FACTOID # 19: Cheap sloppy joes: Looking for reduced-price lunches for schoolchildren? Head for Oklahoma!
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Friden Flexowriter

The Friden Flexowriter was a teleprinter based on a 1940s IBM product that was spun off as an independent company and later sold to the Friden Corp. It could punch and read 6-bit paper tape. Unlike teletype machines that use the 5-bit Baudot code, the Flexowriter had upper and lower case characters. Because of this and the better quality printing produced by its IBM-designed typewriter mechanism, the Flexowriter could be used by itself to automate the production of office documents such as form letters.


The Flexowriter was also used as an input/output device for some early computers, such as the Librascope LGP-30 and the DEC PDP-1. It was also used instead of a key punch for off-line program and data entry.


See Also

External links

  • Photo and more information (http://www.blinkenlights.com/classiccmp/friden/)
  • Discussion of Flexowriter code conversion with link to code chart (http://www.science.uva.nl/faculteit/museum/X1flex.html)

  Results from FactBites:
 
Reference.com/Encyclopedia/Friden Flexowriter (530 words)
The Friden Flexowriter, or flexowriter as on its nameplate, was a teleprinter based on a 1940s IBM product that was spun off as an independent company and later sold to the Friden Corp. It could punch and read 6-bit paper tape.
Auxiliary paper-tape readers could be attached to a Flexowriter to create an early form of "mail merge", where a long custom-created tape containing individual addresses and salutations was merged with a closed-loop form-letter and printed on continuous-form letterhead; both tapes contained embedded "control characters" to switch between readers.
The Flexowriter was also used as an input/output device for some early computers, such as the Librascope LGP-30, the CDC 160, and the DEC PDP-1.
Friden Flexowriter at AllExperts (412 words)
The Friden Flexowriter was a teleprinter based on a 1940s IBM product that was spun off as an independent company and later sold to the Friden Corp. It could punch and read 6-bit paper tape.
The Flexowriter was also used as an input/output device for some early computers, such as the Librascope LGP-30 and the DEC PDP-1.
Friden was acquired by the Singer Corporation in 1965.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m