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Encyclopedia > Frederick William II of Prussia
Frederick William II
King of Prussia, Elector of Brandenburg
Portait by Anton Graff (1792)
Reign 1786 - 1797
Titles Frederick William II of Prussia
Frederick William III of Brandenburg
Born September 25, 1744
Berlin, Prussia
Died November 16, 1797
Potsdam
Buried Berliner Dom
Predecessor Frederick II
Successor Frederick William III
Consort Elizabeth Christine of Brunswick-Lüneburg
Frederika Louisa of Hesse-Darmstadt
Issue Princess Frederica Charlotte
Prince Frederick William
Prince Louis
Princess Wilhelmine
Princess Augusta
Prince Charles
Prince Wilhelm
Royal House House of Hohenzollern
Father Prince Augustus William
Mother Louise Amalie of Brunswick-Lüneburg

Frederick William II (German: Friedrich Wilhelm II; September 25, 1744November 16, 1797) was the fourth King of Prussia, reigning from 1786 until his death. The following is a list of Kings of Prussia (Könige von Preußen) from the Hohenzollern family. ... The Margrave of Brandenburg was one of the seven Electors of the Holy Roman Empire created by the Golden Bull of 1356. ... Image File history File links FWII.jpg Summary Frederick William II king of Prussia Licensing File links The following pages link to this file: Frederick William II of Prussia ... Anton Graff (born November 18, 1736 in Winterthur, died June 22, 1813 in Dresden) was a famous portrait artist. ... is the 268th day of the year (269th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... // Events The third French and Indian War, known as King Georges War, breaks out at Port Royal, Nova Scotia The First Saudi State founded by Mohammed Ibn Saud Prague occupied by Prussian armies Ongoing events War of the Austrian Succession (1740-1748) Births January 10 - Thomas Mifflin, fifth President... This article is about the capital of Germany. ... Anthem Preußenlied, Heil dir im Siegerkranz (both unofficial) The Kingdom of Prussia at its greatest extent, at the time of the formation of the German Empire, 1871 Capital Berlin Government Monarchy King  - 1701 — 1713 Frederick I (first)  - 1888 — 1918 William II (last) Prime minister  - 1848 Adolf Heinrich von Arnim... is the 320th day of the year (321st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1797 (MDCCXCVII) was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 11-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Potsdam is the capital city of the federal state of Brandenburg in Germany. ... Berliner Dom Berliner Dom by night The Berliner Dom or Berlin Cathedral in Berlin, Germany was built between 1895 and 1905. ... Frederick II (German: ; January 24, 1712 – August 17, 1786) was a King of Prussia (1740–1786) from the Hohenzollern dynasty. ... Frederick William III (German: , August 3, 1770 – June 7, 1840) was king of Prussia from 1797 to 1840. ... Elizabeth Christine by Antoine Pesne, 1739. ... Frederika Louisa of Hesse-Darmstadt (October 16, 1751 – February 25, 1805) was Queen of Prussia as the second wife of Frederick William II of Prussia. ... Frederica Charlotte of Prussia (May 7, 1767 – August 6, 1820) was the daughter of King Frederick William II of Prussia and his first wife, Elisabeth Christine of Brunswick-Lüneburg. ... Frederick William III (German: , August 3, 1770 – June 7, 1840) was king of Prussia from 1797 to 1840. ... Queen Wilhelmine of the Netherlands at a young age Queen Wilhelmine of the Netherlands, born Princess of Prussia (full names in Dutch: Frederica Louisa Wilhelmina; full names in German: Friederike Luise Wilhelmine) (Potsdam, 18 November 1774 - The Hague, 12 October 1837), was the first wife of King William I of... Prince Charles of Prussia (Friedrich Karl Alexander) was born on June 29, 1801 in Charlottenburg. ... Prince Wilhelm of Prussia (1783–1851) was the son of Frederick William II of Prussia and Frederika Louisa of Hesse-Darmstadt. ... Hohenzollern redirects here. ... Augustus William (German: August Wilhelm; 9 August 1722, Berlin – 12 June 1758, Oranienburg), Prince of Prussia, was the second son of King Frederick William I of Prussia and Sophia Dorothea of Hanover. ... Louise Amalie of Brunswick-Lüneburg (1722-1780) was daughter of Ferdinand Albert II, Duke of Brunswick-Lüneburg. ... is the 268th day of the year (269th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... // Events The third French and Indian War, known as King Georges War, breaks out at Port Royal, Nova Scotia The First Saudi State founded by Mohammed Ibn Saud Prague occupied by Prussian armies Ongoing events War of the Austrian Succession (1740-1748) Births January 10 - Thomas Mifflin, fifth President... is the 320th day of the year (321st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1797 (MDCCXCVII) was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 11-day-slower Julian calendar). ... The following is a list of Kings of Prussia (Könige von Preußen) from the Hohenzollern family. ...

Contents

Biography

Frederick William was son of Prince Augustus William of Prussia (the second son of King Frederick William I of Prussia) and of Louise Amalie of Brunswick-Lüneburg. His mother's elder sister, Elisabeth, was the wife of Augustus William's brother King Frederick II ("Frederick the Great"). He was born at Berlin and became heir to the throne of Prussia on his father's death in 1758, since Frederick II had no children. The boy was of an easy-going and pleasure-loving disposition, averse to sustained effort of any kind, and sensual by nature. Augustus William (German: August Wilhelm; 9 August 1722, Berlin – 12 June 1758, Oranienburg), Prince of Prussia, was the second son of King Frederick William I of Prussia and Sophia Dorothea of Hanover. ... Frederick William I (German: Friedrich Wilhelm I) (August 14, 1688 – May 31, 1740) of the House of Hohenzollern, was the King in Prussia from 1713 until his death. ... Louise Amalie of Brunswick-Lüneburg (1722-1780) was daughter of Ferdinand Albert II, Duke of Brunswick-Lüneburg. ... Elizabeth Christine by Antoine Pesne, 1739. ... Frederick II (German: ; January 24, 1712 – August 17, 1786) was a King of Prussia (1740–1786) from the Hohenzollern dynasty. ... This article is about the capital of Germany. ... Motto Suum cuique Latin: To each his own Prussia at its peak, as leading state of the German Empire Capital Königsberg, later Berlin Government Duke1  - 1525–68 Albert I (first)  - 1688–1701 Frederick III (last) King1  - 1701–13 Frederick I (first)  - 1888–1918 William II (last) Prime Minister1,2...


His marriage with Elisabeth Christine of Brunswick-Lüneburg, daughter of Charles I, Duke of Brunswick-Lüneburg, contracted July 14, 1765 in Charlottenburg, was dissolved in 1769. He married Frederika Louisa of Hesse-Darmstadt, daughter of Ludwig IX, Landgrave of Hesse-Darmstadt on July 14, 1769 also in Charlottenburg. Although he had a numerous family by his wife, he was completely under the influence of his mistress, Wilhelmine Enke, afterwards created Countess Lichtenau, a woman of strong intellect and much ambition. Elisabeth Christine of Brunswick-Lüneburg (1746-1840) was the daughter of Charles I, Duke of Brunswick-Lüneburg and married Frederick William II of Prussia July 14, 1765 in Charlottenburg. ... Charles (German: Karl; 1 August 1713, Brunswick – 26 March 1780, Brunswick), Duke of Brunswick-Lüneburg, was prince of Wolfenbüttel from 1735 until his death. ... is the 195th day of the year (196th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1765 (MDCCLXV) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 11-day slower Julian calendar). ... Location of Charlottenburg in Berlin Charlottenburg palace Charlottenburg is an area of Berlin within the borough of Charlottenburg-Wilmersdorf. ... Frederika Louisa of Hesse-Darmstadt (October 16, 1751 – February 25, 1805) was Queen of Prussia as the second wife of Frederick William II of Prussia. ... Ludwig IX, Landgrave of Hesse-Darmstadt (December 15, 1719 – May 13, 1742) was a son of Ludwig VIII, Landgrave of Hesse-Darmstadt and Charlotte of Hanau-Lictenberg and Müntzenberg. ... is the 195th day of the year (196th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1769 was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ...


Frederick William was a man of singularly handsome presence, not without mental qualities of a high order; he was devoted to the arts—Beethoven and Mozart enjoyed his patronage, and his private orchestra had a Europe-wide reputation. But an artistic temperament was hardly that was required of a king of Prussia on the eve of the French Revolution; and Frederick the Great, who had employed him in various services—notably in an abortive confidential mission to the court of Russia in 1780—openly expressed his misgivings as to the character of the prince and his surroundings. “Beethoven” redirects here. ... Bologna Mozart - Mozart age 21 in 1777, see also: face only Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (IPA: , baptized Joannes Chrysostomus Wolfgangus Theophilus Mozart) (January 27, 1756 – December 5, 1791) was a prolific and influential composer of the Classical era. ... The French Revolution (1789–1815) was a period of political and social upheaval in the political history of France and Europe as a whole, during which the French governmental structure, previously an absolute monarchy with feudal privileges for the aristocracy and Catholic clergy, underwent radical change to forms based on...


The misgivings appear justified by the event. Frederick William's accession to the throne (17 August 1786) was, indeed, followed by a series of measures for lightening the burdens of the people, reforming the oppressive French system of tax-collecting introduced by Frederick, and encouraging trade by the diminution of customs dues and the making of roads and canals. This gave the new king much popularity with the masses; while the educated classes were pleased by his removal of Frederick's ban on the German language, by the admission of German writers to the Prussian Academy, and by the active encouragement given to schools and universities. is the 229th day of the year (230th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1786 was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... German (called Deutsch in German; in German the term germanisch is equivalent to English Germanic), is a member of the western group of Germanic languages and is one of the worlds major languages. ... Fassade Unter den Linden 74, erbaut 1845/25 von Karl Friedrich Schinkel als vereinte Artillerie- und Ingenieurschule Fassade des Lehrgebäudes an der Dorotheenstraße 58/59, entworfen von Franz Schwechten (1883) Lageplan der Kriegsakademie mit dem Lehrgebäude an der Dorotheenstraße und dem aufgrund der vornehmen Lage 1878...


But these reforms were vitiated in their source. In 1781 Frederick William, then prince of Prussia, inclined, like many sensual natures, to mysticism, had joined the Rosicrucians, and had fallen under the influence of Johann Christof Wöllner (1732 - 1800), and by him the royal policy was inspired. Wöllner, whom Frederick the Great had described as a "treacherous and intriguing priest," had started life as a poor tutor in the family of General von Itzenplitz, a noble of the Margraviate of Brandenburg, had, after the general's death and to the scandal of king and nobility, married the general's daughter, and with his mother-in-law's assistance settled down on a small estate. By his practical experiments and by his writings he gained a considerable reputation as an economist; but his ambition was not content with this, and he sought to extend his influence by joining first the Freemasons and afterwards the Rosicrucians. Wöllner, with his impressive personality and easy if superficial eloquence, was just the man to lead a movement of this kind. Under his influence the order spread rapidly, and he soon found himself the supreme director (Oberhauptdirektor) of several circles, which included in their membership princes, officers and high officials. As a Rosicrucian Wöllner dabbled in alchemy and other mystic arts, but he also affected to be zealous for Christian orthodoxy, imperilled by Frederick II's patronage of "Enlightenment", and a few months before Frederick's death wrote to his friend the Rosicrucian Johann Rudolph von Bischoffswerder (1741 - 1803) that his highest ambition was to be placed at the head of the religious department of the state as an unworthy instrument in the hand of Ormesus (the prince of Prussia's Rosicrucian name) "for the purpose of saving millions of souls from perdition and bringing back the whole country to the faith of Jesus Christ." This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The Temple of the Rose Cross, Teophilus Schweighardt Constantiens, 1618. ... Coat of arms Capital Brandenburg Berlin (from 1417) Religion Roman Catholic Lutheran Calvinist Government Monarchy Margrave  - 1157–70 Albert I  - 1797–1806 Frederick William III History  - Margraviate established 3 October, 1157  - Electorate established 25 December 1356  - Brandenburg-Prussia 27 August 1618  - Kingdom of Prussia 1 January 1701  - Dissolution of the... Alan Greenspan, former chairman, United States Federal Reserve. ... “Freemasons” redirects here. ... For other uses, see Alchemy (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Christian (disambiguation). ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... ...


Such was the man whom Frederick William II, immediately after his accession, called to his counsels. On 26 August 1786 Wöllner was appointed privy councillor for finance (Geheimer Oberfinanzrath), and on 2 October 1786 was ennobled. Though not in name, in fact he was prime minister; in all internal affairs it was he who decided; and the fiscal and economic reforms of the new reign were the application of his theories. Bischoffswerder, too, still a simple major, was called into the king?s counsels; by 1789 he was already an adjutant-general. These were the two men who enmeshed the king in a web of Rosicrucian mystery and intrigue, which hampered whatever healthy development of his policy might have been possible, and led ultimately to disaster. The opposition to Wöllner was, indeed, at the outset strong enough to prevent his being entrusted with the department of religion; but this too in time was overcome, and on 3 July 1788 he was appointed active privy councillor of state and of justice and head of the spiritual department for Lutheran and Catholic affairs. is the 238th day of the year (239th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1786 was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... is the 275th day of the year (276th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1786 was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... is the 184th day of the year (185th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1788 was a leap year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... The Lutheran movement is a group of denominations of Protestant Christianity by the original definition. ...

Prussian Royalty
House of Hohenzollern

Frederick I (1701-1713)
Children
   Princess Louise Dorothea
   Prince Frederick William
Frederick William I (1713-1740)
Children
   Princess Wilhelmine
   Prince Frederick
   Princess Friederike Luise
   Princess Philippine Charlotte
   Princess Sophia
   Princess Louisa Ulrika
   Prince Augustus William
   Princess Anna Amalia
   Prince Henry
   Prince Ferdinand
Frederick II (The Great, 1740-1786)
Frederick William II (1786-1797)
Children
   Prince Frederick William
   Prince Louis
   Princess Wilhelmine
   Princess Augusta
   Prince Charles
   Prince Wilhelm
Frederick William III (1797-1840)
   Prince Frederick William
   Prince Wilhelm
   Princess Charlotte
   Princess Alexandrine
   Prince Charles
Frederick William IV (1840-1861)

War was at once declared on what later times would have called the "modernists". The king, so long as Wöllner was content to condone his immorality (which Bischoffswerder, to do him justice, condemned), was eager to help the orthodox crusade. On 9 July 1788 was issued the famous religious edict, which forbade Evangelical ministers to teach anything not contained in the letter of their official books, proclaimed the necessity of protecting the Christian religion against the "enlighteners" (Aufklärer), and placed educational establishments under the supervision of the orthodox clergy. On 18 December 1788 a new censorship law was issued, to secure the orthodoxy of all published books; and finally, in 1791, a sort of Protestant Inquisition was established at Berlin (Immediat-Examinationscommission) to watch over all ecclesiastical and scholastic appointments. Hohenzollern redirects here. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (560x745, 79 KB) großes Wappen des Königs von Preußen (Deutscher Kaiser) nach 1873. ... Frederick I of Prussia (German: , July 11, 1657 – February 25, 1713), of the Hohenzollern dynasty, was (as Frederick III; ) Elector of Brandenburg (1688–1713) and the first King in Prussia (1701 – 1713). ... Princess Louise Dorothea of Prussia was the daughter of Frederick I of Prussia, king of Prussia. ... Frederick William I (German: Friedrich Wilhelm I) (August 14, 1688 – May 31, 1740) of the House of Hohenzollern, was the King in Prussia from 1713 until his death. ... Frederick William I (German: Friedrich Wilhelm I) (August 14, 1688 – May 31, 1740) of the House of Hohenzollern, was the King in Prussia from 1713 until his death. ... Friederike Sophie Wilhelmine, Princess of Prussia (Berlin, July 3, 1709 - Bayreuth, October 14, 1758), was a daughter of Friedrich Wilhelm I of Prussia. ... Frederick II (German: ; January 24, 1712 – August 17, 1786) was a King of Prussia (1740–1786) from the Hohenzollern dynasty. ... Sophie of Prussia (June 14, 1870–January 13, 1932), was queen consort of King Constantine I of Greece. ... Louisa Ulrika of Prussia (Swedish: Lovisa Ulrika; German: Luise Ulrike) (1720—1782) was Queen consort of Sweden between 1751 and 1771. ... Augustus William (German: August Wilhelm; 9 August 1722, Berlin – 12 June 1758, Oranienburg), Prince of Prussia, was the second son of King Frederick William I of Prussia and Sophia Dorothea of Hanover. ... Princess Anna Amalia of Prussia (November 9, 1723 - March 30, 1787) was one of eight surviving children of Friedrich Wilhelm I of Prussia and Sophie Dorothea von Hannover, and was the younger sister of Friedrich II of Prussia, called Friedrich the Great. ... This page refers to Prince Henry of Prussia (1726-1802); for Prince Henry of Prussia (1862-1929), see Albert Wilhelm Heinrich of Prussia. ... Prince Ferdinand of Prussia (1730-1813) was a brother of Frederick the Great (Frederick II of Prussia). ... Frederick II (German: ; January 24, 1712 – August 17, 1786) was a King of Prussia (1740–1786) from the Hohenzollern dynasty. ... Frederick William III (German: , August 3, 1770 – June 7, 1840) was king of Prussia from 1797 to 1840. ... Wilhelmine of Prussia may refer to: Princess Wilhelmine of Prussia, Margravine of Bayreuth, eldest daughter of Frederick William I of Prussia and the important sister of Frederick II of Prussia Wilhelmina of Prussia, Princess of Orange, daughter of Prince August Wilhelm of Prussia, niece of previous Wilhelmina of Prussia, wife... Prince Charles of Prussia (Friedrich Karl Alexander) was born on June 29, 1801 in Charlottenburg. ... Prince Wilhelm of Prussia (1783–1851) was the son of Frederick William II of Prussia and Frederika Louisa of Hesse-Darmstadt. ... Frederick William III (German: , August 3, 1770 – June 7, 1840) was king of Prussia from 1797 to 1840. ... Photograph of Frederick King Frederick William IV of Prussia (October 15, 1795 - January 2, 1861), the eldest son and successor of Frederick William III of Prussia, reigned as King of Prussia from 1840 to 1861. ... Wilhelm I of Germany (March 22, 1797 – March 9, 1888), German Emperor (Kaiser), ruled January 18, 1871 – 9 March 1888 and King of Prussia, ruled 2 January 1861 – 9 March 1888. ... Empress Alexandra Feodorovna, Palace of Peterhoff Alexandra Feodorovna, born Charlotte, Princess of Prusia, July 13, 1798 - November 1, 1860) was Empress consort of Russia . ... Princess Alexandrine of Prussia (1803–1892), Grand Duchess of Mecklenburg-Strelitz, was the daughter of Frederick William III of Prussia and Louise of Mecklenburg-Strelitz. ... Prince Charles of Prussia (Friedrich Karl Alexander) was born on June 29, 1801 in Charlottenburg. ... Photograph of Frederick King Frederick William IV of Prussia (October 15, 1795 - January 2, 1861), the eldest son and successor of Frederick William III of Prussia, reigned as King of Prussia from 1840 to 1861. ... is the 190th day of the year (191st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1788 was a leap year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Pope · Archbishop of Canterbury Patriarch of Constantinople Christianity Portal This box:      The word evangelicalism often refers to... Clergy is the generic term used to describe the formal religious leadership within a given religion. ... is the 352nd day of the year (353rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1788 was a leap year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... Inquisition (capitalized I) is broadly used, to refer to things related to judgment of heresy by the Roman Catholic Church. ...


In his zeal for orthodoxy, indeed, Frederick William outstripped his minister; he even blamed Wöllner's "idleness and vanity" for the inevitable failure of the attempt to regulate opinion from above, and in 1794 deprived him of one of his secular offices in order that he might have more time "to devote himself to the things of God"; in edict after edict the king continued to the end of his reign to make regulations "in order to maintain in his states a true and active Christianity, as the path to genuine fear of God."


The effects of this policy of blind obscurantism far outweighed any good that resulted from the king's well-meant efforts at economic and financial reform; and even this reform was but spasmodic and partial, and awoke ultimately more discontent than it allayed.


But far more fateful for Prussia was the king's attitude towards the army and foreign policy. The army was the very foundation of the Prussian state, a truth which both Frederick William I and the great Frederick had fully realised; the army had been their first care, and its efficiency had been maintained by their constant personal supervision. Frederick William, who had no taste for military matters, put his authority as "Warlord" (Kriegsherr) into commission under a supreme college of war (Oberkriegs-Collegium) under the Duke of Brunswick and General Wichard Joachim Heinrich von Möllendorf. It was the beginning of the process that ended in 1806 at the Battle of Jena. A warlord is a person with power who has de facto military control of a subnational area due to armed forces loyal to the warlord and not to a central authority. ... Karl Wilhelm Ferdinand Karl Wilhelm Ferdinand, Duke of Brunswick (October 9, 1735 - November 10, German general, was born at Wolfenbüttel. ... Wichard Joachim Heinrich von Möllendorf (1724-1816), (nb the name is Wichard, not Richard, and Möllendorf is spelled with an umlaut on the o, or as Moellendorf) Prussian soldier, began his career as a page of Frederick the Great in 1740. ... The Battle of Jena was fought on October 14, 1806, in Jena, in todays Germany, and resulted in a French victory under Napoleon Bonaparte against the Prussians under General Hohenlohe. ...


In the circumstances, Frederick William's intervention in European affairs was not likely to prove of benefit to Prussia. The Dutch campaign of 1787, entered into for purely family reasons, was indeed successful; but Prussia received not even the cost of her intervention. An attempt to intervene in the war of Russia and Austria against the Ottoman Empire failed of its object; Prussia did not succeed in obtaining any concessions of territory from the alarms of the allies, and the dismissal of Hertzberg (5 July 1791) marked the final abandonment of the anti-Austrian tradition of Frederick the Great. For other uses, see Ottoman (disambiguation). ... Ewald Friedrich, Count von Hertzberg (1725 - May 22, 1795), Prussian statesman, who came of a noble family which had been settled in Pomerania since the 13th century, was born at Lottin, in that province. ... is the 186th day of the year (187th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1791 (MDCCXCI) was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 11-day-slower Julian calendar). ...


Revolution

Meanwhile, the French Revolution had entered upon alarming phases, and in August 1791 Frederick William, at the meeting at Pillnitz, arranged with Emperor Leopold II to join in supporting the cause of King Louis XVI of France. But neither the king's character, nor the confusion of the Prussian finances due to his extravagance, gave promise of any effective action. A formal alliance was indeed signed on 7 February 1792, and Frederick William took part personally in the campaigns of 1792 and 1793. He was hampered, however, by want of funds, and his counsels were distracted by the affairs of Poland, which promised a richer booty than was likely to be gained by the anti-revolutionary crusade into France. A subsidy treaty with the sea powers (19 April 1794) filled his coffers; but the insurrection in Poland that followed the partition of 1793, and the threat of the isolated intervention of Russia, hurried him into the separate Treaty of Basel with the French Republic (5 April 1795), which was regarded by the great monarchies as a betrayal, and left Prussia morally isolated in Europe on the eve of the titanic struggle between the monarchical principle and the new political creed of the Revolution. The French Revolution (1789–1815) was a period of political and social upheaval in the political history of France and Europe as a whole, during which the French governmental structure, previously an absolute monarchy with feudal privileges for the aristocracy and Catholic clergy, underwent radical change to forms based on... Pillnitz Pillnitz is a city quarter of Dresden, Germany. ... Leopold II (born Peter Leopold Joseph) (May 5, 1747 – March 1, 1792) was the penultimate Holy Roman Emperor from 1790 to 1792 and Grand Duke of Tuscany. ... Louis XVI, born Louis-Auguste de France (23 August 1754 – 21 January 1793) ruled as King of France and Navarre from 1774 until 1791, and then as King of the French from 1791 to 1792. ... is the 38th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1792 was a leap year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... In economics, a subsidy is generally a monetary grant given by a government to lower the price faced by producers or consumers of a good, generally because it is considered to be in the public interest. ... April 19 is the 109th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (110th in leap years). ... 1794 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... The Partitions of Poland (Polish Rozbiór or Rozbiory Polski) happened in the 18th century and ended the existence of a sovereign state of Poland (or more correctly the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth). ... The Peace of Basel of 1795 consists of three peace treaties of France (represented by François de Barthélemy). ... is the 95th day of the year (96th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1795 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... For other uses, see Monarch (disambiguation). ... A creed is a statement or confession of belief — usually religious belief — or faith. ...


Prussia had paid a heavy price for the territories acquired at the expense of Poland in 1793 and 1795, and when, on 16 November 1797, Frederick William died, he left the state in bankruptcy and confusion, the army decayed and the monarchy discredited. He was succeeded by his son, Frederick William III. is the 320th day of the year (321st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1797 (MDCCXCVII) was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 11-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Frederick William III (German: , August 3, 1770 – June 7, 1840) was king of Prussia from 1797 to 1840. ...


Ancestry

Frederick William II's ancestors in three generations
Frederick William II of Prussia Father:
Prince Augustus William of Prussia
Paternal Grandfather:
Frederick William I of Prussia
Paternal Great-grandfather:
Frederick I of Prussia
Paternal Great-grandmother:
Sophia Charlotte of Hanover
Paternal Grandmother:
Sophia Dorothea of Hanover
Paternal Great-grandfather:
George I of Great Britain
Paternal Great-grandmother:
Sophia Dorothea of Celle
Mother:
Louise Amalie of Brunswick-Lüneburg
Maternal Grandfather:
Ferdinand Albert II, Duke of Brunswick-Lüneburg
Maternal Great-grandfather:
Duke Ferdinand Albert I of Brunswick
Maternal Great-grandmother:
Christine of Hesse-Eschwege
Maternal Grandmother:
Antoinette Amalie of Brunswick-Lüneburg
Maternal Great-grandfather:
Louis Rudolph, Duke of Brunswick-Lüneburg
Maternal Great-grandmother:
Christine Louise of Oettingen

Augustus William (German: August Wilhelm; 9 August 1722, Berlin – 12 June 1758, Oranienburg), Prince of Prussia, was the second son of King Frederick William I of Prussia and Sophia Dorothea of Hanover. ... Frederick William I (German: Friedrich Wilhelm I) (August 14, 1688 – May 31, 1740) of the House of Hohenzollern, was the King in Prussia from 1713 until his death. ... Frederick I of Prussia (German: , July 11, 1657 – February 25, 1713), of the Hohenzollern dynasty, was (as Frederick III; ) Elector of Brandenburg (1688–1713) and the first King in Prussia (1701 – 1713). ... Sophia Charlotte of Hanover was born on October 30, 1668, at Schloss Iburg near Osnabrück. ... Sophia Dorothea of Hanover (March 16, 1687 – June 28, 1757) was a Princess of Hanover, being the daughter of Georg Ludwig of Brunswick-Lüneburg (later George I of Great Britain) and Sophia Dorothea of Celle. ... George I (George Louis; 28 May 1660 – 11 June 1727)[1] was King of Great Britain and Ireland, from 1 August 1714 until his death. ... Sophia Dorothea (September 15, 1666 – November 23, 1726), only child of George William, Duke of Brunswick-Lüneburg and the Huguenot Eleanore dOlbreuse (1639-1722), was the estranged wife of George Louis, Duke of Brunswick-Lüneburg (later King George I of Great Britain), . // Marriage George William had undertaken... Louise Amalie of Brunswick-Lüneburg (1722-1780) was daughter of Ferdinand Albert II, Duke of Brunswick-Lüneburg. ... Ferdinand Albert (German Ferdinand Albrecht; 29 May 1680 – 2 September 1735, Salzdahlum), Duke of Brunswick-Lüneburg, was an officer in the army of the Holy Roman Empire. ... Ferdinand Albert (German Ferdinand Albrecht; 22 May 1636, Brunswick – 25 April 1687, Bevern), Duke of Brunswick-Lüneburg, was a relative of the princes of Brunswick-Wolfenbüttel. ... Louis Rudolph (German Ludwig Rudolf; 22 July 1671 – 1 March 1735), Duke of Brunswick-Lüneburg, ruled over the Wolfenbüttel subdivision of the duchy from 1731 until his death. ... Christine Louise of Oettingen-Oettingen (Oettingen, March 20, 1671 - Blankenberg September 3, 1747) was Duchess of Brunswick-Lüneburg and the maternal grandmother of Archduchess Maria Theresa of Austria. ...

Posterity

Tomb of Frederick William II in Hohenzollern crypt in the Berliner Dom
Tomb of Frederick William II in Hohenzollern crypt in the Berliner Dom

Frederick William II had the following children: Image File history File links Frederickwilliam2grave. ... Image File history File links Frederickwilliam2grave. ...

Besides his relations with his maitresse en titre, the countess Lichtenau, the king—who was a frank polygamist—contracted two "marriages of the left hand" with Fräulein von Voss and the Countess Dönhoff. Frederica Charlotte of Prussia (May 7, 1767 – August 6, 1820) was the daughter of King Frederick William II of Prussia and his first wife, Elisabeth Christine of Brunswick-Lüneburg. ... His Royal Highness The Prince Frederick, Duke of York and Albany (Frederick Augustus) (16 August 1763 - 5 January 1827) was a member of the British Royal Family, the second eldest child, and second son of King George III. From 1820 until his own death in 1827, he was the heir... Frederick William III (German: , August 3, 1770 – June 7, 1840) was king of Prussia from 1797 to 1840. ... Queen Wilhelmine of the Netherlands at a young age Queen Wilhelmine of the Netherlands, born Princess of Prussia (full names in Dutch: Frederica Louisa Wilhelmina; full names in German: Friederike Luise Wilhelmine) (Potsdam, 18 November 1774 - The Hague, 12 October 1837), was the first wife of King William I of... King William I of the Netherlands, born William Frederik of Orange-Nassau (The Hague, 24 August 1772 - Berlin, 12 December 1843), was the second King of the Netherlands (the first king was Louis I Napoleon Bonaparte). ... Prince Wilhelm of Prussia (1783–1851) was the son of Frederick William II of Prussia and Frederika Louisa of Hesse-Darmstadt. ...

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
Friedrich Wilhelm II
Frederick William II of Prussia
Born: 25 September 1744 Died: 16 November 1797
Preceded by
Frederick II
King of Prussia
1786 — 1797
Succeeded by
Frederick William III of Prussia
Elector of Brandenburg
as Frederick William III

1786 — 1797

This article incorporates text from the Encyclopædia Britannica Eleventh Edition, a publication now in the public domain. Image File history File links Commons-logo. ... Hohenzollern redirects here. ... Frederick II (German: ; January 24, 1712 – August 17, 1786) was a King of Prussia (1740–1786) from the Hohenzollern dynasty. ... The following is a list of the Kings of Prussia (German: König von Preußen); they were members of the Hohenzollern family. ... Frederick William III (German: , August 3, 1770 – June 7, 1840) was king of Prussia from 1797 to 1840. ... The Margrave of Brandenburg was one of the seven Electors of the Holy Roman Empire created by the Golden Bull of 1356. ... Encyclopædia Britannica, the eleventh edition The Encyclopædia Britannica Eleventh Edition (1910–1911) is perhaps the most famous edition of the Encyclopædia Britannica. ... The public domain comprises the body of all creative works and other knowledge—writing, artwork, music, science, inventions, and others—in which no person or organization has any proprietary interest. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Frederick William II of Prussia - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1299 words)
Frederick William was the son of Augustus William, Prince of Prussia (the second son of King Friedrich Wilhelm I of Prussia) and of Louise Amalie of Brunswick-Lüneburg, sister of the wife of Frederick the Great.
Frederick William was a man of singularly handsome presence, not without mental qualities of a high order; he was devoted to the arts—Beethoven and Mozart enjoyed his patronage, and his private orchestra had a Europe-wide reputation.
Frederick William's accession to the throne (17 August 1786) was, indeed, followed by a series of measures for lightening the burdens of the people, reforming the oppressive French system of tax-collecting introduced by Frederick, and encouraging trade by the diminution of customs dues and the making of roads and canals.
Frederick II of Prussia - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1947 words)
Frederick II of Prussia (January 24, 1712 – August 17, 1786) was a king of Prussia from the Hohenzollern dynasty, reigning from 1740 to 1786.
At the time of Frederick's birth, the Houses of Brandenburg and Hanover were enjoying great prosperity; the birth of Frederick was welcomed by his grandfather with more than usual pleasure, as two of his grandsons had already died at an early age.
Frederick William wished his sons and daughters to be educated not as princes and princesses, but as children of simple folk.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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