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Encyclopedia > Frederick Temple

Frederick Temple (1821-1902), was one of the best-loved holders of the title of Archbishop of Canterbury, which he held from 1896 until his death. 1821 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... 1902 (MCMII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... Arms of the see of Canterbury The Archbishop of Canterbury is the senior clergyman of the established Church of England and symbolic head of the worldwide Anglican Communion. ... 1896 was a leap year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ...


Temple was born in Santa Maura, one of the Ionian Islands, the son of Major Octavius Temple, who was subsequently appointed lieutenant-governor of Sierra Leone. On his retirement, Major Temple settled in Devon and contemplated a farming life for his son Frederick, giving him a practical training to that end. The boy was sent to Blundell's School, Tiverton, and soon showed signs of being suited to a different career. He retained a warm affection for the school, where he did well both academically and at physical activities, especially walking. The family was not wealthy, and Frederick knew he would have to earn his own living. He took the first step by winning a scholarship at Balliol College, Oxford, before he was seventeen . Lefkada, or Lefkas (Greek: Modern: Λευκάδα, Ancient/Katharevousa: -as) is an Greek island in the Ionian Sea, connected to the mainland by a long causeway and floating bridge. ... The Ionian Islands (Greek: Ionia Nisia, Ιόνια Νησιά; Ancient Greek: Ionioi Nisoi, Ιόνιοι Νήσοι) are a group of islands in Greece. ... The inner harbour, Brixham, south Devon, at low tide Devon is a large county in South West England, bordering on Cornwall to the west, Dorset and Somerset to the east. ... Blundells School is a British public school, located in Tiverton in the county of Devon. ... Location within the British Isles. ... College name Balliol College Named after John de Balliol Established 1263 Sister College St Johns Master Andrew Graham JCR President Jack Hawkins Undergraduates 403 Graduates 228 Homepage Boatclub Balliol College, founded in 1263, is one of the constituent colleges of the University of Oxford in the United Kingdom. ...


The "Tractarian Movement" had begun five years earlier, but the memorable tract, No. 90, had not yet been written. Temple entered a university vibrating with intellectual and religious excitement. After much discussion and reflection he drew closer to the camp of "the Oxford Liberal Movement." In 1842 he took a "double first" and was elected fellow of Balliol, and lecturer in mathematics and logic. Four years later he was ordained, and, with the aim of improving the education of the very poor, he accepted the headship of Kneller Hall, a college founded by the government for the training of masters of workhouses and penal schools. The experiment was not successful, and Temple himself advised its abandonment in 1855. He then accepted a school-inspectorship, which he held until he went to teach at Rugby in 1858. In the meantime he had attracted the admiration of the Prince Albert, and in 1856 he was appointed chaplain-in-ordinary to Queen Victoria. In I857 he was select preacher at his university. For the 20th century Oxford Movement or Group see Moral Rearmament The Oxford Movement was a loose affiliation of High Church Anglicans who sought to demonstrate that the Church of England was a direct descendant of the Christian church established by the Apostles. ... Wikibooks Wikiversity has more about this subject: School of Mathematics Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to: Mathematics Look up Mathematics in Wiktionary, the free dictionary Wikimedia Commons has media related to: Mathematics Inter. ... Logic, from Classical Greek λόγος (logos), originally meaning the word, or what is spoken, (but coming to mean thought or reason) is most often said to be the study of arguments, although the exact definition of logic is a matter of controversy among philosophers. ... The Poor Law was the system for the provision of social security in operation in England and the United Kingdom from the 16th century until the establishment of the Welfare State in the 20th century. ... A view of Rugby School from the rear, including the playing field, where according to legend Rugby was invented Rugby School, located in the town of Rugby in Warwickshire, is one of the oldest public schools in the United Kingdom and is perhaps one of the top co-educational boarding... Prince Albert of Saxe-Coburg-Gotha (Francis Charles Augustus Albert Emmanuel, of the Saxe-Coburg-Gotha branch of the House of Wettin) (26 August 1819 - 14 December 1861) was the husband and consort of Queen Victoria of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland. ... Victoria Queen of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland, Empress of India Victoria (Alexandrina Victoria) (24 May 1819 – 22 January 1901) was Queen of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland from 20 June 1837, and Empress of India from 1 January 1877 until her death. ...


At Rugby Dr Arnold had died in 1842 and had been succeeded by Dr Tait, who again was followed by Dr Goulburn. Upon the resignation of the latter the trustees appointed Temple, who in that year (1858) had taken the degrees of B.D. and D.D. His life at Rugby was marked by great energy and bold initiative. Thomas Arnold (June 13, 1795 – June 12, 1842) was a famous schoolmaster and historian, head of Rugby School from 1828 to 1841. ... 1842 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ...


Temple strengthened the school's academic reputation in the classics, but also instituted scholarships in natural science, built a laboratory, and recognised the importance of these subjects. He reformed the sporting activities, in spite of all the traditions of the playing fields. His own tremendous powers of work and rough manner intimidated the pupils, but he soon became popular, and raised the school's reputation. His school sermons made a deep impression on the boys, teaching loyalty, faith and duty.


It was two years after he had taken up his work at Rugby that the volume entitled Essays and Reviews caused a controversy. The first essay in the book, "The Education of the World," was by Dr Temple. The authors of the volume were responsible only for their respective articles, but some of these were deemed so destructive that many people banned the whole book, and a noisy demand, led by Samuel Wilberforce, Bishop of Oxford, called on the headmaster of Rugby to dissociate himself from his comrades. Temple's essay had dealt with the intellectual and spiritual growth of the race, and had pointed out the contributions made respectively by the Hebrews, the Egyptians, the Greeks, the Romans, and others. Though accepted as harmless, it was blamed for being in the book. Temple refused to repudiate his associates, and it was only at a much later date (1870) that he decided to withdraw his essay. In the meantime, he printed a volume of his Rugby sermons, to show definitely what his own religious position was. Essays and Reviews, published in 1860, is a collection of seven essays on religion, covering topics including the Biblical researches of the German critics, the evidences of Christianity, religious thought in England, and the cosmology of Genesis. ... A photo of Samuel Wilberforce by Lewis Carroll Samuel Wilberforce (September 7, 1805 - July 19, 1873), English bishop, third son of William Wilberforce, was born at Clapham Common, London. ... Hebrews (syns. ... It has been suggested that Culture of ancient Rome be merged into this article or section. ...


In politics Temple was a follower of Gladstone, and he approved of the disestablishment of the Irish Church. He also wrote and spoke in favour of the Elementary Education Act (1870) of William Edward Forster, and was an active member of the Endowed Schools Commission. In 1869 Gladstone offered him the deanery of Durham, but he declined because he wanted to stay at Rugby. When later in the same year, however, Henry Phillpotts, bishop of Exeter, died, the prime minister turned again to Temple, and he accepted the bishopric of the city he knew so well. The Right Honourable William Ewart Gladstone (29 December 1809 – 19 May 1898) was a British Liberal statesman and Prime Minister (1868–1874, 1880–1885, 1886 and 1892–1894). ... See also civil religion. ... 1870 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... William Edward Forster (July 11, 1818 - April 6, 1886), British statesman, was born of Quaker parents at Bradpole in Dorsetshire. ... Durham (IPA: locally, in RP) is a small city in the north east of England. ... Henry Phillpotts (1778-1869), or Henry of Exeter, as he was commonly called, was one of the most striking figures in the English Church of the 19th century. ...


The appointment caused a fresh controversy. GA Denison, archdeacon of Taunton, Lord Shaftesbury, and others formed a strong committee of protest, whilst Pusey declared that "the choice was the most frightful enormity ever perpetrated by a prime minister." At the confirmation of his election, counsel was instructed to object to it, and in the voting the chapter was divided. Gladstone stood firm, and Temple was consecrated on December 21, 1869. There were murmurings among his clergy against what they deemed his harsh control, but his real kindness soon made itself felt, and, during the sixteen years of his tenure, he overcame the prejudices against him, so that when, on the death of Dr John Jackson in 1885, he was translated to London, the appointment gave general satisfaction. In 1884 he was Bampton Lecturer, taking for his subject "The Relations between Religion and Science." In 1885 he was elected honorary fellow of Exeter College, Oxford. Map sources for Taunton at grid reference ST2324 Taunton is the county town of Somerset, England. ... Anthony Ashley Cooper, 7th Earl of Shaftesbury (1801-1885) was an English philanthropist, the best-known of the Victorian era. ... Edward Bouverie Pusey (August 22, 1800 - September 16, 1882), was an English churchman, one of the leaders of the Oxford Movement. ... December 21 is the 355th day of the year (356th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 1869 is a common year starting on Friday (link will take you to calendar). ... 1885 is a common year starting on Thursday. ... College name Exeter College Named after Walter de Stapledon, Bishop of Exeter Established 1314 Sister College Emmanuel College Rector Ms Frances Cairncross JCR President Emily Pull Undergraduates 299 Graduates 150 Homepage Boatclub Exeter College is one of the constituent colleges of the University of Oxford in the United Kingdom. ...


Dr Temple's tenancy of the bishopric of London saw him working harder than ever. His normal working day at this time was one of fourteen or fifteen hours, though under the strain blindness was rapidly coming on. Many of his clergy and candidates for ordination thought him a rather terrifying person, enforcing almost impossible standards of diligence, accuracy and preaching efficiency, but his manifest devotion to his work and his zeal for the good of the people won him general confidence. In London he continued as a tireless temperance worker, and the working class instinctively recognized him as their friend. When, in view of his growing blindness, he offered to resign the bishopric, he was urged to reconsider his proposal, and on the sudden death of Archbishop Benson in 1896, though now seventy-six years of age, he accepted the see of Canterbury. Temperance may refer to: Temperance (virtue) Temperance movement Temperance (Tarot card) Temperance (band) See also Astrud Gilberto, for the album Temperance This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... Edward White Benson (July 14, 1829 – October 11, 1896) was Archbishop of Canterbury from 1882 until his death. ... 1896 was a leap year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... St Peters St, Canterbury, from the West Gate, 1993 Canterbury (Latin: Duroverum) is a cathedral city in the county of Kent in southeast England. ...


As archbishop he presided in 1897 over the decennial Lambeth Conference. In the same year Dr Temple and the Archbishop of York issued a joint response to an encyclical of the pope which denied the validity of Anglican orders. In 1900 the archbishops again acted together, when an appeal was addressed to them by the united episcopate, to decide the vexed questions of the use of incense in divine service and of the reservation of the elements. After hearing the arguments they decided against both the practices in question. During his archbishopric Dr Temple was deeply distressed by the divisions which were weakening the Anglican Church, and many of his most memorable sermons were calls for unity. 1897 was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... Arms of the Archbishop of York The Archbishop of York, Primate of England, is the metropolitan bishop of the Province of York, and is the junior of the two archbishops of the Church of England, after the Archbishop of Canterbury. ... In the ancient Church, an encyclical was a circular letter sent to all the churches of a particular area. ... Incense is a preparation of aromatic plant matter, often with the addition of essential oils extracted from plant or animal sources, intended to release fragrant smoke for religious, therapeutic, or aesthetic purposes as it smolders. ... The Anglican Communion is a world-wide organisation of Anglican Churches. ...


His first charge as primate on "Disputes in the Church" was felt to be a most powerful plea for a more catholic and a more charitable temper, and again and again during the closing years of his life he came back to this same theme. He was zealous also in the cause of foreign missions, and in a sermon preached at the opening of the new century he urged that a supreme obligation rested upon Britain at this epoch in the world's history to seek to evangelize all nations. In 1900 he presided over the World Temperance Congress in London, and on one occasion preached in the interests of women's education.


In 1902 he discharged the important duties of his office at the coronation of King Edward VII, but the strain at his advanced age told upon his health. During a speech which he delivered in the House of Lords on December 2, 1902 on the Education Bill of that year, he was taken ill, and, though he revived sufficiently to finish his speech, he never fully recovered, and died on December 23 1902. He was interred in Canterbury Cathedral four days later. His second son, William Temple, became Archbishop of Canterbury some years later. 1902 (MCMII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... Edward VII (Albert Edward) (9 November 1841–6 May 1910) was King of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland, King of the Commonwealth Realms, and the Emperor of India. ... This article is about the British House of Lords. ... December 2 is the 336th day (337th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1902 (MCMII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... December 23 is the 357th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (358th in leap years). ... Canterbury Cathedral, N.W., ca. ... William Temple (1881 - 1944), Archbishop of Canterbury (1942 - 1944) was the second son of Archbishop Frederick Temple (1821-1902). ...


References

  • Frederick Temple: an Appreciation (1907) E. G. Sandford, with biographical introduction by William Temple
  • Memoirs of Archbishop Temple (1906) by "Seven Friends," edited by E. G. Sandford

This article incorporates text from the 1911 Encyclop√¶dia Britannica, which is in the public domain. Notable William Temples include: William Temple, 17th century British politician, employer of Jonathan Swift William Temple, Acting Governor of Delaware (1846-1847) William Temple, Archbishop of York (1929-1942) and Archbishop of Canterbury (1942-1944) William Temple, VC, recipient of the Victoria Cross Rev. ... Supporters contend that the Eleventh Edition of the Encyclopædia Britannica (1910-1911) represents the sum of human knowledge at the beginning of the 20th century; indeed, it was advertised as such. ... The public domain comprises the body of all creative works and other knowledge—writing, artwork, music, science, inventions, and others—in which no person or organization has any proprietary interest. ...

Preceded by:
Edward White Benson
Archbishop of Canterbury Followed by:
Randall Thomas Davidson

  Results from FactBites:
 
FREDERICK TEMPLE FACTS AND INFORMATION (1279 words)
Frederick Temple (1821-1902), was one of the best-loved holders of the title of Archbishop_of_Canterbury, which he held from 1892 until his death.
Temple was born in Santa_Maura, one of the Ionian_Islands, the son of Major Octavius Temple, who was subsequently appointed lieutenant-governor of Sierra_Leone.
Temple's essay had dealt with the intellectual and spiritual growth of the race, and had pointed out the contributions made respectively by the Hebrews, the Egyptians, the Greeks, the Romans, and others.
Frederick Temple (1472 words)
Temples essay had treated of the intellectual and spiritual growth of the race, and had pointed out the contributions made respectively by the Hebrews, the Egyptians, the Greeks, the Romans, and others.
Temple refused, so long as the storm lasted, to comply with the request that he would repudiate his associates, and it was only at a much later date (1870) that he saw fit quietly to withdraw his essay.
During his archbishopric Dr Temple was deeply distressed by the divisions which were weakening the Anglican Church, and many of his most memorable sermons were calls for "Unity".
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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