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Encyclopedia > Frederick Smyth (New Hampshire)
NH Gov. Frederick Smyth (1819-1899)
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NH Gov. Frederick Smyth (1819-1899)

Frederick Smyth (March 9, 1819 - April 22, 1899) was an American banker, railroad executive, and politician from Manchester, New Hampshire. Born in 1819 in Candia, New Hampshire, he became City Clerk of Manchester at the age of 30. He served four terms as mayor of Manchester, as a Republican from 1852 - 1854. and again in 1864. March 9 is the 68th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (69th in Leap years). ... 1819 common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... April 22 is the 112th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (113th in leap years). ... 1899 (MDCCCXCIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... Nickname: Queen City Motto: Official website: www. ... 1819 common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... Candia is a town located in Rockingham County, New Hampshire. ... This is a list of Mayors of Manchester, New Hampshire. ... The Republican Party is one of the two major political parties in the United States two-party system, the other one being the Democratic Party. ...

Contents


Early life

Smyth was the third of five children born to Stephen and Dolly Rowe Smyth of Candia.


Around 1838, he and Thomas Wheat began running a country store in Candia under the name of Wheat and Smyth. The store was owned by Wheat's father. They soon left to attend Phillips Andover Academy in Andover, Massachusetts. Financial difficulties forced them to leave Phillips Academy after one term. Phillips Academy (also known as Andover and Phillips Andover) is a coed liberal arts high school, located in Andover, Massachusetts, near Boston. ... Andover is a town located in Essex County, Massachusetts. ...


Smyth moved to Manchester, New Hampshire, where he found a job working for George Porter in Porter's general store and mercantile business. After three years, Smyth was made a partner in the business.


On December 11, 1844, Smyth married Emily Lane of Candia, daughter of John Lane and Nabby Emerson. Emily Lane Smith died on January 14, 1885. Smyth's second wife was Marion Hamilton Cossar of Manchester. They were married while in Scotland. December 11 is the 345th day (346th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1844 was a leap year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... January 14 is the 14th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1885 (MDCCCLXXXV) is a common year starting on Thursday. ... Motto: Nemo me impune lacessit (English: No one provokes me with impunity) Scotlands location within Europe Scotlands location within the United Kingdom Languages English, Gaelic, Scots Capital Edinburgh Largest city Glasgow First Minister Jack McConnell Area - Total - % water Ranked 2nd UK 78,782 km² 1. ...


He continued to be a merchant until 1849, when he sold his share of the business following his election to the post of Manchester city clerk, at the age of 30.


He was reelected to that post in 1850 and 1851. In 1852, he was elected to his first term as mayor of Manchester. He was reelected in 1853 and 1854.


Many of the decisions he made as mayor remain today, including many "firsts," including overseeing the construction of the city's first highways, the first water and sewer systems, the first sidewalks, and streetlights. He is credited with the idea to plant trees along city streets to provide shade and maintain the natural beauty of the city.


In 1857 and 1858, he was a member of the state legislature, representing Manchester's Ward 3. The New Hampshire General Court is the state legislature of the U.S. state of New Hampshire. ...


He was active in the New Hampshire Agriculture Society, serving as treasurer for 10 years. He was a director in the American Agriculture Society and a vice-president of the American Pomological Society. He served as one of the commissioners on the part of the General Government of New Hampshire at the International Exhibition of 1862, in London.


When Abraham Lincoln visited the state in 1860, Smyth introduced him to a crowd as the "next president of the United States". Abraham Lincoln (February 12, 1809 – April 15, 1865), sometimes called Abe Lincoln and nicknamed Honest Abe, the Rail Splitter, and the Great Emancipator, was the 16th President of the United States (1861 to 1865), and the first president from the Republican Party. ...


As governor

He was an unsuccessful candidate for Governor of New Hampshire in 1860, but was elected in 1865, and again in 1866. See also New Hampshire Province of New Hampshire List of Colonial Governors of New Hampshire I am a doodlebug Categories: Lists of United States governors | Governors of New Hampshire ...


Smyth's terms as governor were consumed by efforts to straighten out the state's wartime finances, which were in substantial disarray because of Civil War expenditures. He borrowed $1.2 million to fund the state's war debt, and settled all state claims against the federal government on terms favorable to the state. He is credited with putting New Hampshire's credit on a sound financial footing, and "mustered out" soldiers remaining in wartime military units. Combatants Union (remaining U.S. states) Confederate States of America Commanders Abraham Lincoln† Ulysses S. Grant Jefferson Davis Robert E. Lee Strength 2,213,363 1,064,200 Casualties KIA: 110,100 Total dead: 359,500 Wounded: 275,200 KIA: 94,000 Total dead: 258,000 Wounded: 137,000+  The...


He oversaw a revision of state statutes, and was a strong supporter of passage of the Fourteenth Amendment to he United States Constitution (passed 1868), which guarantees due process and equal protection to all United States citizens. He also undertook to restore fish to certain state rivers, and he began publication of state papers. Page I of the Constitution of the United States of America The United States Constitution is the supreme law of the United States of America. ...


Founding of the University of New Hampshire

On July 7, 1866, during his second term as governor, Smyth signed a bill providing for the incorporation of the New Hampshire College of Agriculture and Mechanic Arts. Smyth had advocated legislation to create the school in his inaugural address. The bill provided that the college be established as part of Dartmouth College and that it should be governed by a nine-member board of trustees. University of New Hampshire (UNH) is a public university in the University System of New Hampshire (USNH). ... July 7 is the 188th day of the year (189th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 177 days remaining. ... 1866 (MDCCCLXVI) is a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar. ... Dartmouth College is a private academic institution in Hanover, New Hampshire, in the United States. ...


The agricultural college was originally located in Hanover, New Hampshire. In 1893, it moved to Durham, New Hampshire and became the University of New Hampshire in 1923. Dartmouth Colleges Baker Memorial Library is a prominent feature at the center of Hanover Hanover is a town located on the Connecticut River in Grafton County, New Hampshire, U.S.. As of the 2000 census, the town had a total population of 10,850. ... Old mill and dam on the Oyster River, 1908, Durham, NH Durham is a town located in Strafford County, New Hampshire, USA. As of the 2000 census, the town had a total population of 12,664. ... University of New Hampshire (UNH) is a public university in the University System of New Hampshire (USNH). ...


On July 19, 1866 the trustees appointed Smyth a trustee of the New Hampshire College of Agriculture and Mechanic Arts. He continued to serve as a trustee until October 7, 1897. At the first meeting of the board, on September 28, 1866, he was elected treasurer. He held the post until August 20, 1895 when he relinquished the post due to ill health. July 19 is the 200th day (201st in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian Calendar, with 165 days remaining. ... 1866 (MDCCCLXVI) is a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar. ... October 7 is the 280th day of the year (281st in leap years). ... 1897 (MDCCCXCVII) was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... September 28 is the 271st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (272nd in leap years). ... 1866 (MDCCCLXVI) is a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar. ... August 20 is the 232nd day of the year (233rd in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 1895 (MDCCCXCV) was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ...


On April 10, 1895, Smyth was elected president of the board. However, business commitments and declining health prevented him from ever presiding as president, even though he held the post until his term as a trustee expired in 1897. April 10 is the 100th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (101st in leap years). ... 1895 (MDCCCXCV) was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ...


The Smyth Prize

In addition to his service as a trustee, Smyth established and provided funds for the Smyth Prize for Writing, Reading and Elocution for students of the agricultural college. The Smyth Prizes were awarded from 1881 until 1904. After Smyth's death in 1899, the prize money came from provisions in his will and then was funded by his wife, Marion C. Smyth. Prizes ranged from $25 to $10. The essay and elocution competitions were open to the senior and middle class while the reading competition was only open to first-year students.


Civic involvement

Smyth served as one of the board of managers of the National Homes for Disabled Soldiers. He was a delegate-at-large to the 1872 Republican national convention, and President Hayes appointed him honorary commissioner to the 1878 International Exposition at Paris. Smyth was a principal stockholder and president of the Concord and Montreal Railroad. He was a trustee of the New England Conservatory of Music in Boston, and served as president of the New Hampshire Orphans' Home at Franklin.


He died in Manchester on April 22, 1899, at the age of 80. He is buried there at Valley Cemetery, where his family has one of the cemetery's 13 mausoleums. Nickname: Queen City Motto: Official website: www. ... April 22 is the 112th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (113th in leap years). ... 1899 (MDCCCXCIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... The Valley Cemetery (a. ...


Some sources[1] say he died at his winter home in Hamilton, Bermuda. City Hall in Hamilton. ...


Smyth's name was honored when, in 1949, Smyth's wife Marion C. Smyth founded the Smyth Trust. The trust provides scholarships to music students in the greater Manchester, New Hampshire area.


See also

List of mayors of Manchester, New Hampshire This is a list of Mayors of Manchester, New Hampshire. ...


External links

  • Smyth at New Hampshire's Division of Historic Resouces
  • University of New Hampshire page on Smyth
  • Smyth Prize winners, 1881-1904
  • The Smyth Trust
Preceded by:
Joseph A. Gilmore
Governor of New Hampshire
18651867
Succeeded by:
Walter Harriman


See also New Hampshire Province of New Hampshire List of Colonial Governors of New Hampshire Categories: Lists of United States governors | Governors of New Hampshire ... 1865 (MDCCCLXV) is a common year starting on Sunday. ... 1867 (MDCCCLXVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ...

Governors of New Hampshire New Hampshire State Flag
Weare | Langdon | Sullivan | Langdon | Sullivan | J. Bartlett | Gilman | Langdon | J. Smith | Langdon | Plumer | Gilman | Plumer | S. Bell | Woodbury | Morril | Pierce | J. Bell | Pierce | Harvey | Dinsmoor | Badger | Hill | Page | Hubbard | Steele | Colby | Williams | Dinsmoor Jr. | Martin | Baker | Metcalf | Haile | Goodwin | Berry | Gilmore | Smyth | Harriman | Stearns | Weston | Straw | Weston | Cheney | Prescott | Head | C. Bell | Hale | Currier | Sawyer | Goodell | Tuttle | J.B. Smith | Busiel | Ramsdell | Rollins | Jordan | Bachelder | McLane | Floyd | Quinby | Bass | Felker | R. Spaulding | Keyes | J.H. Bartlett | A. Brown | F. Brown | Winant | H. Spaulding | Tobey | Winant | Bridges | Murphy | Blood | Dale | Adams | H. Gregg | Dwinell | Powell | King | Peterson | Thomson | Gallen | Roy | Sununu | J. Gregg | Merrill | Shaheen | Benson | Lynch

 
 

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