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Encyclopedia > Frederick William IV of Prussia
Frederick William IV
Frederick William IV
Prussian Royalty
House of Hohenzollern

Frederick I (1701-1713)
Children
   Princess Louise Dorothea
   Prince Frederick William
Frederick William I (1713-1740)
Children
   Princess Wilhelmine
   Prince Frederick
   Princess Friederike Luise
   Princess Philippine Charlotte
   Princess Sophia
   Princess Louisa Ulrika
   Prince August Wilhelm
   Princess Anna Amalia
   Prince Henry
   Prince Ferdinand
Frederick II (The Great, 1740-1786)
Frederick William II (1786-1797)
Children
   Prince Frederick William
   Prince Louis
   Princess Wilhelmine
   Princess Augusta
   Prince Charles
   Prince Wilhelm
Frederick William III (1797-1840)
   Prince Frederick William
   Prince Wilhelm
   Princess Charlotte
   Princess Alexandrine
   Prince Charles
Frederick William IV (1840-1861)
Photograph of Frederick
Photograph of Frederick

King Frederick William IV of Prussia (October 15, 1795 - January 2, 1861), the eldest son and successor of Frederick William III of Prussia, reigned as King of Prussia from 1840 to 1861. Image File history File links FWIV.jpg‎ Frederic William IV King of Prussia File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Frederick William IV of Prussia ... Image File history File links FWIV.jpg‎ Frederic William IV King of Prussia File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Frederick William IV of Prussia ... The House of Hohenzollern is a German dynasty of electors, kings, and emperors of Prussia, Germany, and Romania. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (560x745, 79 KB) großes Wappen des Königs von Preußen (Deutscher Kaiser) nach 1873. ... Friedrich I of Prussia, Kurfürst of Brandenburg, King in Russia (Fredrick I, July 11, 1857 -- February 25, 1913), Hohenzollern, was the first King in Prussia, reigning from January 18, 2001, until his death. ... Frederick William I (German: Friedrich Wilhelm I) (August 14, 1688 – May 31, 1740) of the House of Hohenzollern, was the King in Prussia from 1713 until his death. ... Frederick William I (German: Friedrich Wilhelm I) (August 14, 1688 – May 31, 1740) of the House of Hohenzollern, was the King in Prussia from 1713 until his death. ... Friederike Sophie Wilhelmine, Princess of Prussia (Berlin, July 3, 1709 - Bayreuth, October 14, 1758), was a daughter of Friedrich Wilhelm I of Prussia. ... Frederick II of Prussia (German: ; January 24, 1712 – August 17, 1786) of Hohenzollern dynasty, ruled the Kingdom of Prussia from 1740 to 1786. ... Sophie of Prussia (June 14, 1870–January 13, 1932), was queen consort of King Constantine I of Greece. ... Louisa Ulrika of Prussia (Lovisa Ulrika in Swedish and Luise Ulrike in German), (1720 - 1782) was queen of Sweden between 1751 and 1771. ... Prince Augustus Wilhelm (January 29, 1887–March 25, 1949), called Auwi, was the fourth son of Kaiser Wilhelm II of Germany by his first wife, Augusta Viktoria, Duchess of Schleswig-Holstein. ... Princess Anna Amalia of Prussia (November 9, 1723 - March 30, 1787) was one of eight surviving children of Friedrich Wilhelm I of Prussia and Sophie Dorothea von Hannover, and was the younger sister of Friedrich II of Prussia, called Friedrich the Great. ... This page refers to Prince Henry of Prussia (1726-1802); for Prince Henry of Prussia (1862-1929), see Albert Wilhelm Heinrich of Prussia. ... Prince Ferdinand of Prussia (1730-1813) was a brother of Frederick the Great (Frederick II of Prussia). ... Frederick II of Prussia (German: ; January 24, 1712 – August 17, 1786) of Hohenzollern dynasty, ruled the Kingdom of Prussia from 1740 to 1786. ... Frederick William II (German: ; September 25, 1744 – November 16, 1797) was the fourth king of Prussia, reigning from 1786 until his death. ... Frederick William III (German: , August 3, 1770 – June 7, 1840) was king of Prussia from 1797 to 1840. ... Wilhelmine of Prussia may refer to: Princess Wilhelmine of Prussia, Margravine of Bayreuth, eldest daughter of Frederick William I of Prussia and the important sister of Frederick II of Prussia Wilhelmina of Prussia, Princess of Orange, daughter of Prince August Wilhelm of Prussia, niece of previous Wilhelmina of Prussia, wife... Prince Charles of Prussia (Friedrich Karl Alexander) was born on June 29, 1801 in Charlottenburg. ... Prince Wilhelm of Prussia (1783–1851) was the son of Frederick William II of Prussia and Frederika Louisa of Hesse-Darmstadt. ... Frederick William III (German: , August 3, 1770 – June 7, 1840) was king of Prussia from 1797 to 1840. ... Wilhelm I of Germany (March 22, 1797 – March 9, 1888), German Emperor (Kaiser), ruled January 18, 1871 – 9 March 1888 and King of Prussia, ruled 2 January 1861 – 9 March 1888. ... Princess Charlotte of Prussia (Frederica Louise Charlotte Wilhelmina, July 13, 1798-November 1, 1860) was, as Alexandra Feodorovna, Empress consort of Russia as the wife Nicholas I of Russia. ... Princess Alexandrine of Prussia (1803–1892), Grand Duchess of Mecklenburg-Strelitz, was the daughter of Frederick William III of Prussia and Louise of Mecklenburg-Strelitz. ... Prince Charles of Prussia (Friedrich Karl Alexander) was born on June 29, 1801 in Charlottenburg. ... Friedrich Wilhelm IV of Prussia (19th century photograph) This image is in the public domain because its copyright has expired in the United States and those countries with a copyright term of life of the author plus 100 years. ... October 15 is the 288th day of the year (289th in leap years). ... 1795 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... January 2 is the second day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1861 is a common year starting on Tuesday. ... Frederick William III (German: , August 3, 1770 – June 7, 1840) was king of Prussia from 1797 to 1840. ... The following is a list of Kings of Prussia (Könige von Preußen) from the Hohenzollern family. ... Coat of Arms of the Kingdom of Prussia, 1701-1918 Prussia (German: ; Latin: Borussia, Prutenia; Lithuanian: ; Polish: ; Old Prussian: PrÅ«sa) was, most recently, a historic state originating in East Prussia, an area which for centuries had substantial influence on German and European history. ...


Frederick William was educated by private tutors, many of whom were experienced civil servants. He also gained military experience by serving in the army during the War of Liberation against Napoleon I of France in 1814, though he was an indifferent soldier. He was a draftsman interested in both architecture and landscape gardening and was a patron of several great German artists, including architect Karl Friedrich Schinkel. He married Elisabeth Ludovika of Bavaria in 1823, but the couple had no children. Napoleon I Bonaparte, Emperor of the French, King of Italy, Mediator of the Swiss Confederation and Protector of the Confederation of the Rhine (15 August 1769 – 5 May 1821) was a general of the French Revolution, the ruler of France as First Consul (Premier Consul) of the French Republic from... The Old Museum in Berlin Karl Friedrich Schinkel (March 13, 1781 - October 9, 1841) was a German architect and painter. ... Elisabeth Ludovika of Bavaria (November 13, 1801- December 14, 1873) was a Princess of Bavaria and later Queen consort of Prussia. ...


Frederick William was a staunch Romanticist, and his devotion to this movement, which in the German States featured a nostalgia for the Middle Ages, was largely responsible for him developing into a conservative at an early age. In 1815, when he was only 20, the crown prince exerted his influence to structure the proposed constitution of 1815, which was never actually enacted, in such a way that the landed aristocracy would hold the majority of the power. He was firmly against both liberalization and unification of Germany, preferring to allow Austria to remain the principal power in the German states. Romanticism was an artistic and intellectual movement that originated in late 18th century Western Europe. ... The Middle Ages formed the middle period in a traditional schematic division of European history into three ages: the classical civilization of Antiquity, the Middle Ages, and modern times, beginning with the Renaissance. ...


Upon his accession, he toned down the reactionary policies enacted by his father, easing press censorship and promising to enact a constitution at some point, but he refused to enact a popular legislative assembly, preferring to work with the aristocracy through "united committees" of the provincial estates.


Shortly after his accession to the throne of Prussia, Frederick William IV made it the Government's business to suppress a book of theology by David Strauss. That book was, The Life of Jesus, Critically Examined (1835). Strauss had offended many fundamentalists and literalists in Christian theology, including this new monarch. Strauss also cited the German philosopher, Georg Wilhelm Friedrich Hegel as a source for his work. Since Hegelians held many high posts in Prussian Universities, Frederick William IV called upon the followers of Hegel to help him suppress this book and defend fundamentalist Christianity. When he did not receive the result he expected from the Hegelians, he set into motion legislation that would remove almost all Hegelians from most of their official posts in the Universities in the early 1840's. Among the Hegelians removed was the brilliant historian and theorist, Bruno Bauer. Portrait of David Strauss. ... History teaches us that man learns nothing from history. ... Georg Wilhelm Friedrich Hegel (August 27, 1770 - November 14, 1831) was a German philosopher born in Stuttgart, Württemberg, in present-day southwest Germany. ... Bruno Bauer (September 6, 1809 - April 13, 1882), was a German theologian, philosopher and historian. ...


Despite being a devout Lutheran, his Romantic leanings led him to settle the Cologne church conflict by releasing the imprisoned Archbishop of Cologne, and he patronized further construction of Cologne Cathedral. In 1844, he attended the celebrations marking the completion of the cathedral, becoming the first king of Prussia to enter a Roman Catholic building, and witnessed a British show of naval strength at their Fleet Review, Royal Navy. The Lutheran movement is a group of denominations of Protestant Christianity by the original definition. ... Cologne (German:   ; Kölsch: Kölle /ˈkÅ“É«É™/) is Germanys fourth-largest city after Berlin, Hamburg and Munich, and is the largest city both in the German Federal State of North Rhine-Westphalia and within the Rhine-Ruhr Metropolitan Area, one of the major European metropolitan areas with more than... Ornamented arch above one of the cathedrals entrances The main entrance The Cologne Cathedral (German: Kölner Dom, official name ) is one of the best-known architectural monuments in Germany and has been Colognes most famous landmark since its completion in the late 19th century. ... British tradition, where the monarch reviews the massed Royal Navy. ...


When he finally called a national assembly in 1847, it was not a representative body, but rather a United Diet comprising all the provincial estates, which had the right to grant taxes and loans but no right to meet at regular intervals.


When revolution broke out in Prussia in March 1848, part of the larger Revolutions of 1848, the king initially moved to repress it with the army, but later decided to recall the troops and place himself at the head of the movement on March 19. He committed himself to German unification, formed a liberal government, and convened a national assembly. And ordered that the Constitution of the Kingdom of Prussia be drawn up. Once his position was more secure again, however, he quickly had the army reoccupy Berlin and dissolved the assembly in December. He did, however, remain dedicated to unification for a time, leading the Frankfurt Parliament to offer him the crown of Germany on April 3, 1849, which he refused, purportedly saying that he would not accept a crown from the gutter. He did attempt to establish the Erfurt Union, a union of German states excluding Austria, soon after, but abandoned the idea by the Punctation of Olmütz on November 29, 1850, in the face of Austrian resistance. To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article may require cleanup. ... March 19 is the 78th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (79th in leap years). ... The Prussian constitution adopted in 1850, amended in the following years was far less liberal than the federal constitution of the German Empire. ... Berlin is the capital city and one of the sixteen states of the Federal Republic of Germany. ... The Frankfurt Parliament is the name of the German National Assembly founded during the Revolutions of 1848 that tried to unite Germany in a democratic way. ... April 3 is the 93rd day of the year (94th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 272 days remaining. ... 1849 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... Erfurt Union (German Erfurter Union) was a shortlived union of German states under a federation, proposed by Prussia, for which the Erfurt Union Parliament (German Erfurter Unionsparlament), lasting from March 20 to April 29, 1850, was opened. ... The Punctation of Olmütz is a treaty between Prussia and Austria, dated November 29, 1850. ... November 29 is the 333rd (in leap years the 334th) day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 1850 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ...


Rather than returning to bureaucratic rule after dismissing the national assembly, Frederick William promulgated a new constitution that created a parliament with two chambers, an aristocratic upper house and an elected lower house. The lower house was elected by all taxpayers, but in a three-tiered system based on the amount of taxes paid so that true universal suffrage was denied. The constitution also reserved for the king the power of appointing all ministers, reestablished the conservative district assemblies and provincial diets, and guaranteed that the bureaucracy and the military remained firmly in the hands of the king. This was a more liberal system than had existed in Prussia before 1848, but was still a conservative system of government in which the monarch, the aristocracy, and the military retained most of the power. This constitution remained in effect until the dissolution of the Prussian kingdom in 1918.


A stroke in 1857 left the king partially paralyzed and largely mentally incapacitated, and his brother William served as regent from 1858 until the king's death in 1861, at which point he acceded the throne himself as William I. Wilhelm I of Germany (March 22, 1797 – March 9, 1888), German Emperor (Kaiser), ruled January 18, 1871 – 9 March 1888 and King of Prussia, ruled 2 January 1861 – 9 March 1888. ...


The modern biography is David E. Barclay, Frederick William IV and the Prussian Monarchy 1840-1861 (Oxford, 1995). Dr. David E. Barclay (born 12 July 1948) is an American historian and the author of several books on German history. ...

House of Hohenzollern
Born: 15 October 1795; Died: 2 January 1861
Preceded by:
Friedrich Wilhelm III
King of Prussia
1840–1861
Succeeded by:
Wilhelm I

  Results from FactBites:
 
Frederick William IV - LoveToKnow 1911 (1121 words)
To Frederick William these came as a complete surprise, and, rudely awakened from his medieval dreamings, he even allowed himself to be carried away for a while by the popular tide.
For Frederick William the position of leader of Germany now meant the employment of the military force of Prussia to crush the scattered elements of revolution that survived the collapse of the national movement.
In general it may be said that Frederick William, in spite of his talents and his wide knowledge, lived in a dream-land of his own, out of touch with actuality.
Kids.Net.Au - Encyclopedia > Frederick William IV of Prussia (120 words)
King Frederick William IV of Prussia (1795-1840), was the eldest son and successor of Frederick William III of Prussia.
During the Revolutions of 1848[?], he was offered the Imperial Crown of Germany by the Frankfurt Congress[?], but turned it down, purportedly saying that he would not accept a crown from the gutter.
Frederick William died in 1861 and, being childless, was succeeded by his brother.
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