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Encyclopedia > French Riviera

The French Riviera (French: Côte d'Azur, Occitan: Còsta Azzura) is one of the most famous resort areas in the world, extending along the Mediterranean Sea west from Menton near the Italian border, including the cities and towns of Monaco, Nice, Antibes, and Cannes. Other sources extend the Côte d'Azur further west to include Saint-Raphaël, Sainte-Maxime, Saint-Tropez, Hyères, Toulon, and Cassis.[1] Occitan (IPA AmE: ), known also as Lenga dòc or Langue doc (native name: occitan [1], lenga dòc [2]; native nickname: la lenga nòstra [3] i. ... Mediterranean redirects here. ... Menton (Occitan: Menton in classical norm or Mentan in Mistralian norm; Italian: Mentone) is a town and commune in the Alpes-Maritimes département of the Provence-Alpes-Côte dAzur région of France. ... This article is about the French city. ... Antibes (Provençal Occitan: Antíbol in classical norm or Antibo in Mistralian norm) is a resort town of southeastern France, on the Mediterranean Sea in the Côte dAzur, located between Cannes and Nice. ... For the annual festival, see Cannes Film Festival. ... Saint-Raphaël is a commune of the Var département, in southeastern France. ... Sainte-Maxime is a commune of the Var département located at the extreme southern of France in Provence Alpes Côte d’Azur 90 km from Nice and 130 km from Marseille. ... Saint-Tropez is a commune of the Var département in southern France, located on the French Riviera. ... A square in Hyeres. ... Panorama of Toulon area. ... Cassis can refer to: Blackcurrant Cassis, Bouches-du-Rhône, a commune on the Bouches-du-Rhône département, in southern France This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ...

Map of the French Riviera.
Map of the French Riviera.
The seafront of Nice.
The seafront of Nice.
Menton.
Menton.

Contents

Image File history File links Download high resolution version (826x514, 452 KB) Map of Côte dAzur, France Original work by Markus Bernet, background map courtesy of www. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (826x514, 452 KB) Map of Côte dAzur, France Original work by Markus Bernet, background map courtesy of www. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1024x768, 472 KB) Summary Licensing File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Nice France ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1024x768, 472 KB) Summary Licensing File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Nice France ...

History

From prehistory to the Bronze Age

The Côte d'Azur has been inhabited since prehistoric times. A paleolithic site of a nomad people dating to 950,000 B.C. was discovered in the cave of Vallonet, near Roquebrune-Cap Martin, with stones and bones of animals, including bovines, rhinoceros, and hippopotamus. Other sites were found at the cave of L'Escale, near Saint-Estève Janson (600,000 B.C.), and at Terra Amata (400,000 BC), where a fireplace was discovered, one of the oldest in Europe. The Cosquer Cave, an undersea cave between Cassis and Marseille discovered in 1991, has the oldest man-made art in the region: drawings of bisons, seals, horses and penguins, and outlines of human hands, dating to between 27,000 and 19,000 B.C. // The Paleolithic is a prehistoric era distinguished by the development of stone tools. ... For other uses, see Europe (disambiguation). ... A painted bison from the Cosquer cave The Cosquer cave is located in the Calanque de Morgiou near Marseille, France, not very far from Cap Morgiou. ... Cassis can refer to: Blackcurrant Cassis, Bouches-du-Rhône, a commune on the Bouches-du-Rhône département, in southern France This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... City flag Coat of arms Motto: By her great deeds, the city of Massilia shines The Old Port of Marseille Location Time Zone CET (GMT +1) Coordinates Administration Country Region Provence-Alpes-Côte dAzur Department Bouches-du-Rhône (13) Subdivisions 16 arrondissements (in 8 secteurs) Intercommunality Urban...


Stone dolmens, monuments from the bronze age, can be found near Draguinan. The Valley of Marvels (Vallée des Merveilles) near Mount Bégo, at 2000 meters altitude, was apparently an outdoor religious sanctuary with over 40,000 drawing of people and animals.[2] T shaped Hunebed D27 in Borger-Odoorn, Netherlands, recent. ... The Bronze Age is a period in a civilizations development when the most advanced metalworking has developed the techniques of smelting copper from natural outcroppings and alloys it to cast bronze. ...


Greeks influence

Beginning in the 7th century B.C., Greek sailors from Asia Minor began to visit and then build trading posts (emporia) along the Côte d'Azur. The first known settlement was at Massalia (now Marseille), with colonists from Phocaea, modern-day Foça in Turkey. Other emporia were started at Olbia (Saint-Pierre de l'Almanarre, near Hyères); Antipolis (Antibes); Nicoea (Nice); and Tauroentum and Rhodanousia (Arles). These settlements, which traded with the inhabitants of the interior, became rivals of the Etruscans and Phoenicians, who also visited the Côte d'Azur. Greek traders went far inland from these emporia by river (the Rhône and the Durance or overland to Burgundy and Switzerland. One enterprising navigator from Marseille, Pytheas, traveled as far as Cornwall in about 325 B.C. in search of tin. jarrome Anatolia (Greek: ανατολη anatole, rising of the sun or East; compare Orient and Levant, by popular etymology Turkish Anadolu to ana mother and dolu filled), also called by the Latin name of Asia Minor, is a region of Southwest Asia which corresponds today to the Asian portion of Turkey. ... City flag Coat of arms Motto: By her great deeds, the city of Massilia shines The Old Port of Marseille Location Time Zone CET (GMT +1) Coordinates Administration Country Region Provence-Alpes-Côte dAzur Department Bouches-du-Rhône (13) Subdivisions 16 arrondissements (in 8 secteurs) Intercommunality Urban... Phocaea (Greek: Φώκαια) (modern-day Foça in Turkey) was an ancient Ionian Greek city on the western coast of Anatolia. ... Satellite photo showing location of the ancient cities of Phocaea, Cyme and Smyrna Phocaea (modern-day Foça in Turkey) was an ancient Ionian Greek city on the western coast of Anatolia. ... A square in Hyeres. ... Antibes (Provençal Occitan: Antíbol in classical norm or Antibo in Mistralian norm) is a resort town of southeastern France, on the Mediterranean Sea in the Côte dAzur, located between Cannes and Nice. ... Coordinates Administration Country Region Provence-Alpes-Côte dAzur Department Bouches-du-Rhône (Subprefecture) Arrondissement Arles Canton Chief town of 2 cantons: Arles-Est and Arles-Ouest Intercommunality Agglomeration community of Arles-Crau-Camargue-Montagnette Mayor Hervé Schiavetti (PS) (2001-2008) Statistics Altitude 0 m–57 m (avg. ... The Etruscan civilization existed in Etruria and the Po valley in the northern part of what is now Italy, prior to the formation of the Roman Republic. ... Phoenicia was an ancient civilization in the north of ancient Canaan, with its heartland along the coastal plain of what is now Lebanon and Syria. ... Rhône can refer to: Rhône River Rhône (département) in France Rhône (Wine Region) in France This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... Durance is a 320 km long river in south-eastern France. ... Coat of arms of the second Duchy of Burgundy and later of the French province of Burgundy Burgundy (French: ; German: ) is a historic region of France, inhabited in turn by Celts (Gauls), Romans (Gallo-Romans), and various Germanic peoples, most importantly the Burgundians and the Franks; the former gave their... Pytheas (Πυθέας), ca. ... For other uses, see Cornwall (disambiguation). ... This article is about the metallic chemical element. ...


The Celto-Ligurians

At the beginning of the 4th century B.C., the Ligurians, a nomadic Celtic people, invaded the south of France and travelled all the way to Ancient Rome. The Ligurian tribes of the Oxybii and Deceates settled in what is now the Alpes-Maritimes and the Var, building hilltop forts and settlements. They were soon at war with the inhabitants of Massalia, and they helped the passage of Hannibal along the coast on his way to attack Ancient Rome. In the 2nd century B.C., the continuous conflicts persuaded the inhabitants of Massalia to invite the Romans to be their ally against the Ligurians. The Ligures (Ligurians) were an ancient people who gave their name to Liguria, which once stretched from Northern Italy into southern Gaul. ... This article is about the European people. ... Ancient Rome was a civilization that grew from a small agricultural community founded on the Italian Peninsula circa the 9th century BC to a massive empire straddling the Mediterranean Sea. ... Alpes_Maritimes is a département in the extreme southeast corner of France. ... Var is a département of southeastern France. ... For other uses, see Hannibal (disambiguation). ... Ancient Rome was a civilization that grew from a small agricultural community founded on the Italian Peninsula circa the 9th century BC to a massive empire straddling the Mediterranean Sea. ... Ancient Rome was a civilization that grew from a small agricultural community founded on the Italian Peninsula circa the 9th century BC to a massive empire straddling the Mediterranean Sea. ...


Roman colonization

The Trophy of Augustus at La Turbie.
The Trophy of Augustus at La Turbie.

To subdue the Ligurian tribesIn the 2nd century B.C., Roman legions entered the region three times. In 181 B.C., a Roman army defeated the Ligurians at Genoa; in 154 B.C., the Consul Optimius defeated the Oxybii and the Deceates, who had besieged Antibes and Nice; and in 125 B.C., another Roman army crushed a confederation of Celtic tribes and their allies. The Romans decided to establish permanent settlements, first at Aquae Sextiae (Arles) in 122 B.C., then in Narbonne (118 B.C.). In 102 B.C. the Roman general Marius defeated a new invasion of Cimbres and Teutons, and began to build a system of Roman roads through the region to facilitate the movement of troops, as well as trade, with Rome. In 49 B.C., Marseille took the side of Pompey against Julius Caesar, leading to a decline in its influence, and the rise of Arles. Veterans of the Roman legions were settled at Arles and Fréjus. Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 450 pixelsFull resolution (2000 × 1125 pixel, file size: 791 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 450 pixelsFull resolution (2000 × 1125 pixel, file size: 791 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... See also Legion software and Legion forummer. ... Coordinates Administration Country Region Provence-Alpes-Côte dAzur Department Bouches-du-Rhône (Subprefecture) Arrondissement Arles Canton Chief town of 2 cantons: Arles-Est and Arles-Ouest Intercommunality Agglomeration community of Arles-Crau-Camargue-Montagnette Mayor Hervé Schiavetti (PS) (2001-2008) Statistics Altitude 0 m–57 m (avg. ... Narbonne (Narbona in Catalan and in Occitan, commonly Narbo especially when referring to the Ancient Rome era) is a town and commune of southwestern France in the Languedoc-Roussillon région. ... Gaius Marius (Latin: C·MARIVS·C·F·C·N)¹ (157 BC - January 13, 86 BC) was a Roman general and politician elected Consul an unprecedented seven times during his career. ... This entry is about the tribe of the Teutons. ... A Roman road in Pompeii The Romans, as a military, commercial and political expedient, became adept at constructing roads; many long sections of them are ruler-straight, but it should not be thought that all of them were. ... For other meanings see Pompey (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Julius Caesar (disambiguation). ... Coordinates Administration Country Region Provence-Alpes-Côte dAzur Department Bouches-du-Rhône (Subprefecture) Arrondissement Arles Canton Chief town of 2 cantons: Arles-Est and Arles-Ouest Intercommunality Agglomeration community of Arles-Crau-Camargue-Montagnette Mayor Hervé Schiavetti (PS) (2001-2008) Statistics Altitude 0 m–57 m (avg. ... Roman ruins, aquaduct Fréjus is a coastal town and commune, in the Var département, in southern France. ...


In 8 B.C., the Emperor Augustus built an imposing trophy monument at La Turbie to mark the pacification of the region. Roman towns, monuments and amphitheaters were built all throughout the region, and many still survive: the amphitheater at Cimiez, above Nice; the amphitheater and Roman walls at Fréjus; farther inland in Provence, the theater in Orange; the amphitheaters in Arles and Avignon; and the triumphal arch at Saint-Rémy-de-Provence. For other persons named Octavian, see Octavian (disambiguation). ... La Turbie or the Trophy of the Alps is a Roman monument on the Côte dAzur. ... Cimiez is an upper class neighborhood in Nice, France. ... Roman ruins, aquaduct Fréjus is a coastal town and commune, in the Var département, in southern France. ... For the etymology of the word, see orange (word). ... Coordinates Administration Country Region Provence-Alpes-Côte dAzur Department Bouches-du-Rhône (Subprefecture) Arrondissement Arles Canton Chief town of 2 cantons: Arles-Est and Arles-Ouest Intercommunality Agglomeration community of Arles-Crau-Camargue-Montagnette Mayor Hervé Schiavetti (PS) (2001-2008) Statistics Altitude 0 m–57 m (avg. ... For the Municipality in Quebec, see Avignon Regional County Municipality, Quebec. ... Saint-Rémy-de-Provence is a commune of southern France, in the Bouches-du-Rhône département, in the former province of Provence. ...


Barbarians and Christians

The 5th century baptistery of Fréjus Cathedral, which is still in use.
The 5th century baptistery of Fréjus Cathedral, which is still in use.

Roman Provence reached its height of power and prosperity during the 2nd and 3rd centuries A.D. In the middle of the 3rd century, Germanic peoples began to invade the region, and Roman power began to weaken. The Western Roman Emperor, Constantine, was forced to take sanctuary in Arles at the beginning of the 4th century. Thor/Donar, Germanic thunder god. ... Look up Constantine in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...


During the same period, Christianity became a powerful force in the region. The first cathedrals were built in the 4th century, and bishoprics were established in Arles in 254 A.D.; Marseille in 314 A.D.; Fréjus at the end of the 4th century; Cimiez and Vence in 439 A.D.; Antibes in 442 A.D.; and Toulon in 451 A.D. The oldest Christian structure still in existence on the Côte d'Azur is the baptistery of Fréjus Cathedral, built at the end of the 5th century. The end of the 5th century also saw the founding of the first two monasteries in the region, Lerins Monastery on an island off the coast of Cannes, and Saint-Victor monastery in Marseille. Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Relation to other religions Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Christianity Portal This box:      Christianity is a monotheistic[1] religion centered on the life and teachings of Jesus of Nazareth as presented in the New Testament. ... Buddhist monastery near Tibet A monastery is the habitation of monks. ...


The fall of the Western Roman Empire in the first half of the 5th century was followed by invasion of Provence by the Visigoths, the Burgundians and the Ostrogoths, followed by a long period of wars and dynastic quarrels, which in turn led to further invasions by the Saracens and the Normans in the 9th century. A votive crown belonging to Reccesuinth (653–672) The Visigoths (Latin: ) were one of two main branches of the Goths, an East Germanic tribe, the Ostrogoths being the other. ... This article includes a list of works cited or a list of external links, but its sources remain unclear because it lacks in-text citations. ... This article deals with the continental Ostrogoths. ... For the rugby club Saracens see Saracens (rugby club) The term Saracen comes from Greek sarakenoi. ... Norman conquests in red. ...


The Counts of Provence and the House of Grimaldi

The ruins of the Grimaldi castle at Grimaud, near Saint-Tropez.
The ruins of the Grimaldi castle at Grimaud, near Saint-Tropez.

Some peace was restored to the coast by the establishment in 879 of a new kingdom of Provence, ruled first by the Bosonide dynasty (879-1112), then by the Catalans (1112-1246), and finally by the Angevins (1246-1483). Capital Barcelona Official languages Spanish and Catalan In Val dAran, also Aranese. ... Angevin is the name applied to two distinct medieval dynasties which originated as counts (from 1360, dukes) of the western French province of Anjou (of which angevin is the adjectival form), but later came to rule far greater areas including England, Hungary and Poland (see Angevin Empire). ...


In the 13th century, another powerful political force appeared on the Côte d'Azur, the House of Grimaldi. Descended from a Genoese nobleman who was expelled from Genoa by his rivals in 1271, the members of the different branches of the Grimaldis took power in Monaco, Antibes and Nice, and built castles at Grimaud, Cagnes-sur-Mer and Antibes. The present Prince of Monaco is a descendant of the Grimaldis. “Grimaldi” redirects here. ... The game of Grimaud is considered by many (Notably the Polish federation of 2 player strategy card games) to be the greatest 2 player strategy cardgame ever. ... Cagnes-sur-Mer is a town and commune of the Alpes-Maritimes département, in southeastern France. ... Antibes (Provençal Occitan: Antíbol in classical norm or Antibo in Mistralian norm) is a resort town of southeastern France, on the Mediterranean Sea in the Côte dAzur, located between Cannes and Nice. ... Prince(ss) of Monaco is a title given to certain members of the princely family of Monaco. ...


In 1388, the city of Nice and its surrounding territory, from the mouth of the Var River to the Italian border, was separated from Provence and came under the protection of the House of Savoy. The territory was called the comté of Nice after 1526, and thereafter had a separate language, history and culture from Provence until 1860, when it was re-attached to France under Napoleon III. The House of Savoy or in Italian, La Casa di Savoia, or simply Casa Savoia, (or Savoie, French) is a dynasty of nobles who traditionally had their domain in Savoy, a region that includes present-day Piemonte, other parts of Northern Italy, and a smaller region in France. ... This article is about the President of the French Republic and Emperor of the French. ...


Provence retained its formal independence until 1480, when the last count of Provence, René I of Naples, died and left the comté of Provence to his nephew, Charles du Maine, who in turn left it to Louis XI of France. In 1486, Provence formally became part of France. René dAnjou, René I of Naples (René I the Good, French Le bon roi René) (January 16, 1409 – July 10, 1480), was Duke of Anjou, Count of Provence (1434–1480), Count of Piedmont, Duke of Bar (1430–1480), Duke of Lorraine (1431–1453), King of Naples (1438–1442; titular... Charles IV, Duke of Anjou, also Charles of Maine, Count of Le Maine and Guise (1436–1481) was the son of the Angevin prince Charles of Le Maine, Count of Maine, who was the youngest son of Louis II of Anjou and Yolande of Aragon, Queen of Four Kingdoms. ... Louis XI (July 3, 1423 – August 30, 1483), called the Prudent (French: ) and the Universal Spider (Old French: luniverselle aragne) or the Spider King, was the King of France from 1461−83. ...


Early 19th century; popularity among the British upper classes

Tobias Smollett.
Tobias Smollett.

Until the end of the 18th century, the Côte d'Azur was a remote and impoverished region of France, known mostly for fishing, olive groves and the making of perfume. A new phase of its history began when the coast became a fashionable health resort for the British upper classes in the late 18th century. The first British traveler to describe the benefits of the Riviera was the novelist Tobias Smollett, who visited Nice in 1763, when it was still an Italian city within the Kingdom of Sardinia. Smollett brought Nice and its warm winter temperatures to the attention of the British aristocracy through his book Travels in France and Italy, written in 1765. At about the same time, a Scottish doctor, John Brown, became famous by prescribing what he called climato-therapy, a change to a warm climate, to cure a wide variety of diseases, including tuberculosis, known then as consumption. The French historian Paul Gonnet wrote that as a result, Nice was filled with "a colony of pale and listless English women and listless sons of nobility near death." Tobias Smollett Tobias George Smollett (March 19, 1721 - September 17, 1771) was a Scottish author, best known for his picaresque novels, such as Roderick Random and Peregrine Pickle. ... This article is about the French city. ... John Brown may refer to several people, most famously John Brown (the abolitionist), or the related song John Browns Body (which originally referred to someone else). ... Tuberculosis (abbreviated as TB for tubercle bacillus or Tuberculosis) is a common and deadly infectious disease caused by mycobacteria, mainly Mycobacterium tuberculosis. ...


In 1834, a British nobleman and politician named Henry Peter Brougham, First Baron Brougham and Vaux, who had played an important part in the abolition of the slave trade, travelled with an ill sister to south of France, intending to go to Italy. A cholera epidemic in Italy forced him to stop at Cannes, where he enjoyed the climate and scenery so much that he bought land and built a villa. He began to spend his winters there, and because of his fame, others followed, and Cannes soon had a small British colony. Lord Henry Peter Brougham Baron Brougham & Vaux sitting as Lord High Chancellor of Great Britain Henry Peter Brougham, 1st Baron Brougham and Vaux (September 19, 1778 - May 7, 1868) was Lord High Chancellor of Great Britain. ... For the annual festival, see Cannes Film Festival. ...


Robert Louis Stevenson was another early British visitor who came to Riviera for his health. In 1882 he rented a villa called La Solitude at Hyères, where he wrote much of A Child's Garden of Verses. Robert Louis (Balfour) Stevenson (November 13, 1850–December 3, 1894), was a Scottish novelist, poet and travel writer, and a representative of neo-romanticism in English literature. ... A square in Hyeres. ...


Late 19th, early 20th centuries; railways, gambling and royalty

The casino of Monte Carlo.
The casino of Monte Carlo.

In 1864, five years after Nice became part of France, the first railway arrived there, making Nice and the rest of the Riviera accessible to visitors from all over Europe. One hundred thousand visitors arrived in 1865. By 1874 the foreign colony in Nice, mostly British, had grown to 25,000.


In the mid-19th century, with the arrival of railways, British and French entrepreneurs began to see the potential of tourism in the South of France. At the time, gambling was illegal in both France and Italy. In 1856, the Prince of Monaco, Charles III, began constructing a casino in Monaco, which, to avoid criticism by the church, was formally called a health spa. The first casino was a failure. Then, in 1863, the Prince signed an agreement with an enterprising French businessman, Francois Blanc, already the operator of a very successful casino at Baden-Baden in the Grand Duchy of Baden in Germany, to build a resort and new casino. Blanc arranged for steamships and carriages to take visitors from Nice to Monaco, built hotels, gardens and a new casino in an area called Speluges, which, at the suggestion of Princess Caroline, the mother of Prince Charles, was renamed Monte Carlo, after Charles. When the railway finally reached Monte Carlo in 1870, hundreds of thousands of visitors began to arrive, and the population of the principality of Monaco doubled. Gamble redirects here. ... Charles III, Prince of Monaco (8 December 1818 – 10 September 1889) was reigning Prince of Monaco from 20 June 1856 to his death. ... , Baden-Baden is a town in Baden-Württemberg, Germany. ... Baden was a territory in the southwest of what later became unified Germany. ... Monte Carlo is a very wealthy section of the city-state of Monaco known for its casino, gambling, beaches, glamour, and sightings of famous people. ...


In the second part of the 19th century, thanks to the railway, the Riviera became a popular destination for European royalty. Just days after the railway line opened to Nice in 1864, Czar Alexander II of Russia visited on a private train, followed soon afterwards by Napoleon III and Leopold II, the King of the Belgians. A number of historical people were named Alexander II: Alexander II of Macedon was King of Macedon from 370 to 368 B.C. Alexander II of Epirus was the King of Epirus in 272 B.C. Pope Alexander II was Pope from 1061 to 1073. ... Charles Louis Napoléon Bonaparte (April 20, 1808 - January 9, 1873) was the son of King Louis Bonaparte and Queen Hortense de Beauharnais; both monarchs of the French puppet state, the Kingdom of Holland. ... Leopold II can refer to: Leopold II of Austria (1050-1095) Leopold II, Grand Duke of Tuscany (1797-1870) Léopold II of Belgium (1835-1909) Leopold II, Holy Roman Emperor (1747-1792) This is a disambiguation page: a list of articles associated with the same title. ...

Queen Victoria, in 1887.
Queen Victoria, in 1887.

Queen Victoria of the United Kingdom was a frequent visitor to the Riviera. In 1882, she stayed in Menton, near the Italian border, which had become the largest British colony in the Riviera. In 1891, she spent several weeks at the Grand Hotel Grasse. In 1892, she stayed at the Hotel Cost-belle in Hyères. From 1895 to 1899, she stayed at the Hotel Regina at Cimiez, in the hills above Nice (the Hotel Regina later became the home of painter Henri Matisse). She traveled with party of between sixty and a hundred persons, including her chef, ladies in waiting, dentist, Indian servants, her own bed and her own food. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Queen Victoria redirects here. ... Menton (Occitan: Menton in classical norm or Mentan in Mistralian norm; Italian: Mentone) is a town and commune in the Alpes-Maritimes département of the Provence-Alpes-Côte dAzur région of France. ... Grasse (Provençal Occitan: Grassa in classical norm or Grasso in Mistralian norm) is a town and episcopal see in southeast France, it is a commune of the Alpes-Maritimes département (of which it is a sous-préfecture), on the French Riviera. ... A square in Hyeres. ... Cimiez is an upper class neighborhood in Nice, France. ... Matisse redirects here. ...


Victoria and Albert's son, the Prince of Wales, the future King Edward VII, was also a regular visitor to Cannes, beginning in 1872. He frequented the Club Nautique, a private club on La Croisette, the fashionable seafront boulevard of Cannes. He visited each spring for three weeks, took part in yacht races (he watched from shore, while the royal yacht, Britannia, was sailed by a professional crew), and he had affairs with actresses, courtesans, and the wives of aristocrats in the more relaxed moral climate of the Riviera. After he became King in 1901, he never again visited the Riviera. Prince Albert of Saxe-Coburg and Gotha (Francis Albert Charles Augustus Emanuel, later HRH The Prince Consort; 26 August 1819 – 14 December 1861) was the husband and consort of Queen Victoria of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland. ... Edward VII King of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland, Emperor of India His Majesty King Edward VII (9 November 1841–6 May 1910) was King of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland, King of the Commonwealth realms, and the Emperor of India. ... For other uses, see Britannia (disambiguation). ...


By the end of the 19th century, the Riviera also began to attract painters, who appreciated the climate, the clear light, and the bright colors. Auguste Renoir settled in Cagnes-sur-Mer, and Henri Matisse and Pablo Picasso made their homes on the Riviera. Pierre-Auguste Renoir (February 25, 1841 _ December 3, 1919) was a preeminent French painter. ... Cagnes-sur-Mer is a town and commune of the Alpes-Maritimes département, in southeastern France. ... Matisse redirects here. ... Picasso redirects here. ...


World War I though World War II; American visitors

The First World War brought down many of the royal houses of Europe, and altered the calendar social structure of the visitors to the Riviera. After the war, larger numbers of Americans began to come to the Riviera, business people and celebrities began to outnumber aristocrats, and the season gradually shifted from the winter months to the summer.


Americans had begun coming to the south of France in the 19th century. Henry James set part of his novel, The Ambassadors, on the Riviera. James Gordon Bennett, the son and heir of the founder of the New York Herald, had a villa in Beaulieu. Industrialist John Pierpont Morgan gambled at Monte Carlo, and bought 18th century paintings by Fragonard in Grasse and shipped them to the Metropolitan Museum in New York. For other uses of this name, see Henry James (disambiguation). ... James Gordon Bennett was the name of: James Gordon Bennett, Sr. ... Heralds, wearing tabards, in procession to St. ... Beaulieu is the name of one village in England Beaulieu in the county of Hampshire Beaulieu is also the name of several communes in France: Beaulieu, in the Ardèche département Beaulieu, in the Calvados département Beaulieu, in the Cantal département Beaulieu, in the Côte-dOr département Beaulieu, in the... John Pierpont Morgan (April 17, 1837 – March 31, 1913), American financier and banker, was born in Hartford, Connecticut, a son of Junius Spencer Morgan (1813–1890), who was a partner of George Peabody and the founder of the house of J. S. Morgan & Co. ... Jean-Honoré Fragonard (April 5, 1732 – August 22, 1806) was a French painter. ... Grasse (Provençal Occitan: Grassa in classical norm or Grasso in Mistralian norm) is a town and episcopal see in southeast France, it is a commune of the Alpes-Maritimes département (of which it is a sous-préfecture), on the French Riviera. ... There is also the Museum of Modern Art (MoMA), located in Manhattan. ...


An important feature of the Riviera in the 1920s and 1930s was the Train Bleu, the all first-class sleeping train which brought wealthy passengers from Calais to the Riviera. It made its first trip in 1922, and carried such passengers as Winston Churchill, Somerset Maugham, and the future King Edward VIII to the Riviera. Churchill redirects here. ... W. Somerset Maugham as photographed in 1934 by Carl Van Vechten. ... King Edward VIII King of Great Britain and Northern Ireland, King of Ireland Emperor of India His Majesty King Edward VIII, (Edward Albert Christian George Andrew Patrick David), later His Royal Highness The Duke of Windsor (23 June 1894 – 28 May 1972) was the second British monarch of the House...


After World War I, when Europe was recovering from the war and the American dollar was strong, more Americans, including writers and artists, began coming to the Riviera. Edith Wharton wrote The Age of Innocence (1920) at a villa near Hyères; she won the Pulitzer Prize for the novel, the first woman to do so. Dancer Isadora Duncan frequented Cannes and Nice; she died in a freak auto accident in 1927, when her scarf caught in the wheel of the car in which she was a passenger and strangled her. The writer F. Scott Fitzgerald and his wife Zelda first visited the Riviera in 1924, stopping at Hyères, Cannes and Monte Carlo, eventually staying at St. Raphaël, where he wrote much of The Great Gatsby and began Tender is the Night. Edith Wharton (January 24, 1862 – August 11, 1937) was an American novelist, short story writer, and designer. ... A square in Hyeres. ... Isadora Duncan Isadora Duncan (May 27, 1877 – September 14, 1927) was an American dancer. ... Francis Scott Key Fitzgerald (September 24, 1896 – December 21, 1940) was an American Jazz Age author of novels and short stories. ... A square in Hyeres. ... For the annual festival, see Cannes Film Festival. ... Monte Carlo is a very wealthy section of the city-state of Monaco known for its casino, gambling, beaches, glamour, and sightings of famous people. ... Saint-Raphaël is a commune of the Var département, in southeastern France. ...


While American visitors were largely responsible for making summer the high season on the Riviera, a French fashion designer, Coco Chanel, was responsible for making sunbathing fashionable. She acquired a striking tan during the summer of 1923, and tans immediately became the fashion in Paris. Gabrielle Bonheur Coco Chanel (August 19, 1883 – January 10, 1971)[1] was a pioneering French fashion designer whose modernist philosophy, menswear-inspired fashions, and pursuit of expensive simplicity made her arguably the most important figure in the history of 20th-century fashion. ...


During the crisis of the British Monarchy in 1936, Wallis Simpson, the intended bride of King Edward VIII, was at the Villa Lou Vieie in Cannes, talking with the king by telephone each day. After his abdication, the Duke of Windsor, as he became, and his wife stayed at the Villa La Croe near Antibes. This article is about the monarchy of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland; for further information, see Commonwealth realm, Elizabeth II, and British Royal Family. ... Wallis, Duchess of Windsor and the Duke of Windsor on their wedding day Bessie Wallis Warfield, more widely known as Wallis Simpson and later The Duchess of Windsor (June 19, 1896–April 24, 1986) was the wife of Prince Edward, Duke of Windsor, the former King Edward VIII of the... King Edward VIII King of Great Britain and Northern Ireland, King of Ireland Emperor of India His Majesty King Edward VIII, (Edward Albert Christian George Andrew Patrick David), later His Royal Highness The Duke of Windsor (23 June 1894 – 28 May 1972) was the second British monarch of the House... The peerage title Duke of Windsor was created in the Peerage of the United Kingdom in 1937 for The Prince Edward, formerly King of the United Kingdom, as well as each of the other Commonwealth realms. ... Antibes (Provençal Occitan: Antíbol in classical norm or Antibo in Mistralian norm) is a resort town of southeastern France, on the Mediterranean Sea in the Côte dAzur, located between Cannes and Nice. ...


The British novelist Somerset Maugham also became a resident of the Riviera in 1926, buying the Villa Mauresque near the end of Cap Ferrat, near Nice. W. Somerset Maugham as photographed in 1934 by Carl Van Vechten. ... Distant view of Cap Ferrat View from Èze to Cap Ferrat Cap Ferrat (Cape Ferrat) is situated in Alpes-Maritimes département, in southeastern France. ...


World War II through the 1950s

When Nazi Germany invaded France in June 1940, the remaining British colony on the Riviera was evacuated to Gibraltar and eventually to Britain. American Jewish groups helped some of the Jewish artists living in the south of France, such as Marc Chagall, to escape to the United States. In August 1942, six hundred Jews from Nice were rounded up by the French police and sent to Drancy, and eventually to Nazi death camps. In all about five thousand French Jews from Nice perished during the war. Marc Chagall as photographed in 1941 by Carl Van Vechten. ... Drancy is a commune in the northeastern suburbs of Paris, France. ...


On August 15, 1944, American parachute troops landed near Fréjus, and a fleet landed sixty thousand troops of the American Seventh Army and French First Army between Cavalaire and Agay, east of Saint-Raphaël. German resistance crumbled in a few days.


Saint-Tropez was badly damaged by German mines at the time of the liberation. The novelist Colette organized an effort to assure that the town was rebuilt in its original style. Saint-Tropez is a commune of the Var département in southern France, located on the French Riviera. ... Colette Colette [1] [2] was the pen name of the French novelist Sidonie-Gabrielle Colette (January 28, 1873 – August 3, 1954). ...


When the war ended, artists Marc Chagall and Pablo Picasso returned to the Riviera to live and work. Marc Chagall as photographed in 1941 by Carl Van Vechten. ... Picasso redirects here. ...


The Cannes Film Festival was launched in September 1946, marking the return of French cinema to world screens. The Festival Palace was built in 1949 on the site of the old Cercle Nautique, where the Prince of Wales had met his mistresses. The release of the French film Et Dieu… créa la femme (And God Created Woman) in November 1956 was a major event for the Riviera, making an international star out of Brigitte Bardot, and making an international tourist destination out of Saint-Tropez, particularly for the new class of wealthy international travelers called the 'jet set.' The Cannes Film Festival (French: le Festival de Cannes), founded in 1939, is one of the worlds oldest, most influential and prestigious film festivals. ... Brigitte Bardot (French IPA: ) (born September 28, 1934) is a BAFTA Awards-nominated French actress, former fashion model, singer, known nationalist, animal rights activist, and considered the embodiment of the 1950s and 1960s sex kitten. ... Categories: Move to Wiktionary | Stub ...


The marriage of American film actress Grace Kelly to Prince Rainier of Monaco on April 18, 1956, attracted world attention once again to the Riviera. It was viewed on television by some thirty million people. For the Mika song, see Grace Kelly (song). ... The name Rainier can refer to the following: Mount Rainier, a stratovolcano and national park 54 miles southeast of Seattle, Washington, USA named for British Rear Admiral Peter Rainier Several Princes of Monaco, all of the House of Grimaldi: Rainier I, Rainier II, Rainier III Mount Rainier, a place in...


The 1960s through the 21st century

On May 13, 1971, Mick Jagger, the lead singer of the rock group the Rolling Stones, married Nicaraguan model Bianca Perez de Macias in Saint-Tropez, which maintained the image of the Riviera as a haven for the rich and famous. Sir Michael Phillip Mick Jagger (born July 26, 1943) is a English rock musician, actor, songwriter, record and film producer and businessman. ... This article is about the rock band. ...


During the 1960s, the Mayor of Nice, Jacques Médecin, decided to reduce the dependence of the Riviera on ordinary tourism, and to make it a destination for international congresses and conventions. He built the Palais des Congrès at Acropolis, and founded both a Chagall Museum and a Matisse Museum at Cimiez. High-rise apartment buildings and real estate developments began to spread along the Riviera. Jacques Médecin (1928-1998) was a French politician. ... Marc Chagall as photographed in 1941 by Carl Van Vechten Marc Chagall (July 7, 1887 - March 28, 1985) was a Belarusian painter of Jewish origin. ... Self-Portrait in a Striped T-shirt (1906). ... Cimiez is an upper class neighborhood in Nice, France. ...


At the end of August, 1997, Princess Diana and Dodi Fayed spent their last days together on his father's yacht anchored off Pampelonne Beach near Saint-Tropez, shortly before they were killed in a traffic accident in the Alma Tunnel in Paris. Diana, Princess of Wales (Diana Frances Mountbatten-Windsor, née Spencer) (1 July 1961–31 August 1997), commonly, but incorrectly, known as Princess Diana, was for fifteen years the wife of HRH The Prince Charles, Prince of Wales. ... Emad El-Din Mohamed Abdel Moneim Fayed (April 15, 1955 - August 31, 1997) was the son of Mohamed Al-Fayed, owner of the British department store, Harrods. ... Saint-Tropez is a commune of the Var département in southern France, located on the French Riviera. ... This article is about the capital of France. ...


Today the French Riviera is not just an important tourist destination, but also a center for education, high technology, and scientific research. Nice is the fifth largest city in France, and is home of the University of Nice Sophia-Antipolis, with its own large technology and research park. The University of Nice Sophia Antipolis (French Université Nice Sophia Antipolis) is a university located in Nice, France. ...


Geography

Cap Ferrat; Plage la Paloma, a beach on the Côte d'Azur.
Cap Ferrat; Plage la Paloma, a beach on the Côte d'Azur.
Saint-Jeannet, in Alpes-Maritimes.
Saint-Jeannet, in Alpes-Maritimes.
Port of Porquerolles, an island in Var.
Port of Porquerolles, an island in Var.
Courtade's Beach on Porquerolles.
Courtade's Beach on Porquerolles.

Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2816 × 2112 pixel, file size: 2. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2816 × 2112 pixel, file size: 2. ... Alpes_Maritimes is a département in the extreme southeast corner of France. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2576 × 1932 pixel, file size: 1. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2576 × 1932 pixel, file size: 1. ... Var is a département of southeastern France. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2576 × 1932 pixel, file size: 1. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2576 × 1932 pixel, file size: 1. ...

Places

Places on the French Riviera, from west to east, include:

Cassis is a town commune of the Bouches-du-Rhône département, in southeastern France. ... Panorama of Toulon area. ... A square in Hyeres. ... Saint-Tropez is a commune of the Var département in southern France, located on the French Riviera. ... Roman ruins, aquaduct Fréjus is a coastal town and commune, in the Var département, in southern France. ... Saint-Raphaël is a commune of the Var département, in southeastern France. ... For the annual festival, see Cannes Film Festival. ... Grasse (Provençal Occitan: Grassa in classical norm or Grasso in Mistralian norm) is a town and episcopal see in southeast France, it is a commune of the Alpes-Maritimes département (of which it is a sous-préfecture), on the French Riviera. ... Juan-les-Pins is a district of Antibes, in southeastern France, on the Côte dAzur. ... Antibes (Provençal Occitan: Antíbol in classical norm or Antibo in Mistralian norm) is a resort town of southeastern France, on the Mediterranean Sea in the Côte dAzur, located between Cannes and Nice. ... Biot is a French commune in the département of Alpes-Maritimes and the région of Provence-Alpes-Côte dAzur. ... Villeneuve-Loubet is a town and commune in southeastern France, in the Alpes-Maritimes département, between Cagnes-sur-Mer and Antibes, at the mouth of the Loup River. ... Cagnes-sur-Mer is a town and commune of the Alpes-Maritimes département, in southeastern France. ... Sophia Antipolis is a technology park north-west of Nice, France. ... St Paul de Vence St Paul de Vence (from Colle sur Loupe), Sept 2005 Saint-Paul or Saint-Paul de Vence is a commune of the Alpes-Maritimes département, in southeastern France. ... This article is about the French city. ... Villefranche-sur-Mer (Niçard: Vilafranca de Mar, Italian: Villafranca Marittima) is a small town and commune in the Alpes-Maritimes département. ... Categories: France geography stubs | Communes of Alpes-Maritimes ... Beaulieu-sur-Mer is a seaside resort commune in the Alpes-Maritimes département on the French Riviera, located 6 miles (10 km) apart east from Nice and west from Monaco. ... Èze (Eza in Italian) is a commune of the Alpes-Maritimes département, in France, not far from the town of Nice. ... Cap dAil Cap-dAil is a small French town and commune that borders the district of La Colle in the Principality of Monaco. ... Casino at night with a fountain in front Monte Carlo is the wealthiest of Monacos four quarters, sometimes erroneously believed to be the countrys capital, even though there formally is none. ... Roquebrune-Cap-Martin is a commune in the Alpes-Maritimes département in southeastern France. ... Menton (Occitan: Menton in classical norm or Mentan in Mistralian norm; Italian: Mentone) is a town and commune in the Alpes-Maritimes département of the Provence-Alpes-Côte dAzur région of France. ...

Climate

The French Riviera has a Mediterranean climate, with sunny, hot, dry summers, and mild winters. Winter temperatures are moderated by the proximity to the Mediterranean; days of frost are extremely rare, and in summer the maximum temperature rarely exceeds 30º celsius.[3] Along the French Riviera there are a number of micro-climates, and there can be great differences in the weather between Nice on the east and Toulon on the west. Strong winds, such as the Mistral, a cold dry wind from the northwest or from the east, are another characteristic feature of the Riviera, particularly in the winter and between Toulon and Marseille.  Areas with Mediterranean climate A Mediterranean climate is one that resembles the climate of the lands in the Mediterranean Basin, which includes over half of the area with this climate type world-wide. ... Mistral is an atmospheric phenomenon that occurs mostly in the winter and spring in the Gulf of Lion. ... Panorama of Toulon area. ... City flag Coat of arms Motto: By her great deeds, the city of Massilia shines The Old Port of Marseille Location Time Zone CET (GMT +1) Coordinates Administration Country Region Provence-Alpes-Côte dAzur Department Bouches-du-Rhône (13) Subdivisions 16 arrondissements (in 8 secteurs) Intercommunality Urban...


Nice and the Alpes-Maritimes

Nice and the Alpes-Maritimes département are sheltered by the Alps, and are the most protected part of the Mediterranean coast. The winds in this area are usually gentle, blowing from the sea to the land, though sometimes the Mistral blows strongly from the northwest, or, turned by the mountains, from the east. In 1956 a Mistral from the northwest reached a speed of 180 kilometers an hour at Nice airport.[4] Sometimes in summer the Sirocco brings high temperatures and reddish desert sand from Africa. (See Winds of Provence.) Alp redirects here. ... Sirocco, scirocco, jugo or, rarely, siroc is a strong southerly to southeasterly wind in the Mediterranean that originates from the Sahara and similar North African regions. ... A world map showing the continent of Africa Africa is the worlds second-largest and second most-populous continent, after Asia. ...


Rainfall is rare, but can be torrential, particularly in September, when storms and rain are caused by the difference between the colder air inland and the warm Mediterranean water temperature (20°C-24°C). The average annual rainfall in Nice is 767 millimeters, more than in Paris, though it rains an average of just 63 days a year.


Snow is extremely rare, usually falling once every ten years. 1956 was a very exceptional year, when 20 centimeters of snow blanketed the coast.[5] In January 1985 the coast between Cannes and Menton received 30 to 40 centimeters of snow. In the mountains, snow is present from November to May.


Nice has an average of 2694 hours of sunshine, or about 112 days, a year. The average maximum daily temperature in Nice in August is 28°C, while the average minimum daily temperature in January is 6°C.[6]


Toulon and the Var

Toulon and the département of the Var (which includes St. Tropez and Hyères) have a climate slightly warmer, dryer and sunnier than Nice and the Alpes-Maritimes, but also less sheltered from the wind. Toulon has an average of 2799 hours of sunshine, or about 116 days a year, making it the sunniest city in metropolitan France.[7] The average maximum daily temperature in August is 29.1°C, and the average daily minimum temperature in January is 5.8°C. The average annual rainfall is 665 millimeters, with the most rain from October to November. Saint-Tropez is a commune of the Var département in southern France, located on the French Riviera. ... A square in Hyeres. ...


The cold and dry Mistral wind is particularly frequent and strong in winter between Marseille and Toulon, blowing down the Rhône River Valley. Strong winds blow an average of 118 days a year in Toulon, compared with 76 days at Fréjus further east. The strongest Mistral wind recorded in Toulon was 130 kilometers an hour.[8]


Events and festivals

Several major events take place along the French Riviera at various times of the year:

  • Monaco; Circus Festival, January 27 to February 3.
  • Nice; Carnival, February 10-27.
  • Menton; Lemon Festival, February 12-27.
  • Tourrettes-sur-Loup; Violet Festival, March 13.
  • Monaco; Grand Prix Formula One race, May 12-15.
  • Grasse; Rose Festival, May 12-16.
  • Cannes; International Film Festival, May 12-23.
  • Nice; Jazz Festival, July 8-19.
  • Juan-les-Pins; Jazz Festival, end of July.
  • Grasse; Jasmine Festival, August 4-7.

F1 redirects here. ...

Painters

Paul Signac, The Port of Saint-Tropez, oil on canvas, 1901.
Paul Signac, The Port of Saint-Tropez, oil on canvas, 1901.

The climate and vivid colors of the Mediterranean coast attracted many famous artists during the 19th and 20th centuries. Artists who painted on the coast included: Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... The Papal Palace, Avignon, oil on canvas, 1900 Paul Signac (November 11, 1863 - August 15, 1935) was a French neo-impressionist painter who, working with Georges Seurat, helped develop the pointillist style. ...

The Dining Room in the Country Pierre Bonnard (October 3, 1867 – January 23, 1947) was a French painter and printmaker. ... Le Cannet is a town and a commune of the Alpes-Maritimes département in southeastern France. ... Violin and Candlestick, Paris, spring 1910, San Francisco Museum of Modern Art Georges Braque (May 13, 1882 – August 31, 1963) was a major 20th century French painter and sculptor who, along with Pablo Picasso, developed the art movement known as cubism. ... LEstaque is a small French fishing village just west of Marseille. ... Cezanne redirects here. ... Aix (prounounced eks), or, to distinguish it from other cities built over hot springs, Aix-en-Provence is a city in southern France, some 30 km north of Marseille. ... LEstaque is a small French fishing village just west of Marseille. ... Cypresses at Cagnes by Henri-Edmond Cross (1910) Henri-Edmond Cross (May 20, 1856 – May 16, 1910), was a French pointillist painter. ... A square in Hyeres. ... Maurice Denis (November 25, 1870 – November 1943) was a French painter and writer and a member of the Symbolist and Les Nabis movements. ... Saint-Tropez is a commune of the Var département in southern France, located on the French Riviera. ... Charing Cross Bridge, London (1906). ... LEstaque is a small French fishing village just west of Marseille. ... Martigues is a town and commune in the southeastern part of France, to the northwest of Marseille. ... Raoul Dufy (June 3, 1877 – March 23, 1953) was a French Fauvist painter. ... City flag Coat of arms Motto: By her great deeds, the city of Massilia shines The Old Port of Marseille Location Time Zone CET (GMT +1) Coordinates Administration Country Region Provence-Alpes-Côte dAzur Department Bouches-du-Rhône (13) Subdivisions 16 arrondissements (in 8 secteurs) Intercommunality Urban... Martigues is a town and commune in the southeastern part of France, to the northwest of Marseille. ... Albert Marquet (27 March 1875, Bordeaux – 13 June 1947, Paris) was a French painter, associated with the Fauvism current. ... City flag Coat of arms Motto: By her great deeds, the city of Massilia shines The Old Port of Marseille Location Time Zone CET (GMT +1) Coordinates Administration Country Region Provence-Alpes-Côte dAzur Department Bouches-du-Rhône (13) Subdivisions 16 arrondissements (in 8 secteurs) Intercommunality Urban... Saint-Tropez is a commune of the Var département in southern France, located on the French Riviera. ... LEstaque is a small French fishing village just west of Marseille. ... Matisse redirects here. ... Saint-Tropez is a commune of the Var département in southern France, located on the French Riviera. ... This article is about the French city. ... Vence is a small French town and commune set in the hills of the Alpes Maritimes département, between Nice and Antibes. ... This article is about Impressionist painter. ... Menton (Occitan: Menton in classical norm or Mentan in Mistralian norm; Italian: Mentone) is a town and commune in the Alpes-Maritimes département of the Provence-Alpes-Côte dAzur région of France. ... Bordighera is a town on the Italian Riviera in the Province of Imperia, Liguria. ... Juan-les-Pins is a district of Antibes, in southeastern France, on the Côte dAzur. ... Monte Carlo is a very wealthy section of the city-state of Monaco known for its casino, gambling, beaches, glamour, and sightings of famous people. ... This article is about the French city. ... For the annual festival, see Cannes Film Festival. ... Beaulieu is the name of one village in England Beaulieu in the county of Hampshire Beaulieu is also the name of several communes in France: Beaulieu, in the Ardèche département Beaulieu, in the Calvados département Beaulieu, in the Cantal département Beaulieu, in the Côte-dOr département Beaulieu, in the... Villefranche is the name or part of the name of several communes in France: Villefranche, in the Gers département Villefranche, in the Yonne département Villefranche-dAlbigeois, in the Tarn département Villefranche-dAllier, in the Allier département Villefranche-de-Conflent, in the Pyrénées-Orientales département Villefranche-de-Lauragais, in... Cape Martin, also known as Cap Martin, is a small town located on the French Riviera between Menton and Monaco. ... The Scream. ... This article is about the French city. ... Monte Carlo is a very wealthy section of the city-state of Monaco known for its casino, gambling, beaches, glamour, and sightings of famous people. ... Categories: France geography stubs | Communes of Alpes-Maritimes ... Picasso redirects here. ... Vallauris is a commune in the département of Alpes-Maritimes and the Provence-Alpes-Côte dAzur region of France. ... Mougins is a town and commune in the Alpes-Maritimes département, in southeastern France. ... Pierre-Auguste Renoir (February 25, 1841 _ December 3, 1919) was a preeminent French painter. ... Beaulieu is the name of one village in England Beaulieu in the county of Hampshire Beaulieu is also the name of several communes in France: Beaulieu, in the Ardèche département Beaulieu, in the Calvados département Beaulieu, in the Cantal département Beaulieu, in the Côte-dOr département Beaulieu, in the... Grasse (Provençal Occitan: Grassa in classical norm or Grasso in Mistralian norm) is a town and episcopal see in southeast France, it is a commune of the Alpes-Maritimes département (of which it is a sous-préfecture), on the French Riviera. ... Saint-Raphaël is a commune of the Var département, in southeastern France. ... For the annual festival, see Cannes Film Festival. ... Cagnes-sur-Mer is a town and commune of the Alpes-Maritimes département, in southeastern France. ... The Papal Palace, Avignon, oil on canvas, 1900 Paul Signac (November 11, 1863 - August 15, 1935) was a French neo-impressionist painter who, working with Georges Seurat, helped develop the pointillist style. ... Saint-Tropez is a commune of the Var département in southern France, located on the French Riviera. ...

Famous residents

Roman Arkadyevich Abramovich (IPA: ; Russian: ; born on 24 October 1966 in Saratov, Russian SFSR, USSR) earned his money after taking investment advice from Sir Oliver Bienias and Lord James Orchard. ... For other persons named Paul Allen, see Paul Allen (disambiguation). ... Brigitte Bardot (French IPA: ) (born September 28, 1934) is a BAFTA Awards-nominated French actress, former fashion model, singer, known nationalist, animal rights activist, and considered the embodiment of the 1950s and 1960s sex kitten. ... Rubens Gonçalves Barrichello (born May 23, 1972) is a Brazilian Formula One race driver of Italian descent. ... Dame Shirley Veronica Bassey, DBE (born January 8, 1937), is a Welsh biracial singer, perhaps best-known for performing the theme songs to the James Bond films Goldfinger (1964), Diamonds Are Forever (1971), and Moonraker (1979). ... Troy Bayliss is a motorcycle racer, born in March 30, 1969 at Taree, New South Wales, Australia. ... Richard Richie Benaud OBE (born October 6, 1930 in Penrith, New South Wales) is a former Australian cricketer. ... For other uses, see Bono (disambiguation). ... Tom Boonen (born on October 15, 1980 in Mol, Belgium) is a professional road bicycle racer and is the 2005 World Road Race Champion. ... ... Carla Bruni Tedeschi (born Turin, Italy, 23 December 1967), is an Italian supermodel, songwriter and singer. ... Jenson Alexander Lyons Button, often called Jense, (born 19 January 1980) is an English Formula One racing driver. ... Loris Capirossi is an Italian motorcycle racer, who currently rides the factory Ducati MotoGP bike. ... Belinda Carlisle (born Belinda Josephine Kurczeski on August 17, 1958 in Hollywood, California) is the lead vocalist and a founding member of the all-female New Wave band Go-Gos as well as a successful solo artist. ... Jean Maurice Eugène Clément Cocteau (5 July 1889 – 11 October 1963) was a French poet, novelist, dramatist, designer, boxing manager and filmmaker. ... Joan Henrietta Collins OBE (born 23 May 1933) is a Golden Globe Award winning British actress and bestselling author. ... David Marshall Coulthard, often called DC, (born March 27, 1971 in Twynholm, Kirkcudbrightshire) is a British Formula One racing driver from Scotland. ... John Christopher Depp II[1] (born June 9, 1963) is an American actor, best known for his frequent portrayals of offbeat and eccentric characters such as Jack Sparrow in the Pirates of the Caribbean trilogy and the titular character of Tim Burtons Edward Scissorhands. ... For other subjects called The Edge, see The Edge (disambiguation). ... Michele Ferrero (1927-). Owner of the eponymous chocolate maker Ferrero SpA, one of Europes largest with estimated 2002 sales of $4 billion. ... Francis Scott Key Fitzgerald (September 24, 1896 – December 21, 1940) was an American Jazz Age author of novels and short stories. ... James R. Gandolfini (born September 18, 1961) is a three-time Emmy award winning American actor known for multifaceted portrayals of conscientious yet often inherently sinister characters. ... Sir Stelios Haji-Ioannou, KBE (born 14 February 1967 in Athens) is a Greek-Cypriot born British entrepreneur and is best known for setting up easyJet, a low-cost airline. ... Mika Pauli Häkkinen ( ) (born September 28, 1968 in Helsingin maalaiskunta) is a Finnish racing driver and two-time Formula One champion. ... For other persons named Michael Jackson, see Michael Jackson (disambiguation). ... Sir Elton Hercules John, KBE, born Reginald Kenneth Dwight on March 25, 1947, is one of the most successful British pop singers, composers, and musicians. ... Lucas Luhr (born July 22, 1979, in Mülheim-Kärlich) is a German race car driver, currently racing in the American Le Mans Series for the Audi factory team. ... Loretta Lux (born 1969) was born in Dresden, East Germany and is a German fine art photographer known for her surreal portraits of young children. ... Tommi Antero Mäkinen (pronounced /tom-mi mæ-ki-nen/ in IPA) is a now retired Finnish rally driver, born in Puuppola, Finland near Jyväskylä in June 1964. ... Keke Rosberg (on the left) with Wolf Racing Crew at Monaco GP 1979 Keijo Erik Keke Rosberg (born December 6, 1948) was a popular Formula One driver in the early 1980s and, despite his birthplace Stockholm, Sweden, was the first regular driver from Finland in the series. ... Juan Pablo Montoya Roldán (born September 20, 1975 in Bogotá, Colombia) is a race car driver in NASCAR for Chip Ganassi Racing and a former Formula One driver. ... Jason Plato (born 14 October 1968 in Oxford, England) is a British auto racing driver, currently living in Monte Carlo. ... Roman Polanski (born August 18, 1933) is an Academy Award-winning film director, writer, actor, and producer. ... Nico Rosberg (born June 27, 1985 in Wiesbaden, Germany) is a German racing driver for the Williams team. ... Sophie Sandolo (born July 26, 1976, in Nice, France) is an Italian professional golfer. ... Evgeny Eugene Markovich Shvidler (Russian: Евгений Маркович Швидлер) (born 1964 in Moscow, Russia) is a Russian oil billionaire. ... David Adkins (born November 10[1] or November 18,[2] 1956), better known by the stage name Sinbad, is an African-American stand-up comedian and actor. ... Ivana Trump (born Ivana Marie Zelníčková IPA: on February 20, 1949) is a former Olympic athlete and fashion model also noted for her celebrity brand and marriage to mogul Donald J. Trump. ... Tina Turner (born Anna Mae Bullock) November 26, 1939) is an 11 time Grammy Award-winning (sharing three), American Singer, Dancer, Record Producer, Executive Producer, Film Producer, Actress, Writer, Performer, Songwriter, Author and occasional Painter whose career has spanned from 1956 to present. ... Painting of La Marianne by Andrew Vicari (1980) Andrew Vicari (born 20 April 1938) is a Welsh painter working in France who has established a career painting portraits of the rich and famous. ... This article is about the younger Jacques Villeneuve. ... This article is about the actress. ... Andrew Lloyd Webber, Baron Lloyd-Webber (born 22 March 1948) is a highly successful English composer of musical theatre, and also the elder brother of cellist Julian Lloyd Webber. ... Alessandro Alex Zanardi, b. ...

Trivia

  • The French Riviera was used as a setting in the 2001 video game Spy Hunter, in the missions Double Vision and French Kiss.
  • Côte d'Azur is also used in the Halo series, as the capital city of the UNSC colony of Sigma Octanus IV.

Gran Turismo (GT) is a racing video game series developed by Polyphony Digital for the PlayStation, PlayStation 2, and PlayStation Portable gaming systems. ... The Monaco Grand Prix (Grand Prix de Monaco) is a Formula One race held each year on the Circuit de Monaco. ... Gran Turismo 4 (also known as GT4) is a racing video game for Sony PlayStation 2 which is published by Polyphony Digital. ... For other uses, see Spy Hunter (disambiguation). ... Halos protagonist, the Master Chief, in Halo: Combat Evolved. ...

See also

Liguria and the Italian Riviera Portofino’s small harbour on the Italian Riviera The Italian Rivera ( ) is the narrow coastal strip which lies between the Ligurian Sea and the mountain chain formed by the Maritime Alps and the Apennines. ... The Gulf of Genoa (Golfo di Genova) is the northernmost part of the Ligurian Sea. ... Map showing the Turkish Riviera The Turkish Riviera (also known as The Turquoise Coast) is a popular term used to define an area of southwest Turkey encompassing Antalya, MuÄŸla and to a lesser extent Aydın and Ä°zmir provinces. ... (Région flag) (Region logo) Location Administration Capital Regional President Departments Alpes-de-Haute-Provence Alpes-Maritimes Bouches-du-Rhône Hautes-Alpes Var Vaucluse Arrondissements 18 Cantons 237 Communes 963 Statistics Land area1 31,400 km² Population (Ranked 3rd)  - January 1, 2006 est. ... Riviera is usually used in reference to a coastal area. ...

Bibliography

History

  • Aldo Bastié, Histoire de la Provence, Éditions Ouest-France, 2001.
  • Jim Ring, Riviera, the Rise and Fall of the Côte d'Azur, John Murray Publishers, London, 1988.

Painters

  • La Méditerrranée de Courbet à Matisse, catalog of the exhibit at the Grand Palais, Paris from September 2000 to January 2001. Published by the Réunion des musées nationaux, 2000.

Footnotes

  1. ^ Towns and tourist offices on the coast dispute the borders of the Côte d'Azur. Some authorities (including the official tourist bodies for the Alpes-Maritimes) argue that it stops at the border with the département of the Var, after Théoule-sur-Mer. Others suggest it extends further along the Var coastline, at least as far as Saint-Tropez but possibly to Hyères or even the border with the Bouches-du-Rhône département.
  2. ^ Aldo Bastié, Histoire de la Provence, Edition Ouest-France, 2001.
  3. ^ Internet site of Meteo-France, describing the climate of different French regions.
  4. ^ Météo-France site.
  5. ^ Meteo-France site
  6. ^ Météo-France site.
  7. ^ MSN meteo and Météo-France site.
  8. ^ Météo-France site.

Var is a département of southern France. ... Saint-Tropez is a commune of the Var département in southern France, located on the French Riviera. ... A square in Hyeres. ... Bouches-du-Rhône is a département in the south of France named after the mouth of the Rhône River. ...

External links

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