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Encyclopedia > Fresh water

The term fresh water refers to bodies of water containing low concentrations of dissolved salts and other total dissolved solids. Fresh water is an important renewable resource, necessary for the survival of most terrestrial organisms, and required by humans for drinking and agriculture, among many other uses. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Freshwater is a village and parish at the western end of the Isle of Wight. ... For other meanings of the word salt see table salt or salt (disambiguation). ... Bottled mineral water usually contains higher TDS levels than tap water Total dissolved solids (often abbreviated TDS) is an expression for the combined content of all inorganic and organic substances contained in a liquid which are present in a molecular, ionized or micro-granular (colloidal sol) suspended form. ... A natural resource qualifies as a renewable resource if it is replenished by natural processes at a rate comparable to its rate of consumption by humans or other users. ... In biology and ecology, an organism (in Greek organon = instrument) is a living being. ... Drinking water Mineral Water Drinking water is water that is intended to be ingested by humans. ...

The surface of a freshwater lake in daylight
The surface of a freshwater lake in daylight

Contents

Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ...

Numerical definition

Fresh water is defined as water with less than 0.5 parts per thousand dissolved salts.[1] Freshwater bodies include lakes, rivers, and some bodies of underground water. The ultimate source of fresh water is the precipitation of atmosphere in the form of rain and snow. For other uses, see Salt (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Lake (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see River (disambiguation). ... Missing main definition------ someone add if you know it please. ... Air redirects here. ... This article is about precipitation. ... Snow is a type of precipitation in the form of crystalline water ice, consisting of a multitude of snowflakes that fall from clouds. ...

Water salinity based on dissolved salts in parts per thousand (ppt)
Fresh water Brackish water Saline water Brine
< 0.5 0.5 - 35 35 - 50 > 50

Brackish redirects here. ... For the sports equipment manufacturer, see Brine, Corp. ...

Water distribution

Access to unpolluted fresh water is a critical issue for the survival of many species, including humans, who must drink fresh water in order to survive. Only three percent of the water on Earth is fresh water in nature, and about two-thirds of this is frozen in glaciers and polar ice caps. Most of the rest is underground and only 0.3 percent is surface water. Freshwater lakes, most notably Lake Baikal in Russia and the Great Lakes in North America, contain seven-eighths of this fresh surface water. Swamps have most of the balance with only a small amount in rivers, most notably the Amazon River. The atmosphere contains 0.04% water. [2] In areas with no fresh water on the ground surface, fresh water derived from precipitation may, because of its lower density, overlie saline ground water in lenses or layers. This article is about Earth as a planet. ... This article is about the geological formation. ... This does not cite any references or sources. ... Baikal redirects here. ... The Great Lakes from space The Great Lakes are a group of five large lakes on or near the United States-Canadian border. ... This article is about the river. ...


Aquatic organisms

Fresh water creates a hypotonic environment for aquatic organisms. This is problematic for some organisms, whose cell membranes will burst if excess water is not excreted. Some protists accomplish this using contractile vacuoles, while freshwater fish excrete excess water via the kidney.[3] Although most aquatic organisms have a limited ability to regulate their osmotic balance and therefore can only live within a narrow range of salinity, diadromous fish have the ability to migrate between fresh water and saline water bodies. During these migrations they undergo changes to adapt to the surroundings of the changed salinities; these processes are hormonally controlled. The eel (Anguilla anguilla) uses the hormone prolactin, while in salmon (Salmo salar) the hormone cortisol plays a key role during this process. This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Typical phyla Chromalveolata Chromista Heterokontophyta Haptophyta Cryptophyta (cryptomonads) Alveolata Dinoflagellata Apicomplexa Ciliophora (ciliates) Cabozoa Excavata Euglenozoa Percolozoa Metamonada Rhizaria Radiolaria Foraminifera Cercozoa Archaeplastida (in part) Rhodophyta (red algae) Glaucophyta (basal archaeplastids) Amoebozoa Choanozoa Many others; classification varies Protists (IPA: (RP); (GenAm)), Greek protiston -a meaning the (most) first of all... Schematic of typical animal cell, showing subcellular components. ... A vast number of species of fish have been successfully kept in the home aquarium. ... The kidneys are organs that filter wastes (such as urea) from the blood and excrete them, along with water, as urine. ... Many types of fish undertake migrations on a regular basis, on time scales ranging from daily to annual, and with distances ranging from a few meters to thousands of kilometers. ... For other uses, see Fish (disambiguation). ... Many types of fish undertake migrations on a regular basis, on time scales ranging from daily to annual, and with distances ranging from a few meters to thousands of kilometers. ... Annual mean sea surface salinity for the World Ocean. ... Prolactin (PRL) is a peptide hormone primarily associated with lactation. ... Cortisol is a corticosteroid hormone produced by the adrenal cortex (in the adrenal gland). ...


See also

Shevchenko BN350 desalination unit situated on the shore of the Caspian Sea. ... Limnology is a discipline that concerns the study of inland waters (both saline and fresh), specifically lakes, ponds and rivers (both natural and manmade), including their biological, physical, chemical, and hydrological aspects. ... Annual mean sea surface salinity for the World Ocean. ... H2O and HOH redirect here. ... The movement of water around, over, and through the Earth is called the water cycle. ... Water resources are sources of water that are useful or potentially useful to humans. ...

References

  1. ^ Groundwater Glossary (2006-03-27). Retrieved on 2006-05-14.
  2. ^ Gleick, Peter; et al. (1996). in Stephen H. Schneider: Encyclopedia of Climate and Weather. Oxford University Press. 
  3. ^ Vertebrate Kidneys (2002-11-03). Retrieved on 2006-05-14.

Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 86th day of the year (87th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... May 14 is the 134th day of the year (135th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ... is the 307th day of the year (308th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... May 14 is the 134th day of the year (135th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links

  • Freshwater life.org
  • Freshwater Biological Association
  • Review of freshwater ecology in the UK
  • UK Government Environmental Agency website
  • Pond Conservation. UK National pond monitoring network

 
 

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