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Encyclopedia > Frederick William, Elector of Brandenburg
Frederick William, Elector of Brandenburg.
Frederick William, Elector of Brandenburg.
This article is about the elector of Brandenburg. For the King of Prussia, see Frederick William I of Prussia.

Frederick William (German: Friedrich Wilhelm; February 16, 1620April 29, 1688) was the Elector of Brandenburg and the Duke of Prussia from 1640 until his death. He was of the House of Hohenzollern and is popularly known as the Great Elector (Großer Kurfürst) because of his military and political skill. The Great Elector was also a staunch pillar of the Calvinist faith, associated with the rising commercial class. Frederick William saw the importance of trade and promoted it vigorously. The Great Elector's shrewd domestic reforms gave Prussia a strong position in the post-Westphalia political order of north-central Europe, setting Prussia up for elevation from duchy to kingdom, achieved under his successor. From [1], in the public domain This image is in the public domain because its copyright has expired in the United States and those countries with a copyright term of life of the author plus 100 years. ... From [1], in the public domain This image is in the public domain because its copyright has expired in the United States and those countries with a copyright term of life of the author plus 100 years. ... Frederick William I (German: Friedrich Wilhelm I) (August 14, 1688 – May 31, 1740) of the House of Hohenzollern, was the King in Prussia from 1713 until his death. ... is the 47th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1620 was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Saturday of the 10-day slower Julian calendar). ... is the 119th day of the year (120th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... // Events A high-powered conspiracy of notables, the Immortal Seven, invite William and Mary to depose James II of England. ... The prince-electors or electoral princes of the Holy Roman Empire — German: Kurfürst (singular) Kurfürsten (plural) — were the members of the electoral college of the Holy Roman Empire, having the function of electing the Emperors of Germany. ... Coat of arms Capital Brandenburg Berlin (from 1417) Religion Roman Catholic Lutheran Calvinist Government Monarchy Margrave  - 1157–70 Albert I  - 1797–1806 Frederick William III History  - Margraviate established 3 October, 1157  - Electorate established 25 December 1356  - Brandenburg-Prussia 27 August 1618  - Kingdom of Prussia 1 January 1701  - Dissolution of the... This article is about the nobility title. ... Coat of arms Duchy of Prussia (striped) in the second half of the 16th century Capital Königsberg Religion Protestant (Lutheran) Government Monarchy Duke of Prussia  - 1525 — 1568 Albert I  - 1568 — 1618 Albert Frederick History  - Secularisation April, 1525  - Personal Union (with Brandenburg) August 27, 1618  - Independence September 19, 1657 The... Events December 1 - Portugal regains its independence from Spain and João IV of Portugal becomes king. ... Hohenzollern redirects here. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations · Other religions Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Archbishop of Canterbury · Catholic Pope Coptic Pope · Ecumenical Patriarch Christianity Portal This box:      Calvinism is...

Contents

Biography

Frederick William was born in Berlin to George William, Elector of Brandenburg, and Elizabeth Charlotte of the Palatinate. His inheritance consisted of the March of Brandenburg, ravaged during the Thirty Years' War, a small region on the Dutch border known as Cleves, and Prussia. This article is about the capital of Germany. ... George William (German: Georg Wilhelm) (13 November 1595 - December 1, 1640) of the Hohenzollern dynasty was margrave and elector of Brandenburg and duke of Prussia (1619-1640). ... Elizabeth Charlotte of the Palatinate (19 November 1597 – 26 April 1660) was the German wife of George William, Elector of Brandenburg and Duke of Prussia, and the mother of Frederick William, the Great Elector. Elizabeth Charlotte was the daughter of Elector Frederick IV of the Palatinate and Louise Juliana of... Coat of arms Capital Brandenburg Berlin (from 1417) Religion Roman Catholic Lutheran Calvinist Government Monarchy Margrave  - 1157–70 Albert I  - 1797–1806 Frederick William III History  - Margraviate established 3 October, 1157  - Electorate established 25 December 1356  - Brandenburg-Prussia 27 August 1618  - Kingdom of Prussia 1 January 1701  - Dissolution of the... Combatants Sweden  Bohemia Denmark-Norway (Until 1643) Dutch Republic France Scotland England Saxony  Holy Roman Empire ( Catholic League) Spain Austria Bavaria Commanders Frederick V Buckingham Leven Gustav II Adolf â€  Johan Baner Cardinal Richelieu Louis II de Bourbon Turenne Christian IV of Denmark Bernhard of Saxe-Weimar Johann Georg I of... The Duchy of Cleves (Herzogtum Kleve) was a state of the Holy Roman Empire in present Germany (part of North Rhine-Westphalia) and the Netherlands (parts of Limburg, Noord-Brabant and Gelderland). ... Coat of arms Duchy of Prussia (striped) in the second half of the 16th century Capital Königsberg Religion Protestant (Lutheran) Government Monarchy Duke of Prussia  - 1525 — 1568 Albert I  - 1568 — 1618 Albert Frederick History  - Secularisation April, 1525  - Personal Union (with Brandenburg) August 27, 1618  - Independence September 19, 1657 The...


Foreign diplomacy

During the war George William had striven to maintain with a minimal army a delicate balance between the Protestant and Catholic forces fighting throughout the Holy Roman Empire. Out of these meager beginnings Frederick William managed to rebuild the country. In contrast to the religious disputes in other European states, the elector supported religious tolerance. With the help of French subsidies, he built up an army to defend the country. Through the Treaties of Wehlau, Labiau, and Oliva, Frederick William succeeded in revoking Polish sovereignty over the Duchy of Prussia, leaving the Holy Roman Emperor as his only liege. Protestantism encompasses the forms of Christian faith and practice that originated with the doctrines of the Reformation. ... This article is about the medieval empire. ... In economics, a subsidy is generally a monetary grant given by a government to lower the price faced by producers or consumers of a good, generally because it is considered to be in the public interest. ... The Treaty of Welawa was a political act signed in the Prussian town of Welawa (German Wehlau) between Poland and Brandenburg-Prussia during the Swedish Deluge on September 9, 1657. ... The Treaty of Labiau was a treaty signed between Elector Frederick William of Brandenburg and King Charles X Gustav of Sweden on November 20, 1656 in Labiau, Ducal Prussia. ... Treaty of Oliwa. ... The Holy Roman Emperor was, with some variation, the ruler of the Holy Roman Empire, the predecessor of modern Germany, during its existence from the 10th century until its collapse in 1806. ... Allegiance is a duty of fidelity said to be owed by a subject or a citizen to his state or sovereign. ...


Military career

Frederick William was a military commander of wide renown; his standing army would later become the model for the Prussian military. He is notable for his joint victory with Swedish forces at the Battle of Warsaw (1656), but the Swedes turned on him at the behest of King Louis XIV of France and invaded Brandenburg. After marching 250 kilometers in 15 days back to Brandenburg, he caught the Swedes by surprise and managed to defeat them on the field at the Battle of Fehrbellin, destroying the myth of Swedish military invincibility. He later destroyed another Swedish army that invaded the Duchy of Prussia during the Great Sleigh Drive in 1678. He is noted for his use of broad directives and delegation of decision-making to his commanders, which would later become the basis for the German doctrine of Auftragstaktik, and he is noted for using rapid mobility to defeat his foes. For other uses, see Prussia (disambiguation). ... The Battle of Warsaw which took place on 28-30 July 1656, between armies of the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth on the one side and of Sweden and Brandenburg on the other, was an important battle of the Northern Wars. ... Louis XIV redirects here. ... Combatants Brandenburg Sweden Commanders Georg von Derfflinger Waldemar von Wrangel Strength 5,600 cavalry, 13 guns 7,000 infantry, 4,000 cavalry, 28 guns Casualties 500 men 600 men The Battle of Fehrbellin was fought on June 28, 1675 between Sweden and Brandenburg. ... The Great Sleigh Drive (German: ) was a daring and bold maneuver by Frederick William, the Great Elector of Brandenburg-Prussia, to drive Swedish forces out of the Duchy of Prussia, a territory of his which had been invaded by the Swedes during the winter of 1678. ... Mission-type tactics (German: Auftragstaktik, also known as directive control in the US), are a central component of the tactics of German armed forces since the 19th century. ...


Domestic policies

Frederick William is notable for raising an army of 40,000 soldiers by 1678, through the General War Commissariat presided over by Joachim Friedrich von Blumenthal. He was an advocate of mercantilism, monopolies, subsidies, tariffs, and internal improvements. Following Louis XIV's revocation of the Edict of Nantes, Frederick William encouraged skilled French and Walloon Huguenots to emigrate to Brandenburg-Prussia, bolstering the country's technical and industrial base. On Blumenthal's advice he agreed to exempt the nobility from taxes and in return they agreed to dissolve the Estates-General. He also simplified travel in Brandenburg and the Duchy of Prussia by connecting riverways with canals, a system that was expanded by later Prussian architects, such as Georg Steenke; the system is still in use today. This article or section is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ... This article is about a military rank. ... Frederick William (The Great Elector) set up the General War Commissariat to oversee the army, as well as to levy taxes necessary to support the army. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Mercantile redirects here. ... This article is about the economic term. ... Tax rates around the world Tax revenue as % of GDP Economic policy Monetary policy Central bank   Money supply Fiscal policy Spending   Deficit   Debt Trade policy Tariff   Trade agreement Finance Financial market Financial market participants Corporate   Personal Public   Banking   Regulation        For other uses of this word, see tariff (disambiguation). ... The notion of internal improvements or public works is a concept in economics and politics. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The term Walloons (French: Wallons, Walloon: Walons) refers, in daily speech, to French-speaking Belgians from Wallonia. ... From the 16th to the 18th century the name Huguenot was applied to a member of the Protestant Reformed Church of France, historically known as the French Calvinists. ... The Brandenburg-Prussian state was formed in 1618 when the Duchy of Prussia came under the control of the Elector of Brandenburg (part of the Holy Roman Empire of German Nation). ... Nobility is a traditional hereditary status (see hereditary titles) that exists today in many countries (mainly present or former monarchies). ... “Taxes” redirects here. ... The word States-General, or Estates-General, refers in English to : the Etats-Généraux of France before the French Revolution the Staten-Generaal of the United Provinces and present-day Netherlands. ... For other uses, see Canal (disambiguation). ... Anthem Preußenlied, Heil dir im Siegerkranz (both unofficial) The Kingdom of Prussia at its greatest extent, at the time of the formation of the German Empire, 1871 Capital Berlin Government Monarchy King  - 1701 — 1713 Frederick I (first)  - 1888 — 1918 William II (last) Prime minister  - 1848 Adolf Heinrich von Arnim... Georg Jakob Steenke (1801, Königsberg, Prussia - 1884, Elbing, Prussia) was a Prussian Royal Baurat (construction councillor). ...


Ancestry

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
8. Joachim Frederick, Elector of Brandenburg
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
4. John Sigismund, Elector of Brandenburg
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
9. Margravine Catherine of Brandenburg-Küstrin
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
2. George William, Elector of Brandenburg
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
10. Albert Frederick, Duke of Prussia
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
5. Duchess Anna of Prussia
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
11. Duchess Marie Elenore of Jülich-Cleves-Berg
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
1. Frederick William, Elector of Brandenburg
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
12. Louis VI, Elector Palatine
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
6. Frederick IV, Elector Palatine
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
13. Landgravine Elisabeth of Hesse
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
3. Elizabeth Charlotte of the Palatinate
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
14. William the Silent
Prince of Orange and Count of Nassau
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
7. Countess Louise Juliana of Nassau
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
15. Princess Charlotte of Bourbon
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Joachim Friedrich (27 January 1546 in Cölln — 18 July 1608) of the Hohenzollern dynasty succeeded his father John George as margrave and elector of Brandenburg in 1598, and was in turn succeeded at his death by his son John Sigismund. ... John or Johann Sigismund Hohenzollern (1572-1619) succeeded his father Joachim Friedrich as margrave of Brandenburg and duke of Ducal Prussia in 1608. ... George William (German: Georg Wilhelm) (13 November 1595 - December 1, 1640) of the Hohenzollern dynasty was margrave and elector of Brandenburg and duke of Prussia (1619-1640). ... Albert Frederick (7 May 1553- 28 August 1618) was duke of Ducal Prussia from 1568 until his death. ... Anna, Duchess of Prussia and Jülich-Cleves-Berg (3 July 1576 - 30 August 1625) was the daughter of Albert Frederick, Duke of Prussia and Marie Eleanore of Cleves and became the wife of John Sigismund, Elector of Brandenburg. ... Louis VI, Elector Palatine (Simmern, 4 July 1539 – 22 October 1583, Heidelberg) was an Elector from the branch of Palatinate-Simmern of the house of Wittelsbach. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Elisabeth of Hesse (13 February 1539 – 14 March 1582) was a German noblewoman. ... Elizabeth Charlotte of the Palatinate (19 November 1597 – 26 April 1660) was the German wife of George William, Elector of Brandenburg and Duke of Prussia, and the mother of Frederick William, the Great Elector. Elizabeth Charlotte was the daughter of Elector Frederick IV of the Palatinate and Louise Juliana of... William I (William the Silent). ... This article does not cite its references or sources. ... Charlotte of Bourbon (1546/1547 - Antwerp, 5 May 1582) was the daughter of Louis of Bourbon and Jaqueline of Longwy. ...

Marriages

On 7 December 1646 at The Hague, Frederick William entered into marriage, proposed by Blumenthal as a partial solution to the Jülich-Berg question, with Luise Henriette of Nassau (1627-1667), daughter of Frederick Henry of Orange-Nassau and Amalia of Solms-Braunfels. Their children were is the 341st day of the year (342nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1646 (MDCXLVI) was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the 10-day slower Julian calendar). ... Coordinates: , Country Netherlands Province South Holland Area (2006)  - Municipality 98. ... Frederick Henry (January 29, 1584–March 14, 1647), Prince of Orange, the youngest child of William the Silent, was born at Delft about six months before his fathers assassination. ... Amalia van Solms (31 August 1602 - 8 September 1675), countess of Braunfels, was the wife of Frederick Henry, Prince of Orange. ...

  • William Henry (1648-1649),
  • Charles (1655-1674),
  • Frederick (1657-1713), his successor,
  • Amalie (1656-1664),
  • Henry (1664-1664),
  • Louis (1666-1687).

On 13 June 1668 at Gröningen, Frederick William married Sophie Dorothea of Holstein-Glücksburg, daughter of Philipp of Holstein-Sonderburg-Glücksburg and Sophie Hedwig of Saxe-Lauenburg. Their children were Frederick I of Prussia (German: , July 11, 1657 – February 25, 1713), of the Hohenzollern dynasty, was (as Frederick III; ) Elector of Brandenburg (1688–1713) and the first King in Prussia (1701 – 1713). ... is the 164th day of the year (165th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1668 (MDCLXVIII) was a leap year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Wednesday of the 10-day slower Julian calendar). ... Gröningen is a town in Saxony-Anhalt, Germany. ... ... The Coat of Arms of Lauenburg The Duchy of Lauenburg, also known as Saxe-Lauenburg was a medieval Duchy (Reichsfreiheit) that existed from 1296 in the extreme southeast region of Schleswig-Holstein with its territorial center in the modern district of Lauenburg. ...

  • Philip William (1669-1711),
  • Marie Amalie (1670-1739),
  • Albert Frederick (1672-1731),
  • Charles (1673-1695),
  • Elisabeth Sofie (1674-1748),
  • Dorothea (1675-1676),
  • Christian Ludwig (1677-1734), recipient of Bach's Brandenburg Concertos.
Frederick William, Elector of Brandenburg
Born: 16 February 1620 Died: 29 April 1688
Regnal titles
Preceded by
George William
Elector of Brandenburg
1640-1688
Succeeded by
Frederick III
Duke of Prussia
vassal of Poland (to 1660)

1640-1688

  Results from FactBites:
 
Frederick William, Elector of Brandenburg - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (361 words)
Friedrich Wilhelm (Frederick William) of Brandenburg, Kurfürst of Brandenburg, Duke of Prussia (February 16, 1620 - April 29, 1688) of the House of Hohenzollern, was the Kurfürst (elector) of Brandenburg, from 1640 until his death.
Friedrich Wilhelm was born in Berlin, to Georg Wilhelm von Brandenburg and Elisabeth Charlotte von der Pfalz.
He simplified travel in the ancestral lands of Brandenburg and Prussia by connecting riverways with canals, a system, that was expanded by later Prussian architects, such as Georg Steenke and which is still functioning and in use today.
Encyclopedia: Frederick I of Prussia (1762 words)
Frederick II of Prussia (January 24, 1712–August 17, 1786) was a king of Prussia from the Hohenzollern dynasty, reigning from 1740–86.
Frederick William was the son of Augustus William (the second son of King Friedrich Wilhelm I of Prussia) and of Louise Amalie of Brunswick-Lüneburg, sister of the wife of...
Prince Wilhelm of Prussia (1783–1851) was the son of Frederick William II of Prussia and Frederika Louisa of Hesse-Darmstadt.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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