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Encyclopedia > Frederick Russell Burnham
Frederick Russell Burnham
May 11, 1861(1861-05-11)September 01, 1947 (aged 86)
Image:Major frederick russell burnham dso 1904.jpg
Nickname The King of Scouts;[1] He-who-sees-in-the-dark;[2] Fred
Place of birth Tivoli, Minnesota (Sioux Indian territory; near Mankato, MN)
Place of death Santa Barbara, California, buried at Three Rivers, California
Allegiance Scout for the British Army in Southern Africa; U.S. citizen.
Years of service 1893–1897, 1900–1901
Rank Major
Commands Chief of Scouts under Lord Roberts
Battles/wars Flag of the United States Indian Wars:
Apache Wars
Cheyenne War
First Matabele War:
Shangani Patrol
Flag of the United Kingdom Second Matabele War:
— Assassination of Mlimo
Flag of the United Kingdom Second Boer War:
Battle of Paardeberg
— Driefontein (10 Mar 1900)
— Johannesburg (31 May 1900)
— March on Pretoria (2–5 Jun 1900)
Awards Distinguished Service Order
Queen's South Africa Medal
British South Africa Company Medal
Victoria Cross (declined)
Boy Scouts Silver Buffalo Award
Mount Burnham (California).
Other work messenger, Indian tracker, gold miner, wealthy oil man, American spy. Father of the international Scouting movement and a close friend of Robert Baden-Powell.

Frederick Russell Burnham, DSO (May 11, 1861September 1, 1947), was an American scout and world traveling adventurer known for his service to the British Army in colonial Africa and for teaching woodcraft to Robert Baden-Powell, thus becoming one of the inspirations for the founding of the international Scouting Movement. is the 131st day of the year (132nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1861 (MDCCCLXI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... September 1 is the 244th day of the year (245th in leap years). ... Year 1947 (MCMXLVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display full 1947 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Image File history File links Major_frederick_russell_burnham_dso_1904. ... The Sioux (pronounced ) are a Native American and First Nations people. ... Mankato is a city in the U.S. state of Minnesota. ... Nickname: Location in Santa Barbara County and the state of California Coordinates: , Country State County Santa Barbara Government  - Mayor Marty Blum Area  - Total 41. ... Three Rivers is a census-designated place located in Tulare County, California. ... Lord Roberts of Kabul and Kandahar on his Celebrated Charger (Harpers Magazine, European Edition, December 1897, p27) Field Marshal Frederick Sleigh Roberts, 1st Earl Roberts, VC, KG, KP, GCB, OM, GCSI, GCIE, PC (30 September 1832 – 14 November 1914) was a distinguished British soldier and one of the most... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... For wars involving India, see Military history of India. ... Geronimo, before surrender to General Crook, 17 Apr 1886 The Apache Wars were fought during the nineteenth century between the U.S. military and many western tribes. ... The Cheyenne War, also known as the Cheyenne Campaign, normally refers to a conflict between the United States armed forces and a small group of Cheyenne families, which took place between 1878–1879. ... Combatants United Kingdom, British South Africa Police Ndebele Commanders Cecil Rhodes, Leander Starr Jameson King Lobengula, Mjaan, chief induna Casualties fewer than 100 Over 10,000 British Artillery, ca 1900. ... A panel from the Shangani Memorial at Worlds View in Zimbabwe, c1905. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_United_Kingdom. ... Burnham & Armstrong after the assassination of Mlimo. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_United_Kingdom. ... Combatants British Empire Orange Free State South African Republic Commanders Sir Redvers Buller Lord Kitchener Lord Roberts Paul Kruger Louis Botha Koos de la Rey Martinus Steyn Christiaan de Wet Casualties 6,000 - 7,000 (A further ~14,000 from disease) 6,000 - 8,000 (Unknown number from disease) Civilians... Combatants The British Empire Boers Commanders Sir John French Colonel Kelly-Kenny Piet Cronje Strength 15,000 men 5,000 men Casualties 258 dead 1,211 wounded 86 captured 100 dead 250 wounded 4,096 captured The Battle of Paardeberg was a major battle during the Second Anglo-Boer War. ... DSO medal The Distinguished Service Order (DSO) is a military decoration of the United Kingdom, and formerly of other Commonwealth countries, awarded for meritorious or distinguished service by officers of the armed forces during wartime, typically in actual combat. ... Queens South Africa Medal ‎was awarded to military personnel who served in the Second Boer War between October 11, 1899 and May 31, 1902. ... The British South Africa Company Medal (1890-97). ... For other uses, see Victoria Cross (disambiguation). ... The Silver Buffalo Award is the highest service award of the Boy Scouts of America. ... Park service trail connecting Mt. ... Robert Stephenson Smyth Baden-Powell, 1st Baron Baden-Powell OM, GCMG, GCVO, KCB (22 February 1857 – 8 January 1941), also known as B-P, was a lieutenant-general in the British Army, writer, and founder of the Scout Movement. ... DSO medal The Distinguished Service Order (DSO) is a military decoration of the United Kingdom, and formerly of other Commonwealth countries, awarded for meritorious or distinguished service by officers of the armed forces during wartime, typically in actual combat. ... is the 131st day of the year (132nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1861 (MDCCCLXI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... is the 244th day of the year (245th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1947 (MCMXLVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display full 1947 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Mixed reconnaissance patrol of the Polish Home Army and the Soviet Red Army during Operation Tempest, 1944 Reconnaissance is the military term for the active gathering of information about an enemy, or other conditions, by physical observation. ... The British Army is the land armed forces branch of the British Armed Forces. ... Cecil Rhodes: Cape-Cairo railway project. ... It has been suggested that Firecraft be merged into this article or section. ... Robert Stephenson Smyth Baden-Powell, 1st Baron Baden-Powell OM, GCMG, GCVO, KCB (22 February 1857 – 8 January 1941), also known as B-P, was a lieutenant-general in the British Army, writer, and founder of the Scout Movement. ... This article is about the Boy Scouts and Girl Scouts/Girl Guides organizations. ...


Burnham had little formal education, attending but never graduating high school. He began his career at 14 in the American Southwest as a scout and tracker. Burnham then went to Africa where this background proved useful. He soon became an officer in the British Army, serving in several battles there. During this time, Burnham became friends with Baden-Powell, and passed on to him both his outdoor skills and his spirit for what would later become known as Scouting. The Southwest region of the United States is drier than the adjoining Midwest in weather; the population is less dense and, with strong Spanish-American and Native American components, more ethnically varied than neighboring areas. ...


Burnham eventually moved on to become involved in espionage, oil, conservation, writing and business. His descendants are still active in Scouting. Spy and Secret agent redirect here. ...

Contents

Early life

Burnham was born to a missionary family on an Indian Reservation in Tivoli, Minnesota. As a toddler, he witnessed the burning of New Ulm, Minnesota, by Taoyateduta (Little Crow) and his Sioux warriors in the Dakota War of 1862. During the uprising, his mother, Rebecca (Elizabeth) Russell Burnham, hid the not quite two-year-old boy in a basket of green corn husks and fled for her life. Once the Sioux had been driven away the mother returned to find the house burned down. Her young son was safe, fast asleep in the basket and protected only by the corn husks.[1][3] For other uses, see Missionary (disambiguation). ... Capital Saint Paul Largest city Minneapolis Area  Ranked 12th  - Total 87,014 sq mi (225,365 km²)  - Width 250 miles (400 km)  - Length 400 miles (645 km)  - % water 8. ... Parking meter checker stands by his police vehicle which is imprinted with the German word for police (Polizei). ... Taoyateduta, known as Little Crow Taoyateduta (1810?–July 3, 1863) was a chief of the Mdewakanton Sioux tribe. ... The Sioux (pronounced ) are a Native American and First Nations people. ... Chief Taoyateduta, known as Chief Little Crow Settlers escaping the violence. ...


The young Burnham attended schools in Iowa and there he met Blanche Blick, who would later become his wife. His family moved to Los Angeles, California, in 1870. Two years later his father, the Rev. Edwin Otway Burnham of Kentucky, himself a long time pioneer and missionary along the border of the Sioux Indian reserve in Minnesota, died when Burnham was only 11. While the rest of the family returned to Iowa, the young Burnham stayed in California to make his own way.[4] Los Angeles and L.A. redirect here. ... Rev Edwin Otway Burnham (September 24, 1824 – August 1, 1873), born in Ghent, Kentucky. ...


For the next three years, Burnham worked as a mounted messenger for the Western Union Telegraph Company in California and Arizona. On one occasion his horse was stolen from him by Tiburcio Vasquez, a famous Californio bandit.[5] At 14, he began his life as a scout and Indian tracker in the Apache Wars. He traveled in northern Mexico and the American Southwest, including Texas and Oklahoma, earning a living as a buffalo hunter, cowboy, and prospector, and he continued working as a scout while tracking Indians in the Cheyenne War. The young Burnham eventually went on to attend high school in California but never graduated.[4] Western Union is an American financial services and communications company. ... Official language(s) English Spoken language(s) English 74. ... Tiburcio Vasquez Tiburcio Vasquez (August 11, 1839–March 19, 1875) was a Mexican bandit who was active in California from as early as 1857 to his last capture in 1874. ... Languages Spanish Religions Predominantly Roman Catholic Related ethnic groups Mediterranean Amerindian Mestizo The Californios were Spanish-speaking inhabitants of Alta California, first a part of New Spain, later of Mexico. ... For other senses of this word, see outlaw (disambiguation). ... Geronimo, before surrender to General Crook, 17 Apr 1886 The Apache Wars were fought during the nineteenth century between the U.S. military and many western tribes. ... For other uses, see Texas (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Oklahoma (disambiguation). ... The Cheyenne War, also known as the Cheyenne Campaign, normally refers to a conflict between the United States armed forces and a small group of Cheyenne families, which took place between 1878–1879. ...


In 1882, Burnham returned to Arizona and was appointed Deputy Sheriff of Pinal County, but he soon went back to cattle and mining interests. He joined the losing side of the Tonto Basin Feud before mass killing started, and only narrowly escaped death in Arizona.[3][6] He returned to Prescott, Iowa, to visit his childhood sweetheart, Blanche, and the two were married on February 6, 1884.[4] That same year, he and Blanche settled down to tend to an orange grove in Pasadena, California, but within a year he was back prospecting and scouting. Pinal County is located in the central part of the U.S. state of Arizona. ... The Pleasant Valley War (also sometimes called the Tonto Basin War) was an 1886 Arizona range war between two feuding families, the cattle-herding Grahams and the sheep-herding Tewksburys. ... Prescott is a city located in Adams County, Iowa. ... is the 37th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1884 (MDCCCLXXXIV) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Sunday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Pasadena is a city in Los Angeles County, California, United States. ...


In the 1880s the American press had been popularizing the notion that the West had been won and there was nothing left to conquer in the United States. This idea changed Burnham's life. Ever the soldier of fortune, he began to look elsewhere for the next undeveloped frontier. When he heard of the work of Cecil Rhodes and his pioneers in building the Cape to Cairo railway in Africa, Burnham sold what little he owned and, in 1893, set sail to Cape Town, South Africa, with his wife and young son. He soon joined the British South Africa Company as a scout and headed north. Burnham became well known in Africa for his ability to track, even at night, and the Africans dubbed him He-who-sees-in-the-dark.[2] Cecil Rhodes Cecil John Rhodes, PC, DCL, (July 5, 1853 – March 26, 1902[1]) was a British-born South African businessman, mining magnate, and politician. ... Rhodes: Cape to Cairo The Cape-Cairo Railway is an uncompleted project to cross Africa from south to north by rail. ... Cape Town and the Cape of Good Hope Cape Town (Afrikaans, Dutch: Kaapstad; Xhosa: eKapa or SaseKapa), is one of South Africas three capital cities serving as the legislative capital (executive capital and Bloemfontein the judicial capital). ... The flag of the British South Africa Company The British South Africa Company (BSAC) was established by Cecil Rhodes through the amalgamation of the Central Search Association and the Exploring Company, Ltd. ...


Military career

Burnham in Africa (middle) holding his Remington Model 1875 No. 3 Army in .44WCF rifle
Burnham in Africa (middle) holding his Remington Model 1875 No. 3 Army in .44WCF rifle

Image File history File links Burnham_in_africa_close_up. ... Image File history File links Burnham_in_africa_close_up. ...

First Matabele War

For more details on this topic, see First Matabele War.

Burnham’s first major test in Africa came in 1893 when the British South Africa Company went to war with the Matabele King Lobengula. Jameson had hoped to defeat the Matabele quickly by capturing Lobengula at his royal city of Bulawayo. Burnham and a small group of scouts were sent ahead to report on the situation in Bulawayo. While on the outskirts of town they watched as the Matabele burned down and destroyed everything in sight. By the time the white troops had arrived in force, Lobengula and his warriors had fled and there was little left of old Bulawayo.[7] Combatants United Kingdom, British South Africa Police Ndebele Commanders Cecil Rhodes, Leander Starr Jameson King Lobengula, Mjaan, chief induna Casualties fewer than 100 Over 10,000 British Artillery, ca 1900. ... The Matabele are a branch of the Zulus who split from King Shaka in the early 1820s under the leadership of Mzilikazi, a former general in Shakas army. ... Lobengula (d. ... Sir Leander Starr Jameson, 1st Baronet, KCMG (February 9, 1853 – November 26, 1917), also known as Doctor Jim or The Doctor, was a British colonial statesman who was best known for his involvement in the Jameson Raid. ... The City of Bulawayo is highlighted in this map of Zimbabwe. ...


Shangani Patrol

After he found that Bulawayo had been abandoned, Jameson dispatched a column of soldiers to locate and capture Lobengula. The column, led by Maj. Patrick Forbes, camped on the south bank of the Shangani River about 25 miles (40 km) north-east of the village of Lupane on the evening of 3 December 1893. The next day, late in the afternoon, a dozen men under the command of Maj. Allan Wilson were sent across the river to patrol the area. The Wilson Patrol came across a group of Matabele women and children who claimed to know Lobengula’s whereabouts. Burnham, who served as the lead scout of the Wilson patrol, sensed a trap and advised Wilson to withdraw, but Wilson ordered his patrol to advance.[8] For other persons named Patrick Forbes, see Patrick Forbes (disambiguation). ... is the 337th day of the year (338th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1893 (MDCCCXCIII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... For other persons of the same name, see Alan Wilson (disambiguation). ...


Soon afterwards, the patrol found the king and Wilson sent a message back to the laager requesting reinforcements. Forbes, however, was unwilling to set off across the river in the dark, so he sent only 20 more men, under the command of Henry Borrow, to reinforce Wilson’s patrol. Forbes intended to send the main body of troops and artillery across the river the following morning; however, the main column was ambushed by Matabele warriors and delayed. Wilson’s patrol too came under attack, but the Shangani River had swollen and there was now no possibility of retreat. In desperation, Wilson sent Burnham and two other scouts, Pearl “Pete” Ingram (a Montana cowboy) and George Gooding (an Australian), to cross the Shangani River, find Forbes, and bring reinforcements. In spite of a shower of bullets and spears, the three made it to Forbes, but the battle raging there was just as intense as the one they had left, and there was no hope of anyone reaching Wilson in time. As Burnham loaded his rifle to beat back the Matabele warriors, he quietly said to Forbes, "I think I may say that we are the sole survivors of that party." Wilson, Borrow, and their men were indeed surrounded by hundreds of Matabele warriors; escape was impossible, and all were killed.[8][9] This article is about the U.S. State. ...


Rhodesian colonial histories called this the Shangani Patrol, and hailed Wilson and Borrow as national heroes.[10] For his service in the war, Burnham was presented the British South Africa Company Medal, a gold watch, and a share of a 300 acre (120 ha) tract of land in Matabeleland. It was here that Burnham uncovered many artifacts in the huge granite ruins of the ancient civilization of Great Zimbabwe.[1] This article is about the break-away colony of (Southern) Rhodesia , today Zimbabwe. ... A panel from the Shangani Memorial at Worlds View in Zimbabwe, c1905. ... The British South Africa Company Medal (1890-97). ... Matabeleland is a region in the west and south-west of Zimbabwe, between the Limpopo and Zambezi rivers. ... Great Zimbabwe is the name given to the remains of stone, sometimes referred to as the Great Zimbabwe Ruins, of an ancient Southern African city, located at in present-day Zimbabwe which was once the centre of a vast empire known as the Munhumutapa Empire (also called Monomotapa or Mwene...


Second Matabele War

Burnham & Armstrong after the assassination of Mlimo. Matabele warriors in hot pursuit.
Burnham & Armstrong after the assassination of Mlimo. Matabele warriors in hot pursuit.
For more details on this topic, see Second Matabele War.

In March 1896, the Matabele again revolted against the authority of the British South Africa Company in what is now celebrated in Zimbabwe as the First War of Independence. Mlimo, the Matabele spiritual leader, is credited with fomenting much of the anger that led to this confrontation. Matabeleland defenses were in disarray due to the ill-fated Jameson Raid, and the first few months of the war alone hundreds of white settlers were killed. With few troops to support them, the settlers quickly built a laager in the centre of Bulawayo on their own and mounted patrols under such figures as Burnham, Baden-Powell, and Selous. An estimated 50,000 Matabele retreated into their stronghold of the Matobo Hills near Bulawayo, a region that became the scene of the fiercest fighting against the white settler patrols.[11] Image File history File links Size of this preview: 462 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (900 × 1167 pixel, file size: 119 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 462 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (900 × 1167 pixel, file size: 119 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. ... Burnham & Armstrong after the assassination of Mlimo. ... The Jameson Raid (December 29, 1895 - January 2, 1896) was a raid on Paul Krugers Transvaal Republic carried out by Sir Leander Starr Jameson and his Rhodesian and Bechuanaland policemen over the New Year weekend of 1895-96. ... Robert Stephenson Smyth Baden-Powell, 1st Baron Baden-Powell OM, GCMG, GCVO, KCB (22 February 1857 – 8 January 1941), also known as B-P, was a lieutenant-general in the British Army, writer, and founder of the Scout Movement. ... Frederick Courteney Selous on safari in Africa. ... Matobo landscape. ...


Assassination of Mlimo

The turning point in the war came when Burnham and a young scout named Bonar Armstrong found their way through Matobo Hills to the sacred cave where Mlimo had been hiding. Not far from the cave was a village of about 100 huts filled with many warriors. The two scouts tethered their horses to a thicket and crawled on their bellies, screening their slow, cautious movements by means of branches held before them. Once inside the cave, they waited until Mlimo entered.[12] Mlimo was said to be about 60 years old, with very dark skin, sharp-featured; American news reports of the time described him as having a cruel, crafty look. Burnham and Armstrong waited until Mlimo entered the cave and started his dance of immunity, at which point Burnham shot Mlimo just below the heart.[12]


The two scouts then leapt over the dead Mlimo and ran down a trail toward their horses. Hundreds of warriors, encamped nearby, picked up their arms and searched for the attackers. To distract the Matabele, Burnham set fire to the village. The two white men got on their horses and rode back to Bulawayo. Shortly after learning of the assassination of Mlimo, Cecil Rhodes boldly walked unarmed into the Ndebele stronghold in Matobo Hills and persuaded the impi to lay down their arms, thus ending the Second Matabele War.[13][14] An Impi is an isiZulu word for any armed body of men. ...


Klondike Gold Rush

With the Matabele war over, Burnham decided it was time to leave Africa and move on to other adventures. The family returned to California where Burnham left his wife and young son Bruce with his mother. Soon after, he and his eldest son Roderick, then 12 years old, traveled to Alaska and the Yukon to prospect in the Klondike Gold Rush.[3] Upon hearing of the Spanish-American War, Burnham rushed home to volunteer his services, but before he could get to the fighting the war was already over. Burnham then returned to the Klondike. Colonel Theodore Roosevelt regretted this as much as Burnham and paid him a great tribute in his book.[4] For other uses, see Alaska (disambiguation). ... This article is about Yukon Territory in Canada. ... A typical gold mining operation, on Bonanza Creek. ... Combatants United States Republic of Cuba Philippine Republic Kingdom of Spain Commanders Nelson A. Miles William R. Shafter George Dewey Máximo Gómez Emilio Aguinaldo Patricio Montojo Pascual Cervera Arsenio Linares Ramón Blanco Casualties 3,289 U.S. dead (432 from combat); considerably higher although undetermined Cuban and... Theodore Roosevelt, Jr. ...


Second Boer War

Burnham 1902
Burnham 1902
For more details on this topic, see Second Boer War.

In January 1900, while prospecting in Skagway, Alaska, Burnham received the following telegram: Lord Roberts appoints you on his personal staff as Chief of Scouts. If you accept, come at once the quickest way possible. Although Cape Town is at the opposite end of the globe from the Klondike, he left within the hour.[15] He would arrive at the front just before the Battle of Paardeberg. During the war, Burnham spent much time behind the Boer lines gathering information and blowing up railway bridges and tracks. He was twice captured and twice escaped, but he was also disabled for a time by his near-fatal wounds. Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (747x1024, 108 KB) TITLE: Major F.R. Burnham CALL NUMBER: LC-B2- 1148-2[P&P] REPRODUCTION NUMBER: LC-DIG-ggbain-05789 (digital file from original neg. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (747x1024, 108 KB) TITLE: Major F.R. Burnham CALL NUMBER: LC-B2- 1148-2[P&P] REPRODUCTION NUMBER: LC-DIG-ggbain-05789 (digital file from original neg. ... Combatants British Empire Orange Free State South African Republic Commanders Sir Redvers Buller Lord Kitchener Lord Roberts Paul Kruger Louis Botha Koos de la Rey Martinus Steyn Christiaan de Wet Casualties 6,000 - 7,000 (A further ~14,000 from disease) 6,000 - 8,000 (Unknown number from disease) Civilians... Broadway Avenue, Skagway, May 2007. ... Lord Roberts of Kabul and Kandahar on his Celebrated Charger (Harpers Magazine, European Edition, December 1897, p27) Field Marshal Frederick Sleigh Roberts, 1st Earl Roberts, VC, KG, KP, GCB, OM, GCSI, GCIE, PC (30 September 1832 – 14 November 1914) was a distinguished British soldier and one of the most... Combatants The British Empire Boers Commanders Sir John French Colonel Kelly-Kenny Piet Cronje Strength 15,000 men 5,000 men Casualties 258 dead 1,211 wounded 86 captured 100 dead 250 wounded 4,096 captured The Battle of Paardeberg was a major battle during the Second Anglo-Boer War. ...


In a step that was unusual for a foreigner, Burnham was given a commission by Lord Roberts and the rank of captain.[15] Burnham was first captured while trying to warn a British column approaching Thaba' Nchu.[16][17] He came upon a group of Boers hiding on the banks of the river, toward which the British were even then advancing. Cut off from his own side, Burnham chose to signal the approaching soldiers even though it would expose him to capture. With a red kerchief, Burnham signaled the soldiers to turn back, but the column paid no attention and plodded steadily on into the ambush, while Burnham was at once taken prisoner. In the fight that followed, Burnham pretended to receive a wound in the knee. Limping heavily and groaning with pain, he was placed in a wagon with the officers who really were wounded, and who, in consequence, were not closely guarded. Later that evening, Burnham slipped over the driver's seat, dropped between the two wheels of the wagon, lowered himself and fell between the legs of the oxen on his back in the road. In an instant the wagon had passed over him safely, and while the dust still hung above the trail he rolled rapidly over into the ditch at the side of the road and lay motionless. It was four days before he was able to re-enter the British lines, during which time he had been lying in the open veldt. He had subsisted on one biscuit and two handfuls of "mealies" (i.e., maize).[3][18] Thaba Nchu is a black largely Tswana dominated town just 60km east of Bloemfontein. ... This article is about the maize plant. ...


On June 2, 1900, while trying by night to blow up the bridge on the Pretoria-Delagoa Bay railway line at Bronkhorstspruit, 20 miles (32 km) east of Pretoria and a vital link to the sea, Burnham was surrounded by a party of Boers and could save himself only by instant flight. He had all but gotten away when a bullet caught his horse; it crashed to the ground dead, crushing Burnham beneath it and knocking him senseless. He continued in a dazed state for nearly a day and when he came to he found that both friends and foes had departed. Although still suffering the most acute agony, Burnham heroically crept back to the railroad, placed his charges, and blew up the line in two places. Knowing the explosion would soon bring the Boers, he crept on his hands and knees to an empty kraal and lay there for two days and nights insensible. Upon hearing the sound of distant firing, Burnham crawled toward the fighting. By then he was indifferent as to whether the gunshots were coming from the enemy or from his own people, but, as it chanced, he was picked up by a friendly patrol and carried to Pretoria. The surgeons discovered that in his fall Burnham had torn apart the muscles of the stomach and burst a blood-vessel. His survival, the doctors assured him, was due only to the fact that he had been without food for three days. is the 153rd day of the year (154th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Äž: For the film, see: 1900 (film). ... Maputo Bay, formerly Delagoa Bay (Port. ... Bronkhorstspruit is a small farming town 50km east of Pretoria, Gauteng, South Africa along the N4 highway towards Witbank. ... Motto: Praestantia Praevaleat Pretoria (May Pretoria Be Pre-eminent In Excellence) Country South Africa Province Gauteng Established 1855 Area  - City 1,644 km²  (634. ... A South African cattle kraal (Photo by Richard Jones) Kraal (also spelt craal or kraul) is an Afrikaans and South African English word for an enclosure for cattle or other livestock, located within an African homestead or village surrounded by a palisade, mud wall, or other fencing, roughly circular in...

Burnham and a young Churchill returning from the Boer War on the Dunottar Castle, July 1900.
Burnham and a young Churchill returning from the Boer War on the Dunottar Castle, July 1900.[19]

Burnham's injuries were so serious that he was ordered to England by Lord Roberts. Two days before leaving for London, he was promoted to the rank of major.[3][20][21] On his arrival in England, Burnham was commanded to dine with Queen Victoria and to spend the night at Osborne House.[22] A few months later, after the Queen's death, King Edward VII personally presented Burnham with the Queen's South Africa Medal with four bars for the battles at Driefontein (Mar 10, 1900), Johannesburg (May 31, 1900), Paardeberg (February 17–26, 1900), and Cape Colony (October 11, 1899May 31, 1902), in addition to the cross of the Distinguished Service Order,[21][23] the second highest decoration in the British Army, for his heroism during the "victorious" March to Pretoria (2-5 June 1900). Burnham had been selected for the Victoria Cross, Britain’s highest military award, but he declined rather than forfeit his American citizenship – a requirement at the time. Nevertheless, Burnham received the highest awards of any American who served in the Second Boer War.[15] Image File history File links Burnham_churchill_jul1900. ... Image File history File links Burnham_churchill_jul1900. ... Churchill redirects here. ... The RMS Dunottar Castle was built at Govan Shipyards in 1889 by the Fairfield Ship Building & Engineering Co. ... Victoria Queen of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland, Empress of India Victoria (Alexandrina Victoria) (24 May 1819–22 January 1901) was a Queen of the United Kingdom, reigning from 20 June 1837 until her death. ... Osborne House and its grounds are now open to the public Osborne House is a former royal residence in East Cowes, Isle of Wight, England. ... Edward VII King of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland, Emperor of India His Majesty King Edward VII (9 November 1841–6 May 1910) was King of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland, King of the Commonwealth realms, and the Emperor of India. ... Queens South Africa Medal ‎was awarded to military personnel who served in the Second Boer War between October 11, 1899 and May 31, 1902. ... March 10 is the 69th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (70th in leap years). ... Äž: For the film, see: 1900 (film). ... is the 151st day of the year (152nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Äž: For the film, see: 1900 (film). ... Äž: For the film, see: 1900 (film). ... is the 284th day of the year (285th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1899 (MDCCCXCIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Friday [1] of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... is the 151st day of the year (152nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1902 (MCMII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Tuesday [1] of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... DSO medal The Distinguished Service Order (DSO) is a military decoration of the United Kingdom, and formerly of other Commonwealth countries, awarded for meritorious or distinguished service by officers of the armed forces during wartime, typically in actual combat. ... For other uses, see Victoria Cross (disambiguation). ...


Burnham's most accomplished soldiers during the Second Boer War were Lovat Scouts, a Scottish Highland regiment, whom he described as "half wolf and half jackrabbit."[24] These scouts were well practiced in the arts of marksmanship, field craft, and tactics. After the war, this regiment went on to become the British army's first sniper unit.[24] The Lovat Scouts was a yeomanry regiment of the Territorial Army, now a platoon of the 51st Highland Regiment. ... Shooting is the act of causing a gun to fire at a target. ... Field craft is a term used especially in British military circles to describe the basic military skills required to operate stealthily at day or night regardless of weather or terrain. ... Military tactics (Greek: Taktikē, the art of organizing an army) are the collective name for methods for engaging and defeating an enemy in battle. ... For other uses, see Sniper (disambiguation). ...


"Father of Scouting"

Commemorative coin issued by the BSA in 2007 in celbration of 100 years of Scouting.
Burnham (standing) & Baden-Powell (right) at a Boy Scout event, ca. 1910
Burnham (standing) & Baden-Powell (right) at a Boy Scout event, ca. 1910

Burnham was already a celebrated scout when he first befriended Baden-Powell during the Second Matabele War. Himself a brilliant outdoorsman, Baden-Powell was a distinguished cavalry officer, and reportedly the finest pig sticker in India — meaning he was adept at killing a sprinting wild boar with one lance thrust from the back of a galloping horse. During the siege of Bulawayo, the two men rode many times into the Matobo Hills on patrol, and it was in these African hills that Burnham first introduced Baden-Powell to the ways and methods of the indigenous peoples of the Americas, and taught him woodcraft (better known today as scoutcraft).[25] So impressed was Baden-Powell by Burnham's Scouting spirit that he fondly told people he "sucked him dry" of all he could possibly tell.[26] It was here that Baden-Powell began to wear his signature Stetson campaign hat and kerchief for the first time.[27] Both men recognized that wars were changing markedly and the British Army needed to adapt; so during their joint scouting missions, Baden-Powell and Burnham discussed the concept of a broad training program in woodcraft for young men, rich in exploration, tracking, field craft, and self-reliance. In Africa, no scout embodied these traits more than Burnham.[28] While Baden-Powell went on to refine the concept of Scouting and become the founder of the international Scouting movement, Burnham has been called the movement's father.[29] Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Pigsticking, boar-hunting, or hog-hunting is a form of hunting in which wild boars are pursued on horseback and killed with spears. ... Native Americans redirects here. ... It has been suggested that Firecraft be merged into this article or section. ... The Stetson Cavalry Hat For the university, see Stetson University. ... A USMC drill instructor wearing a campaign hat A Canadian Mountie wearing the familiar Stetson and Red Serge tunic at Expo 67 in Montreal. ... Explorer redirects here. ... Tracking is a Scouting which involves activity laying a trail or following a trail laid by others. ... Field craft is a term used especially in British military circles to describe the basic military skills required to operate stealthily at day or night regardless of weather or terrain. ...

Frederick Russell Burnham: Explorer, discoverer, cowboy, and Scout. Native American, he served as chief of scouts in the Boer War, an intimate friend of Lord Baden-Powell. It was on some of his exploits demanding great courage, alertness, skill in surmounting the perils of the out-of-doors, that the founder of Scouting based some of the activities of the Boy Scout program. As an honorary Scout of the Boy Scouts of America, he has served as an inspiration to the youth of the Nation and is the embodiment of the qualities of the ideal Scout.
— 27th Annual Report of the Boy Scouts of America (1936).[30]

Burnham later became close friends with others involved in the Scouting movement in the United States, such as Theodore Roosevelt, the Chief Scout Citizen, and Gifford Pinchot, the Chief Scout Forester.[31] The Boy Scouts of America (BSA) made Burnham an Honorary Scout in 1927,[32] and for his noteworthy and extraordinary service to the Scouting movement, Burnham was bestowed the highest commendation given by the Boy Scouts of America, the Silver Buffalo Award, in 1936.[33] Throughout his life he remained active in Scouting at both the regional and the national level in the United States and he corresponded regularly with Baden-Powell on Scouting topics. For the Boy Scouting program within the BSA, see Boy Scouting (Boy Scouts of America). ... Theodore Roosevelt, Jr. ... Gifford Pinchot (August 11, 1865 – October 4, 1946) was the first Chief of the United States Forest Service (1905–1910) and the Republican Governor of Pennsylvania (1923–1927, 1931–1935). ... For the Boy Scouting program within the BSA, see Boy Scouting (Boy Scouts of America). ... The Silver Buffalo Award is the highest service award of the Boy Scouts of America. ...

Park service trail connecting Mt. Burnham to Mt. Baden-Powell
Park service trail connecting Mt. Burnham to Mt. Baden-Powell

The low-key Burnham and Baden-Powell remained close friends for their long lives. Much of their correspondence was burned by the jealous Olave Baden-Powell in 1958, but the seal on the Burnham - Baden-Powell letters at Yale and Stanford expired in 2000 and the true depth of their friendship and love of Scouting has again been revealed.[34] In 1931, Burnham read the speech dedicating Mount Baden-Powell in California,[35][36] to his old Scouting friend.[37] Their friendship, and equal status in the world of Scouting and conservation, is honored with the dedication of the adjoining peak, Mount Burnham,[38][39] in his honor. Image File history File links Scout_trail_usgs. ... Image File history File links Scout_trail_usgs. ... content. ... YALE (Yet Another Learning Environment) is an environment for machine learning experiments and data mining. ... Stanford redirects here. ... Mount Baden-Powell is a peak in the San Gabriel Mountains of California named for the famous English Lord Robert Baden-Powell, founder of the World Scouting Movement. ... Park service trail connecting Mt. ...


Burnham's descendants followed in his footsteps and are active in Scouting and in the military. His son Roderick enlisted in the U.S. Army and fought in World War I France. His grandson, Frederick Russell Burnham II, was a leader in the BSA and a Vietnam war veteran. His great-grandson, Russell Adam Burnham is an Eagle Scout and was United States Army's Soldier of the Year in 2003.[40][41] “The Great War ” redirects here. ... Combatants Republic of Vietnam United States Republic of Korea Thailand Australia New Zealand The Philippines National Front for the Liberation of South Vietnam Democratic Republic of Vietnam People’s Republic of China Democratic Peoples Republic of Korea Strength US 1,000,000 South Korea 300,000 Australia 48,000... Spc. ... An Eagle Scout is a Scout with the highest rank attainable in the Boy Scouting program of the Boy Scouts of America (BSA). ... The United States Army is the largest and oldest branch of the armed forces of the United States. ...


Later in life

Fred and Rod Burnham ca. 1930
Fred and Rod Burnham ca. 1930

Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 573 pixelsFull resolution (4189 × 2998 pixel, file size: 1. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 573 pixelsFull resolution (4189 × 2998 pixel, file size: 1. ...

Post war

After recovering from his wounds, Burnham served as the London office manager for the Wa Syndicate. In 1901, while still employed by the Wa Syndicate, he left London to lead an expedition through Ghana and Upper Volta to look for minerals and ways to improve river navigation in the region.[42] From 1902–1904, Burnham was employed by the East Africa Syndicate. He led a mineral prospecting expedition which traveled extensively in the area around lake Rudolph (now Lake Turkana), and he discovered a lake of carbonate of soda in Tanzania.[22][43] Wa is the capital of the Upper West Region of Ghana and is the main city of the Wala people. ... Map showing the Volta river in Upper Volta Upper Volta (French: ) was the name of the African country now called Burkina Faso. ... The East Africa Protectorate was a British dependency extending from the Indian Ocean inland to Uganda. ... View over Lake Turkana Lake Turkana, formerly known as Lake Rudolf, is a lake in the Great Rift Valley in Kenya (although the far northern end of the lake crosses into Ethiopia), which covers a surface area of 6405 km² (2473 mi²), making it the worlds largest permanent desert...


Yaqui

Burnham returned to North America and for the next few years became associated with the Yaqui River irrigation project in Mexico. While investigating the Yaqui valley for mineral and agricultural resources, Burnham reasoned that a dam could provide year-round water to rich alluvial soil in the valley; turning the region into one of the garden spots of the world and generate much needed electricity. He purchased water rights and some 300 acres of land in this region and contacted an old friend from Africa, John Hays Hammond, who conducted his own studies and then purchased an additional 900,000 acres of this land -- an area the size of Rhode Island. Burnham, in 1908, made important archeological discoveries of Mayan civilization in this region, including the Esperanza Stone.[44][45] He became a close business associate of Hammond and led a team of 500 men in guarding mining properties owned by Hammond, J.P. Morgan, and the Guggenheims in the Mexican state of Sonora.[46] Just as the irrigation and mining projects were nearing completion in 1912, a long series of Mexican revolutions began. The final blow to these efforts came in 1917 when Mexico passed laws prohibiting the sale of land to foreigners. Burnham and Hammond carried their properties until 1930 and then sold them to the Mexican government.[47] Alluvium is soil land deposited by a river or other running water. ... John Hays Hammond (31 March 1855 in San Francisco – 8 June 1936) was an American mining engineer, and father of John Hays Hammond, Jr. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... The United Mexican States (Estados Unidos Mexicanos or Mexico) comprises 31 states (estados) and one federal district (Distrito Federal), which contains the capital, Mexico City. ... Sonora is a state in northwestern Mexico, bordering the states of Chihuahua to the east, Sinaloa to the south, and Baja California to the northwest. ...


Espionage

To my friendly enemy, Major Frederick Russell Burnham, the greatest scout of the world, whose eyes were that of an Empire. I once craved the honour of killing him, but failing that, I extend my heartiest admiration.
Fritz Joubert Duquesne, 1933, One warrior to another.[36]

During World War I, Burnham was living in California and was active in counterespionage for Britain.[48] Much of it involved a famous Boer spy, Capt. Fritz Joubert Duquesne, who became a German spy in both World Wars and claimed to have killed Field Marshal Kitchener while en route to meet with the Russians.[49] During the Second Boer War, Burnham and Duquense were each under orders to assassinate the other, but it was not until 1910 that the two men first met while both were in Washington, D.C., separately lobbying Congress to pass a bill in favor of the importation of African game animals into the United States (H.R. 23621).[36] Duquesne was twice arrested by the FBI and in 1942 he, along with the 32 other Nazi agents who made up the Duquesne Spy Ring, was sent to prison for espionage in the largest spy ring conviction in U.S. history.[50] Frederick “Fritz” Joubert Duquesne (sometimes spelt Du Quesne pronounced in English as “Doo-Cain’’) (born Cape Colony 21 September 1877, died New York City 24 May 1956) was a South African Boer soldier, prisoner of war, big game hunter, journalist, war correspondent, Anglophobe, stockbroker, saboteur, spy, and adventurer whose hatred... “The Great War ” redirects here. ... Espionage operations intended to identify enemy spies. ... Frederick “Fritz” Joubert Duquesne (sometimes spelt Du Quesne pronounced in English as “Doo-Cain’’) (born Cape Colony 21 September 1877, died New York City 24 May 1956) was a South African Boer soldier, prisoner of war, big game hunter, journalist, war correspondent, Anglophobe, stockbroker, saboteur, spy, and adventurer whose hatred... Field Marshal Horatio Herbert Kitchener, 1st Earl Kitchener, KG, KP, GCB, OM, GCSI, GCMG, GCIE, ADC, PC (24 June 1850 – 5 June 1916) was an Anglo-Irish British Field Marshal, diplomat and statesman popularly referred to as Lord Kitchener. ... The Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) is a federal criminal investigative, intelligence agency, and the primary investigative arm of the United States Department of Justice (DOJ). ... The 33 convicted members of the Duquesne spy ring (FBI print) The Duquesne Spy Ring is the largest espionage case in United States history that ended in convictions. ...

I know Burnham. He is a scout and a hunter of courage and ability, a man totally without fear, a sure shot, and a fighter. He is the ideal scout, and when enlisted in the military service of any country he is bound to be of the greatest benefit.
President Theodore Roosevelt, 1901. [1]

During this period, Burnham was one of the eighteen officers selected by former U.S. president Theodore Roosevelt to raise a volunteer infantry division for service in France in 1917 shortly after the United States entered the war.[51] A plan to raise volunteer soldiers from the Western U.S. came out of a meeting of the New York based Rocky Mountain Club and Burnham was put in charge of both the general organization and recruitment from the Southwest.[52] Congress gave Roosevelt the authority to raise up to four divisions similar to the Rough Riders of 1st United States Volunteer Cavalry Regiment and to the British Army 25th (Frontiersmen) Battalion, Royal Fusiliers; however, as Commander-in-chief, President Woodrow Wilson refused to make use of Roosevelt's volunteers and the unit disbanded.[53][54] Theodore Roosevelt, Jr. ... Theodore Roosevelt, Jr. ... Roosevelt and the Rough Riders atop San Juan Heights, 1898 The Rough Riders was the name bestowed by the American press on the 1st U.S. ... The 25th (Frontiersmen) Service Battalion, Royal Fusiliers (City of London Regiment) was a British Army unit that served during World War I. It was raised by the Legion of Frontiersmen. ... Commander-in-Chief (in NATO-lingo often C-in-C or CINC pronounced sink) is the commander of all the military forces within a particular region or of all the military forces of a state. ... Thomas Woodrow Wilson (December 28, 1856–February 3, 1924), was the twenty-eighth President of the United States. ...


Oil wealth

Although Burnham had lived all over the world, he never had a great deal of wealth to show for his efforts. Ironically, it was not until he returned to California, the place of his youth, that he struck it rich. In 1923, Burnham struck oil at Dominguez Hill, California. In the first 10 years of operation, the Burnham Exploration Company paid out $10.2 million in dividends.[47]


Conservation

An avid conservationist and hunter, Burnham supported the early conservation programs of his friends Theodore Roosevelt and Gifford Pinchot. He and his associate John Hayes Hammond led novel game expeditions to Africa with the goal of finding large animals such as Giant Eland, hippopotamus, zebra, and various bird species that might be bred in the United States and become game for future American sportsmen. Burnham, Hammond, and Duquesne appeared several times before the Committee on Agriculture to ask for help in importing large African animals.[55][56] In 1914, he help establish the Wild Life Protective League of American, Department of Southern California, and served as its first Secretary.[57] Conservationists are those people who tend to more highly rank the wise use of the Earths resources and ecosystems. ... Hunting is, in its most general sense, the pursuit of a target. ... A Giant Eland Binomial name Taurotragus derbianus Gray, 1847 The Giant Eland (Taurotragus derbianus also known as the Derby Eland) is an open forest savannah antelope. ... Binomial name Linnaeus, 1758[2] Range map[1] The hippopotamus (Hippopotamus amphibius), from the Greek ‘ιπποπόταμος (hippopotamos, hippos meaning horse and potamos meaning river), often shortened to hippo, is a large, mostly plant-eating African mammal, one of only two extant species in the family Hippopotamidae (the other being the Pygmy... For other uses, see Zebra (disambiguation). ...


In his later years, Burnham filled various public offices and also served as a member of the Boone and Crockett Club of New York,[58][59] and as a founding member of the American Committee for International Wildlife Protection (now a committee of the World Conservation Union).[60] He was a founding member of the Save-the-Redwoods League, he helped lobby for and create the Cabeza Prieta National Wildlife Refuge and the Kofa National Wildlife Refuge for Desert Bighorn Sheep in Arizona, and he campaigned for state parks in California.[61] He was one of the original members of the first California State Parks Commission, serving from 1927 to 1934,[62] and late in his life he was president of the Southwest Museum of Los Angeles from 1938 until 1940.[63] The Boone and Crockett Club is a conservationist organization, founded in the United States in 1877 by Theodore Roosevelt. ... The World Conservation Union or International Union for the Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources (IUCN) is an international organization dedicated to natural resource conservation. ... Save-the-Redwoods logo The Save-the-Redwoods League is an organization dedicated to the protection of the remaining Coast Redwood trees in the U.S. state of California. ... The Cabeza Prieta National Wildlife Refuge is located in the Sonoran Desert in southwestern Arizona in the United States. ... The Kofa National Wildlife Refuge is located near Yuma, Arizona, in the southwestern United States. ... Trinomial name Ovis canadensis nelsoni The Desert Bighorn Sheep (Ovis canadensis nelsoni) is a subspecies of Bighorn Sheep that occurs in the desert Southwest regions of the United States. ... The California Department of Parks and Recreation manages the California state parks system, which contains 1. ... Southwest Museum from Sycamore-Grove Park The Southwest Museum is a museum, library, and archive. ...


Personal life

Appearance

At 5 ft 4 in (1.62 m), Burnham was slight, but he was also muscular and bronzed, with a finely formed square jaw. He had a boyish appearance which he used to his advantage on numerous occasions. His most noticeable feature was his steady, grey-blue eyes. Contemporary reports had it that Burnham's gaze appeared to never leave those of the person he was looking at, and yet somehow could simultaneously monitor all the details of the physical surroundings. It was also said that Burnham's eyes possessed a far-away look such as those acquired by people whose occupation has caused them to watch continually at sea or on great plains.[64][1][3]


Mannerisms

Burnham would not smoke and seldom drank alcohol, fearing these habits would injure the acuteness of his sense of smell. He found ways to train himself in mental patience, took power naps instead of indulging in periods of long sleep, and drank very little liquid. He trained himself to accept these abstinences in order to endure the most appalling fatigues, hunger, thirst, and wounds, so that when scouting or traveling where there was no water, he might still be able to exist. On more than one occasion he survived in environments where others would have died, or were in fact dying, of exhaustion. To him scouting was as exact a study as is the piano, and it was said that he could read the face of nature as easily as most could read their morning newspaper. He was quiet-mannered and courteous, according to contemporaries. Their reports describe a man who was neither shy nor self-conscious, who was extremely modest, and who seldom spoke of his many adventures.[64][1][3] A power-nap is a short sleep, usually 15-20 minutes, intended to revitalize the subject from drowsiness while working, coined by Cornell University social psychologist James Maas. ...


Family

Blanche Blick Burnham in Bulawayo, Rhodesia, 1896
Blanche Blick Burnham in Bulawayo, Rhodesia, 1896

Burnham's wife of 55 years, Blanche Blick Burnham (February 25, 1862 - December 22, 1939) of Nevada, Iowa, accompanied him in very primitive conditions through many travels in both the Southwest United States and Southern Africa. They had three children together, but only one survived into adulthood. In the early years, she watched over the children and the pack animals, always careful to keep a rifle within arms length. In the dark of night, she used her rifle many times against lions and hyena and, during the Siege of Bulawayo, against Ndebele warriors. Several members of the Blick family joined the Burnhams in Rhodesia, moved with them to England, and returned to the United States with the Burnhams to live near Three Rivers, California. When Burnham Exploration Company struck it rich in 1923, the Burnhams moved to a mansion in a new housing development then known as Hollywoodland (a name later shortened to "Hollywood") and took many trips around the world in high style. In 1939, Blanche suffered a stroke. She died a month later and was buried in the Three Rivers Cemetery.[65][66] Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... is the 56th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about 1862 . ... is the 356th day of the year (357th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1939 (MCMXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Story County Courthouse Nevada is a city in Story County, Iowa, United States. ... Binomial name Panthera leo (Linnaeus, 1758) The Lion (Panthera leo) is a mammal of the family Felidae. ... Subfamilies and Genera Hyaeninae Crocuta Hyaena Parahyaena Protelinae Proteles Hyenas or Hyænas are moderately large terrestrial carnivores native to Africa, Arabia, Asia and the Indian subcontinent. ... Three Rivers is a census-designated place located in Tulare County, California. ... Greetings from Hollywood Hollywood is a district of the city of Los Angeles, California, U.S.A., that extends from Vermont Avenue on the east to just beyond Laurel Canyon Boulevard above Sunset and Crescent Heights Boulevards on the west; the north to south boundary east of La Brea Avenue...

Rod Burnham, 1921
Rod Burnham, 1921

Burnham's first son, Roderick (August 21, 1886July 2, 1976), was born in Pasadena, California, but accompanied the family to Africa and learned the Northern Ndebele language.[67] He went to Skagway, Alaska with his father, and then to a military school in France in 1900. In 1904, he attended the University of California, Berkeley, joined the football team, but left Berkley after a dispute with his coach. From 1905-08, he went to the University of Arizona, joined the Delta Kappa Epsilon fraternity, played the position of running back, and became the captain of the football team. He attended the Michigan School of Mines (now Michigan Technological University) in 1910, became a geologist, and worked for Union Oil as Manager of Lands and Foreign Exploration helping to develop the first wells in Mexico and Venezuela.[68] He took time off from his job to serve in the U.S. Army in World War I and fought in France.[66] He and his father became minority owners of the Burnham Exploration Company, incorporated in 1919 by Harris Hays Hammond (the son of John Hays Hammond, Sr). In 1930, he and Paramount Pictures founder W. W. Hodkinson started the Central American Aviation Corporation, the first airline in Guatemala.[69][70] Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... is the 233rd day of the year (234th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1886 (MDCCCLXXXVI) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... is the 183rd day of the year (184th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1976 Pick up sticks(MCMLXXVI) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Northern Ndebele language, or isiNdebele, or Sindebele, is an African language belonging to the Nguni group of Bantu languages, and spoken by the Ndebele or Matabele people of Zimbabwe. ... There are three types of military academies: High school level institutions (up to age 19), university level institutions, and those only serving to prepare officer cadets for commissioning into the armed services of a state ( such as RMA Sandhurst ). United States usage The term Military School primarily refers to (middle... Sather tower (the Campanile) looking out over the San Francisco Bay and Mount Tamalpais. ... The University of Arizona (UA or U of A) is a land-grant and space-grant public institution of higher education and research located in Tucson, Arizona, United States. ... Delta Kappa Epsilon (ΔΚΕ; also pronounced D-K-E or Deke) is the oldest secret college mens fraternity of New England origin. ... P.J. Daniels was a star running back for Georgia Tech from 2002-2005. ... Michigan Technological University (abbr. ... The Geologist by Carl Spitzweg A geologist is a contributor to the science of geology, studying the physical structure and processes of the Earth and planets of the solar system (see planetary geology). ... The Unocal Corporation (NYSE: UCL), based in El Segundo, California, was founded in 1890 as the Union Oil Company of California. ... Paramount Pictures Corporation is an American motion picture production and distribution company, based in Hollywood, California. ... W. W. (William Wadsworth) Hodkinson (16 August 1881 - 2 June 1971) has been given the soubriquet of The Man Who Invented Hollywood. ...

Dedication
To the Memory of the Child: Nada Burnham, who "bound all to her" and, while her father cut his way through the hordes of the Ingobo Regiment, perished of the hardships of war at Buluwayo on 19 May, 1896, I dedicate these tales—and more particularly the last, that of a Faith which triumphed over savagery and death.
H. Rider Haggard, from his book: The Wizard (1896)[71]

Nada (May 1894 - May 19, 1896), Burnham’s daughter who was the first white child born in Bulawayo, died of fever and starvation during the Siege of Bulawayo. She was buried three days later in the Pioneer Cemetery, plot #144, in Bulawayo, Zimbabwe. Nada is the Zulu word for lily and she was named after the heroine in Sir H. Rider Haggard’s Zulu tale, Nada the Lily (1892). Three of Haggard's books are dedicated to Burnham's daughter, Nada: The Wizard (1896), Elissa: The Doom of Zimbabwe (1899), and Black Heart and White Heart: A Zulu Idyll (1900).[72][64] H. Rider Haggard, author Sir Henry Rider Haggard (June 22, 1856 – May 14, 1925), born in Norfolk, England, was a Victorian writer of adventure novels set in locations considered exotic by readers in his native England. ... is the 139th day of the year (140th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1896 (MDCCCXCVI) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display calendar). ... The birth of the first white child was a celebrated occasion across many parts of the Americas and Australia. ... The City of Bulawayo is highlighted in this map of Zimbabwe. ... Zulu (called isiZulu in Zulu), is a language of the Zulu people with about 10 million speakers, the vast majority (over 95%) of whom live in South Africa. ... Binomial name Agapanthus umbellatus The African lily (Agapanthus umbellatus) is a member of the family Alliaceae and a native of the Cape of Good Hope, from where it was introduced to Europe at the close of the 17th century. ... H. Rider Haggard, author Sir Henry Rider Haggard (June 22, 1856 – May 14, 1925), born in Norfolk, England, was a Victorian writer of adventure novels set in locations considered exotic by readers in his native England. ...


Burnham’s youngest son, Bruce B. Burnham (1897-1902), was staying with family in London when he accidentally drowned in the river Thames.[73] This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... Several places exist with the name Thames, and the word is also used as part of several brand and company names Most famous is the River Thames in England, on which the city of London stands Other Thames Rivers There is a Thames River in Canada There is a Thames...


In 1943, at 83 years of age, Burnham married his young typist, Ilo K. Willetts Burnham (1914-1958). The couple sold their mansion and moved to Santa Barbara in 1946.[74][66]


Burnham was a descendent of Thomas Burnham (1617-1688) of Hartford, Connecticut, the first American ancestor of a large number of Burnhams.[65] The descendents of Thomas Burnham have been noted in every American war, including the French and Indian war.[4] Thomas Burnham (1617 - June 24, 1688) was born in Hatfield, Hertfordshire, England. ... Hartford redirects here. ... Combatants France First Nations allies: Algonquin Lenape Wyandot Ojibwa Ottawa Shawnee Great Britain American Colonies Iroquois Confederacy Strength 3,900 regulars 7,900 militia 2,200 natives (1759) 50,000 regulars and militia (1759) Casualties 3,000 killed, wounded or captured 10,040 killed, wounded or captured The French and...


Death

Burnham died at 86 on September 1, 1947 of heart failure at his home in Santa Barbara, California. At a private ceremony he was buried at Three Rivers, California, near his old cattle ranch, La Cuesta. His memorial stone was designed by his only surviving child, Roderick. Also buried at Three Rivers cemetery is his first wife, Blanche Blick Burnham, several members of the Blick family who had also pioneered in 19th century Rhodesia with Burnham for a time, his son Roderick, his granddaughter Martha Burnham Burleigh, and the Montana cowboy “Pete” Ingram who survived the Shangani Patrol massacre along with Burnham.[75] is the 244th day of the year (245th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1947 (MCMXLVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display full 1947 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Nickname: Location in Santa Barbara County and the state of California Coordinates: , Country State County Santa Barbara Government  - Mayor Marty Blum Area  - Total 41. ...


Legacy

Ernest Hemingway acquired the rights to produce a film version of Scouting on Two Continents in late 1958. CBS immediately contracted Hemingway to produce the film for television, with Gary Cooper expressing an interest in playing the part of Burnham. Hemingway was already behind schedule in his other commitments and never started on the film when he committed suicide in July 1961.[76] Ernest Miller Hemingway (July 21, 1899 – July 2, 1961) was an American novelist, short-story writer, and journalist. ... This article is about the broadcast network. ... Gary Cooper (born Frank James Cooper May 7, 1901 – May 13, 1961) was a two-time Academy Award-winning American film actor of English heritage. ...


Burnham was portrayed by Will Hutchins in Shangani Patrol (1970), a feature film by David Millin.[77] Filmed on location in Bulawayo, Zimbabwe by RPM Film Studios, 35 mm copies of the film are now preserved by the National Film, Video and Sound Archives, Pretoria, South Africa. Will Hutchins (born May 5, 1932) is an American actor most noted for playing the lead role of Tom Brewster in the Warner Brothers western television series Sugarfoot (1957). ...


In 1933, the newly discovered Serbelodon Burnhami, a extinct gomphothere (Shovel-Tusker elephant) from North America, was officially named after Burnham.[78] Genus  ? Gnathabelodon  ? Archaeobelodon  ? Protanancus  ? Amebelodon  ? Platybelodon  ? Serbelodon Gomphotherium Sinomastodon Eubelodon Rhynchotherium Stegomastodon Haplomastodon Notiomastodon Cuvieronius  ? Anancus  ? Tetralophodon  ? Paratetralophodon The Gomphotheres are a diverse group of extinct elephant-like animals (proboscideans) that were widespread in North America during the Miocene and Pliocene epochs, 12-1. ...


See also

Scouting Portal
Biography Portal

Image File history File links Scout_logo2. ... Image File history File links Crystal_personal. ...

Notes

  1. ^ a b c d e f Davis, Richard Harding (1906). Real Soldiers of Fortune. New York: Charles Scribner's Sons. ISBN 0873642392. 
  2. ^ a b West, James E.; Peter O. Lamb; illustrated by Lord Baden-Powell (1932). He-who-sees-in-the-dark; the boys' story of Frederick Burnham, the American scout. Brewer, Warren and Putnam. 
  3. ^ a b c d e f g Burnham, Frederick Russell (1926). Scouting on Two Continents. Doubleday, Page & company, p.2; Chapters 3 & 4. OCLC 407686. 
  4. ^ a b c d e (1915) Press Reference Library: Notables of the West. New York: International News Service. OCLC 5532411. 
  5. ^ Carr, Harry (September 6 1931). "They knew the old California bandits". Los Angeles Times: K10. 
  6. ^ R. R. Money (April 1962). "Tonto Basin Feud". Blackwood's Magazine 291. ISSN 0006-436X. 
  7. ^ Donovan, Charles Henry Wynne (1894). With Wilson in Matabeleland, Or, Sport and War in Zambesia. London: Henry, 271. 
  8. ^ a b Forbes, Archibald; Arthur Griffiths, George Alfred Henty, and E. F. Knight (1896). Battles of the Nineteenth Century. London, Paris, Melbourne: Castle, 110-119. 
  9. ^ Hensman, Howard (1900). A history of Rhodesia, compiled from official sources. Edinburgh and London: W. Blackwood and sons. 
  10. ^ Wills, W.A.; L.T Collingridge (with contributions by Frederick C Selous and H. Rider Haggard) (1894). The Downfall of Lobengula. The African Review, 153–172. 
  11. ^ Selous, Frederick Courteney (1896). Sunshine and Storm in Rhodesia. London: R. Ward. 
  12. ^ a b (June 25, 1896) "Killed the Matabele God: Burnham, the American scout, may end uprising". New York Times. Retrieved on 2007-09-28. 
  13. ^ Farwell, Byron (2001). The Encyclopedia of Nineteenth-Century Land Warfare: An Illustrated World View. W. W. Norton, 539. ISBN 0393047709. 
  14. ^ Leebaert, Derek (2006). To Dare and to Conquer: Special Operations and the Destiny of Nations. Little, Brown, 379. ISBN 0316143847. 
  15. ^ a b c Byron Farwell (March 1976). "Taking Sides in the Boer War". American Heritage Magazine 20 (3). ISSN 0002-8738. Retrieved on 2007-03-07. 
  16. ^ (April 8, 1900) "American scout escapes". Atlanta Constitution issn=0093-1179. 
  17. ^ Frederic William Unger (1901). With "Bobs" and Krüger: Experiences and Observations of an American War Correspondent in the Field with both Armies. H.T. Coates and company, Chapter XXV. 
  18. ^ (May 5) "England's American Scout". New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved on 2007-09-28. 
  19. ^ FinestHour. Journal of the Churchill Center and Societies, Summer 2005. Retrieved on 2007-08-02.
  20. ^ (Aug 4, 1900) "Southern California by Towns and Counties: Fred Burnham now a Major in British Army; Recovering from His Injuries". Los Angeles Times. ISSN 0458-3035. 
  21. ^ a b (March 2, 1902) "Burnham's services brought to the attention of Parliament: He maintains his well-known modesty. His injuries received in Africa. Now living in a London suburb.". Los Angeles Times. ISSN 0458-3035. 
  22. ^ a b Lee Shippey (Feb 2, 1930). "Lee Side o' L.A.: Personal Glimpses of Famous Southlanders". Los Angeles Times. ISSN 0458-3035. 
  23. ^ (Sep 28, 1901) "More South African Honors: Lady Sarah Wilson and Major Burnham, the American Scout, among those decorated". New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. 
  24. ^ a b John Plaster (2006). The Ultimate Sniper: An Advanced Training Manual For Military And Police Snipers. Paladin Press, 5. ISBN 0-87364-704-1. 
  25. ^ Baden-Powell, Robert (1908). Scouting for Boys: A Handbook for Instruction in Good Citizenship. London: H. Cox, xxiv. ISBN 0-486457-19-2. 
  26. ^ Great Canadian Heritage Discoveries. Biographical sketch. The Canadian Anglo-Boer War Museum (200). Retrieved on 2007-03-31.
  27. ^ Jeal, Tim (1989). Baden-Powell. London: Hutchinson. ISBN 0-09-170670-X. 
  28. ^ Prichard, Hesketh Vernon Hesketh (2004). Sniping in France, 1914-18 : with notes on the scientific training of scouts, observers, and snipers. Solihull, West Midlands, England: Helion. ISBN 1874622477. 
  29. ^ Forster, Reverend Dr. Michael. The Origins of the Scouting Movement. Netpages. Retrieved on 2007-10-02.
  30. ^ West, James E (1937). 10108 H.doc.18. U.S. Congress, House Committee on Education., 472. 
  31. ^ (1911) The Official Handbook for Boys, First Edition, Boy Scouts of America. 
  32. ^ (1933) Handbook for Boys, Third Edition, Boy Scouts of America, 611. 
  33. ^ Fact Sheet: The Silver Buffalo Award. Fact sheet. Boy Scouts of America Troop 14 (1936). Retrieved on 2006-11-28.
  34. ^ van Wyk, Peter (2000). Burnham: King of Scouts. Trafford Publishing. Retrieved on 2007-03-30.
  35. ^ GNIS: Mount Baden-Powell. USGS. Retrieved on April 17, 2006.
  36. ^ a b c Burnham, Frederick Russell (1944). Taking Chances. Haynes Corp, xxv-xxix. ISBN 1-879356-32-5. 
  37. ^ Dedication of Mount Baden-Powell. The Pine Tree Web. Retrieved on April 23, 2006.
  38. ^ Everett, Mary Nixon (July-Aug 1952). "Dedication of Mount Burnham". The The Masterkey 26 (4). Southwest Museum. 
  39. ^ GNIS: Mount Burnham. USGS. Retrieved on April 17, 2006.
  40. ^ Frederick Russell Burnham. White Eagle District. Retrieved on 2007-08-19.
  41. ^ Preston, Kenneth O. (2003). Sgt Major, US Army. U.S. Army. Retrieved on 2006-04-22.
  42. ^ (Aug 12, 1901) "A New Eldorado: Discoveries in West Africa by Major Burnham, England's American Scout". New York Times (London Mail). ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved on 2007-09-28. 
  43. ^ Alistair Tough (1985). "Papers of Frederick R. Burnham (1861–1947) in the Hoover Institution Archives". History in Africa 12: 385–387. African Studies Association. ISSN 03615413. 
  44. ^ Charles Holder (1910). "The Esperanza Stone". Scientific American: 196. Scientific American, Inc. ISSN 0036-8733. 
  45. ^ Fort, Charles; Horace Liveright (1919). The Book of the Damned. Horace Liveright, chapter XI. 
  46. ^ (April 23, 1912) "Guarding Morgan Mines: Burnham's Force also at Guggenheim Properties is report". New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved on 2007-09-28. 
  47. ^ a b John Hays Hammond (1935). The Autobiography of John Hays Hammond. Farrar & Rinehart, 565. ISBN 0-40505-913-2. 
  48. ^ Lott, J. "Jack" P. (March 1977). "Major F. R. Burnham, D.S.O.". Rhodesiana Magazine 36. ISSN 0556-9605. 
  49. ^ Wood, Clement (1932). The man who killed Kitchener: The life of Fritz Joubert Duquesne. New York: W. Faro. OCLC 1071583. 
  50. ^ FBI History: Famous Cases. Federal Bureau of Investigation. Retrieved on 2007-05-05.
  51. ^ Burnham, FR. Anglo Boer War. Retrieved on 2007-08-13.
  52. ^ (March 13, 1917) "Enroll Westerners for Service in War; Movement to Register Men of That Region Begun at the Rocky Mountain Club. Headed by Major Burnham. John Hays Hammond and Others of Prominence Reported to be Supporting Plan". New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. 
  53. ^ Roosevelt, Theodore (1917). The Foes of Our Own Household. New York: George H. Doran, 347. LCCN 17025965. 
  54. ^ (May 20, 1917) "Roosevelt's Army has not lost hope; Colonel's Aids from all over the country meet and leave the future in his hands.". New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. 
  55. ^ (April 17, 1910) "May import African animals to solve meat problem". New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved on 2007-09-28. 
  56. ^ (March 3, 1911) "Animals from Africa: Maj Burnham will import wild beasts for Western plains". Washington Post (reprint from New York Herald). ISSN 0148-2076. 
  57. ^ Bryant, H. C. (April 1915). "Organizations Defending Wild Life". California Fish and Game. ISSN 0008-1078. 
  58. ^ (March 21, 1930) "The Fauna of the British Empire". Science (journal). ISSN 0036-8075. 
  59. ^ (May 14, 1929) "Maj. Burnham and family depart for Africa: Angelenos to tour world". Los Angeles Times. ISSN 0458-3035. 
  60. ^ (May 23, 1930) "Scientific Notes and News". Science (journal). ISSN 0036-8075. 
  61. ^ Coates, Peter A. (2007). American Perceptions of Immigrant and Invasive Species: Strangers on the Land. Berkeley: University of California Press. ISBN 0520249305. 
  62. ^ Colby, William E.; Frederick Law Olmsted, Jr (April 1933). "Borrego Desert Park". Sierra Club Bulletin XVIII: 144. Retrieved on 2007-07-29. 
  63. ^ Dan L. Thrapp (1991). Encyclopedia of frontier biography. University of Nebraska Press, 195. ISBN 0-80329-418-2. 
  64. ^ a b c Haggard, H. Rider [1926]. The Days of My Life Volume II. Retrieved on 2006-12-17. 
  65. ^ a b Bradford, Mary E; Richard H Bradford (1993). An American family on the African frontier: the Burnham family letters, 1893–1896. Niwot, Colorado: Roberts Rinehart. ISBN 1879373661. 
  66. ^ a b c van Wyke, Peter (2003). Burnham: Chief of Scouts. Victoria, Canada: Trafford Publishing. ISBN 1879373661. 
  67. ^ (June 6, 1896) "A Young South African". Los Angeles Times. ISSN 0458-3035. 
  68. ^ (June 19, 1927) "Californians Develop Venezuela Oil Fields". Los Angeles Times. ISSN 0458-3035. 
  69. ^ (January 17, 1932) "Plane line saves weeks: American Air Service in Guatemala carries odd passenger list over hard country". New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. 
  70. ^ Cubé, Caroline. Finding Aid for the W.W. Hodkinson Papers, 1881-1971. Manuscript guide. University of California Los Angeles, Special Collections, Young Research Library. Retrieved on 2007-10-15.
  71. ^ Haggard, H. Rider (1896). The Wizard. New York, London: Longmans, Green. 
  72. ^ (Nov 21, 1896) "Rider Haggard's Tribute". Atlanta Constitution. ISSN 0093-1179. 
  73. ^ Montgomery, Ruth (1967). A Search for the Truth. New York: Fawcett Crest. ISBN 0449210855. 
  74. ^ Weideman, Christine. Guide to the Frederick Russell Burnham Papers. Manuscript guide. Yale University Library. Retrieved on 2007-09-11.
  75. ^ Elliott, John (2004). King of Scouts honored at gravesite. The Kaweah Commonwealth Online. Retrieved on 2004-08-27.
  76. ^ Hemingway, Ernest; A. E. Hotchner (2005). Dear Papa, Dear Hotch: The Correspondence of Ernest Hemingway And A. E. Hotchner. Columbia, Missouri: University of Missouri Press. ISBN 0826216056. 
  77. ^ Shangani Patrol at the Internet Movie Database
  78. ^ Osborn, Henry Fairfield (June 29 1933). "Serbelodon Burnhami, a new Shovel-Tusker from California". American Museum Novitates (639): 1-5. Retrieved on 2007-11-01. 

For other persons named Richard Davis, see Richard Davis (disambiguation). ... Dr. James E. West (May 16, 1876 – May 15, 1948) was a lawyer and an advocate of childrens rights, who become the first professional Chief Scout Executive of the Boy Scouts of America (BSA), serving from 1911-1943. ... Robert Stephenson Smyth Baden-Powell, 1st Baron Baden-Powell OM, GCMG, GCVO, KCB (22 February 1857 – 8 January 1941), also known as B-P, was a lieutenant-general in the British Army, writer, and founder of the Scout Movement. ... The Online Computer Library Center (OCLC) was founded in 1967 and originally named the Ohio College Library Center. ... The Online Computer Library Center (OCLC) was founded in 1967 and originally named the Ohio College Library Center. ... This just IN !!!:paris hiltons new dog. ... Blackwoods Magazine was a British magazine and miscellany printed between 1817 and 1980. ... ISSN, or International Standard Serial Number, is the unique eight-digit number applied to a periodical publication including electronic serials. ... Frederick Courteney Selous on safari in Africa. ... H. Rider Haggard, author Sir Henry Rider Haggard (June 22, 1856 – May 14, 1925), born in Norfolk, England, was a Victorian writer of adventure novels set in locations considered exotic by readers in his native England. ... Lobengula (d. ... Frederick Courteney Selous on safari in Africa. ... The New York Times is an internationally known daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed in the United States and many other nations worldwide. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 271st day of the year (272nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... ISSN, or International Standard Serial Number, is the unique eight-digit number applied to a periodical publication including electronic serials. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 66th day of the year (67th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Atlanta Journal-Constitution is the only major daily newspaper of Atlanta and metro Atlanta. ... The New York Times is an internationally known daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed in the United States and many other nations worldwide. ... ISSN, or International Standard Serial Number, is the unique eight-digit number applied to a periodical publication including electronic serials. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 271st day of the year (272nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 214th day of the year (215th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This just IN !!!:paris hiltons new dog. ... ISSN, or International Standard Serial Number, is the unique eight-digit number applied to a periodical publication including electronic serials. ... This just IN !!!:paris hiltons new dog. ... ISSN, or International Standard Serial Number, is the unique eight-digit number applied to a periodical publication including electronic serials. ... This just IN !!!:paris hiltons new dog. ... ISSN, or International Standard Serial Number, is the unique eight-digit number applied to a periodical publication including electronic serials. ... The New York Times is an internationally known daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed in the United States and many other nations worldwide. ... ISSN, or International Standard Serial Number, is the unique eight-digit number applied to a periodical publication including electronic serials. ... The Ultimate Sniper: An Advanced Training Manual for Military and Police Snipers is a book written by Maj. ... The Ultimate Sniper: An Advanced Training Manual for Military and Police Snipers is a book written by Maj. ... Robert Stephenson Smyth Baden-Powell, 1st Baron Baden-Powell OM, GCMG, GCVO, KCB (22 February 1857 – 8 January 1941), also known as B-P, was a lieutenant-general in the British Army, writer, and founder of the Scout Movement. ... 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Hoover Tower at the Hoover Institution The Hoover Institution on War, Revolution, and Peace is a public policy think tank and library founded by Herbert Hoover at Stanford University, his alma mater. ... Scientific American is a popular-science magazine, published (first weekly and later monthly) since August 28, 1845, making it the oldest continuously published magazine in the United States. ... This article is not about Charles Forte. ... The New York Times is an internationally known daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed in the United States and many other nations worldwide. ... ISSN, or International Standard Serial Number, is the unique eight-digit number applied to a periodical publication including electronic serials. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 271st day of the year (272nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... John Hays Hammond (31 March 1855 in San Francisco – 8 June 1936) was an American mining engineer, and father of John Hays Hammond, Jr. ... ISSN, or International Standard Serial Number, is the unique eight-digit number applied to a periodical publication including electronic serials. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 125th day of the year (126th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 225th day of the year (226th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... ISSN, or International Standard Serial Number, is the unique eight-digit number applied to a periodical publication including electronic serials. ... Theodore Roosevelt, Jr. ... ISSN, or International Standard Serial Number, is the unique eight-digit number applied to a periodical publication including electronic serials. ... The New York Times is an internationally known daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed in the United States and many other nations worldwide. ... ISSN, or International Standard Serial Number, is the unique eight-digit number applied to a periodical publication including electronic serials. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 271st day of the year (272nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... ... The New York Herald was a large distribution newspaper based in New York City that existed between May 6, 1835 and 1924. ... ISSN, or International Standard Serial Number, is the unique eight-digit number applied to a periodical publication including electronic serials. ... 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Frederick Law Olmsted, Jr. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 210th day of the year (211th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... H. Rider Haggard, author Sir Henry Rider Haggard (June 22, 1856 – May 14, 1925), born in Norfolk, England, was a Victorian writer of adventure novels set in locations considered exotic by readers in his native England. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 17 is the 351st day of the year (352nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This just IN !!!:paris hiltons new dog. ... ISSN, or International Standard Serial Number, is the unique eight-digit number applied to a periodical publication including electronic serials. ... This just IN !!!:paris hiltons new dog. ... ISSN, or International Standard Serial Number, is the unique eight-digit number applied to a periodical publication including electronic serials. ... The New York Times is an internationally known daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed in the United States and many other nations worldwide. ... ISSN, or International Standard Serial Number, is the unique eight-digit number applied to a periodical publication including electronic serials. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 288th day of the year (289th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... H. Rider Haggard, author Sir Henry Rider Haggard (June 22, 1856 – May 14, 1925), born in Norfolk, England, was a Victorian writer of adventure novels set in locations considered exotic by readers in his native England. ... The Atlanta Journal-Constitution is the only major daily newspaper of Atlanta and metro Atlanta. ... ISSN, or International Standard Serial Number, is the unique eight-digit number applied to a periodical publication including electronic serials. ... Ruth Shick Montgomery (1912 - June 10, 2001) was an American journalist and self-described Christian psychic in the tradition of Jeane Dixon and Edgar Cayce. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 254th day of the year (255th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 239th day of the year (240th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Ernest Miller Hemingway (July 21, 1899 – July 2, 1961) was an American novelist, short-story writer, and journalist. ... Aaron Edward Hotchner, (June 28, 1920- ) is an American editor, novelist, playwright and biographer. ... The Internet Movie Database (IMDb) is an online database of information about movies, actors, television shows, production crew personnel, and video games. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 305th day of the year (306th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

Bibliograpy

Wikisource
Wikisource has original works written by or about:

Image File history File links Wikisource-logo. ... The original Wikisource logo. ...

Works

Burnham's Scouting on Two Continents. (1934 edition). Cover sketch of Burnham by Baden-Powell
Burnham's Scouting on Two Continents. (1934 edition). Cover sketch of Burnham by Baden-Powell
  • Burnham, Frederick Russell (1926). Scouting on Two Continents. Doubleday, Page. ISBN 1879356317. 
  • Burnham, Frederick Russell (1944). Taking Chances. Haynes. ISBN 1-879356-32-5. 
  • Bradford, Mary E; Richard H Bradford (1993). An American family on the African frontier: the Burnham family letters, 1893–1896. Niwot, Colorado: Roberts Rinehart. ISBN 1879373661. 
  • Burnham, Frederick R. (1927). "The remarks of Major Frederick R. Burnham". Historical Society of Southern California 13 (4): 334–352. 
  • Frederick Russell Burnham Papers. Manuscripts and Archives, Yale University. A large collection of Burnham's documents: Correspondence, 1864–1947. Subject Files, 1890–1947. Writings, 1893–1946. Personal and Family Papers, 1879–1951. Photographs, ca. 1893–1924.
  • Frederick Russell Burnham Papers, 1879–1979, Hoover Instition Library and Archives, Stanford University. Another large collection of Burnham's documents: Correspondence, speeches and writings, clippings, other printed matter, photographs, and memorabilia, relating to the Matabele Wars of 1893 and 1896 in Rhodesia, the Second Boer War, exploration expeditions in Africa, and gold mining in Alaska during the Klondike gold rush.
  • Burnham Footage of Southern and Eastern Africa, 35 min. silent b&w video. Footage shot in South Africa, Rhodesia, Zimbabwe, Zambia and eastern Africa during a family trip. Smithsonian Institution archives. call# 85.4.1; AF-85.4.1 (1929)

Image File history File links Size of this preview: 429 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (450 × 629 pixel, file size: 57 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Book cover from the 1934 edition of Scouting on Two Continents, by Frederick Russell Burnham. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 429 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (450 × 629 pixel, file size: 57 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Book cover from the 1934 edition of Scouting on Two Continents, by Frederick Russell Burnham. ... Robert Stephenson Smyth Baden-Powell, 1st Baron Baden-Powell OM, GCMG, GCVO, KCB (22 February 1857 – 8 January 1941), also known as B-P, was a lieutenant-general in the British Army, writer, and founder of the Scout Movement. ... The Smithsonian Institution Building or Castle on the National Mall serves as the Institutions headquarters. ...

Biographies

  • Davis, Richard Harding (1906). Real Soldiers of Fortune. New York: Charles Scribner's Sons. ISBN 0873642392. ; Real Soldiers of Fortune, available at Project Gutenberg.
  • West, James E.; Peter O. Lamb, illustrated by Lord Baden-Powell (1932). He-who-sees-in-the-dark; the boys' story of Frederick Burnham, the American scout. Brewer, Warren and Putnam. OCLC 1710834. 
  • van Wyk, Peter (2003). Burnham: King of Scouts. Trafford Publishing. Retrieved on 2007-03-30.
  • Wilson, James Grant; John Fiske (1900). Appleton's Cyclopædia of American Biography. New York: Gale Research, 249. ISBN 1855069571. 
  • Homans, James Edward (1918). The Cyclopaedia of American Biography. New Enlarged Edition of Appleton's Cyclopaedia of American Biography. Volume VIII.. New York: The Press Association Compilers, inc, 249-251. OCLC 81277904. 
  • Hammond, John Hays (January-June 1921). "South African Memories: Rhodes - Barnato - Burnham". Scribner's Magazine LXIX: 257 - 277. 
  • Britt, Albert (1923). The Boys' Own Book of Adventurers. New York: The Macmillan company, A chapter on Burnham, the Last of the Scouts. OCLC 4585632. 
  • Ehrenclou, V. L. (May-June 1925). "Major Burnham - The Scout". Union Oil Bulletin: 1-11, 19. OCLC 12064434. 
  • Haggard, H. Rider (1926). The Days of My Life Volume II. London, New York: Longmans, Green and Co, Chapter XVII is on Major Burnham; Letters in chapter XIII dedicated to Burnham's daughter, Nada. OCLC 476006. 
  • Banning, William; George Hugh Banning (1930). Six Horses. New York: Century, Foreword by Frederick Russell Burnham. OCLC 1744707. 
  • Shippey, Lee; A. L. Ewing (1930). Folks Ushud Know; Interspersed with Songs of Courage. Sierra Madre, Calif: Sierra Madre Press, pp. 23; Chapter on Major Burnham. OCLC 2846678. 
  • Grant, Madison; Charles Stewart Davison (1930). The alien in our midst; or, "Selling our birthright for a mess of pottage"; the written views of a number of Americans (present and former) on immigration and its results. New York: Galton Pub. Co., Essay by Major Burnham titled, The howl for cheap Mexican labor, pp. 44-48. OCLC 3040493. 
  • West, James E. (1931). The Boy Scout's Book of True Adventure: their own story of famous exploits and adventures told by honorary scouts. New York: Putman, Essay by Major Burnham titled Scouting Against the Apache; foreword by Theodore Roosevelt. OCLC 8484128. 
  • Grinnell, George Bird Grinnell; Kermit Roosevelt, W. Redmond Cross, and Prentiss N. Gray (editors) (1933). Hunting trails on three continents; a book of the Boone and Crockett Club. New York: The Derrydale Press, Essay by Major Burnham titled, Taps for the Great Selous. OCLC 1624738. 
  • (May-June 1951) "In my fathers house are many mansions". Sunset Club Yearbook. EPH.061.9494.11. 
  • American Council of Learned Societies (1928-58). Dictionary of American Biography. New York: Scribner. OCLC 4171403. 
  • Money, R. R. (January 1962). "Greatest Scout". Blackwood's Magazine v291: p.42-52. 
  • Lott, J.P. "Jack" (September 1976). "Major Burnham of the Shangani Patrol". Rhodesiana Magazine. 
  • Bradford, Richard H. (1984). "Frederick Russell Burnham, the British Empire's American Scout". Paper presented at the American Historical Society Annual Meeting, Washington, D.C.. 

For other persons named Richard Davis, see Richard Davis (disambiguation). ... Project Gutenberg, abbreviated as PG, is a volunteer effort to digitize, archive and distribute cultural works. ... Dr. James E. West (May 16, 1876 – May 15, 1948) was a lawyer and an advocate of childrens rights, who become the first professional Chief Scout Executive of the Boy Scouts of America (BSA), serving from 1911-1943. ... Robert Stephenson Smyth Baden-Powell, 1st Baron Baden-Powell OM, GCMG, GCVO, KCB (22 February 1857 – 8 January 1941), also known as B-P, was a lieutenant-general in the British Army, writer, and founder of the Scout Movement. ... The Online Computer Library Center (OCLC) was founded in 1967 and originally named the Ohio College Library Center. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 89th day of the year (90th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Appletons Cyclopædia of American Biography is a six-volume collection of biographies of famous Americans, published between 1887 and 1889, edited by James Grant Wilson (1832-1914) and John Fiske (1842-1901); published by D. Appleton and Company, New York. ... The Online Computer Library Center (OCLC) was founded in 1967 and originally named the Ohio College Library Center. ... John Hays Hammond (31 March 1855 in San Francisco – 8 June 1936) was an American mining engineer, and father of John Hays Hammond, Jr. ... Scribners Magazine is a magazine. ... The Online Computer Library Center (OCLC) was founded in 1967 and originally named the Ohio College Library Center. ... The Online Computer Library Center (OCLC) was founded in 1967 and originally named the Ohio College Library Center. ... Sir Henry Rider Haggard KBE (June 22, 1856 – May 14, 1925), born in Norfolk, England, was a Victorian writer of adventure novels set in exotic locations. ... The Online Computer Library Center (OCLC) was founded in 1967 and originally named the Ohio College Library Center. ... The Online Computer Library Center (OCLC) was founded in 1967 and originally named the Ohio College Library Center. ... The Online Computer Library Center (OCLC) was founded in 1967 and originally named the Ohio College Library Center. ... Madison Grant in the early 1920s. ... The Online Computer Library Center (OCLC) was founded in 1967 and originally named the Ohio College Library Center. ... Dr. James E. West (May 16, 1876 – May 15, 1948) was a lawyer and an advocate of childrens rights, who become the first professional Chief Scout Executive of the Boy Scouts of America (BSA), serving from 1911-1943. ... Theodore Roosevelt, Jr. ... The Online Computer Library Center (OCLC) was founded in 1967 and originally named the Ohio College Library Center. ... George Bird Grinnell (1849 – 1938) was an American anthropologist, historian, naturalist, and writer. ... Kermit Roosevelt, explorer, author and soldier, accompanied his father, Theodore Roosevelt on several expeditions to Africa and the Amazon Kermit Roosevelt I (October 10, 1889 – June 4, 1943) was a son of U.S. President Theodore Roosevelt (also known as TR). ... The Boone and Crockett Club is a conservationist organization, founded in the United States in 1877 by Theodore Roosevelt. ... The Derrydale Press is an American book publishing company founded in 1927 with headquarters on Park Ave. ... Frederick Courteney Selous on safari in Africa. ... The Online Computer Library Center (OCLC) was founded in 1967 and originally named the Ohio College Library Center. ... The Online Computer Library Center (OCLC) was founded in 1967 and originally named the Ohio College Library Center. ... Blackwoods Magazine was a British magazine and miscellany printed between 1817 and 1980. ...

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v  d  e
Scouting Topics
15 articles
Founders, pioneers, and notable leaders

Robert Baden-Powell • Olave Baden-Powell • Agnes Baden-Powell • Daniel Carter Beard • William D. Boyce • Frederick Russell Burnham • George Thomas Coker • David Cossgrove • Olga Drahonowska-Małkowska • Charles Eastman • Arthur Rose Eldred • Andrzej Małkowski  • Ernest Thompson Seton • William A. Smith • James E. West • J. S. Wilson Image File history File links Hatcombine. ... Robert Stephenson Smyth Baden-Powell, 1st Baron Baden-Powell OM, GCMG, GCVO, KCB (22 February 1857 – 8 January 1941), also known as B-P, was a lieutenant-general in the British Army, writer, and founder of the Scout Movement. ... content. ... Agnes Baden-Powell (16 December 1858 – 2 June 1945) was younger than her brother Robert Baden-Powell, and at the time she agreed to take over the Girl Guides, this new experience for girls, she was already in her early 50s. ... Daniel Carter (Uncle Dan) Beard (June 21, 1850– June 11, 1941) was an American illustrator, author, and social reformer from Covington, Kentucky. ... William D. Boyce William Dickson Boyce (June 16, 1858- June 11, 1929), was an American entrepreneur, best known today for founding the Boy Scouts of America. ... George Thomas Coker (born July 14, 1943) is a retired US Navy commander, honored with the Navy Cross for his leadership as a prisoner of war (POW) during the Vietnam War, and a Distinguished Eagle Scout noted for his devotion to Scouting. ... Lieutenant Colonel David Cossgrove (1852 - 1920) served in the South African War with Robert Baden-Powell, founder of Scouts and Guides in the United Kingdom. ... Wedding photo of Olga and Andrzej MaÅ‚kowski Olga Drahonowska-MaÅ‚kowska (b. ... Dr. Charles Alexander Eastman (Sioux: Ohiyesa, February 19, 1858 - January 8, 1939) was a Native American author, physician and reformer. ... Arthur Eldred, 1912, BSAs first Eagle Scout. ... Andrzej MaÅ‚kowski Wedding photo of Olga and Andrzej MaÅ‚kowski Andrzej Juliusz MaÅ‚kowski (b. ... Ernest Thompson Seton (August 14, 1860 - October 23, 1946) was a noted author and founding pioneer of the Boy Scouts of America. ... Sir William Alexander Smith (October 27, 1854 - May 10, 1914), the founder of the Boys Brigade, was born in Pennyland House, Thurso, Scotland. ... Dr. James E. West (May 16, 1876 – May 15, 1948) was a lawyer and an advocate of childrens rights, who become the first professional Chief Scout Executive of the Boy Scouts of America (BSA), serving from 1911-1943. ... J.S. Wilson with Mishima Michiharu, Chief Scout of Japan, at the national training camp at Lake Yamanaka, on the slopes of Mount Fujiyama, December 1952 Scouting Round the World Colonel John Skinner Belge Wilson was a Scottish Scouting luminary and friend and contemporary of General Baden-Powell, recruited by...

Persondata
NAME Burnham, Frederick Russell
ALTERNATIVE NAMES Burnham, Frederick; Burnham, Major
SHORT DESCRIPTION father of scouting; military scout; soldier of fortune; oil man; writer; rancher
DATE OF BIRTH May 11, 1861
PLACE OF BIRTH Tivoli (Mankato), Minnesota, USA
DATE OF DEATH September 01, 1947
PLACE OF DEATH Santa Barbara, California, USA

 
 

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