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Encyclopedia > French fries
French Fries/Chips
In a bowl.
Origin Information
Alternate Names(s): Chips
Fries
French-fried potatoes
Country of Origin : Multiple claims
Dish Information
Course Served : Side Dish
Serving Temperature : Hot
Main Ingredient(s) : Potatoes

French fries (North America; sometimes not capitalized[1]), chips (United Kingdom, Republic of Ireland, and many Commonwealth nations), fries,[2] or French-fried potatoes (formal) are pieces of potato that have been deep-fried. A distinction is sometimes made between fries and chips, whereby North Americans refer to any pieces of fried potatoes as fries, while in the UK, long thin strips of potatoes are sometimes called fries to contrast them with the thickly cut strips, which are always referred to as chips.[3] Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2605x1788, 1000 KB) Beschreibung Licensing File links The following pages link to this file: French fries Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner used to create or digitize it. ... North American redirects here. ... The Commonwealth of Nations as of 2008. ... For other uses, see Potato (disambiguation). ... A Deep fried Twinkie Breaded, deep-fried squid Deep frying is a cooking method whereby food is submerged in hot oil or fat. ...

Contents

Etymology

Oven baked
Oven baked

The straightforward explanation of the term is that it means potatoes fried in the French sense of the verb "to cook", which can mean either sautéing or deep-grease frying, while its French origin, frire, unambiguously means deep-frying : frites being its past participle used with a plural feminine substantive, as in pommes de terre frites ("deep-fried potatoes").[4][5] Thomas Jefferson, famous for serving French dishes, wrote exactly the latter French expression.[4][6][verification needed] In the early 20th century, the term "French fried" was being used for foods such as onion rings or chicken, apart from potatoes.[7][8] Image File history File linksMetadata No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File linksMetadata No higher resolution available. ... Sautéing is a method of cooking food using a small amount of fat in a shallow pan over relatively high heat. ... A Deep fried Twinkie Breaded, deep-fried squid Deep frying is a cooking method whereby food is submerged in hot oil or fat. ... In linguistics, a participle is an adjective derived from a verb. ... In linguistics, grammatical gender is a morphological category associated with the expression of gender through inflection or agreement. ... Thomas Jefferson (13 April 1743 N.S.–4 July 1826) was the third President of the United States (1801–09), the principal author of the Declaration of Independence (1776), and one of the most influential Founding Fathers for his promotion of the ideals of Republicanism in the United States. ... Onion Loaf Onion rings are a type of fast food commonly found in the United States, Canada, United Kingdom and other places. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ...


The verb "to french", though not attested until after "French fried potatoes" had appeared[citation needed], can refer to "julienning" of vegetables as is acknowledged by some dictionaries,[9] while others only refer to trimming the meat off the shanks of chops.[10] In the UK, "Frenched" lamb chops (particularly for serving as a 'rack of lamb') have the majority of the fat removed together with a small piece of fatty meat from between the ends of the chop bones, leaving mainly only the meat forming the "eye" of the chop attached. Julienning is a method of food preparation in which the food item is cut into long thin (matchstick-sized) strips. ... Shank can refer to: A major scaffold protein that interacts indirectly with both NMDA receptors and metabotropic receptors. ...


Culinary origin

Belgium

Belgians claim that "French" fries are in fact Belgian, but definitive evidence for the origin is difficult to present. Belgian historian Jo Gerard recounts that potatoes were already fried in 1680 in the Spanish Netherlands, in the area of "the Meuse valley between Dinant and Liège, Belgium. The poor inhabitants of this region allegedly had the custom of accompanying their meals with small fried fish, but when the river was frozen and they were unable to fish, they cut potatoes lengthwise and fried them in oil to accompany their meals."[11][12][13] Motto: Dutch: Eendracht maakt macht; French: Lunion fait la force; German: Einigkeit macht stark (English: Strength lies in unity) Anthem: The Brabançonne Capital Brussels Largest city Brussels Official languages Dutch, French, German Government King Prime Minister Constitutional Monarchy Albert II Guy Verhofstadt Independence Belgian Revolution 1830 Area  â€¢ Total... This article or section should be merged with Seventeen Provinces The Spanish Netherlands was a portion of the Low Countries controlled by Spain from the sixteenth to the eighteenth century. ... The Meuse (Maas) at Maastricht Meuse near Grave The Meuse (Dutch & German Maas) is a major European river, rising in France and flowing through Belgium and the Netherlands before draining into the North Sea. ... The tower of Notre-Dame, seen from the citadel Dinant is a municipality located on the River Meuse in the Belgian province of Namur, Belgium. ... Liege or Liège has several meanings: A liege is the person or entity to which one has pledged allegiance. ... For other uses, see Fish (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see River (disambiguation). ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with vegetable oil. ...


The Dutch concur with a Southern Netherlandish or Belgian origin when referring to Vlaamse frieten ('Flemish fries'). In 1857, the newspaper Courrier de Verviers devotes an article to Fritz (assumed pun with 'frites'), a Belgian entrepreneur selling French fries at fairs, calling them "le roi des pommes de terre frites". In 1862, a stall selling French fried potatoes (see frietkot) called "Max en Fritz" was established near Het Steen in Antwerp.[14][12] The Dutch (Ethnonym: Nederlanders meaning Lowlanders) are the dominant ethnic group[1] of the Netherlands[2]. They are usually seen as a Germanic people. ... The Southern Netherlands (Dutch: , Spanish: , French: ) were a part of the Low Countries controlled by Spain (Spanish Netherlands, 1579-1713), Austria (Austrian Netherlands, 1713-1794) and captured by France (1794-1815). ... For other uses, see Flanders (disambiguation). ... For the computer game by Peter Molyneux, see The Entrepreneur. ... French fries (North America; sometimes not capitalized[1]), chips (United Kingdom, Republic of Ireland, and many Commonwealth nations), fries,[2] or French-fried potatoes (formal) are pieces of potato that have been deep-fried. ... Het Steen, Antwerp, Belgium Het Steen is a historic medieval castle in the old city center of Antwerp, Belgium, one of Europes biggest ports. ...


A Belgian legend claims that the term "French" was introduced when British or American soldiers arrived in Belgium during World War I, and consequently tasted Belgian fries. They supposedly called them "French", as it was the official language of the Belgian Army at that time.[12] But the term "French fried potatoes" had been in use in America long before the Great War.[citation needed] “The Great War ” redirects here. ... Flag of Belgium The Land Component, formerly the Belgian Army, is the land-based armed force of the Belgian Armed Forces. ... Ypres, 1917, in the vicinity of the Battle of Passchendaele. ...


Whether or not Belgians invented them, "frites" became the national snack and a substantial part of both national dishes — making the Belgians their largest per capita consumers[citation needed] in Europe, and their "symbolic" creators. A snack food is seen in Western culture as a type of food that is not meant to be eaten as part of one of the main meals of the day (breakfast, lunch, supper). ... For other uses, see Europe (disambiguation). ...


France

Many Americans attribute the dish to France — although in France they are almost exclusively thought of as Belgian — and offer as evidence a notation by U.S. President Thomas Jefferson. "Pommes de terre frites à cru, en petites tranches" ("Potatoes deep-fried while raw, in small cuttings") are noted in a manuscript in Thomas Jefferson's hand (circa 1801-1809) and the recipe almost certainly comes from his French chef, Honoré Julien.[4] It is worth noting, though, that France had recently annexed what is now Belgium, and would retain control over it until the Congress of Vienna of 1815 brought it under Dutch control.[15] In addition, from 1813[16] on, recipes for what can be described as French fries, occur in popular American cookbooks. By the late 1850s, one of these mentions the term "French fried potatoes".[17] For the pop band, see Presidents of the United States of America. ... Thomas Jefferson (13 April 1743 N.S.–4 July 1826) was the third President of the United States (1801–09), the principal author of the Declaration of Independence (1776), and one of the most influential Founding Fathers for his promotion of the ideals of Republicanism in the United States. ... This article is about culinary recipes. ... For other uses, see Chef (disambiguation). ... Ceremonies during the annexation of Hawaii. ... The Congress of Vienna by Jean-Baptiste Isabey, 1819. ... For the 2005 Missy Elliott album, see The Cookbook. ...


Recipes for fried potatoes (not clearly specified how) in French cookbooks date back at least to Menon's Les soupers de la cour (1755). It is true that eating potatoes was promoted in France by Parmentier, but he did not mention fried potatoes in particular. And the name of the dish in languages other than English does not refer to France; in French, they are simply called "pommes de terres frites" or, more commonly, simply "pommes frites" or 'frites'. Antoine Parmentier Antoine-Augustin Parmentier (Montdidier August 12, 1737 – December 13, 1813) is remembered as a vocal promoter of cultivating the potato as a food source (for humans) in France and throughout Europe. ...


Spain

Some claim that the dish was invented in Spain, the first European country in which the potato appeared via the New World colonies, and assumes the first appearance to have been as an accompaniment to fish dishes in Galicia,[citation needed] from which it spread to the rest of the country and further to the Spanish Netherlands, more than a century before Belgium was created there. Frontispiece of Peter Martyr dAnghieras De orbe novo (On the New World). Carte dAmérique, Guillaume Delisle, 1722. ... This article is about a type of political territory. ... Galicia (Spain) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia /**/ @import /skins-1. ... This article or section should be merged with Seventeen Provinces The Spanish Netherlands was a portion of the Low Countries controlled by Spain from the sixteenth to the eighteenth century. ...


Professor Paul Ilegems, curator of the Friet-museum in Antwerp, Belgium, believes that Saint Teresa of Ávila fried the first chips, referring also to the tradition of frying in Mediterranean cuisine.[18][14] A curator of a cultural heritage institution (e. ... For other uses, see Antwerp (disambiguation). ... Teresa of Ávila by Peter Paul Rubens Saint Teresa of Ávila (known in religion as Teresa de Jesús, baptised as Teresa de Cepeda y Ahumada) (March 28, 1515 - October 4, 1582) was a Spanish Roman Catholic mystic and monastic reformer. ... For other uses, see Tradition (disambiguation). ... Mediterranean cuisine is the cuisine of the areas around the Mediterranean Sea. ...


Spreading popularity

United Kingdom

The first chip fried in Britain was apparently on the site of Oldham's Tommyfield Market in 1860. In Scotland, chips were first sold in Dundee, "...in the 1870s, that glory of British gastronomy – the chip – was first sold by Belgian immigrant Edward De Gernier in the city’s Greenmarket."[19] For the larger local government district, see Metropolitan Borough of Oldham. ... This article is about the country. ... For other uses, see Dundee (disambiguation). ... Gastronomy is the study of relationship between culture and food. ... Immigration is the act of moving to or settling in another country or region, temporarily or permanently. ...


United States' world-wide influence

Prepared at a restaurant with thermostat temperature control.
Prepared at a restaurant with thermostat temperature control.

Although the thicker cut English style of fried potato was already a popular dish in most Commonwealth countries, the thin style of french fries has been popularized worldwide in part by U.S.-based fast-food chains like McDonald's and Burger King. This came about through the introduction of the frozen French fry invented by the J.R. Simplot Company of Idaho in the early 1950s. Before the handshake deal between Ray Kroc of McDonald's and Jack Simplot, potatoes were hand-cut and peeled in the restaurants, but Simplot's frozen product reduced preparation time and aided the expansion of the McDonald's franchise. One of the few fast-food chains that still prepares fresh potatoes on the premises is In-N-Out Burger. Others include Nathan's Famous, Five Guys, the Canadian chain Harvey's, and Penn Station.[20] Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1600 × 1200 pixel, file size: 433 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) [Image at Flickr|http://flickr. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1600 × 1200 pixel, file size: 433 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) [Image at Flickr|http://flickr. ... Motto: (traditional) In God We Trust (official, 1956–present) Anthem: The Star-Spangled Banner Capital Washington, D.C. Largest city New York City Official language(s) None at the federal level; English de facto Government Federal Republic  - President George W. Bush (R)  - Vice President Dick Cheney (R) Independence - Declared - Recognized... Fast food is food prepared and served quickly at a fast-food restaurant or shop at low cost. ... McDonalds Corporation (NYSE: MCD) is the worlds largest chain of fast-food restaurants, primarily selling hamburgers, chicken, french fries, milkshakes and soft drinks. ... Burger King (NYSE: BKC), often abbreviated to BK, is a global chain of hamburger fast food restaurants. ... The J.R. Simplot Company, commonly referred to as Simplot, was founded in 1923 as a one-man business by 14-year-old John Richard Simplot near the small agricultural community of Declo, Idaho. ... -1... The 1950s decade refers to the years of 1950 to 1959 inclusive. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Ray Kroc (October 5, 1902 - January 14, 1984) took over and franchised the then single-restaurant McDonalds Corporation from 1955. ... John Richard Simplot (born January 4, 1909, in Dubuque, Iowa) is the founder of the J.R. Simplot Company, the largest supplier of french fries to McDonalds. ... For other uses, see Restaurant (disambiguation). ... The original In-N-Out in Baldwin Park, California only provided a basic menu for its customers. ... In-N-Out headquarters at University Tower in Irvine In-N-Out Burger is a privately owned and operated fast-food restaurant chain in the Western United States. ... The original Nathans Nathans Famous is a chain of U.S.-based fast food restaurants specializing in hot dogs. ... Five Guys is a fast casual restaurant chain that originated in the Washington, D.C. metropolitan area. ... Harveys may be a reference to: John Harvey & Sons, old established wine merchants of Bristol and makers of Harveys Bristol Cream sherry. ... Penn Station is a chain of East Coast sub restaurants found throughout the South and Midwest United States. ...


Recent developments

Pre-made french fries have been available for home-cooking since the seventies, usually having been pre-fried (or sometimes baked), frozen and placed in a sealed plastic bag.


Newer varieties of French fries include those which have been battered and breaded, and many U.S. fast-food and casual food chains have turned to dusting with kashi, dextrin and flavors coating for crispier fries with particular tastes. Results with new batterings and breadings, followed by microwaving, remain sub-standard, though oven frying may deliver reasonable fries, albeit different from the traditionally fried item.[21] Dextrins are a group of low-molecular-weight carbohydrates produced by the hydrolysis of starch. ... Microwave oven A microwave oven, or microwave, is a kitchen appliance employing microwave radiation primarily to cook or heat food. ... Oven depicted in a painting by Millet An oven is an enclosed compartment for heating, baking or drying. ...


Variants

Fried Sweet potatos served with a restaurant meal in Harvard Square
Fried Sweet potatos served with a restaurant meal in Harvard Square

French fries have numerous variants, from "thick-cut" to "shoestring", "joe joes", "crinkle", "curly" and many other names. They can also be coated with breading and spices, which include garlic powder, onion powder, black pepper, paprika and salt to create "seasoned fries", or cut thickly with the skin left on to create potato wedges, or without the skin to create "steak fries", essentially the American equivalent of the British "chip". Sometimes, French fries are cooked in the oven as a final step in the preparation (having been coated with oil during preparation at the factory): these are often sold frozen and are called "oven fries" or "oven chips". Binomial name (L.) Lam. ... For other uses, see Restaurant (disambiguation). ... Chess players in Harvard Square in August of 2005 Harvard Square is a large triangular area in the center of Cambridge, Massachusetts, at the intersection of Massachusetts Avenue, Brattle Street, and John F. Kennedy Street. ... A crouton is a small piece of dry or fried bread, often seasoned, that is used to add texture and flavour to salads, notably the Caesar salad, and in soups. ... External links Wikibooks Cookbook has more about this subject: Spice Food Bacteria-Spice Survey Shows Why Some Cultures Like It Hot Citat: ...Garlic, onion, allspice and oregano, for example, were found to be the best all-around bacteria killers (they kill everything). ... Garlic powder is a spice, or powder, made from pounding garlic. ... Wikibooks Cookbook has more about this subject: Onion powder Onion powder is a spice used in cooking. ... Binomial name L.[1] Black pepper (Piper nigrum) is a flowering vine in the family Piperaceae, cultivated for its fruit, which is usually dried and used as a spice and seasoning. ... Capsicum fruit which comes in various shapes and colours can be used to make paprika. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ...


In France, the thick-cut fries are called 'pommes Pont-Neuf'[22] or simply 'pommes frites', about 10 mm; thinner variants are 'pommes allumettes' (matchstick potatoes), ±7 mm, and 'pommes pailles' (potato straws), 3-4 mm (roughly ⅜, ¼ and ⅛ inch respectively). The two-bath technique is standard (Bocuse). 'Pommes gaufrettes' or "waffle-cut potatoes" are not typical French fried potatoes, but actually crisps obtained by quarter turning the potato before each next slide over a grater and deep-frying just once.[23] A millimetre (American spelling: millimeter, symbol mm) is an SI unit of length that is equal to one thousandth of a metre. ... An inch (plural: inches; symbol or abbreviation: in or, sometimes, ″ - a double prime) is the name of a unit of length in a number of different systems, including English units, Imperial units, and United States customary units. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Potato chips. ... A typical cheese grater. ...


A Belgian chef patented "steppegras" ('prairie grass'), his variety of extremely thin-cut French fried potatoes developed in 1968 while working in Germany. The name refers to a dish including its particular sauce, and to his restaurant.[24] For other uses, see Patent (disambiguation). ...


In Australia, the United Kingdom, Ireland and elsewhere, the term "French fries" was made popular by American fast-food franchises setting up restaurants and serving narrow-cut (shoestring) fries. Traditional "chips" in the United Kingdom and Ireland are usually cut much thicker, typically between ⅜ and ½ inches (9.5-13 mm) square in cross-section and cooked twice, making them less crunchy on the outside and fluffier on the inside. Since the surface-to-volume ratio is lower, they have a lower fat content. Chips are part of the popular take-away dish fish and chips. In Australia, the UK, Ireland, and New Zealand, few towns are without a chip shop (colloquially, a chippie/chippy). An inch (plural: inches; symbol or abbreviation: in or, sometimes, ″ - a double prime) is the name of a unit of length in a number of different systems, including English units, Imperial units, and United States customary units. ... In materials science, hardness is the characteristic of a solid material expressing its resistance to permanent deformation. ... This article is about the mathematical concept. ... A serving of fish and chips Fish and chips (sometimes written fish n chips), a popular take-away food with British origins, consists of deep-fried fish in batter or breadcrumbs with deep-fried chipped (slab-cut) potatoes. ... A colloquialism is an informal expression, that is, an expression not used in formal speech or writing. ...


In an interview, Burger King president Donald Smith said that his chain's fries are sprayed with a sugar solution shortly before being packaged and shipped to individual outlets. The sugar carmelizes in the cooking fat, producing the golden color customers expect. Without it, the fries would be nearly the same color outside as inside: pasty yellow. Smith believes that McDonald's also sugar-coats its fries. McDonalds was assumed to fry their fries for a total time of about 15 to 20 minutes, and with fries fried at least twice. The fries appear to contain beef lard, or shortening.[25]


Food pairings

Besides being a popular snack in themselves, French fried potatoes as a side dish to specific food or an integral part of a named dish often typify a country: Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 450 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1536 × 2048 pixel, file size: 1. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 450 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1536 × 2048 pixel, file size: 1. ... A serving of fish and chips Fish and chips (sometimes written fish n chips), a popular take-away food with British origins, consists of deep-fried fish in batter or breadcrumbs with deep-fried chipped (slab-cut) potatoes. ... A side dish of salad accompanying a small pie A side dish, sometimes referred to as a side order or simply a side, is a food item that accompanies the entrée or main course at a meal. ...

  • In Belgium, steamed mussels: mosselen-friet (Dutch) or moules-frites (French), a popular summer dish when the mussels arrive, typically from Zeeland. Also biefstuk-friet or bifteck-frites (which may be served with beef or horse steak), with plainly seasoned fries or served with a Belgian sauce, and usually a simple salad. A quick and inexpensive traditional is a deep fried egg on top of a plate of chips.
  • In France, grilled steak: steak-frites.
  • In Spain, fried eggs: huevos con patatas.
  • In the United Kingdom, chips are a popular staple. Chip shops (or "chippies") commonly serve several dishes with chips such as cod (fish and chips) and battered sausage (sausage supper). British cafes, on the other hand, serve more traditional fare, such as fried eggs (double egg and chips).
  • In the United States, hamburgers: Burger and fries.
  • In Germany, sausage with curry-flavored ketchup: Currywurst.
  • In Norway, Finland and Sweden, kebab, hamburgers and sausages.
  • In Israel, chips are served in pita bread with breaded chicken or falafel, along with cucumber and tomato, and condiments such as hummus, tahini, or tzatziki.
  • In Chile, chips are served with fried eggs, fried onions and a steak in a national dish called Bistec a lo pobre.

Mussels A mussel is a bivalve shellfish that can be found in lakes, rivers, creeks, intertidal areas, and throughout the ocean. ... Capital Middelburg Largest city Terneuzen Queens Commissioner Karla Peijs Religion (1999) Protestant 35% Catholic 23% Area  â€¢ Land  â€¢ Water   1,788 km² (10th) 1,146 km² Population (2006)  â€¢ Total  â€¢ Density 380,186 (11th) 213/km² (10th) Anthem Zeeuws volkslied ISO NL-ZE Official website www. ... This article deals with food. ... Beef rump steak on grill pan, cooked to medium rare A steak (from Old Norse steik, roast) is a slice of meat, typically beef, or fish. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... Although widely available, fish and chips have become particularly popular in seaside towns, for example here in Hunstanton, UK. The example shows modern packaging: traditionally, vendors sold fish and chips wrapped in newspaper — a practice now largely discontinued. ... COD may refer to many different topics, including: Cash on delivery Completion of discharge, shipping College of DuPage, a public Junior College with campuses in the suburbs of Chicago Call of Duty (series), a series of computer games Canadian Oxford Dictionary Carrier onboard delivery Catastrophic optical damage, a failure mode... A serving of fish and chips Fish and chips (sometimes written fish n chips), a popular take-away food with British origins, consists of deep-fried fish in batter or breadcrumbs with deep-fried chipped (slab-cut) potatoes. ... ... This article is about the food item. ... This article is about the prepared meat. ... Currywurst Currywurst is a German dish consisting of hot pork sausage (German: wurst) cut into slices and seasoned with curry sauce (regularly consisting of ketchup or tomato paste blended with curry) and generous amounts of curry powder, or a ready-made ketchup-based sauce seasoned with curry and other spices. ... Left to right: Chenjeh Kabab, Kabab Koobideh, Jujeh Kabab in an Afghan restaurant. ... For other uses, see Pita (disambiguation). ... Not to be confused with Wienerschnitzel, an American restaurant chain. ... This article is about the Middle Eastern food. ... Hummus or hummus bi tahini (Arabic: ; ‎; Armenian Õ°Õ¡Õ´Õ¸Õ½) also spelled hamos, houmous, hommos, hommus, hummos, hummous or humus) is a dip or spread made of ground chickpeas, sesame tahini, lemon juice, and garlic. ... Tahini dip Tahini, jar 453g. ... Tzatziki in a glass bowl. ...

Accompaniments

With chili and cheese
With chili and cheese

French fries are almost always salted just after cooking. They are then served with a variety of condiments, notably ketchup, curry, curry ketchup (mildly hot mix of the former), hot or chili sauce, mustard, mayonnaise, bearnaise sauce, tartar sauce, tzatziki, feta cheese, garlic sauce, fry sauce, ranch dressing, barbecue sauce, gravy, brown sauce, vinegar (especially malt vinegar), lemon, piccalilli, pickled cucumber, gherkins, very small pickled onions, or honey.[26][27] Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution‎ (2,816 × 2,112 pixels, file size: 3. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution‎ (2,816 × 2,112 pixels, file size: 3. ... A pot of chili con carne with beans and tomatoes. ... Cheese is a solid food made from the milk of cows, goats, sheep, and other mammals. ... For other uses, see Ketchup (disambiguation). ... This article is about the dish. ... For the streetball player, see Philip Champion. ... For other uses, see Mustard. ... For the song by The Smashing Pumpkins, see Mayonaise (song). ... Bearnaise sauce (French: Sauce Béarnaise) is a sauce of butter and egg yolks flavored with tarragon and shallots, with chervil, cooked in wine and vinegar to make a glaze. ... Chicken with tartar sauce Tartar sauce or tartare sauce is a thick white sauce made from mayonnaise and finely chopped pickled cucumber, capers, onions (or chives), and fresh parsley. ... Tzatziki in a glass bowl. ... Feta (Greek φέτα, feminine gender) is a classic curd cheese in brine whose tradition dates back to Greece thousands of years ago. ... Binomial name L. Allium sativum L., commonly known as garlic, is a species in the onion family Alliaceae. ... Fry sauce is a condiment common in Utah. ... Ranch dressing is an American condiment. ... The St. ... For other uses, see Gravy (disambiguation). ... A bottle of brown sauce, as defined by British cuisine Brown sauce can refer to one of two different sauces: In French cuisine and other cuisines based on it, it generally refers to a meat stock-based gravy-like sauce. ... Vinegar is sometimes infused with spices or herbs—as here, with oregano. ... This article is about the fruit. ... Piccalilli is a mustard pickle, which generally contains gherkins, cauliflower and onions, but may contain virtually any type of vegetable. ... A deli pickle. ... The gherkin is a variety of small cucumber commonly used for pickling. ... A jar of pickled onions The pickled onion is a popular pickled food consisting of small onions pickled in a solution of vinegar and salt, often with other preservatives and flavourings. ... For other uses, see Honey (disambiguation). ...


Australia

Chips are sometimes eaten with tomato sauce (which is in fact different from traditional ketchup), but most often with salt and most shops offer a choice of plain or chicken salt (seasoned salt). When served at a Fish and Chip shop, where a thicker cut of chip is traditionally served, vinegar is also offered as a traditional accompaniment. Many shops may also offer gravy. Potato wedges are also popular which consist of a quartered, often with the skin left on, seasoned fried potato. Potato wedges are commonly eaten with sweet chilli sauce and sour cream. For other uses, see Ketchup (disambiguation). ... This article is about common table salt. ... Chicken salt is a flavoured salt composed of herbs, spices, other flavourings and sometimes monosodium glutamate (MSG). ... For other uses, see Gravy (disambiguation). ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Sweet chilli sauce is a popular condiment in Western culture. ... Blinis with sour cream and red caviar Smoked salmon, chive, cream cheese, sour cream and cucumber Slice of toasted bread with sour cream and pepper Sour cream is a dairy product rich in fats obtained by fermenting a regular cream by certain kinds of lactic acid bacteria. ...


Belgium

A typical frietkot in Brussels streets.
A typical frietkot in Brussels streets.

Even the smallest Belgian town has a frietkot (literally 'fries shack').[28] This Dutch language term also became adopted by the French speaking part of the country in addition to the French friterie; an equivalent though slightly less colloquial Dutch form for such vending stall is frietkraam, while a frituur — from French friture — can as well be in a proper shop possibly furnished with tables. Traditionally, take-away chips were picked by the fingers out of a tip bag wrapped from a square paper, while walking on the streets. By the 1970s and 80s with several meat accompaniments gaining popularity, more practical open carton boxes became standard and tiny plastic forks available. One can order a small or large portion, often three or four sizes are priced.
Fries with mayonnaise is a fastfood classic in Belgium, often eaten without any side orders. The limited choice around 1960 between a pickled herring, a cold large meatball boulet or red coloured garlic sausage cervela (both often served deep-fried later on), or a beef or (now rarely) horsemeat stew, became expanded by stoofvlees or stoofkarbonade and a wide variety of deep-fried meats as chicken legs, beef or pork sticks, minced beef and/or pork and/or chicken and/or turkey in all shapes (balls, sticks, sausages) mixed with a dosage of fat and condiments to one's preference, usually factory made. An example of an additional on-the-spot preparation is sometimes in Flanders called mammoet speciaal (mammoth special), a large frikandel (curryworst in Antwerp and Flemish Brabant) deep-fried and cut so as to put chopped onion in the V-shaped length and dressed with mayonnaise and (curry-)ketchup. The earliest of the current wide array of sauces, are mayonnaise, fritessaus or sauce pommes-frites ("fry sauce" in English--see the sections on France and the Netherlands) and a local pickle-sauce similar to piccalilli.[29][27] Though Belgians do not sprinkle vinegar on fries, they may eat them with cold mussels out of the shells preserved in vinegar, entirely uncomparable to the national dish with freshly boiled hot mussels served in the shells. Image File history File links Fritkot. ... Image File history File links Fritkot. ... This article is about the settlement itself. ... A typical friterie in Brussels Friterie in Belgium (Brussels and Wallonia) and some parts of Northern France, frituur or fritkot in flanders is a traditional chip shop serving quick service fast food. ... For the song by The Smashing Pumpkins, see Mayonaise (song). ... A very popular Scandinavian food item, pickled herring has been around for a long time. ... Frikandel A frikandel (plural frikandellen) is a Dutch snack, a sort of minced-meat hot dog. ... For the song by The Smashing Pumpkins, see Mayonaise (song). ... A deli pickle. ... Piccalilli is a mustard pickle, which generally contains gherkins, cauliflower and onions, but may contain virtually any type of vegetable. ...


United Kingdom

In the United Kingdom, chips are usually accompanied by salt and malt vinegar. Other types of vinegar (such as onion vinegar) are rarely used. The fondness for vinegar on chips has led to some outlets using spray misters, such as used for misting plants or spraying cleaning products, for the even distribution of vinegar to chips. In most of the UK, chicken nuggets and chips are popular with children. In England and Wales, gravy and curry sauce are available from some chip shops. This article is about common table salt. ... Vinegar is often infused with spices or herbs—as here, with oregano. ... The United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland is a country in western Europe, and member of the Commonwealth of Nations, the G8, the European Union, and NATO. Usually known simply as the United Kingdom, the UK, or (inaccurately) as Great Britain or Britain, the UK has four constituent... A chicken nugget is a piece of chicken, either whole or composed from a paste of finely minced meat, which is then coated in batter or breadcrumbs before being cooked. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... This article is about the country. ... For other uses, see Gravy (disambiguation). ... This article is about the dish. ... Fish and chips in wrapping paper Fish and chips is deep-fried fish in batter with deep-fried potatoes, and a popular take-away food. ...


In Northern England, Scotland and South Wales, chips and gravy is a popular dish. In parts of England, 'cheesy chips' or chips with grated cheddar thickly sprinkled on can be found. In the United Kingdom, the term french fries refers exclusively to the long thin version served in fast food establishments. The most common accompaniment for chips in England is tomato ketchup. Meals served with chips are often accompanied by mushy peas or baked beans. In the Midlands and some Northern regions of England a takeaway of chips with either mushy peas or baked beans is called a "pea mix" or "bean mix" respectively. Northern England, The North or North of England is a rather ill-defined term, with no universally accepted definition. ... This article is about the country. ... Approximate extent of South East Wales. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... , This article is about the settlement in Somerset, England. ... This article is about the condiment; for the singers, see Las Ketchup. ... A British meal of fish and chips served with mushy peas in the ramekin on the right. ... Baked beans and scrambled egg on toast. ...


In Edinburgh and Fife, a local speciality is to serve chips with salt and sauce (a mixture of brown sauce and vinegar). Often the vinegar is actually non-brewed condiment, a solution of acetic acid coloured with caramel. Fish and chips in parts of Scotland is more commonly called a 'fish supper'. For other uses, see Edinburgh (disambiguation). ... This article is about the area in Scotland. ... Non-brewed condiment is a vinegar substitute created with water, acetic acid, flavourings and caramel colour. ... R-phrases , S-phrases , , , Flash point 43 °C Related Compounds Related carboxylic; acids Formic acid; Propionic acid; Butyric acid Related compounds acetamide; ethyl acetate; acetyl chloride; acetic anhydride; acetonitrile; acetaldehyde; ethanol; thioacetic acid; acetylcholine; acetylcholinesterase Supplementary data page Structure and properties n, εr, etc. ...


In the Isle of Man, chips are traditionally served with cheese and gravy.


Republic of Ireland

In Ireland, chips are commonly served with salt and vinegar. A serving is often referred to as a single of chips. Many outlets are Italian and there is a strong tradition of Italian chippies. Many outlets also serve ships with a sauce accompaniment, the most popular being curry sauce. For meals served with chips, coleslaw is often served. Fish and chips or kebab and chips are popular take-away meals. A bowl of coleslaw Coleslaw (or cole slaw) is a salad consisting primarily and minimally of shredded, raw, white cabbage, although it often also includes shredded carrots. ... A serving of fish and chips Fish and chips (sometimes written fish n chips), a popular take-away food with British origins, consists of deep-fried fish in batter or breadcrumbs with deep-fried chipped (slab-cut) potatoes. ... Left to right: Chenjeh Kabab, Kabab Koobideh, Jujeh Kabab in an Afghan restaurant. ...


Bulgaria

In Bulgaria, a serving of fries can be ordered with a covering of sirene, a grated white brine cheese. http://malincho. ...


Canada

In Canada, French fries are the main component of a dish called 'poutine' french for "a mess": a mixture of French fries with fresh cheese curds (sometimes rasped cheese), covered with a hot gravy (usually), hot chicken sauce (much less common), or chicken BBQ sauce (rarely). This dish is invented in Pointe Gatineau, Quebec and its popularity has spread throughout Quebec and the rest of Canada. Not only now found at road-side chip stands but it is carried in national chains such as Harvey's[30] and New York Fries[31] as well as Canadian outlets of international franchises such as A&W,[32] Burger King[33] and Mc Donald's. (A similar variant, 'disco fries' is found in several New England cities.) Original flavour poutine from La Banquise with thin gravy and cheese curds Poutine (Quebec French pronunciation ) is a dish consisting of French fries topped with fresh cheese curds and covered with hot gravy (usually brown gravy) and sometimes other additional ingredients. ... Original flavour poutine from La Banquise with thin gravy and cheese curds Poutine (Quebec French pronunciation ) is a dish consisting of French fries topped with fresh cheese curds and covered with hot gravy (usually brown gravy) and sometimes other additional ingredients. ... Cheese curds are the fresh curds of cheddar cheese. ... For other uses, see Gravy (disambiguation). ... This article is about the Canadian province. ... Harveys may be a reference to: John Harvey & Sons, old established wine merchants of Bristol and makers of Harveys Bristol Cream sherry. ... New York Fries is a popular Canadian fast food restaurant that serves french fries as its main menu item. ... A&W is a brand name used by two companies: A&W Restaurants A&W Root Beer - once only at the restaurants, now available at supermarkets This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... Burger King (NYSE: BKC), often abbreviated to BK, is a global chain of hamburger fast food restaurants. ... McDonalds Corporation (NYSE: MCD) is the worlds largest chain of fast-food restaurants, primarily selling hamburgers, chicken, french fries, milkshakes and soft drinks. ... Disco fries is a dish made up of french fries covered in brown gravy, on top of which cheese is melted. ... This article is about the region in the United States of America. ...


Throughout Canada, white vinegar is a popular condiment for French fries. No other country is known to so enjoy white vinegar (as opposed to malt or other vinegars) on its fries (although it is served as an accompaniment for Fish and Chips in Australia). Most major Canadian fast-food outlets provide white vinegar packets next to their ketchup packets in their stores, and many restaurants keep white vinegar on their tables. That is not to say that the use of malt vinegar is not common – particularly amongst those of English heritage. In most traditional 'fish & chips' shops in Canada, malt vinegar is more prevalent. However, ketchup and vinegar remain the most popular condiments used on French fries in Canada.


In Newfoundland, "chips, dressing and gravy" (sometimes referred to by outsiders as "Newfie fries") comprise French fries topped with "dressing" (turkey stuffing made with summer savoury) and gravy. Another variation consists of topping the French Fries with either ground beef, hot dogs, dressing and cheese and topped with gravy. This article is about the Canadian province of Newfoundland and Labrador. ... Scene from an outport (small fishing village) in Newfoundland Newfie is a colloquial, and generally pejorative, term used in Canada for someone who is from Newfoundland. ... This article is about cooking. ... Binomial name Summer savory (Satureja hortensis) (chubrica or чубрица in Bulgarian) is the better known of the Savory species. ...


Denmark, Sweden and Norway

In Denmark, Sweden and Norway, fries are called pommes frites, literally meaning fried potatoes and pronounced "pom-frit," similarly to the original French pronunciation of pommes [de terre] frites. Pommes frites may be served with many different kinds of sauce or complements, especially ketchup or remoulade sauce, but other accompaniments are also common. French (français, langue française) is one of the most important Romance languages, outnumbered in speakers only by Spanish and Portuguese. ... For other uses, see Ketchup (disambiguation). ... Remoulade or rémoulade is a popular condiment in many countries, and was invented in France. ...


France

In France a common dish is fries and a steak called a steak-frites (steak-fries). French fries are also popular alongside the sandwich grec, roasted or fried chicken, and hamburgers. The fries are often accompagnied by ketchup, mayonnaise, "ketchup-mayo" (a mixture of the two), and sometimes a vaguely béarnaise-like sauce called "sauce pommes frites" (found also under the same name and with a similar form in French-speaking Belgium, and in Dutch-speaking Belgium and the Netherlands as fritessaus), which is available at local McDonald's restaurants and in bottled form in supermarkets.[34] Döner kebab sandwich served in a thick pita. ... Bearnaise sauce (French: Sauce Béarnaise) is a sauce of butter and egg yolks flavored with tarragon and shallots, with chervil, cooked in wine and vinegar to make a glaze. ...


Germany

In Germany, like in Scandinavia, fries are called pommes frites, accompaniments are usually limited to ketchup and mayonnaise. The two are often offered together, commonly called Pommes rot-weiß ("fries, red and white"). Although mustard may also be available at the same fast food stand to serve with Bratwurst, it is not considered a French fry condiment. Curry ketchup is a common condiment when the French fries are served with a Currywurst. Larger currywurst outlets offer a variety of atypical sauces, such as aioli, wasabi mayonnaise, and honey mustard. Bratwurst with sauerkraut and potatoes A bratwurst (IPA: ) is a sausage composed of pork, beef, and sometimes veal. ...


New Zealand

In New Zealand, hot chips are usually served salted, and tomato sauce is a popular accompaniment. At fish & chip shops, where the chips are of a thicker cut, they are usually served with fried fish fillets, and without tomato sauce, though this is frequently available at an additional cost. United States-style takeaway outlets (such as McDonald's, Burger King) usually serve thin-cut chips (KFC is a notable exception), salted, with tomato sauce as an option. Pie carts and hot-food outlets at fairgrounds, stadiums and other events usually serve thick-cut chips in a large paper cup, invariably with tomato sauce drizzled over the chips. Malt vinegar is a traditional but increasingly rare accompaniment at fish & chip shops and pie carts, usually available from a bottle on the counter where customers help themselves to their own tastes. This article does not cite any references or sources. ... McDonalds Corporation (NYSE: MCD) is the worlds largest chain of fast-food restaurants, primarily selling hamburgers, chicken, french fries, milkshakes and soft drinks. ... Burger King (NYSE: BKC), often abbreviated to BK, is a global chain of hamburger fast food restaurants. ... KFC, also known as Kentucky Fried Chicken, is a food chain based in Louisville, Kentucky, known mainly for its fried chicken. ...


Netherlands

With tartar sauce, served in a cone in the Netherlands
With tartar sauce, served in a cone in the Netherlands

In the Netherlands, fries are popular as fast food, served as patat (for the French patates frites) in vending points that often very similar to the ones in Belgium but called snackbars. Traditionally, fries are served as with mayonnaise or a lower-fat version called fritessaus, although the latter is often also referred to as mayonnaise. This combination is usually called patat met (for literally "fries with"), as opposed to patat zonder ("fries without", without any sauce). Other popular sauces are satésaus (satay sauce, a peanut sauce that is also served with the Indonesian meat sate), ketchup, speciaal (special; a mixture of chopped onions, fritessaus, and ketchup). Another interesting combination is Patat Oorlog (Dutch for: French Fries War), which is French fries with a variety of sauces, a variety that differs from region to region, and even from one snackbar to another. While it sometimes means mayonnaise (or rather, fritessaus), peanut sauce and chopped raw onions, in other places it means the fries are accompanied with all condiments available. Dutch snackbars typically offer at least 8 condiments or combinations of them (the condiments are never free in Dutch snackbars), but some serve up to 40 different styles. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2304x1728, 2607 KB) Summary Michael Rosenberg (ME), http://www. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2304x1728, 2607 KB) Summary Michael Rosenberg (ME), http://www. ... Chicken with tartar sauce Tartar sauce or tartare sauce is a thick white sauce made from mayonnaise and finely chopped pickled cucumber, capers, onions (or chives), and fresh parsley. ... For the song by The Smashing Pumpkins, see Mayonaise (song). ... Grilled beef satay. ... For other uses, see Ketchup (disambiguation). ...


When taken as fast food,, fries are often accompanied by other popular deep-fried fast foods such as the kroket and frikandel, but fries are also served as a side dish in regular restaurants. A well made fries recipe would give the fries a fried fish and pastry like fragrance. The texture of this fries indicates that it may have first been blanched before frying. The croquet or croquette (kroket in Dutch) is a popular snack in the Netherlands. ... Frikandel A frikandel (plural frikandellen) is a Dutch snack, a sort of minced-meat hot dog. ...


Philippines

In the Philippines, they are often served with a sprinkling of powdered flavors, primarily cheese, sour cream or barbecue. In some fast food chains, these are topped with cheese sauce and minced bacon. Cheese is a solid food made from the milk of cows, goats, sheep, and other mammals. ... Blinis with sour cream and red caviar Smoked salmon, chive, cream cheese, sour cream and cucumber Slice of toasted bread with sour cream and pepper Sour cream is a dairy product rich in fats obtained by fermenting a regular cream by certain kinds of lactic acid bacteria. ... A barbecue on a trailer at a block party in Kansas City. ... For other uses, see Bacon (disambiguation). ...


Poland

In Poland chips (fries) are a popular fast-food, with the Poles calling them "frytki". The usual elongated baton shape has always been the most popular, but other shapes like wedges or (more "traditional") potato slices are also a popular home dish. Another recipe mandated slicing the potatoes into rings, and then frying them, sometimes accompanied by onions. Fries are served with ketchup, mustard or garlic sauce. For other uses, see Ketchup (disambiguation). ... Look up Mustard in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...


United States

Fries with a burger, served in an American diner.
Fries with a burger, served in an American diner.

In the United States, by far the most popular condiment for fries is ketchup, so much so that consumption of restaurant fries drives ketchup sales.[35] Occasionally mustard is used, and malt vinegar mainly available at restaurants which serve fish and chips. Fries are sometimes coated with melted cheese, called cheese fries. This can be in combination with chili, making chili cheese fries. A staple at many sports bars is fries with bleu cheese dressing as a dip, or sometimes ranch dressing. Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1024x768, 112 KB) Hamburger and fries served in an American dinner. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1024x768, 112 KB) Hamburger and fries served in an American dinner. ... Look up diner in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... For other uses, see Ketchup (disambiguation). ... Look up Mustard in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Vinegar is often infused with spices or herbs—as here, with oregano. ... Disco fries, similar to the poutine of Quebec, is a dish made up of french fries covered in brown gravy, on top of which cheese is melted. ... A pot of chili con carne with beans and tomatoes. ...

Steak fries are thicker-cut fries, often with the skins intact. They are often coated with spices or marinaded before cooking. They may be fried or baked in the oven.[37] Country of origin United States Region, town Source of milk Cow Pasteurised Yes Texture thick, viscous liquid Aging time n/a Certification Cheez Whiz is a thick processed cheese sauce or spread introduced by Kraft Foods in 1952. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... This article describes a kind of cheese produced primarily in the United States and Canada. ... Binomial name L. Allium sativum L., commonly known as garlic, is a species in the onion family Alliaceae. ... For the song by The Smashing Pumpkins, see Mayonaise (song). ... Disco fries is a dish made up of french fries covered in brown gravy, on top of which cheese is melted. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Look up diner in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Chilis Grill & Bar is a chain of over 1,000 casual dining restaurants, most located in the United States. ... For other uses, see Texas (disambiguation). ... Disco fries, similar to the poutine of Quebec, is a dish made up of french fries covered in brown gravy, on top of which cheese is melted. ... Ranch dressing is an American condiment. ... A pot of chili con carne with beans and tomatoes. ... Checkers Drive-In Restaurants, Inc. ... Checkers Drive-In Restaurants Inc. ... Pittsburgh redirects here. ... The Cheese Steak variant of a Primanti Bros sandwich. ... Look up Deli in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... A bowl of coleslaw Coleslaw (or cole slaw) is a salad consisting primarily and minimally of shredded, raw, white cabbage, although it often also includes shredded carrots. ... This article deals with food. ... It has been suggested that Middle Atlantic States be merged into this article or section. ... Old Bay Seasoning is a blend of herbs and spices that is currently marketed by McCormick & Company. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... Vinegar is sometimes infused with spices or herbs—as here, with oregano. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Fry sauce is a condiment common in Utah. ... This article is about the U.S state. ... Official language(s) English Spoken language(s) English 74. ... Carne asada tacos. ... Blinis with sour cream and red caviar Smoked salmon, chive, cream cheese, sour cream and cucumber Slice of toasted bread with sour cream and pepper Sour cream is a dairy product rich in fats obtained by fermenting a regular cream by certain kinds of lactic acid bacteria. ... Guacamole // Guacamole is an avocado-based relish or dip from the time of the Aztecs. ... Carne asada fries are a local specialty found primarily in San Diego, California. ... Mexican cuisine is a style of food that originated in Mexico. ... Red states show the core of the South Central, states shown as pink may or may not be included in the South Central, and thus their inclusion or exclusion varies from source to source. ... For other uses, see Gravy (disambiguation). ... Marination, also known as marinading, is the process of soaking foods in a seasoned, often acidic, liquid before cooking. ...


Vietnam

In Vietnam, restaurants are usually found serving fries with sugar over a dollop of soft butter.


Health aspects

Cooking in oil.
Cooking in oil.

French fries can contain a large amount of fat (usually saturated) or oils from frying. Some researchers have suggested that the high temperatures used for frying such dishes may have results harmful to health (see acrylamides). In the United States about ¼ of vegetables consumed are prepared as French fries and are proposed to contribute to widespread obesity. Frying French fries in beef tallow, recently discarded from the McDonald's recipe, adds saturated fat to the diet. Replacing tallow with tropical oils such as palm oil simply substitutes one saturated fat for another. Replacing tallow with partially hydrogenated oil reduces cholesterol but adds trans fat, which has been shown to both raise LDL cholesterol and lower HDL cholesterol.[38][39][40] Many restaurants now advertise their use of unsaturated oils. Five Guys, for example, advertises their fries are prepared in peanut oil.[41] Download high resolution version (1343x1105, 196 KB)fries cooking Photograph available under GFDL license. ... Download high resolution version (1343x1105, 196 KB)fries cooking Photograph available under GFDL license. ... For other uses, see FAT. Fats consist of a wide group of compounds that are generally soluble in organic solvents and largely insoluble in water. ... Saturated fat is fat that consists of triglycerides containing only saturated fatty acids. ... Oil painting is done on surfaces with pigment ground into a medium of oil - especially in early modern Europe, linseed oil. ... R-phrases , , , , , , , S-phrases , Flash point 138 °C Autoignition temperature 424 °C Except where noted otherwise, data are given for materials in their standard state (at 25 Â°C, 100 kPa) Infobox disclaimer and references The chemical compound acrylamide (acrylic amide) has the chemical formula C3H5NO. Its IUPAC name is 2... For other uses, see Vegetable (disambiguation). ... Tallow is rendered beef or mutton fat (suet). ... McDonalds Corporation (NYSE: MCD) is the worlds largest chain of fast-food restaurants, primarily selling hamburgers, chicken, french fries, milkshakes and soft drinks. ... Palm oil from Ghana with its natural dark color visible, 2 litres Palm oil block showing the lighter color that results from boiling. ... Cholesterol is a sterol (a combination steroid and alcohol). ... A trans fatty acid (commonly shortened to trans fat) is an unsaturated fatty acid molecule that contains a trans double bond between carbon atoms, which makes the molecule less kinked compared to cis fat. Research suggests a correlation between diets high in trans fats and diseases like atherosclerosis and coronary... Low-density lipoprotein (LDL) refers to a class and range of lipoprotein particles, varying somewhat in their size and contents, which carry cholesterol in the blood and around the body, for use by various cells. ... Five Guys is a fast casual restaurant chain that originated in the Washington, D.C. metropolitan area. ...


Legal issues

In 1994, the well-known owner of Stringfellows nightclub in London, Peter Stringfellow, took exception to McCain Foods' use of the name "Stringfellows" for a brand of long thin French fries and took them to court. He lost the case (Stringfellows v McCain Food (GB) Ltd (1994)) on the basis that there was no connection in the public mind between the two uses of the name, and therefore McCain's product would not have caused the nightclub to lose any sales.[42][43] This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... Peter Stringfellow (born October 17, 1940 in South Yorkshire, UK) is a multi-millionaire businessman and minor British celebrity. ... McCain Foods Limited, a privately owned company established in 1957 by the McCain brothers in Florenceville, New Brunswick, Canada, is the worlds largest producer of french fries and other oven-ready frozen foods. ...


In New Zealand in 1995 some branches of the local fast food chain Georgie Pie took to calling their French fries "Kiwi Fries", in opposition to the French resumption of nuclear testing in the South Pacific. The Georgie Pie Logo Georgie Pie was a fast food chain owned by supermarket operator Progressive Enterprises that hoped to be New Zealand’s own homegrown alternative to the global fast-food industry giants such as McDonald’s, Pizza Hut and Burger King. ... Species See text. ...


In early 2003 some members of the US congress proposed calling French fries Freedom Fries in response to France's opposition to the proposed invasion of Iraq. By 2006 the menu at the House restaurant had reverted to calling them French fries.[44] Wikinews has related news: Capitol Hill fries and toast French again Freedom fries was a short-lived[1] name used by some in the United States for French fries, as a result of anti-French sentiment in the United States. ...


In June 2004, the United States Department of Agriculture, with the advisement of a federal district judge from Beaumont, Texas, classified batter-coated French fries as a vegetable under the Perishable Agricultural Commodities Act. Although this move was mostly for trade reasons (French fries do not meet the standard to be listed as a "processed food"), this received significant media attention partially due to the documentary Super Size Me. USDA redirects here. ... Location in the state of Texas Coordinates: , Counties Settled 1835 Incorporation 1838 Gentilic Beaumonter Government  - Type Council-Manager  - Mayor Becky Ames  - City Manager Kyle Hayes  - Mayor Pro - Tem Nancy Beaulieu Area  - City 222. ... For other uses, see Vegetable (disambiguation). ... Agricultural Marketing Service - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia /**/ @import /skins-1. ... Food preservation is the process of treating and handling food in such a way as to stop or greatly slow down spoilage to prevent foodborne illness while maintaining nutritional value, texture and flavor. ... Super Size Me is an Academy Award-nominated 2004 documentary film, directed by and starring Morgan Spurlock, an American independent filmmaker. ...


See also

A Deep fried Twinkie Breaded, deep-fried squid Deep frying is a cooking method whereby food is submerged in hot oil or fat. ... A chip pan is a deep cooking pan used to fry chips, where the pan is filled with oil or fat, and the sliced potatoes added. ... Deep fryer for restaurant use. ... Vacuum fryers were originally developed for the potato chip production as they are fit to process low-quality potatoes that contain higher reducing sugar levels than normal, as they frequently have to be processed in spring and early summer before the potatoes from the new harvest become available. ... Fry sauce is a condiment common in Utah. ... Home fries are a type of potato dish made by frying diced, shredded, or sliced potatoes that have been par-cooked by boiling, baking, steaming, or microwaving. ... Wikinews has related news: Capitol Hill fries and toast French again Freedom fries was a short-lived[1] name used by some in the United States for French fries, as a result of anti-French sentiment in the United States. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...

Notes

  1. ^ Merriam-Webster Online Dictionary
  2. ^ The American Heritage Dictionary, Fourth Edition, 2000
  3. ^ Halliburton, Rachel & Muir, Jenni (2008), “London's best chips”, Time Out London: 2, <http://www.timeout.com/london/restaurants/features/3254/2.html>. Retrieved on 14 May 2008 
  4. ^ a b c Hess, Karen (Nov 2005). "The Origin of French Fries". PPC (Petits Propos Culinaires), journal of food studies and food history (3×/year by Prospect Books, Devon) (68): p. 39 Retrieved on 23 Mar 2007. 
  5. ^ Objets de la recherche : frite (French). ATILF Analyse et traitement informatique de la langue française, TLFi Le trésor de la langue française informatisé. Retrieved on 23 Mar 2007. “Part. passé substantivé au fém. de frire*, p. ell. de pommes de terre dans le syntagme pommes de terre frites.”
  6. ^ Fishwick, Marshall W. "fee required The Savant as Gourmet". The Journal of Popular Culture vol 32 (part 1): p. 51-58. Oxford: Blackwell Publishing. doi:10.1111/j.0022-3840.1998.3201_51.x. ISSN 0022-3840. 
  7. ^ Mackenzie, Catherine (7 Apr 1935). "Food the City Likes Best". The New York Times Magazine: SM18. Retrieved on 2007-04-15. “… the chef at the Rainbow Room launches into a description of his special steak, its French-fried onion rings, its button mushrooms …” 
  8. ^ Rorer, Sarah Tyson [c1902]. "Page 211", Mrs. Rorer's New Cook Book. Philadelphia: Arnold & Company, p. 211. Retrieved on 2007-04-12. “French Fried Chicken” 
  9. ^ "french : (...) Usage: often capitalized – 1 : to trim the meat from the end of the bone of (as a chop) – 2 : to cut (green beans) in thin lengthwise strips before cooking" (Merriam-Webster's Collegiate Dictionary, 10th ed.)
  10. ^ "to French: to prepare, as a chop, by partially cutting the meat from the shank and leaving bare the bone so as to fit it for convenient handling" (Oxford English Dictionary)
  11. ^ Specialities: Frites. Belgian Federal Government. Retrieved on 25 Oct 2006.
  12. ^ a b c Geschiedenis van de friet (Dutch). Fritkot Max. Retrieved on 25 Oct 2006.
  13. ^ Creemers, Jochen & Willekens, Kurt. Geschiedenis (Dutch). De Frietsite (JC webdesign) © 2003-2004. Retrieved on 25 Oct 2006.
  14. ^ a b Ilegems, Paul [1993]. De Frietkotcultuur (in Dutch). Loempia. ISBN 90-6771-325-2. 
  15. ^ Ebeling, Charles (2005-10-31). French fried: From Monticello to the Moon, A Social, Political and Cultural Appreciation of the French Fry. The Chicago Literary Club. Retrieved on 12 Jan 2007.
  16. ^ Ude, Louis. The French Cook
  17. ^ Warren, Eliza [uncertain: 1856, 1859?]. (at Google books) The economical cookery book for housewives, cooks, and maids-of-all-work, with hints to the mistress and servant. London: Piper, Stephenson, and Spence, p. 88. OCLC 27869877. “French fried potatoes” 
  18. ^ Schoetens, Marc. "Heilige Teresa bakte de eerste frieten", De Morgen, December 13, 2005. (Dutch)  (Feb 25, 2007 found archived as "Nieuw boek van frietprofessor Paul Ilegems over frietkotcultuur" 20051213.3133206672696574)
  19. ^ Dundee Fact File. Dundee City Council. Retrieved on 20 Mar, 2007.
  20. ^ Green, Frank (27 Jul 2003). In-N-Out Burger carves niche in the fast-food market. QSRWeb, portal for the Quick Service Restaurant industry. Retrieved on 24 Mar 2007.
  21. ^ Gerdes, Sharon (1 Dec 2001). Batters and Breadings Liven Tastes. Virgo Publishing © – Food Product Design. Retrieved on 24 Mar 2007.
  22. ^ Evelyn Saint-Ange, Paul Aratow (translator), La Bonne Cuisine de Madame E. Saint-Ange: The Essential Companion for Authentic French Cooking, Larousse, 1927, translation Ten Speed Press, 2005, ISBN 1-580-08605-5, p. 553.
  23. ^ Les pommes gauffrettes (French). 'Chef Simon' Sabine et Bertrand SIMON. Retrieved on 9 Apr 2007.
  24. ^ Steppegras (Dutch). Restaurant Steppegras. Retrieved on 17 Apr 2007.
  25. ^ Poundstone, William [1983]. Big Secrets. William Morrow and Co., 23. ISBN 0-688-04830-7. 
  26. ^ Side Dishes: International French Fries. Food Services of America. Retrieved on 28 Nov 2006.
  27. ^ a b Les sauces servies traditionnellement avec les frites en Belgique: Les pickles belges (Belgian Pickles) (French). belgourmet. Retrieved on 12 Jan 2007.
  28. ^ Whether Herstappe's eighty-odd inhabitants have a 'frietkot'? Belgium's smallest municipality Saint-Josse-ten-Noode has at least one. frite(rie)s. EuroBRU portail de la capitale de l'Europe. Retrieved on 2007-07-27.
    *The figure of speech is obviously not exaggerated:
    * Bouillon, Pierre; Bodeux, Jean-Luc; D'Artois, Didier; De Boeck, Philippe; Deffet, Eric; Dellisse, Daniel; Detaille, Stéphane; Du Brulle, Christian; Fiorilli, Thierry; Huon, Julie; Lamquin, Véronique; Lefèvre, Gabrielle; Leroy, Marcel; Maron, Guy; Meuwissen, Eric; Moreau, Catherine; Pierre, Philippe; Saint-Ghislain, Valéry; Surmont, Eddy; Vanham, Vincent (2005-06-30). "Ouske c'est chez nous" (in French). Le Soir, édition Namur/Luxembourg: p. 1. Retrieved on 2007-07-27.  (See heading 'Fritkot')
    * Sambre, Pierre. "Belgitude > La frite dorée ; Gloire nationale: l'eclosion du cornet cool" (in French). Le Tribune de Bruxelles, free with newspapers La Libre Belgique, La Dernière Heure, etc: p. 40. Retrieved on 2007-07-27. 
  29. ^ Franquin (1973). Gaston Lagaffe aka Guust Flater: Gare aux gaffes d'un gars gonflé (jpg) (French). Editions Dupuis. Retrieved on 12 Jan 2007. “en crocquant quelques frites... Hmum.. Délicieuses...avec des pickles. (while eating some fries... Hmm.. Delightful... with piccalilly [Belgian pickles])” (publication date showing a sauce, outside Belgium rarely used with fries, to have been typical before far more kinds became available)
  30. ^ http://www.harveys.ca/eng/nutritional_info/Harveys_NAG_V2.pdf
  31. ^ http://www.southstburger.com/pdf/SOUTH_ST-launch_release4.pdf
  32. ^ Poutine - Large
  33. ^ Burger King - Our menu
  34. ^ "Sauce pommes frites" in Benedicta's "Oh Ouizz!" line
  35. ^ Vegetable Consumption Away from Home on the Rise
  36. ^ Sunset Grille Menu. Sunset Grille. Retrieved on 27 Jun 2006.
  37. ^ Oven Steak Fries
  38. ^ Fats and Cholesterol. Harvard School of Public Health. Retrieved on 14 Sep 2006.
  39. ^ Trans: The Phantom Fat. Nutrition Action Healthletter (Center for Science in the Public Interest). Retrieved on 14 Sep 2006.
  40. ^ Mayo Clinic Staff (22 Jun 2006). Dietary fats: Know which types to choose © 1998-2006. Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research (MFMER). Retrieved on 14 Sep 2006.
  41. ^ Five Guys
  42. ^ Sequel opportunities. AKME Publications – Akme Student Law Library, with permission: earlier published in the New Law Journal, 25 March 1994 and in abriged form in The Author of Spring 1994. Retrieved on 2007-03-25.
  43. ^ Section 7 – Intellectual Property (pdf). Semple Piggot Rochez Ltd (2001). Retrieved on 2007-03-25.
  44. ^ Bellantoni, Christina. "Hill fries free to be French again ; GOP in House mum about it", Washington Times, 2006-08-02, pp. A.01. Retrieved on 2008-01-07. 

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References

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
French fries
Wikibooks
Wikibooks Cookbook has an article on
French Fries
  • Bocuse, Paul. La Cuisine du marché, Paris, 1992.
  • Tebben, Maryann. “French” Fries: France’s Culinary Identity from Brillat-Savarin to Barthes (essay). online journal Convivium Artium: Food Representation in Literature, Film, and the Arts © 2006. Department of Modern Languages and Literatures, University of Texas at San Antonio. Retrieved on 7 Dec 2006.

Image File history File links Wikibooks-logo-en. ... Wikibooks logo Wikibooks, previously called Wikimedia Free Textbook Project and Wikimedia-Textbooks, is a wiki for the creation of books. ... December 7 is the 341st day (342nd in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links

  • News on French Fries and Potato Processing
  • The Official French Fries Pages -- information and fan site

Notes


  Results from FactBites:
 
The Secret History of French Fries (1835 words)
French claim it was one of their countrymen, while the Belgians fiercely hold that it was one of their own who first frenched a fry.
Although today fries are commonly eaten in many other countries, they are only associated with the Gallic culture here in the U.S. French fries were born to be fast food.
Today, French fries account for more than one-fourth of all potatoes sold in the U.S. market—over six million pounds of potatoes are processed into frozen fries annually.
French fries - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (3469 words)
The Spanish claim for originating French fries claims the first appearance of the recipe to have been in Galicia, where it was used as an accompaniment for fish dishes, and from which it spread to the rest of the country and then to Belgium.
In Utah, and the surrounding area, French fries are often served with fry sauce, a mixture of spices, mayonnaise, and ketchup.
In the Canadian provinces of Quebec and New Brunswick, French fries are the main component of a dish called poutine: a mixture of French fries with fresh cheese curds, covered with a hot gravy, optionally with browned ground beef and/or a vegetable such as green peas mixed in.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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