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Encyclopedia > Frenzy
Frenzy

original film poster
Directed by Alfred Hitchcock
Produced by William Hill
Alfred Hitchcock (uncredited)
Written by Novel:
Arthur La Bern
Screenplay:
Anthony Shaffer
Starring Jon Finch
Barry Foster
Alec McCowen
Billie Whitelaw
Anna Massey
Clive Swift
Barbara Leigh-Hunt
Jean Marsh
Vivien Merchant
Bernard Cribbins
Music by Ron Goodwin
Cinematography Gilbert Taylor
Leonard J. South (uncredited)
Editing by John Jympson
Distributed by Universal Pictures
Release date(s) Flag of the United Kingdom May 25, 1972
Flag of the United States June 21, 1972
Running time 116 min.
Country United Kingdom
Language English
Budget US$3,500,000
Allmovie profile
IMDb profile

Frenzy is a 1972 thriller film directed by Alfred Hitchcock, and is the penultimate feature film of his extensive career. The original music score was composed by Ron Goodwin. The film was marketed with the tagline "From the Master of Shock! A shocking masterpiece!" It was his first and only R rated film. The title Frenzy can refer to a number of things: An Alfred Hitchcock film, see Frenzy For the album by Split Enz see Frenzy (album). ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Sir Alfred Joseph Hitchcock KBE (August 13, 1899 â€“ April 29, 1980) was an iconic and highly influential British-born film director and producer who pioneered many techniques in the suspense and thriller genres. ... William Hill was the Proprietary Governor of the Province of Avalon in Newfoundland from 1634 to 1638. ... Sir Alfred Joseph Hitchcock KBE (August 13, 1899 â€“ April 29, 1980) was an iconic and highly influential British-born film director and producer who pioneered many techniques in the suspense and thriller genres. ... Anthony Joshua Shaffer, (May 15, 1926 – November 6, 2001), was a English dramatist. ... Jon Finch (born March 2, 1941 in Caterham, Surrey) is an English actor noted for many Shakespearean roles. ... (John) Barry Foster born in Beeston, Nottinghamshire, England on 21 August 1927, died 11 February 2002, of a heart attack while being cared for at the Royal Surrey Hospital in Guildford. ... Alec McCowen (born May 26, 1925) is an English actor, best known for classical roles including Shakespeare. ... Billie Whitelaw, CBE (born June 6, 1932) is a distinguished English actress of both stage and film. ... Anna Massey, CBE (born August 11, 1937) is a British actress. ... Clive Swift in his role as Richard Bucket in Keeping Up Appearances. ... Barbara Leigh-Hunt,(b. ... Jean Lyndsay Torren Marsh (born 1 July 1934) is a Golden Globe-nominated English actress and writer, who is best known for co-creating the British period drama Upstairs, Downstairs with Eileen Atkins. ... Vivien Merchant in a scene from The Homecoming (1973) Vivien Merchant (born on July 22, 1929 in Manchester, England) was a British actress, who was born Ada Thompson. ... Bernard Cribbins as Captain Michael in Space: 1999, episode: Brian the Brain (1976). ... Ronald Alfred Goodwin (February 17, 1925 – January 8, 2003) was a British composer and conductor best known for his film scores. ... Gil Taylor (born 12 April 1914) in Bushey Heath, England, is a cinematographer. ... Universal Pictures is the main motion picture production/distribution arm of Universal Studios, a subsidiary of NBC Universal. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_United_Kingdom. ... is the 145th day of the year (146th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1972 (MCMLXXII) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... is the 172nd day of the year (173rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1972 (MCMLXXII) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... USD redirects here. ... The thriller is a broad genre of literature, film, and television. ... Director Herbert Brenon with actress Alla Nazimova on the set of War Brides, 1916 A director is a person who directs the making of a film. ... Sir Alfred Joseph Hitchcock KBE (August 13, 1899 â€“ April 29, 1980) was an iconic and highly influential British-born film director and producer who pioneered many techniques in the suspense and thriller genres. ... Penultimate can mean next to last in a general context, but is used most often in linguistics as an adjective or noun to denote or refer to the penult of a word/ penultimate stress. ... Ronald Alfred Goodwin (February 17, 1925 – January 8, 2003) was a British composer and conductor best known for his film scores. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ...

Contents

Production

The film is based upon the novel Goodbye Piccadilly, Farewell Leicester Square by Arthur La Bern, and was adapted for the screen by Anthony Shaffer. La Bern later expressed his dissatisfaction with Shaffer's adaptation [1]. Goodbye Piccadilly, Farewell Leicester Square is a novel by Arthur La Berne, which was the basis for Alfred Hitchcocks film Frenzy. ... Anthony Joshua Shaffer, (May 15, 1926 – November 6, 2001), was a English dramatist. ...


After a pair of unsuccessful films depicting political intrigue and espionage, Hitchcock returned to the murder genre with this film, which tells the story of a serial killer who rapes and strangles several women in London. The narrative makes use of the familiar Hitchcock theme of an innocent man overwhelmed by circumstantial evidence and wrongly assumed to be guilty. Many critics consider Frenzy the last great Hitchcock film and a return to form after his two previous works, Topaz and Torn Curtain. Spy and Secret agent redirect here. ... Serial killers are individuals who have a history of multiple slayings of victims who were usually unknown to them beforehand. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... A narrative is a construct created in a suitable medium (speech, writing, images) that describes a sequence of fictional or non-fictional events. ... Circumstantial evidence is lesbian sex with a huge glass dildo unrelated facts that, when considered together, can be used to infer a conclusion about something unknown. ... Topaz, director Alfred Hitchcocks 51st movie, filmed between 1968 and 1969, was adapted from the book Topaz (ISBN 0-553-23547-8) by Leon Uris. ... Torn Curtain DVD cover Torn Curtain is a 1966 thriller film directed by Alfred Hitchcock, featuring his trademark characters and camera techniques. ...


Hitchcock set and filmed Frenzy in London after many years making films in the United States. The film opens with a sweeping shot along the Thames to the Tower Bridge, and while the interior scenes were filmed at Pinewood Studios, much of the location filming was done in and around Covent Garden and was an homage to the London of Hitchcock's childhood. The son of a Covent Garden merchant, Hitchcock filmed several key scenes showing the area as the working produce market that it was. Aware that the area's days as a market were numbered, Hitchcock wanted to record the area as he remembered it. According to the making-of feature on the DVD, an elderly man who remembered Hitchcock's father as a dealer in the vegetable market came to visit the set during the filming and was treated to lunch by the director. Certainly the area as seen in the film still exists, but the market no longer operates from there, and the buildings seen in the film are now occupied by restaurants and nightclubs, and the laneways where merchants and workers once carried their produce are now occupied by tourists and street performers. Several places exist with the name Thames, and the word is also used as part of several brand and company names Most famous is the River Thames in England, on which the city of London stands Other Thames Rivers There is a Thames River in Canada There is a Thames... For the bridge of the same name in California, see Tower Bridge (California). ... The gatehouse at Pinewood Studios Pinewood Studios is a major British film studio situated in Iver Heath, Buckinghamshire. ... Covent Garden is a district in London, located on the easternmost parts of the City of Westminster and the southwest corner of the London Borough of Camden. ... DVD (also known as Digital Versatile Disc or Digital Video Disc - see Etymology) is a popular optical disc storage media format. ...


Synopsis

The film has become well known for a couple of grisly key scenes. The rape and murder of the Brenda character, played by Barbara Leigh-Hunt, makes use of numerous short edits in a similar fashion to the Janet Leigh shower scene in Psycho, and this serves to heighten the images of violence and horror. Barbara Leigh-Hunt,(b. ... Janet Leigh (July 6, 1927 – October 3, 2004), born Jeanette Helen Morrison, was an American actress. ... Psycho is a 1960 suspense/horror film directed by auteur Alfred Hitchcock from the screenplay by Joseph Stefano about a psychotic killer. ...


Only one murder is depicted onscreen, as screenwriter Schaffer convinced Hitchcock that to show a second murder would be redundant. The murder of the barmaid Barbara Jane "Babs" Milligan occurs off-screen, although the audience sees her entering the killer's apartment and is left with a clear message that she will be murdered. The audience next sees the killer carrying a large sack and placing it onto the back of a lorry where it sits unobtrusively among a load of unsold potatoes ready to be transported back to Lincolnshire. He soon recalls that as he was strangling her, Babs had torn a pin from his lapel. He climbs on to the lorry to retrieve the pin from Babs' dead fingers, only to find the lorry starting off on its journey north. The killer desperately scrabbles through the sack of potatoes to find the dead woman's hand. As rigor mortis has set in, he is unable to prise the pin from her grasp until he has broken her fingers. This sequence is also composed of numerous edits to create tension and remains one of this film's most identifiable scenes. For other places with the same name, see Lincolnshire (disambiguation). ... This article is about the sign of death. ...


As in several other previous Hitchcock films, the audience is fully aware of the identity of the killer (Bob Rusk, played by Barry Foster) very early in the proceedings, and is also shown how circumstantial guilt is rapidly built up around an innocent man (Richard Blaney, played by Jon Finch). Blaney is duly apprehended by the police and jailed, all the while maintaining his innocence. The investigating detective reconsiders the previous events and begins to believe that he has arrested the wrong man. In several scenes showing the detective's domestic situation, comedy is used to heighten the grisly nature of the death scenes. (John) Barry Foster born in Beeston, Nottinghamshire, England on 21 August 1927, died 11 February 2002, of a heart attack while being cared for at the Royal Surrey Hospital in Guildford. ... This article is about the emotion. ... Jon Finch (born March 2, 1941 in Caterham, Surrey) is an English actor noted for many Shakespearean roles. ... Gumshoe redirects here. ... A comedy is a dramatic performance of a light and amusing character, usually with a happy conclusion to its plot. ...


The detective and his wife discuss the case and the wife gently points the detective in the right direction with a series of simple but appropriate questions and comments. The innocent man escapes from prison, and the detective knows that he will head to Rusk's flat at Covent Garden, so immediately goes there. Blaney has already arrived to find that the door to Rusk's flat is unlocked. He silently creeps in and sees what he presumes to be the top of Rusk's head, asleep in bed; he strikes the body with a metal bar. Just then the audience is shown the truth: it is not Rusk in bed, but another woman whose hand slips out from under the covers. Blaney pulls the covers back and there both for him and the audience it is confirmed: the strangulated face of another victim.


Suddenly the detective bursts through the door while Blaney is still standing over the corpse in shock holding the metal bar. Blaney protests his innocence to the detective but the expression on the policeman's face is clearly one of doubt; just then they both hear Rusk carrying something large and heavy up the staircase. The detective then realises Blaney is innocent and the two men wait in the flat for the killer, the detective hiding behind the door, whilst Blaney simply stands by the bed. When Rusk arrives, he has a large trunk with him, to carry away the dead body, and with the body lying in the bed, his guilt is finally obvious. The film ends with Chief Inspector Oxford's line, "Mr. Rusk, you're not wearing your tie". The abrupt ending of the film is probably Hitchcock's inference to the audience to simply 'join the dots' i.e. Blaney will be pardoned, Rusk arrested and eventually sent to prison for life. For the Breton religious festivals, see Pardon (ceremony). ... Life imprisonment is a term used for a particular kind of sentence of imprisonment. ...


Behind the scenes

  • Alfred Hitchcock's cameo is a signature occurrence in most of his films. In Frenzy he can be seen (three minutes into the film) in the center of a crowd scene wearing a bowler hat. Teaser trailers show a Hitchcock-like dummy floating in the Thames River and Hitchcock introducing the audience to Covent Garden via the fourth wall.
  • Henry Mancini was hired to do the score, but Hitchcock hated the very first theme he wrote, and fired him immediately.
  • Michael Caine was Hitchcock's first choice for the role of Rusk, but Caine thought the character was disgusting and said "I don't want to be associated with the part". Caine would later play a transvestite serial killer in the gory Brian De Palma thriller Dressed to Kill. Barry Foster was cast after Hitchcock saw him in Twisted Nerve. Vanessa Redgrave reportedly turned down the role of Brenda, and David Hemmings (who had co-starred with Redgrave in Blow-Up) was considered to play Blaney.

It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with List of Alfred Hitchcock cameo appearances. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Trailer (film). ... Thames River may refer to: The River Thames in England, United Kingdom is often mistakenly called the Thames River by people from abroad. ... Covent Garden is a district in London, located on the easternmost parts of the City of Westminster and the southwest corner of the London Borough of Camden. ... The fourth wall is the imaginary wall at the front of the stage in a proscenium theater, through which the audience sees the action in the world of the play. ... Henry Mancini (April 16, 1924 – June 14, 1994), was an Academy Award winning American composer, conductor and arranger. ... This article is about the English actor. ... Brian De Palma (born Brian Russell DePalma on September 11, 1940 in Newark, New Jersey) is a controversial American film director, best known for directing the Al Pacino classic Scarface, and the Academy Award-winning The Untouchables. ... Dressed to Kill is a 1980 horror film written and directed by Brian de Palma. ... Barry Foster Barry Foster was an american football running back in the National Football League. ... Twisted Nerve is a 1968 film about a disturbed young man, Martin, whose mother treats him like a small boy. ... Vanessa Redgrave, CBE (born 30 January 1937) is an Academy Award winning English actress and member of the Redgrave family, one of the enduring theatrical dynasties. ... David Hemmings in Blowup David Hemmings (18 November 1941 – 3 December 2003) was an English movie actor and director, whose most famous role was the photographer in Michelangelo Antonionis Blowup in 1966 (opposite Vanessa Redgrave), one of the films that best represented the spirit of the 1960s. ... Look up blow up in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...

External links

  • Frenzy at the Internet Movie Database
  • Frenzy at Allmovie
  • Online review of Frenzy
  • 'Frenzy' Screenshot Gallery
  • Frenzy Eyegate Gallery

For the in-memory database management system, see In-memory database. ...

References

  1. ^ Letters to the Editor: Hitchcock's "Frenzy", The Times, 29th May 1972
// Complete filmography Silent films British films American films Television episodes Alfred Hitchcock Presents: Revenge (1955) Alfred Hitchcock Presents: Breakdown (1955) Alfred Hitchcock Presents: The Case of Mr. ... Sir Alfred Joseph Hitchcock KBE (August 13, 1899 â€“ April 29, 1980) was an iconic and highly influential British-born film director and producer who pioneered many techniques in the suspense and thriller genres. ... In 1922 Alfred Hitchcock obtained his first shot at directing for Gainsborough Pictures with the film Number 13 (or Mrs. ... Always Tell Your Wife is a 1923 short comedy film directed by Hugh Croise and an uncredited Alfred Hitchcock. ... The Pleasure Garden is a 1925 film, and the debut feature of Alfred Hitchcock. ... The Mountain Eagle was Alfred Hitchcocks second silent film as director, released in 1926, following The Pleasure Garden. ... The Lodger: A Story of the London Fog often just called The Lodger was a 1927 silent film directed by Alfred Hitchcock. ... Downhill is a 1927 film directed by Alfred Hitchcock. ... The Ring is a 1927 British, silent, black and white film directed and written by Alfred Hitchcock. ... The Farmer’s Wife is a silent movie, directed by Alfred Hitchcock and released in 1928. ... Champagne is a 1928 silent film by film director Alfred Hitchcock, based on an original story by English writer and critic Walter C. Mycroft. ... The Manxman is a 1929 film directed by Alfred Hitchcock. ... Blackmail (1929) was directed by Alfred Hitchcock and stars Anny Ondra, John Longden, and Cyril Ritchard, and based on the play Blackmail by Charles Bennett. ... Juno and the Paycock is a 1930 film directed by Alfred Hitchcock. ... Mary is a 1931 Alfred Hitchcock film based on Clemence Danes novel & Herbert Juttkes book. ... Elstree Calling is a 1930 film directed by Andre Charlot, Jack Hulbert, Paul Murray, and Alfred Hitchcock as a homage to vaudeville made to look like an early TV special. ... The Skin Game is a 1931 film by Alfred Hitchcock, based on a play by John Galsworthy. ... Number Seventeen is a 1932 film directed by Alfred Hitchcock based on a stage play by J. Jefferson Fargeon. ... Rich and Strange is a 1932 film direced by Alfred Hitchcock during his time in the British film industry. ... Waltzes from Vienna is a 1933 film directed by Alfred Hitchcock. ... The Man Who Knew Too Much is a 1934 suspense film directed by Alfred Hitchcock. ... The 39 Steps is a 1935 film directed by Alfred Hitchcock, based on the adventure novel The Thirty-nine Steps by John Buchan. ... For other uses, see Secret agent (disambiguation). ... Sabotage is a 1936 British film directed by Alfred Hitchcock, which tells the story of Carl Verloc (played by Oscar Homolka), a terrorist from an unnamed European country, who conducts a series of attacks in London. ... Young and Innocent (U.S. title: The Girl Was Young) is a British film (1937) directed by Alfred Hitchcock starring Nova Pilbeam, Derrick De Marney and John Longden. ... The Lady Vanishes is a 1938 film directed by Alfred Hitchcock. ... Jamaica Inn is a film made by Alfred Hitchcock adapted from Daphne du Mauriers novel of the same name, in 1939, the first of three of du Mauriers works that Hitchcock adapted. ... Rebecca is a 1940 psychological thriller directed by Alfred Hitchcock as his first American project. ... Foreign Correspondent is a 1940 film which tells the story of an American reporter who becomes involved in espionage in England during the onset of World War II. It stars Joel McCrea, George Sanders, Laraine Day, Herbert Marshall, Albert Bassermann and Robert Benchley. ... For other uses see Mr. ... Suspicion (1941) is a film noir directed by Alfred Hitchcock starring Cary Grant and Joan Fontaine as a married couple. ... Saboteur is a 1942 Universal film directed by Alfred Hitchcock with a screenplay written by Peter Viertel and Joan Harrison. ... For other uses, see Shadow of a Doubt (disambiguation). ... Lifeboat is a 1944 World War II war film, directed by Alfred Hitchcock from a story written by John Steinbeck. ... Aventure Malgache is a 1944 French language propaganda short film made by Alfred Hitchcock for the British Ministry of Information. ... Bon Voyage is a 1944 French language propaganda short film made by Alfred Hitchcock for the British Ministry of Information. ... Spellbound is a 1945 psychological thriller and mystery film directed by Alfred Hitchcock. ... Notorious is a 1946 thriller directed and produced by Alfred Hitchcock, and starring Cary Grant and Ingrid Bergman as two people whose lives become intimately entangled during an espionage operation. ... The Paradine Case was a 1947 courtroom drama movie, directed by Alfred Hitchcock, produced by David O. Selznick. ... Rope (1948) is an Alfred Hitchcock classic film notable for its single location covered in what appeared to be just a few continuous shots. ... Under Capricorn is a 1949 film directed by Alfred Hitchcock based on a novel by Helen Simpson. ... Stage Fright DVD cover Stage Fright is a 1950 Warner Bros. ... Strangers on a Train is a film released in 1951 by Warner Bros. ... I Confess is a 1953 film directed by Alfred Hitchcock starring Montgomery Clift as Fr. ... Dial M for Murder is a 1954 Warner Brothers film directed by Alfred Hitchcock starring Grace Kelly and Ray Milland as a married couple. ... For the 1998 remake, see Rear Window (1998 film). ... To Catch a Thief is a 1955 film directed by Alfred Hitchcock, starring Cary Grant, Grace Kelly, Jessie Royce Landis and John Williams. ... The Trouble with Harry is an American black comedy film directed by Alfred Hitchcock, which was released on October 3, 1955 in the United States. ... The Man Who Knew Too Much is a 1956 suspense film directed by Alfred Hitchcock, starring James Stewart and Doris Day. ... The Wrong Man is a 1956 film by Alfred Hitchcock which stars Henry Fonda and Vera Miles. ... Vertigo (1958) is a psychological thriller directed by Alfred Hitchcock, and starring James Stewart, Kim Novak, and Barbara Bel Geddes. ... This article is about the film. ... Psycho is a 1960 suspense/horror film directed by auteur Alfred Hitchcock from the screenplay by Joseph Stefano about a psychotic killer. ... The Birds is a 1963 horror film by Alfred Hitchcock, loosely based on the short story The Birds by Daphne du Maurier. ... Marnie is a 1964 psychological thriller directed by Alfred Hitchcock and based on the novel Marnie by Winston Graham. ... Torn Curtain DVD cover Torn Curtain is a 1966 thriller film directed by Alfred Hitchcock, featuring his trademark characters and camera techniques. ... Topaz, director Alfred Hitchcocks 51st movie, filmed between 1968 and 1969, was adapted from the book Topaz (ISBN 0-553-23547-8) by Leon Uris. ... Family Plot is a 1976 Universal motion picture directed by Alfred Hitchcock and starring Karen Black, Bruce Dern, Barbara Harris and William Devane, with Cathleen Nesbitt. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with List of Alfred Hitchcock cameo appearances. ... Projects developed by Alfred Hitchcock but not realized: // Greenmantle (1939 – 1942) Hitchcock very much wanted to direct a follow-up to The 39 Steps, and he felt that Greenmantle was a superior book. ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
Frenzy (782 words)
Frenzy (1972) is a crime thriller film directed by Alfred Hitchcock, and is the second last feature film of his extensive career.
The film is based upon the novel Goodbye Picadilly, Farewell Leicester Square by Arthur La Berne and was adapted for the screen by Anthony Schaffer.
Hitchcock set and filmed Frenzy in London after many years making films in the United States.
Frenzy - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (828 words)
The film is based upon the novel Goodbye Picadilly, Farewell Leicester Square by Arthur La Berne and was adapted for the screen by Anthony Shaffer.
The narrative made use of the familiar Hitchcock theme of an innocent man overwhelmed by circumstantial evidence and wrongly assumed to be guilty.
On a 2004 AandE Biography episode on serial killer Joel Rifkin, Rifkin tells an interviewer that he was inspired to strangle his victims after watching the Alfred Hitchcock movie thriller, Frenzy.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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