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Encyclopedia > Freestyle wrestling
Two men in the U.S. military, one from the Navy and one from the Marine Corps, compete in freestyle wrestling.
Two men in the U.S. military, one from the Navy and one from the Marine Corps, compete in freestyle wrestling.
Freestyle Wrestling
Style Grappling
Country of origin Flag of the United Kingdom United Kingdom
Parenthood Catch wrestling
Famous practitioners Alexander Medved, Bruce Baumgartner, John Smith
Olympic Sport Yes

Freestyle wrestling is a form of amateur wrestling that is practiced throughout the world. It is, along with track and field, one of the oldest sports in history. This article is about collegiate wrestling. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 540 pixelsFull resolution (1720 × 1160 pixel, file size: 437 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) US Marine Corps (USMC) Corporal (CPL) Jacob Clark (dressed in red), a member of the All Marines Wrestling Team, competes in a Freestyle wresting match... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 540 pixelsFull resolution (1720 × 1160 pixel, file size: 437 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) US Marine Corps (USMC) Corporal (CPL) Jacob Clark (dressed in red), a member of the All Marines Wrestling Team, competes in a Freestyle wresting match... The Military of the United States, also known as the United States Armed Forces, is structured into five branches consisting of the: United States Army United States Marine Corps United States Navy United States Air Force United States Coast Guard Reserves United States National Guard United States Army Reserve United... USN redirects here. ... The United States Marine Corps (USMC) is a branch of the United States military responsible for providing power projection from the sea,[1] utilizing the mobility of the U.S. Navy to rapidly deliver combined-arms task forces. ... For other uses, see Grapple. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_United_Kingdom. ... Catch wrestling is a popular style of wrestling. ... Alexander Medved (Belarusian: Алякса́ндр Васíлевiч Мядзве́дзь; Russian: Алекса́ндр Васи́льевич Медве́дь) (born September 16, 1937 in Belaya Tserkov, Ukrainian SSR) is a famous Soviet/Belarusian wrestler. ... Bruce Baumgartner (born August 31, 1962, in Haledon, New Jersey) is a retired American amateur wrestler and current Director of Athletics for the Edinboro University of Pennsylvania. ... John W. Smith (born August 9, 1965) is currently the head coach of wrestling at Oklahoma State University. ... FILA Greatest Wrestler of 20th Century (Greco-Roman) Alexander Karelin throws Olympian Jeff Blatnick with his Karelin Lift Womens wrestling Andrell Durden (top) and Edward Harris grapple for position during the All-Marine Wrestle Offs. ... Athletics, also known as track and field or track and field athletics, is a collection of sport events. ...


According to the International Federation of Associated Wrestling Styles (FILA), freestyle wrestling is one of the four main forms of amateur competitive wrestling that are practiced internationally today. The other three forms of wrestling are Greco-Roman, judo, and sambo. American high school and college wrestling is conducted under different rules and termed collegiate wrestling. Freestyle wrestling, like its American counterpart, collegiate (also known as scholastic or folkstyle) wrestling, has its origins in catch-as-catch-can wrestling and both have the prime victory condition of the wrestler winning by pinning his opponent on the mat. The International Federation of Associated Wrestling Styles, also known in French as Fédération Internationale des Luttes Associées (FILA), is an international wrestling federation that holds events around the world. ... Ancient Greek wrestlers (Pankratiasts) Wrestling is the act of physical engagement between two unarmed persons, in which each wrestler strives to get an advantage over or control of their opponent. ... This article is about Greco-Roman wrestling. ... This article is about the martial art and sport. ... Sambo (Russian: ) -- (also called Sombo in the US and sometimes written in all-caps) is a modern martial art, combat sport and self-defense system developed in the former Soviet Union, and recognized as an official sport by the USSR All-Union Sports Committee in 1938, presented by Anatoly Kharlampiev. ... For other uses, see High school (disambiguation). ... College (Latin collegium) is a term most often used today to denote an educational institution. ... This article is about collegiate wrestling. ... Catch wrestling is a popular style of wrestling. ...

Contents

History

Freestyle wrestling has been in the Olympic Games since the 1904 Olympics in Saint Louis, Missouri.
Freestyle wrestling has been in the Olympic Games since the 1904 Olympics in Saint Louis, Missouri.

Freestyle wrestling, according to FILA, is said to have originated in Great Britain and the United States by the name of "catch-as-catch-can" wrestling.[1] "Catch-as-catch-can" wrestling had a particular following in Great Britain and the variant developed in Lancashire had a particular effect on freestyle wrestling.[2] "Catch-as-catch-can" wrestling gained great popularity in fairs and festivals during the 19th century. In catch-as-catch-can wrestling, both contestants started out standing and then a wrestler sought to hold his opponent's shoulder to the ground (known as a fall). If no fall was scored, both wrestlers continued grappling on the ground, and almost all holds and techniques were allowable. A Scottish variant of Lancashire wrestling also became popular, that began with both wrestlers standing chest to chest, grasping each other with locked arms around the body, and if no fall was made, with a match continuing on the ground.[3] Also, there was the Irish collar-and-elbow style, where wrestlers started out on their feet with both wrestlers grasping each other by the collar with one hand and by the elbow with the other. If neither wrestler then achieved a fall, the contestants would continue both standing and on the ground until a fall was made. Irish immigrants later brought this style of wrestling to the United States, where it soon became widespread, especially because of the success of the wrestling champion of the Army of the Potomac, George William Flagg from Vermont.[4] Catch-as-catch can was the style performed by at least a half dozen U.S. presidents, including George Washington, Zachary Taylor, Abraham Lincoln, Andrew Johnson, Ulysses S. Grant, and Theodore Roosevelt.[5] Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 525 pixelsFull resolution (2000 × 1312 pixel, file size: 648 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Marine Cpl. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 525 pixelsFull resolution (2000 × 1312 pixel, file size: 648 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Marine Cpl. ... The five Olympic rings were designed in 1913, adopted in 1914 and debuted at the Games at Antwerp, 1920. ... 1904 (MCMIV) was a leap year starting on a Friday (see link for calendar). ... Nickname: Gateway City, Gateway to the West, or Mound City Motto: Official website: http://stlouis. ... Official language(s) English Capital Jefferson City Largest city Kansas City Largest metro area St Louis[1] Area  Ranked 21st  - Total 69,709 sq mi (180,693 km²)  - Width 240 miles (385 km)  - Length 300 miles (480 km)  - % water 1. ... The International Federation of Associated Wrestling Styles, also known in French as Fédération Internationale des Luttes Associées (FILA), is an international wrestling federation that holds events around the world. ... Catch wrestling is a popular style of wrestling. ... Lancashire is a non-metropolitan county of historic origin in the North West of England, bounded to the west by the Irish Sea. ... Scottish can refer to: Look up Scottish in Wiktionary, the free dictionary (as an adjective) things to do with Scotland (see also Scots and Scotch) (as a noun) the Scottish people. ... Immigration is the act of moving to or settling in another country or region, temporarily or permanently. ... Generals Burnside, Hancock, Couch, Ferro, Patrick, Wilcox, Cochrane, Buford and others. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      For other uses, see President of the United States (disambiguation). ... George Washington (February 22, 1732 – December 14, 1799)[1] led Americas Continental Army to victory over Britain in the American Revolutionary War (1775–1783), and in 1789 was elected the first President of the United States of America. ... Zachary Taylor (November 24, 1784 – July 9, 1850)[2] was an American military leader and the twelfth President of the United States. ... For other uses, see Abraham Lincoln (disambiguation). ... For other persons of the same name, see Andrew Johnson (disambiguation). ... Ulysses S. Grant,[2] born Hiram Ulysses Grant (April 27, 1822 – July 23, 1885), was an American general and the eighteenth President of the United States (1869–1877). ... Theodore Roosevelt, Jr. ...


Because of the widespread interest in and esteem of professional Greco-Roman wrestling and its popularity in many international meets in nineteenth century Europe, freestyle wrestling (and wrestling as an amateur sport in general) had a tough time gaining ground on the continent. The 1896 Olympic Games had only one wrestling bout, a heavyweight Greco-Roman match.[6] Freestyle wrestling first emerged as an Olympic sport in the Saint Louis Olympics of 1904. All 40 wrestlers who participated in the 1904 Olympics were American. The 1904 Olympics sanctioned the rules commonly used for catch-as-catch can, but imposed some restrictions on dangerous holds. Wrestling by seven weight classes (47.6 kg, 52.2 kg, 56.7 kg, 61.2 kg, 65.3 kg, 71.7 kg, and greater than 71.7 kg) was an important innovation in the Summer Olympics.[7] For other uses, see Europe (disambiguation). ... Year 1896 (MDCCCXCVI) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display calendar). ... Nickname: Gateway City, Gateway to the West, or Mound City Motto: Official website: http://stlouis. ... 1904 (MCMIV) was a leap year starting on a Friday (see link for calendar). ... The Summer Olympic Games are an international multi-sport event held every four years, organised by the International Olympic Committee. ...


Since 1921, the International Federation of Associated Wrestling Styles (FILA), which has its headquarters near Lausanne, Switzerland, has set the "Rules of the Game", with regulations for scoring and procedures that govern tournaments such as the World Games and the competition at the Summer Olympics. These were later adopted by the Amateur Athletic Union (AAU) for its freestyle matches. Freestyle wrestling gained great popularity in the United States after the Civil War. By the 1880s, tournaments drew hundreds of wrestlers. The rise of cities, increased industrialization, and the closing of the frontier provided the affable environment for amateur wrestling, along with boxing, to increase in esteem and popularity. Amateur wrestling teams soon emerged, such as the wrestling team of the New York Athletic Club, which had its first tournament in 1878. Professional wrestling also developed (which was not like today's "sports-entertainment" seen today), and by the 1870s, professional championship matches offered allowances of up to $1,000.[8] Year 1921 (MCMXXI) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar). ... The International Federation of Associated Wrestling Styles, also known in French as Fédération Internationale des Luttes Associées (FILA), is an international wrestling federation that holds events around the world. ... Lausanne (pronounced ) is a city in the French-speaking part of Switzerland, situated on the shores of Lake Geneva (French: Lac Léman), and facing Évian-les-Bains (France) and with the Jura mountains to its north. ... - The Amateur Athletic Union, widely known as the AAU, was formed in United States. ... Combatants United States of America (Union) Confederate States of America (Confederacy) Commanders Abraham Lincoln, Ulysses S. Grant Jefferson Davis, Robert E. Lee Strength 2,200,000 1,064,000 Casualties 110,000 killed in action, 360,000 total dead, 275,200 wounded 93,000 killed in action, 258,000 total... // Development and commercial production of electric lighting Development and commercial production of gasoline-powered automobile by Karl Benz, Gottlieb Daimler and Maybach First commercial production and sales of phonographs and phonograph recordings. ... For other senses of these words, see boxing (disambiguation) or boxer (disambiguation). ... 1878 (MDCCCLXXVIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... // The invention of the telephone (1876) by Alexander Graham Bell. ...


Nineteenth century wrestling matches were particularly long, and especially Greco-Roman bouts (where holds below the waist and the use of the legs are not allowed) could last as many as eight to nine hours, and even then, it was only decided by a draw.[9] In the 20th century, time limits were set for matches.[10] For more than forty years into the twentieth century, freestyle and its American counterpart, collegiate wrestling, did not have a scoring system that decided matches in the absence of a fall. The introduction of a point system by Oklahoma State University wrestling coach Art Griffith that gained acceptance in 1941 influenced the international styles as well. By the 1960s international wrestling matches in Greco-Roman and freestyle were scored by a panel of three judges in secret, who made the final decision by raising colored paddles at the match's end. Dr. Albert de Ferrari from San Francisco who became vice president of FILA, lobbied for a visible scoring system and a rule for "controlled fall", which would recognize a fall only when the offensive wrestler had done something to cause it. These were soon adopted internationally in Greco-Roman and freestyle.[11] By 1996, before a major overhaul of FILA rules, an international freestyle match consisted of two three-minute periods, with a one minute rest between periods.[12] Today, wrestlers from the countries of the former Soviet Union, Japan, Turkey, Iran, Sweden, Finland, and the United States have had the strongest showings. Alexander Medved of Russia won 10 world championships and three Olympic gold medals, in the period of 1964-1972. Gold medalists from the United States include: Doug Blubaugh, Ben Peterson, John Peterson, Dan Gable, and John Smith, who in 1988 won first place in the Summer Olympics as well as winning six world championships in the period of 1987-1992. Many collegiate wrestlers have moved on to freestyle competition, particularly internationally with great success.[13] This article is about Greco-Roman wrestling. ... (19th century - 20th century - 21st century - more centuries) Decades: 1900s 1910s 1920s 1930s 1940s 1950s 1960s 1970s 1980s 1990s As a means of recording the passage of time, the 20th century was that century which lasted from 1901–2000 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar (1900–1999... This article is about collegiate wrestling. ... Oklahoma State University Logo The Oklahoma State University System comprises of five educational instututes across Oklahoma. ... For other uses, see 1941 (disambiguation). ... The 1960s decade refers to the years from 1960 to 1969, inclusive. ... “San Francisco” redirects here. ... Year 1996 (MCMXCVI) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full 1996 Gregorian calendar). ... Alexander Medved (Belarusian: Алякса́ндр Васíлевiч Мядзве́дзь; Russian: Алекса́ндр Васи́льевич Медве́дь) (born September 16, 1937 in Belaya Tserkov, Ukrainian SSR) is a famous Soviet/Belarusian wrestler. ... Also Nintendo emulator: 1964 (emulator). ... Year 1972 (MCMLXXII) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Benjamin Lee Peterson was the winner of the silver medal in Freestyle 90 kg wrestling at the 1976 Summer Olympics representing the United States. ... A North American proponent of bodyweight-only exercises and creator of Transformetricsâ„¢ - an exercise system similar to that which was first popularized by Charles Atlas. ... Dan Gable Dan Gable (born October 25, 1948 in Waterloo, Iowa), is a well-known American amateur wrestler. ... John W. Smith (born August 9, 1965) is currently the head coach of wrestling at Oklahoma State University. ... Year 1988 (MCMLXXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Friday (link displays 1988 Gregorian calendar). ... The Summer Olympic Games are an international multi-sport event held every four years, organised by the International Olympic Committee. ... Year 1987 (MCMLXXXVII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link displays 1987 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 1992 (MCMXCII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display full 1992 Gregorian calendar). ... This article is about collegiate wrestling. ...


Weight Classes

This freestyle wrestler locks the limbs of his opponent in order to take him down to the mat.
This freestyle wrestler locks the limbs of his opponent in order to take him down to the mat.

Currently, international men's freestyle wrestling is divided into four main age categories: schoolboys, cadets, juniors, and seniors.[14] Schoolboys (young men ages 14-15; or age 13 with a medical certificate and parental authorization) wrestle in 10 weight classes ranging from 29 to 85 kg.[15] Cadets (young men ages 16-17; or age 15 with a medical certificate and parental authorization) wrestle in 10 weight classes ranging from 39 to 100 kg.[16] Juniors (young men ages 18 to 20; or age 17 with a medical certificate and parental authorization) wrestle in eight weight classes ranging from 46 to 120 kg.[17] Seniors (men ages 20 and up) wrestle in seven weight classes ranging from 50 to 120 kg.[18] For men, there is also a special category for some freestyle competitions, "Veterans", for men ages 35 and older, presumably featuring the same weight classes as seniors.[19] Also, all of the men's age categories and weight classes can be applied to Greco-Roman wrestling.[20] In many styles of wrestling, opponents are matched based on weight (mass). ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 530 pixelsFull resolution (2100 × 1391 pixel, file size: 686 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Army Sgt. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 530 pixelsFull resolution (2100 × 1391 pixel, file size: 686 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Army Sgt. ... This article is about Greco-Roman wrestling. ...


Women currently compete in freestyle wrestling in one of four age categories on an international level: schoolgirls, cadets, juniors, and seniors.[21] Schoolgirls (young women ages 14-15; or age 13 with a medical certificate and parental authorization) wrestle in 10 weight classes ranging from 28 to 62 kg.[22] Cadets (young women ages 16-17; or age 15 with a medical certificate and parental authorization) wrestle in 10 weight classes ranging from 36 to 70 kg.[23] Juniors (young women ages 18 to 20; or age 17 with a medical certificate and parental authorization) wrestle in eight weight classes ranging from 40 to 72 kg.[24] Seniors (women ages 20 and up) wrestle in seven weight classes ranging from 44 to 72 kg.[25] Wrestlers after weigh-in may only wrestle in their own weight class. Wrestlers in the senior age category may wrestle up a weight class except for the heavyweight division (which starts at a weight more than 96 kg for the men and more than 67 kg for the women).[26] Different nations may have different weight classes and different age categories for their levels of freestyle competition.


Structure of the Tournament

A typical international wrestling tournament takes place by direct elimination with an ideal number of wrestlers (4, 8, 16, 32, 64, etc.) in each weight class and age category competing for placement. The competition in each weight class takes place in one day.[27] The day before the wrestling in a scheduled weight class and age category takes place, all the applicable wrestlers are examined by a physician and weighed-in. Each wrestler after being weighed on the scale then draws a token randomly that gives a certain number.[28]


If an ideal number is not reached to begin elimination rounds, a qualification round will take place to eliminate the excess number of wrestlers. For example, 22 wrestlers may weigh-in over the ideal number of 16 wrestlers. The six wrestlers who drew the highest numbers after 16 and the six wrestlers who drew the six numbers immediately before 17 would then wrestle in six matches in the qualification round. The winners of those matches would then go on to the elimination round.[29]


In the elimination round, the ideal number of wrestlers then pair off and compete in matches until two victors emerge who will compete in the finals for first and second place. All of the wrestlers who lost to the two finals then have the chance to wrestle in a repechage round. The repechage round begins with the wrestlers who lost to the two finalists at the lowest level of competition in the elimination round. The matches are paired off by the wrestlers who lost to one finalist and the wrestlers who lost to the other. The two wrestlers who win after every level of competition are the victors of the repechage round.[30] Repechage (French, pronounced re-pe-shage, literally re-fishing) is a practice amongst ladder competitions that allows participants that failed to meet qualifying standards by a small margin to continue to the next round. ...


In the finals, the two victors of the elimination round compete for first and second place.[31]


In all rounds of the tournament, the wrestlers compete in matches paired off in the order of the numbers they drew after the weigh-in.[32]


After the finals match, the awards ceremony will take place. The first place and second place wrestlers will receive a gold and silver medal, respectively. (At the FILA World Championships, the first place wrestler will receive the World Championship Belt.) The two repechage round winners will each be awarded third place with a bronze medal. The two wrestlers who lost in the finals for the third place are awarded fifth place. From seventh place down, the wrestlers are ranked according to the classification points earned for their victories or losses. If there is a tie among wrestlers for classification points, the ranking is determined in this order from the highest to the lowest:

  • Most victories earned by fall
  • Most matches won by technical superiority
  • Most periods won by technical superiority
  • Most points scored in the tournament
  • Least points scored in the tournament

Wrestlers who remained tied after that will be awarded placements "ex aequo." Wrestlers classified from the fifth to the 10th place will receive a special diploma. The wrestling tournaments in the Olympic Games and the Senior and Junior World Championships are designed to take place over three days on three mats.[33] The five Olympic rings were designed in 1913, adopted in 1914 and debuted at the Games at Antwerp, 1920. ...


Layout of the Mat

The match takes place on a thick rubber mat that is shock-absorbing to ensure safety. For the Olympic Games, all World Championships, and World Cups, the mat has to be new. The main wrestling area has a nine meter diameter and is surrounded by a 1.5 meter border of the same thickness known as the protection area. Inside the nine meter in diameter circle is a red band of one meter in width that is on the outer edge of the circle and is known as the red zone. The red zone is used to help indicate passivity on the part of a wrestler. Inside the red zone is the central surface of wrestling which is seven meters in diameter. In the middle of the central surface of wrestling is the central circle, which is one meter in diameter. The central circle is surrounded by a band 10 centimeters wide and is divided in half by a red line eight centimeters in width. The diagonally opposite corners of the mat are marked with the wrestlers' colors, red and blue.[34]


For competition in the Olympic Games, the World Championships, and the Continental Championships, the mat is installed on a platform no greater than 1.1 meters in height. If the mat lays on a podium and the protection margin (covering and free space around the mat) does not reach two meters, the sides of the podium are covered with 45º (degree) inclined panels. In all cases, the color of the protection area is different from the color of the mat.[35]


Equipment

  • A singlet is a one-piece wrestling garment made of spandex that should provide a tight and comfortable fit for the wrestler. It is made from nylon or lycra and prevents an opponent from using anything on the wrestler as leverage. One wrestler usually competes in a red singlet and the other in a blue singlet.[36]
  • A special pair of shoes is worn by the wrestler to increase his mobility and flexibility. Wrestling shoes are light and flexible in order to provide maximum comfort and movement. Usually made with rubber soles, they help give the wrestler's feet a better grip on the mat.[37]
  • A handkerchief, also called a bloodrag is carried in the singlet. In the event of bleeding, the wrestler will remove the cloth from his singlet and attempt to stop the bleeding or clean up any bodily fluids that may have gotten onto the mat.[38]
  • Headgear, equipment worn around the ears to protect the wrestler, is optional in freestyle. This is done at the participant's own risk, as there is the potential to develop cauliflower ear.[39]

A wrestling singlet (or simply singlet) is clothing commonly used in amateur wrestling. ... Example of spandex Spandex or elastane is a synthetic fiber known for its exceptional elasticity (stretchability). ... For other uses of this word, see nylon (disambiguation). ... Lycra is INVISTAs trademark for a synthetic polyurethane-based elastane textile with elastic properties of the sort known generically as spandex. As with other spandex materials, Lycra is commonly used in athletic or active clothing, such as clothes for cycling, swimwear, leotards and dancewear, as well as in underclothes. ... Wrestling shoes are active wear used in competition and practice for the sport of wrestling. ... Two college wrestlers in the United States with headgear competing in collegiate (or folkstyle) wrestling. ... Cauliflower ear (or perichondrial hematoma) is a condition common among rugby players - particularly forwards, boxers, martial artists and wrestlers. ...

The Match

A match is a competition between two individual wrestlers of the same weight class. In freestyle wrestling, a jury (or team) of three officials (referees) is used. The referee controls the action in the center, blowing the whistle to start and stop the action, and supervises the scoring of holds and infractions. The judge sits at the side of the mat, keeps score, and occasionally gives his approval when needed by the referee for various decisions. The mat chairman sits at the scoring table, keeps time, is responsible for declaring technical superiority, and supervises the work of the referee and judge. To call a pin, two of the three officials must agree (usually, the referee and either the judge or the mat chairman).[40] A referee is a person who has authority to make decisions about play in many sports. ...


Period Format

The freestyle wrestler in the blue singlet scores points over the wrestler in the red singlet to win by decision.
The freestyle wrestler in the blue singlet scores points over the wrestler in the red singlet to win by decision.

In Greco-Roman and freestyle, the format is now three two-minute periods. Before each match, each wrestler's name is called, and the wrestler takes his place at the corner of the mat assigned to his color. The referee then calls both of them to his side at the center of the mat, shakes hands with them, inspects their apparel, and checks for any perspiration, oily or greasy substances, and any other infractions. The two wrestlers then greet each other, shake hands, and the referee blows his whistle to start the period.[41] Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 525 pixelsFull resolution (2000 × 1312 pixel, file size: 651 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Army Spc. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 525 pixelsFull resolution (2000 × 1312 pixel, file size: 651 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Army Spc. ... A wrestling singlet (or simply singlet) is clothing commonly used in amateur wrestling. ...


A wrestler wins the match when he has won two out of three periods. For example, if one competitor were to win the first period 1-0 and the second period 1-0, the match would be over. However, if the other competitor were to win the second period, then a third and deciding period would result. Only a fall, injury default, or disqualification terminates the match; all other modes of victory result only in period termination. One side effect of this format is that it is possible for the losing wrestler to outscore the winner. For example, periods may be scored 3-2, 0-4, 1-0, leading to a total score of 4-6 but a win for the wrestler scoring fewer points.[42]


When the period (or match) has concluded, the referee stands at the center of the mat facing the officials' table. Both wrestlers then come, shake hands, and stand on either side of the referee to await the decision. The referee then proclaims the winner by raising the winner wrestler's hand in the air usually. Each wrestler then shakes hands with the referee and returns to shake hands with his opponent's coach.[43]


Scoring

In freestyle wrestling, points can be scored in the following ways:

  • Takedown (1 to 5 points): A wrestler gaining control over his opponent on the mat from a neutral position (when the wrestler is on his feet). At least three points of contact have to be controlled on the mat (e.g. two arms and one knee; two knees and one arm or the head; or two arms and the head).[44]
(5 points) - For a takedown brought about by a throw of grand amplitude (a throw in which a wrestler brings his opponent off of the mat and controls him so that his feet go directly above his head) either from the standing or par terre position into a direct and immediate danger position.[45]
(3 points) - Generally, for a takedown brought about by a grand amplitude throw that does not bring his opponent in a direct and immediate danger position or for a takedown in which a wrestler's opponent is taken from his feet or his stomach to his back or side (a throw of short amplitude) so that he is in the danger position.[46]
(1 point) - A wrestler taking his opponent from his feet to his stomach or side such that his back or shoulders are not exposed to the mat.[47]
  • Reversal (1 point): A wrestler gaining control over his opponent from a defensive position (when the wrestler is being controlled by his opponent).[48]
Two United States military servicemen grapple in a freestyle wrestling championship match.
Two United States military servicemen grapple in a freestyle wrestling championship match.
  • Exposure also called the Danger Position (2 or 3 points): Criteria for exposure or the danger position is met when 1) a wrestler's opponent is in a bridge position to avoid being pinned, 2) a wrestler's opponent is on one or both elbows with his back to the mat and avoids getting pinned, 3) a wrestler holds one of his opponent's shoulders to the mat and the other shoulder at an acute angle (less than 90 degrees), 4) a wrestler's opponent is in an "instantaneous fall" position (where both of his shoulders are on the mat for less than one second), or 5) the wrestler's opponent rolls on his shoulders.[49] A wrestler in the danger position allows his opponent to score two points. An additional hold-down point may be earned by maintaining the exposure continuously for five seconds.[50]
  • Penalty (1 or 2 points): Under the 2004-2005 changes to the international styles, a wrestler whose opponent takes an injury time-out receives one point unless the injurëd wrestler is bleeding. Other infractions (e.g. fleeing a hold or the mat, striking the opponent, acting with brutality or intent to injure, using illegal holds, etc.) are penalized by an award of either one or two points, a Caution, and choice of position.[51]
  • Out-of-Bounds (1 point): Whenever a wrestler places his foot in the protection area, the match is stopped, and a point is awarded to his opponent.[52]

Classification points are also awarded in an international wrestling tournament, which give most points to the winner and in some cases, one point to the loser depending on the outcome of the match and how the victory was attained. For example, a victory by fall would give the winner five classification points and the loser no points, while a match won by technical superiority with the loser scoring technical points would award three points to the winner and one point to loser.[53] Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 530 pixelsFull resolution (2100 × 1391 pixel, file size: 695 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Army Capt. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 530 pixelsFull resolution (2100 × 1391 pixel, file size: 695 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Army Capt. ... The armed forces of the United States of America consist of the United States Army United States Navy United States Air Force United States Marine Corps United States Coast Guard Note: The United States Coast Guard has both military and law enforcement functions. ...


The full determinations for scoring are found here on pages 34 to 40.


Scores no longer rewarded in Greco-Roman and freestyle wrestling

In 2004, FILA radically changed the format and scoring of the international styles. Part of this involved eliminating two ways of scoring which are possible from the par terre, or 'on the mat,' position.

  • Escape: A wrestler escaping his opponent's control.
  • Lifting: A wrestler successfully lifting an opponent in the defensive position and exposing his back.

Victory Conditions in Freestyle Wrestling

Compared to collegiate (scholastic or folkstyle) wrestling, the main style done in U.S. high schools, colleges, and universities, freestyle wrestling involves a greater emphasis on explosive action by both wrestlers, as opposed to one wrestler's dominance and control of the other.
Compared to collegiate (scholastic or folkstyle) wrestling, the main style done in U.S. high schools, colleges, and universities, freestyle wrestling involves a greater emphasis on explosive action by both wrestlers, as opposed to one wrestler's dominance and control of the other.

A match can be won in the following ways: Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 540 pixelsFull resolution (1720 × 1160 pixel, file size: 407 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) US Marine Corps (USMC) Corporal (CPL) Jacob Clark (dressed in red), a member of the All Marines Wrestling Team, competes in a Freestyle wresting match... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 540 pixelsFull resolution (1720 × 1160 pixel, file size: 407 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) US Marine Corps (USMC) Corporal (CPL) Jacob Clark (dressed in red), a member of the All Marines Wrestling Team, competes in a Freestyle wresting match... This article is about collegiate wrestling. ... Motto: (Out Of Many, One) (traditional) In God We Trust (1956 to date) Anthem: The Star-Spangled Banner Capital Washington D.C. Largest city New York City None at federal level (English de facto) Government Federal constitutional republic  - President George Walker Bush (R)  - Vice President Dick Cheney (R) Independence from... For other uses, see High school (disambiguation). ... College (Latin collegium) is a term most often used today to denote an educational institution. ... Representation of a university class, 1350s. ...

  • Win by Fall: A fall, also known as a pin, occurs when one wrestler holds both his opponents' shoulders on the mat simultaneously. In Greco-Roman and freestyle, a pin must be held long enough for the referee to "observe the total control of the fall" (usually about one or two full seconds). Then either the judge or the mat chairman concurs with the referee that a fall is made. (If the referee does not indicate a fall, and the fall is valid, the judge and the mat chairman can concur together and announce the pin.) A fall ends the match entirely regardless of when it occurs.[54] In the United States, for the Kids freestyle and Greco-Roman wrestling division (wrestlers ages 8 to 14) in competitions sponsored by USA Wrestling[55] and in the Tots, Bantam, Midget, and Junior divisions (wrestlers ages 5 to 12) in competitions sponsored by the Amateur Athletic Union[56], it is specified that a pin must be held for two full seconds.
  • Win by Technical Superiority (Also called Technical Fall): If one wrestler gains a six-point lead over his opponent at any time in the period, scores a five point throw (a throw where the person's feet go directly above his head, also called a throw of grand amplitude), or scores two three point takedowns (taking an opponent from his feet to their back or sides so that there is shoulder exposure), the current period is declared over and he is declared the winner of that period.[57]
  • Win by Decision: If neither wrestler achieves either a fall or technical superiority, the wrestler who scored more points during the period is declared the winner of that period. If the score is tied by points at the end of a period, generally, the wrestler who scored the last technical point would be awarded the period. If the score is tied at zero at the end of a period, the wrestlers go through an overtime procedure known as The Clinch in which the wrestlers are required to enter the clinch position and wrestle until a point is scored, or until one of the wrestlers breaks the clinch.[58]
The wrestler on top obtains the fall in this freestyle wrestling match.
The wrestler on top obtains the fall in this freestyle wrestling match.
  • Win by Default: If one wrestler is unable to continue participating for any reason or fails to show up on the mat after his name was called three times before the match begins[59], his opponent is declared the winner of the match by default, forfeit, or withdrawal.
  • Win by Injury: If one wrestler is injured and unable to continue, the other wrestler is declared the winner. This is also referred to as a medical forfeit or injury default. The term also encompasses situations where wrestlers become ill, take too many injury time-outs, or bleed uncontrollably. If a wrestler is injured by his opponent's illegal maneuver and cannot continue, the wrestler at fault is disqualified.[60]
  • Win by Disqualification: Normally, if a wrestler is assessed three Cautions for breaking the rules, he is disqualified. Under other circumstances, such as flagrant brutality, the match may be ended immediately and the wrestler disqualified and removed from the tournament.[61]

This article is about the pin as it is defined in amateur wrestling. ... USA Wrestling (formerly known as the United States Wrestling Federation and as the United States Wrestling Association) is the organization that currently governs freestyle wrestling and Greco-Roman wrestling in the United States. ... - The Amateur Athletic Union, widely known as the AAU, was formed in United States. ... In amateur wrestling, a technical fall, or technical superiority (tech for short; slang: I teched him), is a victory condition satisfied by outscoring your opponent by a specified number of points. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 533 pixelsFull resolution (1728 × 1152 pixel, file size: 546 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 533 pixelsFull resolution (1728 × 1152 pixel, file size: 546 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. ... This article is about the pin as it is defined in amateur wrestling. ...

Team Scoring

In an international wrestling tournament, teams enter one wrestler at each weight class and score points based on the individual performances. For example, if a wrestler at the 52.0 kg weight class finishes in first place, then his team will receive ten points. If he were to finish in tenth place, then the team would only receive one. At the end of the tournament, each team's score is tallied, and the team with the most points wins the team competition.[62]


Team Competition

A team competition or dual meet is a meeting between (typically two) teams in which individual wrestlers at a given weight class compete against each other. A team receives one point for each victory in a weight class regardless of the outcome. The team that scores the most points at the end of the matches wins the team competition. If there are two sets of competitions with one team winning the home competition and one winning the away competition, a third competition may take place to determine the winner for ranking purposes, or the ranking may take place by assessing in order: 1) the most victories by adding the points of the two matches; 2) the most points by fall, default, forfeit, or disqualificaiton; 3) the most matches won by technical superiority; 4) the most periods won by technical superiority; 5) the most technical points won in all the competition; 6) the least technical points won in all the competition. This works similarly when more than two teams are involved in this predicament.[63]


Women's wrestling

Two women wrestlers competing in a freestyle match.
Two women wrestlers competing in a freestyle match.

Freestyle is the only style used for international competition in women's wrestling, possibly because of there being more strength usage in Greco-Roman. The rules for women's freestyle wrestling, with some modifications, are largely the same as that for the men. The period lengths are the same, with a 30 second break between two periods.[64] Women wear a special singlet, so that they will not simply have to wear a male's singlet with a T-shirt underneath. Some small United States college wrestling clubs have women wrestle freestyle against Canadian universities mostly because of the limited number of wrestling programs in the United States. Most of the U.S. athletic organizations such as the NCAA do not sponsor women's wrestling, while the Canadian Interuniversity Sport association does. (The National Collegiate Wrestling Association is sponsoring a women's division beginning with the 2007-2008 season, based largely on collegiate wrestling rules.[65]) Women's wrestling made its Olympic debut at the 2004 Olympic Games in Athens, Greece. Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 574 pixelsFull resolution (2100 × 1507 pixel, file size: 2. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 574 pixelsFull resolution (2100 × 1507 pixel, file size: 2. ... T-Shirt A T-shirt (or tee shirt) is a shirt with short or long sleeves, a round neck, put on over the head, without pockets. ... The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA, often said NC-Double-A) is a voluntary association of about 1200 institutions, conferences, organizations and individuals that organizes the athletics programs of many colleges and universities in the United States. ... CIS Logo Canadian Interuniversity Sport (CIS) is the national governing body of university sport in Canada. ... The National Collegiate Wrestling Association(NCWA) is a post secondary athletic association built to help the promotion of collegiate wrestling. ... This article is about collegiate wrestling. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The five Olympic rings were designed in 1913, adopted in 1914 and debuted at the Games at Antwerp, 1920. ... This article is about the capital of Greece. ...


See also

FILA Greatest Wrestler of 20th Century (Greco-Roman) Alexander Karelin throws Olympian Jeff Blatnick with his Karelin Lift Womens wrestling Andrell Durden (top) and Edward Harris grapple for position during the All-Marine Wrestle Offs. ... Folk wrestling is a generic term for traditional wrestling disciplines which may or may not be codified as a modern sport. ... This article is about Greco-Roman wrestling. ... This article is about collegiate wrestling. ...

Notes

  1. ^ Freestyle Wrestling. FILA (2007-01-01). Retrieved on 2007-08-02.
  2. ^ "Wrestling, Freestyle" by Michael B. Poliakoff from Encyclopedia of World Sport: From Ancient Times to the Present, Vol. 3, p. 1190, eds. David Levinson and Karen Christensen (Santa Barbara, CA: ABC-CLIO, Inc., 1996).
  3. ^ "Wrestling, Freestyle" by Michael B. Poliakoff from Encyclopedia of World Sport: From Ancient Times to the Present, Vol. 3, p. 1190, eds. David Levinson and Karen Christensen (Santa Barbara, CA: ABC-CLIO, Inc., 1996).
  4. ^ "Wrestling, Freestyle" by Michael B. Poliakoff from Encyclopedia of World Sport: From Ancient Times to the Present, Vol. 3, p. 1190, eds. David Levinson and Karen Christensen (Santa Barbara, CA: ABC-CLIO, Inc., 1996).
  5. ^ Freestyle Wrestling. FILA (2007-01-01). Retrieved on 2007-08-02.
  6. ^ "Wrestling, Freestyle" by Michael B. Poliakoff from Encyclopedia of World Sport: From Ancient Times to the Present, Vol. 3, p. 1190, eds. David Levinson and Karen Christensen (Santa Barbara, CA: ABC-CLIO, Inc., 1996).
  7. ^ Freestyle Wrestling. FILA (2007-01-01). Retrieved on 2007-08-02.
  8. ^ "Wrestling, Freestyle" by Michael B. Poliakoff from Encyclopedia of World Sport: From Ancient Times to the Present, Vol. 3, p. 1190, eds. David Levinson and Karen Christensen (Santa Barbara, CA: ABC-CLIO, Inc., 1996).
  9. ^ "Wrestling, Greco-Roman" by Michael B. Poliakoff from Encyclopedia of World Sport: From Ancient Times to the Present, Vol. 3, p. 1196, eds. David Levinson and Karen Christensen (Santa Barbara, CA: ABC-CLIO, Inc., 1996).
  10. ^ "Wrestling, Freestyle" by Michael B. Poliakoff from Encyclopedia of World Sport: From Ancient Times to the Present, Vol. 3, p. 1191, eds. David Levinson and Karen Christensen (Santa Barbara, CA: ABC-CLIO, Inc., 1996)
  11. ^ Dellinger, Bob. The Oldest Sport. National Wrestling Hall of Fame and Museum. Retrieved on 2007-08-12.
  12. ^ "Wrestling, Freestyle" by Michael B. Poliakoff from Encyclopedia of World Sport: From Ancient Times to the Present, Vol. 3, p. 1191, eds. David Levinson and Karen Christensen (Santa Barbara, CA: ABC-CLIO, Inc., 1996).
  13. ^ "Wrestling, Freestyle" by Michael B. Poliakoff from Encyclopedia of World Sport: From Ancient Times to the Present, Vol. 3, p. 1193, eds. David Levinson and Karen Christensen (Santa Barbara, CA: ABC-CLIO, Inc., 1996).
  14. ^ International Wrestling Rules: Greco-Roman Wrestling, Freestyle Wrestling, Women's Wrestling. p. 11. FILA (2006-12-01). Retrieved on 2007-08-09.
  15. ^ International Wrestling Rules: Greco-Roman Wrestling, Freestyle Wrestling, Women's Wrestling. p. 12. FILA (2006-12-01). Retrieved on 2007-08-09.
  16. ^ International Wrestling Rules: Greco-Roman Wrestling, Freestyle Wrestling, Women's Wrestling. p. 12. FILA (2006-12-01). Retrieved on 2007-08-09.
  17. ^ International Wrestling Rules: Greco-Roman Wrestling, Freestyle Wrestling, Women's Wrestling. p. 12. FILA (2006-12-01). Retrieved on 2007-08-09.
  18. ^ International Wrestling Rules: Greco-Roman Wrestling, Freestyle Wrestling, Women's Wrestling. p. 12. FILA (2006-12-01). Retrieved on 2007-08-09.
  19. ^ International Wrestling Rules: Greco-Roman Wrestling, Freestyle Wrestling, Women's Wrestling. p. 11. FILA (2006-12-01). Retrieved on 2007-08-09.
  20. ^ International Wrestling Rules: Greco-Roman Wrestling, Freestyle Wrestling, Women's Wrestling. pp. 11-13. FILA (2006-12-01). Retrieved on 2007-08-09.
  21. ^ International Wrestling Rules: Greco-Roman Wrestling, Freestyle Wrestling, Women's Wrestling. p. 55. FILA (2006-12-01). Retrieved on 2007-08-09.
  22. ^ International Wrestling Rules: Greco-Roman Wrestling, Freestyle Wrestling, Women's Wrestling. p. 55. FILA (2006-12-01). Retrieved on 2007-08-09.
  23. ^ International Wrestling Rules: Greco-Roman Wrestling, Freestyle Wrestling, Women's Wrestling. p. 55. FILA (2006-12-01). Retrieved on 2007-08-09.
  24. ^ International Wrestling Rules: Greco-Roman Wrestling, Freestyle Wrestling, Women's Wrestling. p. 55. FILA (2006-12-01). Retrieved on 2007-08-09.
  25. ^ International Wrestling Rules: Greco-Roman Wrestling, Freestyle Wrestling, Women's Wrestling. p. 55. FILA (2006-12-01). Retrieved on 2007-08-09.
  26. ^ International Wrestling Rules: Greco-Roman Wrestling, Freestyle Wrestling, Women's Wrestling. pp. 12, 55. FILA (2006-12-01). Retrieved on 2007-08-09.
  27. ^ International Wrestling Rules: Greco-Roman Wrestling, Freestyle Wrestling, Women's Wrestling. p. 14. FILA (2006-12-01). Retrieved on 2007-08-09.
  28. ^ International Wrestling Rules: Greco-Roman Wrestling, Freestyle Wrestling, Women's Wrestling. pp. 19-20. FILA (2006-12-01). Retrieved on 2007-08-09.
  29. ^ International Wrestling Rules: Greco-Roman Wrestling, Freestyle Wrestling, Women's Wrestling. pp. 14-15. FILA (2006-12-01). Retrieved on 2007-08-09.
  30. ^ International Wrestling Rules: Greco-Roman Wrestling, Freestyle Wrestling, Women's Wrestling. pp. 15-16. FILA (2006-12-01). Retrieved on 2007-08-09.
  31. ^ International Wrestling Rules: Greco-Roman Wrestling, Freestyle Wrestling, Women's Wrestling. p. 16. FILA (2006-12-01). Retrieved on 2007-08-09.
  32. ^ International Wrestling Rules: Greco-Roman Wrestling, Freestyle Wrestling, Women's Wrestling. p. 20. FILA (2006-12-01). Retrieved on 2007-08-09.
  33. ^ International Wrestling Rules: Greco-Roman Wrestling, Freestyle Wrestling, Women's Wrestling. pp. 16-18, 40. FILA (2006-12-01). Retrieved on 2007-08-09.
  34. ^ International Wrestling Rules: Greco-Roman Wrestling, Freestyle Wrestling, Women's Wrestling. pp. 8-9. FILA (2006-12-01). Retrieved on 2007-09-25.
  35. ^ International Wrestling Rules: Greco-Roman Wrestling, Freestyle Wrestling, Women's Wrestling. p. 9. FILA (2006-12-01). Retrieved on 2007-09-25.
  36. ^ International Wrestling Rules: Greco-Roman Wrestling, Freestyle Wrestling, Women's Wrestling. p. 9. FILA (2006-12-01). Retrieved on 2007-08-12.
  37. ^ International Wrestling Rules: Greco-Roman Wrestling, Freestyle Wrestling, Women's Wrestling. p. 10. FILA (2006-12-01). Retrieved on 2007-08-12.
  38. ^ International Wrestling Rules: Greco-Roman Wrestling, Freestyle Wrestling, Women's Wrestling. p. 9. FILA (2006-12-01). Retrieved on 2007-08-09.
  39. ^ International Wrestling Rules: Greco-Roman Wrestling, Freestyle Wrestling, Women's Wrestling. p. 10. FILA (2006-12-01). Retrieved on 2007-08-10.
  40. ^ International Wrestling Rules: Greco-Roman Wrestling, Freestyle Wrestling, Women's Wrestling. pp. 22-26. FILA (2006-12-01). Retrieved on 2007-08-09.
  41. ^ International Wrestling Rules: Greco-Roman Wrestling, Freestyle Wrestling, Women's Wrestling. pp. 27-28. FILA (2006-12-01). Retrieved on 2007-08-09.
  42. ^ International Wrestling Rules: Greco-Roman Wrestling, Freestyle Wrestling, Women's Wrestling. pp. 27, 30. FILA (2006-12-01). Retrieved on 2007-08-09.
  43. ^ International Wrestling Rules: Greco-Roman Wrestling, Freestyle Wrestling, Women's Wrestling. p. 29. FILA (2006-12-01). Retrieved on 2007-08-12.
  44. ^ International Wrestling Rules: Greco-Roman Wrestling, Freestyle Wrestling, Women's Wrestling. p. 36. FILA (2006-12-01). Retrieved on 2007-08-12.
  45. ^ International Wrestling Rules: Greco-Roman Wrestling, Freestyle Wrestling, Women's Wrestling. p. 37. FILA (2006-12-01). Retrieved on 2007-08-12.
  46. ^ International Wrestling Rules: Greco-Roman Wrestling, Freestyle Wrestling, Women's Wrestling. p. 37. FILA (2006-12-01). Retrieved on 2007-08-12.
  47. ^ International Wrestling Rules: Greco-Roman Wrestling, Freestyle Wrestling, Women's Wrestling. p. 36. FILA (2006-12-01). Retrieved on 2007-08-12.
  48. ^ International Wrestling Rules: Greco-Roman Wrestling, Freestyle Wrestling, Women's Wrestling. p. 36. FILA (2006-12-01). Retrieved on 2007-08-12.
  49. ^ International Wrestling Rules: Greco-Roman Wrestling, Freestyle Wrestling, Women's Wrestling. p. 35. FILA (2006-12-01). Retrieved on 2007-08-12.
  50. ^ International Wrestling Rules: Greco-Roman Wrestling, Freestyle Wrestling, Women's Wrestling. pp. 36-37. FILA (2006-12-01). Retrieved on 2007-08-12.
  51. ^ International Wrestling Rules: Greco-Roman Wrestling, Freestyle Wrestling, Women's Wrestling. pp. 36-37. FILA (2006-12-01). Retrieved on 2007-08-12.
  52. ^ International Wrestling Rules: Greco-Roman Wrestling, Freestyle Wrestling, Women's Wrestling. p. 36. FILA (2006-12-01). Retrieved on 2007-08-12.
  53. ^ International Wrestling Rules: Greco-Roman Wrestling, Freestyle Wrestling, Women's Wrestling. p. 40. FILA (2006-12-01). Retrieved on 2007-08-12.
  54. ^ International Wrestling Rules: Greco-Roman Wrestling, Freestyle Wrestling, Women's Wrestling. p. 41. FILA (2006-12-01). Retrieved on 2007-08-09.
  55. ^ International Wrestling Rules: Greco-Roman Wrestling, Freestyle Wrestling, Women's Wrestling, modified for USA Wrestling. pp. 41, 72. USA Wrestling (2007-01-01). Retrieved on 2007-08-10.
  56. ^ 2005 Wrestling Handbook, Part XVI:International Rules and Regulations (FILA). pp. 4, 24. Amateur Athletic Union (AAU) (2005-01-01). Retrieved on 2007-08-12.
  57. ^ International Wrestling Rules: Greco-Roman Wrestling, Freestyle Wrestling, Women's Wrestling. p. 55. FILA (2006-12-01). Retrieved on 2007-08-09.
  58. ^ International Wrestling Rules: Greco-Roman Wrestling, Freestyle Wrestling, Women's Wrestling. pp. 30-31, 43-46. FILA (2006-12-01). Retrieved on 2007-08-09.
  59. ^ International Wrestling Rules: Greco-Roman Wrestling, Freestyle Wrestling, Women's Wrestling. p. 27. FILA (2006-12-01). Retrieved on 2007-08-09.
  60. ^ International Wrestling Rules: Greco-Roman Wrestling, Freestyle Wrestling, Women's Wrestling. pp. 30, 52-53. FILA (2006-12-01). Retrieved on 2007-08-09.
  61. ^ International Wrestling Rules: Greco-Roman Wrestling, Freestyle Wrestling, Women's Wrestling. pp. 31, 50. FILA (2006-12-01). Retrieved on 2007-08-09.
  62. ^ International Wrestling Rules: Greco-Roman Wrestling, Freestyle Wrestling, Women's Wrestling. pp. 31-33. FILA (2006-12-01). Retrieved on 2007-08-12.
  63. ^ International Wrestling Rules: Greco-Roman Wrestling, Freestyle Wrestling, Women's Wrestling. pp. 32-33. FILA (2006-12-01). Retrieved on 2007-08-12.
  64. ^ International Wrestling Rules: Greco-Roman Wrestling, Freestyle Wrestling, Women's Wrestling. pp. 55-56. FILA (2006-12-01). Retrieved on 2007-08-09.
  65. ^ 2007-08 Wrestling Plan. NCWA (2007-08-01). Retrieved on 2007-09-24.

Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the. ... is the 1st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the. ... is the 214th day of the year (215th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the. ... is the 1st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the. ... is the 214th day of the year (215th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the. ... is the 1st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the. ... is the 214th day of the year (215th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Main entrance to the museum. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the. ... is the 224th day of the year (225th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 335th day of the year (336th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the. ... is the 221st day of the year (222nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 335th day of the year (336th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the. ... is the 221st day of the year (222nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 335th day of the year (336th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the. ... is the 221st day of the year (222nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 335th day of the year (336th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the. ... is the 221st day of the year (222nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 335th day of the year (336th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the. ... is the 221st day of the year (222nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 335th day of the year (336th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the. ... is the 221st day of the year (222nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 335th day of the year (336th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the. ... is the 221st day of the year (222nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 335th day of the year (336th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the. ... is the 221st day of the year (222nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 335th day of the year (336th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the. ... is the 221st day of the year (222nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 335th day of the year (336th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the. ... is the 221st day of the year (222nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 335th day of the year (336th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the. ... is the 221st day of the year (222nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 335th day of the year (336th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the. ... is the 221st day of the year (222nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 335th day of the year (336th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the. ... is the 221st day of the year (222nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 335th day of the year (336th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the. ... is the 221st day of the year (222nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 335th day of the year (336th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the. ... is the 221st day of the year (222nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 335th day of the year (336th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the. ... is the 221st day of the year (222nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 335th day of the year (336th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the. ... is the 221st day of the year (222nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 335th day of the year (336th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the. ... is the 221st day of the year (222nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 335th day of the year (336th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the. ... is the 221st day of the year (222nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 335th day of the year (336th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the. ... is the 221st day of the year (222nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 335th day of the year (336th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the. ... is the 268th day of the year (269th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 335th day of the year (336th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the. ... is the 268th day of the year (269th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 335th day of the year (336th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the. ... is the 224th day of the year (225th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 335th day of the year (336th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the. ... is the 224th day of the year (225th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 335th day of the year (336th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the. ... is the 221st day of the year (222nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 335th day of the year (336th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the. ... is the 222nd day of the year (223rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 335th day of the year (336th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the. ... is the 221st day of the year (222nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 335th day of the year (336th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the. ... is the 221st day of the year (222nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 335th day of the year (336th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the. ... is the 221st day of the year (222nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 335th day of the year (336th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the. ... is the 224th day of the year (225th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 335th day of the year (336th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the. ... is the 224th day of the year (225th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 335th day of the year (336th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the. ... is the 224th day of the year (225th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 335th day of the year (336th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the. ... is the 224th day of the year (225th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 335th day of the year (336th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the. ... is the 224th day of the year (225th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 335th day of the year (336th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the. ... is the 224th day of the year (225th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 335th day of the year (336th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the. ... is the 224th day of the year (225th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 335th day of the year (336th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the. ... is the 224th day of the year (225th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 335th day of the year (336th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the. ... is the 224th day of the year (225th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 335th day of the year (336th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the. ... is the 224th day of the year (225th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 335th day of the year (336th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the. ... is the 224th day of the year (225th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 335th day of the year (336th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the. ... is the 221st day of the year (222nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the. ... is the 1st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the. ... is the 222nd day of the year (223rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 1st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the. ... is the 224th day of the year (225th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 335th day of the year (336th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the. ... is the 221st day of the year (222nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 335th day of the year (336th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the. ... is the 221st day of the year (222nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 335th day of the year (336th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the. ... is the 221st day of the year (222nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 335th day of the year (336th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the. ... is the 221st day of the year (222nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 335th day of the year (336th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the. ... is the 221st day of the year (222nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 335th day of the year (336th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the. ... is the 224th day of the year (225th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 335th day of the year (336th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the. ... is the 224th day of the year (225th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 335th day of the year (336th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the. ... is the 221st day of the year (222nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the. ... is the 213th day of the year (214th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the. ... is the 267th day of the year (268th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

References

  • Poliakoff, Michael (1996), "Wrestling, Freestyle", in Christensen, Karen, Encyclopedia of World Sport: From Ancient Times to the Present, vol. 3, Santa Barbara, CA: ABC-CLIO, Inc., pp. 1189-1193, ISBN0874368197
  • Poliakoff, Michael (1996), "Wrestling, Greco-Roman", in Christensen, Karen, Encyclopedia of World Sport: From Ancient Times to the Present, vol. 3, Santa Barbara, CA: ABC-CLIO, Inc., pp. 1194-1196, ISBN0874368197

External links

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
Freestyle wrestling

  Results from FactBites:
 
Freestyle wrestling - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (2102 words)
Freestyle wrestling is a form of amateur wrestling practiced throughout the world.
Freestyle is possibly the oldest sport in history, with the possible exception of track and field.
Freestyle wrestling is a common practice worldwide and is an Olympic event.
Amateur wrestling - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1635 words)
There are two "international" wrestling styles performed in the Olympic Games under the supervision of FILA (Fédération Internationale des Luttes Associées or International Federation of Associated Wrestling Styles): Freestyle and Greco-Roman.
Freestyle is possibly derived from the English Lancashire style.
Wrestling is conducted on a padded mat that must have excellent shock absorption, tear resistance, and compression qualities.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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