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Encyclopedia > French franc
French franc
franc francès (Catalan)
franc français (French)
20 franc coin 1 franc coin
20 franc coin 1 franc coin
ISO 4217 Code FRF
User(s) Monaco, Andorra, France except New Caledonia, French Polynesia, and Wallis and Futuna
ERM
Since 13 March 1979
Fixed rate since 31 December 1998
Replaced by €, non cash 1 January 1999
Replaced by €, cash 1 January 2002
= 6.55957 ₣
Pegged by KMF, XAF & XOF, XPF, ADF, MCF
Subunit
1/100 centime
Symbol ₣ (rare). Most people used F or FF
Nickname balle (≥1₣)

bâton, patate, plaque, brique (10,000₣) Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ...  Eurozone countries  ERM II countries  other EU countries  unilaterally adopted euro The European Exchange Rate Mechanism, ERM, was a system introduced by the European Community in March 1979, as part of the European Monetary System (EMS), to reduce exchange rate variability and achieve monetary stability in Europe, in preparation for... March 13 is the 72nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (73rd in leap years). ... Also: 1979 by Smashing Pumpkins. ... December 31 is the 365th day of the year (366th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1998 Gregorian calendar). ... January 1 is the first day of the calendar year in both the Julian and Gregorian calendars. ... Year 1999 (MCMXCIX) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full 1999 Gregorian calendar). ... January 1 is the first day of the calendar year in both the Julian and Gregorian calendars. ... For album titles with the same name, see 2002 (album). ... “EUR” redirects here. ... A fixed exchange rate, sometimes (less commonly) called a pegged exchange rate, is a type of exchange rate regime wherein a currencys value is matched to the value of another single currency or to a basket of other currencies, or to another measure of value, such as gold. ... ISO 4217 Code KMF User(s) Comoros Inflation rate 3% Source CIA World Fact Book, 2005 est. ... now. ... ISO 4217 Code XPF User(s) New Caledonia, French Polynesia, and Wallis and Futuna Inflation 2. ... The Monégasque franc was one of the official currencies of the Principality of Monaco until 2002, when it changed to the Euro. ... Centime is French for cent, and is used in English as the name of the fraction currency in several Francophone countries (including Switzerland and formerly France), where it is one hundredth of a franc. ...

Coins
Freq. used 5, 10, 20 centimes, ½₣, 1₣, 2₣, 5₣, 10₣
Rarely used 20₣
Banknotes 20₣, 50₣, 100₣, 200₣, 500₣
Central bank Banque de France
Website www.banque-france.fr
Mint Monnaie de Paris
Website www.monnaiedeparis.com
This infobox shows the latest status before this currency was rendered obsolete.
¤Currency signs

฿¢ • ₫ • ƒ • ₲ •
£PRS/.
R$$ • ₮ • ¥Lm • $ One of the Banque de Frances offices in Paris. ... A mint is a facility which manufactures coins for currency. ... The Monnaie de Paris (Paris Mint) or, more administratively speaking, the Direction of Coins and Medals, is an administration of the French government charged with issuing coins, as well as producing medals and other similar items. ... The currency sign (¤) is the character used by any societies when the symbol for their own currency is unavailable. ... A currency sign is a graphic symbol often used as a shorthand for a currencys name. ... ISO 4217 Code THB User(s) Thailand Inflation 4. ... The cedi is the unit of currency of Ghana, Africa. ... A two-cent euro coin A United States penny, or 1¢ In currency, the cent is a monetary unit that equals 1/100 of the basic unit of value. ... The colón is the currency of two Central American nations: Costa Rica (ISO 4217 three-letter currency code: CRC) see Costa Rican colón El Salvador (ISO 4217: SVC) – since 2001 used in parallel with the United States dollar; see dollarization, El Salvador colón. ... ISO 4217 Code VND User(s) Vietnam Inflation 7. ... The euro (€; ISO 4217 code EUR) is the currency of twelve of the twenty-five nations that form the European Union (and four outside it, as well as Montenegro and Kosovo), which form the Economic and Monetary Union (EMU). ... Æ’ The florin sign (Æ’) is a symbol that is used for the currencies florin, also called a gulden and guilder. ... The guaraní (plural: guaraníes; ISO 4217 code PYG) is the national currency unit of Paraguay. ... Kip is the currency of Laos. ... The Pound sign (£) is the symbol for Pound sterling, the currency of the United Kingdom, and some other currencies of the same name in other countries. ... The Pound sign (£) is the symbol for Pound sterling, the currency of the United Kingdom, and some other currencies of the same name in other countries. ... The mill or mille(â‚¥) (sometimes mil in the UK) is an abstract unit of currency. ... naira sign The naira is the currency of Nigeria. ... ISO 4217 Code PHP User(s) Philippines Inflation 7. ... ISO 4217 Code BWP User(s) Botswana Inflation 10. ... ISO 4217 Code ZAR User(s) Common Monetary Area: Lesotho, Namibia, South Africa, and Swaziland Inflation 5. ... It has been suggested that History of the rupee be merged into this article or section. ... ISO 4217 Code BDT User(s) Bangladesh Inflation 7% Source The World Factbook, 2005 est. ... Centennial of the Battle of Callao in 1866 during the Chincha Islands War The sol, later known as the sol de oro, was the currency of Peru between 1863 and 1985. ... ISO 4217 Code BDT User(s) Bangladesh Inflation 7% Source The World Factbook, 2005 est. ... ISO 4217 Code BRL User(s) Brazil Inflation 3. ... $ The dollar sign ($) is a symbol primarily used to indicate a unit of currency. ... ISO 4217 Code MNT User(s) Mongolia Inflation 9. ... â‚© The won sign (â‚©) is a symbol that is used for the currencies: North Korean won South Korean won Woolong, a fictional currency in Cowboy Bebop Categories: | ... Â¥9 Chinese price sticker Â¥ is a currency sign used for the following currencies: Chinese yuan (CNY) Japanese yen (JPY) The base unit of the two currencies above share the same Chinese character (圓/å…ƒ/円), pronounced yuan in Mandarin Chinese and en in Standard Japanese. ... ISO 4217 Code UAH User(s) Ukraine Inflation 11. ... ₪ ₪ is a currency sign that is used for the Israeli new sheqel currency which replaced the Israeli sheqel in 1985. ... The Maltese lira, known in the Maltese language as the Lira Maltija, is the currency of Malta. ... Cifrão on 2. ...

Former signs

The austral was the currency of Argentina between 1985 and 1991. ... // First Cruzeiro, 1942-1967 The cruzeiro (Cr$) was the monetary unit of Brazil from 1942 to 1986. ... The pfennig was a small German coin valued at 1/100 of a Deutsche Mark and other German currencies with the name Mark. ... ISO 4217 Code GRD User(s) Greece Inflation 3. ... The European Currency Unit (₠; ECU) was a basket of the currencies of the European Community member states, used as the unit of account of the European Community before being replaced by the euro. ... ISO 4217 Code DEM User(s) Germany, Montenegro, Kosovo ERM Since 13 March 1979 Fixed rate since 31 December 1998 Replaced by €, non cash 1 January 1999 Replaced by €, cash 1 January 2002 € = 1. ... ISO 4217 Code ESP User(s) Spain, Andorra Inflation 1. ...


Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ...

The franc (represented by the franc sign ₣ or more commonly just F) is a former currency of France. Between 1360 and 1641, it was the name of coins worth 1 livre tournois and it remained in common parlance as a term for this amount of money. It was re-introduced (in decimal form) in 1795 and remained the national currency until the introduction of the euro in 1999 (for accounting purposes) and 2002 (coins and banknotes). Look up F, f in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... The livre tournois (or Tournoise pound) was a currency used in France, named after the town of Tours, in which it was minted. ... The livre was the currency of France until 1795. ... 1795 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... “EUR” redirects here. ... Year 1999 (MCMXCIX) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full 1999 Gregorian calendar). ... For album titles with the same name, see 2002 (album). ...

Contents

History

Before the French Revolution

The franc was introduced by King John II in 1360. Its name comes from the inscription reading Johannes Dei Gratia Francorum Rex ("Jean by the grace of God King of the Franks") and its value was set as one livre tournois (a money of account). Francs were later minted under Charles V, Henri III and Henri IV. John II the Good (French: Jean II le Bon) (April 16, 1319 – April 8, 1364), was King of France 1350–1364, Duke of Normandy and Count of Anjou and Maine 1332–1350, Count of Poitiers 1344–1350, and Duke of Guienne 1345–1350. ... Events October 24 - The Treaty of Brétigny is ratified at Calais, marking the end of the first phase of the Hundred Years War. ... The livre tournois (or Tournoise pound) was a currency used in France, named after the town of Tours, in which it was minted. ... Charles V the Wise (French: Charles V le Sage) (January 21, 1338 – September 16, 1380) was king of France from 1364 to 1380 and a member of the Valois Dynasty. ... Henry III (French: Henri III; Polish: Henryk III Walezy; September 19, 1551 - August 2, 1589) was King of Poland (1573-1574) and subsequently King of France (1574-1589). ... By Frans Pourbus the younger. ...


Louis XIII of France stopped minting the franc in 1641 (replacing it with the Écu and Louis d'Or), but use of the name "franc" continued in accounting as a synonym for the livre tournois. Louis XIII (September 27, 1601 – May 14, 1643), called the Just (French: le Juste), was King of France from 1610 to 1643. ... The term écu may refer to one of several French coins. ... The Louis is any number of French coins first introduced by Louis XIII in 1640. ...


French Revolution

5 franc coin of the Bourbon Restoration.
5 franc coin of the Bourbon Restoration.

The franc was established as the national currency by the French Revolutionary Convention in 1795 as a decimal unit (1 franc = 10 decimes = 100 centimes) of 4.5 g of fine silver. This was slightly less than the livre of 4.505 g but the franc was set in 1796 at 1.0125 livres (1 livre, 3 deniers), reflecting in part the past minting of sub-standard coins. Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 600 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1552 × 1551 pixel, file size: 328 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Work by Rama File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 600 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1552 × 1551 pixel, file size: 328 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Work by Rama File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Capital Paris Language(s) French Government Monarchy King  - 1814-1824 Louis XVIII  - 1824-1830 Charles X Legislature Parliament History  - Bourbon Restoration 1814  - July Revolution 21 January, 1830 Currency French Franc Following the ousting of Napoleon I of France in 1814, the Allies restored the Bourbon Dynasty to the French throne. ... 1795 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... General Name, Symbol, Number silver, Ag, 47 Chemical series transition metals Group, Period, Block 11, 5, d Appearance lustrous white metal Standard atomic weight 107. ... The livre was the currency of France until 1795. ... Year 1796 (MDCCXCVI) was a leap year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Monday of the 11-day slower Julian calendar). ... A denier is a type of French coin created by Charlemagne. ...


In 1803, the "franc germinal" (named after the name of the month in the revolutionary calendar) was established, creating a gold franc containing 9/31 g (290.32 mg) of fine gold. From this point, gold and silver-based units circulated interchangeably on the basis of a 1:15.5 ratio between the values of the two metals (bimetallism). This system continued until 1864, when all silver coins except the 5 franc piece were debased from 90% to 83.5% silver without the weights changing. 1803 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... A French Revolutionary Calendar in the Historical Museum of Lausanne. ... In economics, bimetallism is a monetary standard in which the value of the monetary unit can be expressed either with a certain amount of gold or with a certain amount of silver: the ratio between the two metals is fixed by law. ...


The currency was retained during the Bourbon Restoration. Capital Paris Language(s) French Government Monarchy King  - 1814-1824 Louis XVIII  - 1824-1830 Charles X Legislature Parliament History  - Bourbon Restoration 1814  - July Revolution 21 January, 1830 Currency French Franc Following the ousting of Napoleon I of France in 1814, the Allies restored the Bourbon Dynasty to the French throne. ...


Latin Monetary Union

France was a founding member of the Latin Monetary Union (LMU) in 1865. The common currency was based on the franc germinal, with the name franc already being used in Switzerland and Belgium, whilst other countries used their own names for the currency. In 1873, the LMU went over to a purely gold standard of 1 franc = 9/31 g gold. The Latin Monetary Union (1865-1927) was a 19th century attempt to unify several European currencies into a single currency that could be used in all the member states, at a time when most national currencies were still made out of gold and silver. ... The gold standard is a monetary system in which the standard economic unit of account is a fixed weight of gold. ...


World War I

The outbreak of World War I caused France to leave the gold standard of the LMU. The war severely undermined the franc's strength, as war expenditure, inflation and postwar reconstruction, financed partly through the printing of ever more money, reduced the franc's purchasing power by 70% from 1915 to 1920 and a further 43% from 1922 to 1926. After a brief return to the gold standard (1928 to 1936) the currency was allowed to resume its slide, until it was worth in 1959 less than a fortieth of its 1934 value. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... “The Great War ” redirects here. ... 1915 (MCMXV) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar). ... 1920 (MCMXX) was a leap year starting on Thursday. ... Year 1922 (MCMXXII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar). ... 1926 (MCMXXVI) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar). ... The gold standard is a monetary system in which the standard economic unit of account is a fixed weight of gold. ... Year 1928 (MCMXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar). ... 1936 (MCMXXXVI) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will take you to calendar). ... 1959 (MCMLIX) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


World War II

During the occupation of France, the franc was a satellite currency of the German Reichsmark. The coins were changed, with the words Travail, Famille, Patrie (Work, Family, Fatherland) replacing the Republican triad Liberté, Égalité, Fraternité (Liberty, Equality, Fraternity) and the emblem of the Vichy regime added. User(s) Germany Subunit 1/100 Reichspfennig Symbol RM Reichspfennig Rpf. ... Vichy France (French: now called Régime de Vichy or Vichy; called itself at the time État Français, or French State) was the French state of 1940-1944 which was a puppet government under Nazi influence, as opposed to the Free French Forces, based first in London and later...


At the liberation, the US attempted to impose use of the US occupation franc, which was averted by General De Gaulle. A 10-franc US occupation banknote. ...


Post-War period

After WWII, France devalued its currency within the Bretton Woods system on several occasions. Beginning in 1945 at a rate of 480 francs to the British pound (119.1 to the U.S. dollar), by 1949 the rate was 980 to the pound (350 to the dollar). This was reduced further in 1957 and 1958, reaching 1382.3 to the pound (493.7 to the dollar). Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... ISO 4217 Code GBP User(s) United Kingdom, Crown Dependencies Inflation 2. ... ISO 4217 Code USD User(s) the United States, the British Indian Ocean Territory,[1] the British Virgin Islands, Cambodia, East Timor, Ecuador, El Salvador, the Marshall Islands, Micronesia, Palau, Panama, Turks and Caicos Islands, and the insular areas of the United States Inflation 2. ...


The new franc

In January 1960 the French franc was revalued at 100 existing francs. Old one and two franc pieces continued to circulate as centimes (none of which were minted for the first two years), 100 of them making a nouveau franc (the abbreviation NF was used on banknotes for some time). Inflation continued to erode the currency's value but at a greatly reduced rate compared to other countries. The one centime coin never circulated widely. Only one further devaluation occurred, in 1968, before the Bretton Woods system was replaced by free floating exchange rates. Nonetheless, when the euro replaced the franc on January 1, 1999, the franc was worth less than an eighth of its original 1960 value. 1960 (MCMLX) was a leap year starting on Friday (the link is to a full 1960 calendar). ... January 1 is the first day of the calendar year in both the Julian and Gregorian calendars. ... Year 1999 (MCMXCIX) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full 1999 Gregorian calendar). ...


The old franc pieces were gradually withdrawn and demonetized. None were valid at the time of the euro's introduction.


Interestingly, after revaluation and the introduction of the new franc, many French people continued to speak of old francs (anciens francs), to describe large sums. For example, lottery prizes were often advertised in amounts of centimes, equivalent to the old franc. This usage continued right up to the time when franc notes and coins were withdrawn in 2002.


In his series of books about Provence, author Peter Mayle relates that that some people there continued to cite prices in old francs into the 1990s. Coat of arms of Provence Provence (Provençal Occitan: Provença in classical norm or Prouvènço in Mistralian norm) is a former Roman province and is now a region of southeastern France, located on the Mediterranean Sea adjacent to the Italian border. ... Peter Mayle (born 1939) is a British-born author most famous for his series of books detailing life in Provence, France. ...


European Monetary Union

From January 1, 1999, the value exchange rate of the French franc against the euro was set at a fixed parity of 1 EUR=6.55957 FRF. Euro coins and notes replaced it entirely between January 1 and February 17, 2002. January 1 is the first day of the calendar year in both the Julian and Gregorian calendars. ... Year 1999 (MCMXCIX) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full 1999 Gregorian calendar). ... “EUR” redirects here. ... Though abolished as a legal coin by Louis XIII in 1641 in favor of the gold louis or écu, the term franc continued to be used in common parlance for the livre tournois. ... February 17 is the 48th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... For album titles with the same name, see 2002 (album). ...


Coins

The first coins were issued in denominations of 1 and 5 centimes, 1 and 2 decimes (in copper), quarter, half, 1, 2, and 5 francs (in silver), and 20 and 40 francs (in gold). Copper coins were not issued between 1801 and 1848, leaving the quarter-franc as the smallest coin being minted. During this period, copper coins from the previous currency system circulated, with a one-sou coin being valued at 5 centimes.


Bronze coinage was introduced from 1848, and coins worth 1, 2, 5 and 10 centimes were issued from 1853. The quarter-franc was discontinued, with silver 20-centime coins issued between 1849 and 1868. The gold coinage also changed at this time, with 40- franc coins no longer produced and 5-, 10-, 50- and 100-franc coins introduced. The last gold 5-franc pieces were minted in 1869, and silver 5-franc coins were last minted in 1878. Nickel 25-centime coins were introduced in 1903.


The First World War brought substantial changes to the coinage. Gold coinage was suspended and holed 5, 10 and 25 centimes minted in nickel or cupro-nickel were introduced. In 1920, production of bronze and silver coinage ceased, with aluminium-bronze 50-centime, and 1- and 2-franc coins introduced. Until 1929, these coins were issued by the Chambers of Commerce of France. During the same period, local Chambers of Commerce also issued small change coins. In 1929, silver coins were reintroduced in 10- and 20-franc denominations. Ypres, 1917, in the vicinity of the Battle of Passchendaele. ...


The Second World War also affected the coinage substantially. Zinc 10- and 20-centime pieces were introduced, along with aluminium coins of 50 centimes, and 1 and 2 francs. Following the war, rapid inflation caused denominations below 1 franc to be withdrawn and coin denominations up to 100 francs were introduced by 1954. Mushroom cloud from the nuclear explosion over Nagasaki rising 18 km into the air. ...


In 1960, the new franc was introduced, worth 100 of the old francs. Stainless steel 1- and 5-centime, aluminum-bronze 10-, 20- and 50-centime, nickel one-franc and silver 5-franc coins were introduced. Silver 10-franc pieces were introduced in 1964, followed by aluminum-bronze 5-centime and nickel half-franc coins in 1966.


Nickel clad cupro-nickel 5-franc and nickel-brass 10-franc coins replaced their silver counterparts in 1970 and 1974, respectively. Nickel 2 francs were introduced in 1979, followed by bimetallic 10 and 20 francs in 1988 and 1992, respectively. The 20-franc coin was composed of two rings and a centre plug.


A nickel 10-franc piece was issued in 1986, but was quickly withdrawn and demonitized due to confusion with the half-franc and an unpopular design. The aluminum-bronze pieces continued to circulate until the bimetallic pieces were developed and additional aluminum-bronze coins were minted to replace those initially withdrawn. Once the bi-metallic coins were circulating the aluminum-bronze pieces were withdrawn and demonitized. A silver 50-franc piece was issued from 1974-1980, but was withdrawn and demonitized after the price of silver spiked in 1980. A 100-franc piece, in silver, was issued, and circulated to a small extent, until the introduction of the euro. All French franc coins were demonitized in 2005 and are no longer redeemable at the Banque de France. One of the Banque de Frances offices in Paris. ...


At the time of the changeover to the euro, the coins in circulation were This article does not cite its references or sources. ...

  • 1 centime (0.152 cent) stainless steel, rarely circulated
  • 5 centimes (0.762 cent) aluminum-bronze
  • 10 centimes (1.52 cent) aluminum-bronze
  • 20 centimes (3.05 cent) aluminum-bronze
  • ½ franc (7.62 cent) nickel
  • 1 franc (15.24 cent) nickel
  • 2 francs (30.49 cent) nickel
  • 5 francs (76.22 cent) nickel clad copper-nickel
  • 10 francs (€1.52) bimetallic
  • 20 francs (€3.05) bimetallic
  • 100 francs (€15.24) silver, rarely circulated

Coins were exchangeable until February 17, 2005 [1] February 17 is the 48th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Banknotes

5 franc note issued between 1917-33
50 franc note issued between 1940-42

The first franc paper money issues were made in 1795. They were assignats in denominations between 100 and 10,000 francs. These followed in 1796 by "territorial mandate promises" for 25 up to 500 francs. The treasury also issued notes that year for 25 up to 1000 francs. Image File history File links 5_French_Francs_1922. ... Image File history File links 5_French_Francs_1922. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Assignats were banknotes issued by the National Constituent Assembly in France during the French Revolution. ...


In 1800, the Bank of France began issuing notes, first in denominations of 500 and 1000 francs. In the 1840s, 100- and 200-franc notes were added, while 5-, 20- and 50- francs were added in the 1860s and 70s, although the 200-franc note was discontinued.


The First World War saw the introduction of 10- and 5000-franc notes but, despite base metal 5-franc coins being introduced after the war, the banknotes were not removed.


In 1944, the liberating Allies introduced paper money in denominations between 2 and 1000 francs. Following the war, 10,000-franc notes were introduced, while 5-, 10- and 20-franc notes were replaced by coins, as were the 50- and 100-franc notes in the 1950s.


The first issue of the new franc consisted of 500-, 1000-, 5000- and 10,000-franc notes overprinted with their new denominations of 5, 10, 50 and 100 new francs. This issue was followed by notes of the same design but with only the new denomination shown. 500-new franc notes were also introduced at this time. 5- and 10- franc notes were withdrawn in 1970 and 1979, respectively.


Banknotes in circulation when the franc was replaced were [2] A £20 Bank of England banknote. ...

Banknotes of the current series as of euro changeover may be exchanged with the French central bank or services like GFC until February 17, 2012. Most older series are exchangeable for 10 years from date of withdrawal. Claude Debussy, photo by Félix Nadar, 1908. ... Antoine de Saint-Exupéry[1] (pronounced ) (June 29, 1900 – presumably July 31, 1944) was a French writer and aviator. ... Paul Cézanne (IPA: , January 19, 1839 – October 22, 1906) was a French artist and Post-Impressionist painter whose work laid the foundations of the transition from the 19th century conception of artistic endeavour to a new and radically different world of art in the 20th century. ... Alexandre Gustave Eiffel (December 15, 1832 – December 27, 1923; French pronunciation in IPA, in English usually pronounced in the German manner ) was a French engineer and architect and a specialist of metallic structures. ... // Pierre Curie (Paris, France, May 15, 1859 – April 19, 1906, Paris) was a French physicist, a pioneer in crystallography, magnetism, piezoelectricity and radioactivity. ... Madame Curie redirects here. ... The introduction of this article does not provide enough context for readers unfamiliar with the subject. ... February 17 is the 48th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2012 (MMXII) will be a leap year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


The franc as an international reserve currency

Main article: Reserve currency
International accumulation of foreign reserve currencies
Currency Percentage of global currency reserves held in the particular currency, expressed in US dollars
1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006
US dollar 59.0% 62.1% 65.2% 69.3% 70.9% 70.5% 70.7% 66.5% 65.8% 65.9% 66.4% 65.7%
Euro - - - - 17.9% 18.8% 19.8% 24.2% 25.3% 24.9% 24.3% 25.2%
German Mark 15.8% 14.7% 14.5% 13.8% - - - - - - - -
Pound sterling 2.1% 2.7% 2.6% 2.7% 2.9% 2.8% 2.7% 2.9% 2.6% 3.3% 3.6% 4.2%
Japanese yen 6.8% 6.7% 5.8% 6.2% 6.4% 6.3% 5.2% 4.5% 4.1% 3.9% 3.7% 3.2%
French franc 2.4% 1.8% 1.4% 1.6% - - - - - - - -
Swiss franc 0.3% 0.2% 0.4% 0.3% 0.2% 0.3% 0.3% 0.4% 0.2% 0.2% 0.1% 0.2%
Other 13.6% 11.7% 10.2% 6.1% 1.6% 1.4% 1.2% 1.4% 1.9% 1.8% 1.9% 1.5%
Sources:

1995-1999 & 2006, IMF (International Monetary Fund): Currency Composition of Official Foreign Exchange Reserves
1999-2005, ECB (European Central Bank): The Accumulation of Foreign Reserves, Occasional Paper Series, Nr. 43 A reserve currency (or anchor currency) is a currency which is held in significant quantities by many governments and institutions as part of their foreign exchange reserves. ... A reserve currency (or anchor currency) is a currency which is held in significant quantities by many governments and institutions as part of their foreign exchange reserves. ... ISO 4217 Code USD User(s) the United States, the British Indian Ocean Territory,[1] the British Virgin Islands, Cambodia, East Timor, Ecuador, El Salvador, the Marshall Islands, Micronesia, Palau, Panama, Turks and Caicos Islands, and the insular areas of the United States Inflation 2. ... “EUR” redirects here. ... ISO 4217 Code DEM User(s) Germany, Montenegro, Kosovo ERM Since 13 March 1979 Fixed rate since 31 December 1998 Replaced by €, non cash 1 January 1999 Replaced by €, cash 1 January 2002 € = 1. ... ISO 4217 Code GBP User(s) United Kingdom, Crown Dependencies Inflation 2. ... ISO 4217 Code JPY User(s) Japan Inflation -0. ... ISO 4217 Code CHF User(s) Switzerland, Liechtenstein, Campione dItalia Inflation 1. ... This article needs additional references or sources to facilitate its verification. ... Headquarters Frankfurt, Germany Established 1 January 1998 President Jean-Claude Trichet Central Bank of Austria, Belgium, France, Finland, Germany, Greece, Ireland, Italy, Luxembourg, Netherlands, Portugal, Spain Currency Euro -ISO 4217 Code EUR Reserves >€4 billion Base borrowing rate 4. ...

Andorran franc (ADF)

The Andorran franc was a 1:1 peg to the French franc. Unlike Monaco, Andorra was not in formal currency union with France. Consequently, no Andorran coins were minted nor notes printed.


See also

The livre tournois (or Tournoise pound) was a currency used in France, named after the town of Tours, in which it was minted. ... French euro coins feature three separate designs for the three series of coins. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...

External links

Preceded by
Livre
French currency
1360-1641
Succeeded by
Livre
Écu
Louis d'Or
Preceded by
Livre,
Écu,
Louis d'Or,

Kronenthaler (?-1795, Austrian Netherlands)
? (?-1918 Saarland)
? (?-1954 Saarland)
? (CFA-zone)
? (CFP-zone)
French currency
1795-19991



1795-1815 (Southern Netherlands)

1918-1935 (Saarland)
1954-1957 (Saarland)
?-1945 (French African colonies)
?-1945 (French Pacific colonies)
Succeeded by
Euro



Dutch guilder (1815-1832, Southern Netherlands)
German Reichsmark (1935-?, Saarland)
German mark (1957-2002, Saarland)
CFA franc (1945-present, CFA-zone)
CFP franc (1945-present, CFP-zone)
  1. ^  1999 by law, 2002 de facto.

  Results from FactBites:
 
French franc - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (576 words)
Though abolished as a legal coin by Louis XIII in 1641 in favor of the gold louis and silver écu, the term franc continued to be used in common parlance for the livre tournois.
The franc was introduced by king John II of France in 1360.
In January 1960 the French franc was revalued at 100 existing francs.
Franc - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (865 words)
The franc was originally a French gold coin of 3.87 g minted in 1360 on the occasion of the release of King John II ("the good"), held by the English since his capture at the Battle of Poitiers four years earlier.
The French franc was the national currency of France from 1360 until 1641, and from 1795 until 1999 (franc coins and notes were legal tender until 2002).
In 1926 Belgium as well as France experienced depreciation and an abrupt collapse of confidence, leading to the introduction of a new gold currency for international transactions, the belga of 5 francs, and the country's withdrawal from the monetary union, which ceased to exist at the end of the year.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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