, Frieda's character was inspired by his longtime friend Frieda Rich, a local artist whom he met while taking classes at the Minneapolis Art Instructions School.[1] She was a regular in Peanuts throughout the 1960s, but as newer characters were phased in towards the end of the decade she began appearing less often, and she ceased to be a featured character after 1975, making only cameo appearances since then. Today she is best remembered as the Peanuts character with naturally curly hair, of which she is extremely proud. For other uses, see Peanut (disambiguation). ... Lynda Mendelson was a child actress noted for providing the voice of Frieda in several Peanuts animated films during the early 1970s. ... Linda Ercoli was born on March 7, 1960 in California. ... Look up Frida in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... This article is about the comic strip, the sequential art form as published in newspapers and on the Internet. ... For other uses, see Peanut (disambiguation). ... Charles Monroe Schulz (November 26, 1922 - February 12, 2000) was a 20th-century American cartoonist best known for his Peanuts comic strip. ... This article is about the city in Minnesota. ... The 1960s decade refers to the years from the beginning of 1960 to the end of 1969. ... Year 1975 (MCMLXXV) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...

Contents

Personality and Characteristics

Frieda made her debut on March 6, 1961, when Linus introduced her to Charlie Brown. She was the eleventh permanent character to join the cast, and the first since Sally was born in 1959. She was initially presented, in both the advance press release and the first few strips, as Linus' schoolmate.[2] She sat behind him in class, and although he considered her a friend, he also confessed that she was such a chatterbox, he hadn't heard a word their teacher said the whole semester.[3] Her most prominent feature is her "naturally curly hair," which she manages to work into every conversation, to the dismay of those around her. This self-love about her hair leads people to believe that she is rather vain. In turn, Frieda herself believes that the other girls are jealous of her hair, and also that "people expect more of her" because she has it.[4][5] Nevertheless, enough people in the neighborhood like her that she got thirty valentines one year.[6] Journalist Christopher Caldwell described her as, "A fetching, kind and charming girl, who throws her deeper goodness away because she wants to be admired for such superficialities as 'being a good conversationalist'."[7] Frieda Rich, the character's namesake, was once asked whether she bore any character resemblances to her cartoon counterpart. She replied, "I recognize myself," adding as an example that while talking to Schulz once about Universalists and Congregationalists, she had jokingly called herself a "conversationalist," and Schulz borrowed that for the strip.[8] is the 65th day of the year (66th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1961 (MCMLXI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Linus van Pelt is one of the characters in Charles M. Schulzs comic strip Peanuts. ... This article is about the character from Peanuts. ... Year 1959 (MCMLIX) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Christopher Caldwell is a senior editor at The Weekly Standard, as well as a regular contributor to The Financial Times and Slate Magazine. ... The flaming chalice is the universally recognized symbol for Unitarian Universalism. ... Congregational churches are Protestant Christian churches practicing congregationalist church governance, in which each congregation independently and autonomously runs its own affairs. ...


Relationships With Other Characters

Charlie Brown

Frieda was usually nicer to Charlie Brown than most of the other girls in the neighborhood. Unlike Lucy, Patty, and Violet, she seemed to be mindful of his feelings and never teased him or put him down to his face (except for rare moments in the Peanuts specials), though she did get mad at him a few times. She eventually joined Charlie Brown's baseball team as an outfielder, but refused to wear a baseball cap because it would hide her naturally curly hair.[9] She seemed to be one of the few characters that Charlie Brown felt confident enough to stand up to, as he did once when she was badgering Snoopy about chasing rabbits and he told her to mind her own business.[10] This article is about the character from Peanuts. ... Patty from a comic strip. ... Violet from a comic strip. ... This article is about the sport. ... A baseball cap worn with the bill at the front, shading the eyes A baseball cap is a type of soft cap with a long, stiffened and curved peak and it is worn by men, women and children. ... Snoopy is a fictional character in the long-running comic strip Peanuts, by Charles M. Schulz. ...


Linus van Pelt

Frieda's first appearance in Peanuts.

Linus was the first character in the series that Frieda met. She sat behind him in school, and after they became friends he took her around and introduced her to some of the other kids in the neighborhood. Not much is shown of their friendship beyond those strips that introduce her, but even that early in their relationship they seemed to look out for each other. Linus tried to protect her the first time she unintentionally upset Lucy (see below), and she in turn was one of the few kids who didn't see his need for a security blanket as a bad thing, for which he was so grateful that he kissed her hand.[11] Linus van Pelt is one of the characters in Charles M. Schulzs comic strip Peanuts. ...


Lucy van Pelt

Frieda's relationship with Lucy got off to a rocky start when Frieda, as usual, brought up her naturally curly hair almost as soon as they were introduced. Lucy became visibly offended by this, to the point where Linus (performing the introductions) felt it necessary to beg Lucy not to slug her.[12] Despite Frieda's faux pas the two girls eventually became friends, and when they played baseball for Charlie Brown's team they often spent their time in the outfield chatting instead of paying attention to the game.[13] The biggest source of friction between them seems to be over Schroeder. There have been a few occasions where Lucy, who is in love with Schroeder, has come over to spend time with him as he plays the piano, only to find Frieda already occupying her spot. Frieda's reasons for being there can only be guessed at; when Lucy asked her point-blank she evasively replied, "Who wants to know? Maybe I just like music." Sometimes Lucy would just sit down next to her, but on at least one occasion Frieda's presence actually led to a physical fight between the two girls.[14] Book cover Lucy van Pelt is a character in the syndicated comic strip Peanuts, written and drawn by Charles Schulz. ... Schroeder is a fictional character in the long-running comic strip Peanuts, created by Charles M. Schulz. ...


Snoopy

Out of all the characters, Frieda has the most trouble getting along with Snoopy, whom she frequently accuses of being "lazy" and "useless." She has strong pre-conceived notions of what a beagle should be doing with its time; she wants Snoopy to be a working dog and a hunter (especially a hunter of rabbits), and not spend so much time sleeping on top of his doghouse. She often comes over and tries to goad Snoopy into chasing rabbits with her, either by threat or persuasion, which he is always reluctant to do. If he does consent to "hunt," he'll either sandbag it and only pretend to look for the rabbits, or if he does find rabbits he'll frolic and play with them once he's out of Frieda's sight.[15] Once, in a fit of frustration, she reported Snoopy's behavior to the "Head Beagle," which led to him being found guilty of not meeting his rabbit quota and left the neighborhood kids mad at her for turning him in. Snoopy is a fictional character in the long-running comic strip Peanuts, by Charles M. Schulz. ... This article is about the dog breed. ... Sandbagging is the practice of deceptively portraying oneself as being in a weaker position than is true. ...


Faron

Faron is a male cat that Frieda bought for herself, primarily to spite Snoopy. She believed he was too smug for his own good, and decided that having a cat in the neighborhood would take him down a few notches.[16] Her choice of cat ended up being more comical than intimidating; Faron is seemingly boneless, and she carries him everywhere, draped over her arms. He seemed to be as unpopular with the other neighborhood kids as he was with Snoopy; Frieda tried to find someone who was willing to hold Faron for her whenever she needed to go somewhere like the library that wouldn't allow cats inside, but she usually had a lot of trouble finding a willing volunteer.[17]A running gag is Faron being unwhitingly "held" by Charlie Brown; Linus Van Pelt or even Snoopy! Faron last appearence is being "unseen" in a tree! The running gag is a popular hallmark of comic and serious forms of entertainment. ...


Faron was named for country-western singer Faron Young, whom Schulz "admired very much,"[18] but he only made a few appearances in the strip. Schulz was dissatisfied at his own drawing of a cat; also, he wanted to continue exploring Snoopy's fantasy life, and felt like having a cat in the strip brought Snoopy back to being too much of a real dog.[18] A Faron Young promotional photo. ...


Last Appearance

Frieda remained a full member of the Peanuts cast for just over 14 years. Her last official appearance in the strip was on March 20, 1975, although unnamed girls who resemble her would occasionally pop up in later years.[1] Frieda also continued to make appearances in the animated Peanuts specials and the Saturday morning series The Charlie Brown and Snoopy Show, even being mentioned in the lyrics of the latter's theme song. is the 79th day of the year (80th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1975 (MCMLXXV) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Charlie Brown and Snoopy Show is an animated television series featuring characters and storylines from the Charles M. Schulz comic strip Peanuts. ...


Notes

  1. ^ a b The Peanuts FAQ, accessed 10/14/07
  2. ^ "Hullo There, Frieda." Tucson Citizen, Feb. 28, 1961, p. 15
  3. ^ Schulz (2006) The Complete Peanuts 1961-1962, p. 29. Comic originally published 1961-03-07.
  4. ^ Schulz (2006) The Complete Peanuts 1961-1962, p. 114. Comic originally published 1961-09-22.
  5. ^ Schulz (2007) The Complete Peanuts 1963-1964, p. 148. Comic originally published 1963-12-11.
  6. ^ Schulz (2007) The Complete Peanuts 1963-1964, p. 20. Comic originally published 1963-02-15.
  7. ^ Caldwell, Christopher. "Against Snoopy" New York Press, Dec. 28, 1999
  8. ^ Associated Press. "Frieda Doesn't Have Problems Like Charlie." Winona Daily News, Oct. 5, 1969, p. 7
  9. ^ Schulz (2006) The Complete Peanuts 1961-1962, p. 39. Comic originally published 1961-03-30.
  10. ^ Schulz (2006) The Complete Peanuts 1961-1962, p. 58. Comic originally published 1961-05-14.
  11. ^ Schulz (2006) The Complete Peanuts 1961-1962, p. 29. Comic originally published 1961-03-08.
  12. ^ Schulz (2006) The Complete Peanuts 1961-1962, p. 30. Comic originally published 1961-03-09.
  13. ^ Schulz (2006) The Complete Peanuts 1961-1962, p. 220. Comic originally published 1962-05-27.
  14. ^ Schulz (2006) The Complete Peanuts 1961-1962, p. 46. Comic originally published 1961-04-16.
  15. ^ Schulz (2007) The Complete Peanuts 1963-1964, p. 303. Comic originally published 1964-12-06.
  16. ^ Schulz (2006) The Complete Peanuts 1961-1962, p. 59. Comic originally published 1961-05-17.
  17. ^ Schulz (2006) The Complete Peanuts 1961-1962, pp. 68-69, 83, 133.
  18. ^ a b Schulz, Charles (1975). Peanuts Jubilee: My Life and Art With Charlie Brown and Others. Holt, Rinehart, and Winston. ISBN 0-0301-5081-7. 

Year 1961 (MCMLXI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 66th day of the year (67th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1961 (MCMLXI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 265th day of the year (266th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see 1963 (disambiguation). ... is the 345th day of the year (346th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see 1963 (disambiguation). ... is the 46th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1961 (MCMLXI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 89th day of the year (90th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1961 (MCMLXI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 134th day of the year (135th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1961 (MCMLXI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 67th day of the year (68th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1961 (MCMLXI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 68th day of the year (69th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1962 (MCMLXII) was a common year starting on Monday (the link is to a full 1962 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 147th day of the year (148th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1961 (MCMLXI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 106th day of the year (107th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also Nintendo emulator: 1964 (emulator). ... is the 340th day of the year (341st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1961 (MCMLXI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 137th day of the year (138th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Charles Monroe Schulz (November 26, 1922 - February 12, 2000) was a 20th-century American cartoonist best known for his Peanuts comic strip. ...

References

  • Schulz, Charles (1975). Peanuts Jubilee: My Life and Art With Charlie Brown and Others. New York, NY: Holt, Rinehart, and Winston. ISBN 0-0301-5081-7. 
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